Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (2018/2019)
15.24 Philosophy

Philosophy courses at the 1000-level are an introduction to the study of Philosophy, its methods, its general questions, and some of the major historical figures in the discipline. Courses at the 2000-level offer an introduction to major fields, applied ethics, and interdisciplinary electives, and can be taken beginning in a student's first year of study. Courses at the 3000-level usually assume that students have completed at least two courses in Philosophy. At the 4000-level, courses are advanced seminars with small enrollment caps, and normally assume that students have taken at least two Philosophy courses at the 3000-level.

The second digit in each course number at the 2000-level designates an area in Philosophy.

  • Second Digit in 2000-level
  • 0 Major Areas in Philosophy
  • 1 Applied Ethics
  • 2 History of Philosophy
  • 3 Interdisciplinary Philosophy

The second digit in each course number at the 3000-level designates an historical period.

  • Second Digit in 3000-level
  • 0 Ancient Philosophy
  • 1 Medieval Philosophy
  • 2 Modern Philosophy
  • 3 18th and 19th Century Philosophy
  • 4 20th Century and Contemporary Philosophy

A tentative list of upcoming Philosophy course offerings can be found at www.mun.ca/hss/courses.php.

  • Philosophy courses are designated by PHIL.

1002

Introduction to Philosophy

(same as the former PHIL 1200) is a general introduction to the study of Philosophy both as a contemporary intellectual discipline and as a body of knowledge. It introduces philosophy’s forms of enquiry, the nature of its concepts, and its fields (epistemology, logic, metaphysics, aesthetics, ethics, and political philosophy) by way of the critical study of primary works by major philosophers. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, de Beauvoir, Arendt.

CR: the former PHIL 1200

1005

Philosophy of Human Nature

(same as the former PHIL 1000 and the former PHIL 1600) is an approach to philosophical thinking by way of analysis and critique of theories of human nature, classical and modern, and the world views associated with them. This course is of particular value to students interested in the Social Sciences and Humanities.

CR: the former PHIL 1000, the former PHIL 1600

1010

Critical Reading and Writing in Human Nature

(same as the former PHIL 1001) provides an overview of foundational knowledge and skills to enable critical reading and writing at the university level by way of analysis and critique of selected conceptions and theories of human nature raised throughout the history of philosophy. All sections of this course follow the Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

CR: the former PHIL 1001

1011

Critical Reading and Writing in Ethics

(same as the former PHIL 1230) will focus on learning and practicing the fundamental skills required for university-level critical reading and writing that will prepare students for other Humanities and Social Sciences courses regardless of discipline. The course will focus on foundational skills in how to differentiate ethical questions (how ought we to live?) from other types of reasoning. All sections of this course follow the Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

CR: the former PHIL 1230

1100

Critical Thinking

aims to impart critical analytic skills: i.e., the ability to recognize good and bad arguments, the ability to explain why a particular argument is good or bad, and a general understanding of why a good argument ought to persuade and a bad argument ought not to persuade.

2010

Metaphysics

(same as the former PHIL 2000) is an introduction to the systematic inquiry into the nature of reality. Topic may include the nature of being, time, the question of God, appearance and reality, the one and the many, mind and matter, essence and existence.

CR: the former PHIL 2000

2020

Epistemology

(same as the former PHIL 2220) introduces philosophy by way of the question of the nature of knowledge. Is knowledge a possession or an activity? Is truth an illusion, a correspondence, or a form of coherence? What does it mean to ‘hold a belief’ or ‘affirm a proposition’? Short classical texts form the basis of the works studied and may include Plato, Descartes, and Ayer.

CR: the former PHIL 2220

2030

Logic

(same as the former PHIL 2210) aims to improve the student’s ability to formulate and evaluate arguments. At the end of the course, the student will have a thorough understanding of the essentials of argument, the rules of valid inference, and ways of proving the validity of good arguments and the invalidity of bad arguments. Open in any year to all students desiring acquaintance with basic logical skills. All sections of this course follow Quantitative Reasoning Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

CR: the former PHIL 2210

2031

Intermediate Logic

(same as the former PHIL 2211, the former PHIL 3110) aims to give students a more thorough understanding of the essentials of argument, and, consequently, the opportunity to become better reasoners. The course builds on and further cultivates the skills and techniques previously developed. Thoroughly completing what is generally known as 'standard logic', the course then surveys important work in elementary meta-theory, modal logic, and other non-classical domains. All sections of this course follow Quantitative Reasoning Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

CR: the former PHIL 2211, the former PHIL 3110

PR: PHIL 2030 or the former PHIL 2210 or permission of the Department

2040

Moral Philosophy

(same as the former PHIL 2230) aims to identify and justify the principles by which we evaluate our behaviour. It explores such questions as: Is there a universal moral principle governing the conduct of all human beings? Are there specific character traits necessary to being a good person? Can we determine a moral law that would guarantee right action? What is the role of emotion in moral behaviour? The course may also include treatment of specific moral problems.

CR: the former PHIL 2230

2050

Social and Political Philosophy

is concerned with the social and political institutions and practices by which human life is organized. Historical and/or contemporary texts will be engaged to explore some of the following issues: What is the nature of political authority? What is the nature of freedom? What material and social conditions must be met in order for societies to be just? How are existing societies unjust, and how should that injustice be addressed?

CR: the former PHIL 3400

2060

Philosophy of Language and Mind

(same as Linguistics 2300, the former Linguistics 2710, the former PHIL 2300) is a survey of philosophical thinking about human language and thought, and about how these phenomena relate to the rest of the natural world. Topics covered include the nature of language, the relations between thought and language, and the nature of consciousness.

CR: Linguistics 2300, the former Linguistics 2710, the former PHIL 2300

2070

Philosophy of Religion

(same as Religious Studies 2070) examines the philosophical aspects of religious belief, religious language, and theology. Topics may include: the distinction and relation between reason and faith, the existence of God, the meaning of human existence, the problem of evil, and the religious foundations of moral action.

CR: the former PHIL 3500, Religious Studies 2070, the former Religious Studies 3500

2100

Health Ethics

(same as the former PHIL 2551) examines concepts of health and illness and their ethical implications.

CR: the former PHIL 2551

2110

Bimedical Ethics

(same as the former PHIL 2553) examines medical dilemmas from legal and ethical points of view.

CR: the former PHIL 2553

2120

Mental Health Ethics

(same as the former PHIL 2552, the former PHIL 2802) is an inquiry into the morality of mental health care and the epistemology of mental illness claims. We will study the mental illness definitions in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the International Classification of Diseases, together with critical philosophical essays and nonmedical theories (e.g., Foucault, Mosher).

CR: the former PHIL 2552, the former PHIL 2802

2130

Environmental Ethics

(same as the former PHIL 2561, the former PHIL 2809) is a philosophical approach to issues in ecology. Topics may include historical and contemporary concepts of nature, technology, the ethical status of animals and the non-human, the application of traditional ethical paradigms to environmental issues, and the future of humanity in an age of climate change, ballooning human population, disappearing wilderness, and dwindling resources.

CR: the former PHIL 2561, the former PHIL 2809

2140

Media Ethics

(same as the former PHIL 2582) examines ethical issues and dilemmas arising in the realm of the mass media, within the context of foundational ethical theories and major philosophies of mass communication. Topics include the nature and structure of mass communication, the public sphere, and the role of the media in a functioning democracy. Subtopics include: propaganda, censorship, freedom of speech, and access to information and communication.

CR: the former PHIL 2582

2201

History of Ancient Philosophy

(same as Classics 2701, the former PHIL 2701) introduces students to the origins of philosophy in the West. Topics include cosmology, metaphysics, physics, ethics, God, and the ancient ideal of philosophy as a ‘way of life.’ We will examine the texts and fragments of the most influential and foundational philosophers of the ancient world, focusing primarily on the thought of Plato and Aristotle, their engagement with the Pre- Socratic philosophers who came before them, and their influence upon philosophers since.

CR: Classics 2701, the former PHIL 2701

2205

History of Medieval Philosophy

(same as Medieval Studies 2205, Religious Studies 2205) examines and traces the historical developments of a number of philosophical themes, questions, and ideas throughout medieval philosophy by reading, analyzing, and discussing selected primary texts from philosophers and theologians from the 4th to 14th centuries. Authors may include Augustine, Proclus, Boethius, Al-Farabi, Ibn Sina, Anselm, Ibn Rushd, Maimonides, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus, and Ockham, among others.

CR: Medieval Studies 2205, Religious Studies 2205

2215

History of Modern Philosophy

(same as the former PHIL 2702) is a survey of the development of Western philosophy since the 17th century until the late 18th century. Topics may include the existence of God, whether nature is determined and if there is free will, the rise of early modern science, and the debates over rationalism and empiricism.

CR: the former PHIL 2702

2310

Philosophy and Literature

engages philosophically with different literary forms such as poetry, drama, and fiction. Possible topics include the use of literary works to express philosophical ideas, the nature of literary expression, and different traditions of literary criticism and interpretation. Course readings will comprise both literature and philosophy.

CR: the former PHIL 3610

2320

Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

(same as the former PHIL 2541) examines Western theories and practices of soul-care (especially traditions of depth psychology) in a historical perspective, with selections from Augustine, Eckhart, Schelling, Schopenhauer, Freud, Jung, Lacan and Foucault. Students will not only gain knowledge of Western therapeutical cultures, but also an understanding of themselves.

CR: the former PHIL 2541

2330

Philosophy and Technology

(same as the former PHIL 2571, the former PHIL 2801) examines concepts of technology and their ethical implications.

CR: the former PHIL 2571, the former PHIL 2801

2340

Philosophy of Film

(same as the former PHIL 2581) introduces some of the central philosophers, topics, and themes in the philosophy of film. Topics and themes include: the nature of film image, the relationship between film and “reality”, the social/ political role and function of film, and the nature and value of the documentary. The course will also consider the representation of broader philosophical ideas in film. A film or films will accompany each section.

CR: the former PHIL 2581

2360

Philosophy and Art

(same as the former PHIL 3620) addresses various philosophical questions concerning art, such as the nature of the work of art, the nature of beauty, the nature of artistic experience, and the social function of art. Course content will include historical and/or contemporary works of art and philosophical texts.

CR: the former PHIL 3620

2370

Philosophy of Law

(same as the former PHIL 2400) examines the nature, history, purpose, and operation of law. It covers such topics as natural law, legal positivism, responsibility, justice, individual human rights, the relationship between law and individual freedom, the idea of international law, prominent critiques of law, and the historical development of conceptions of law from the ancient world to the contemporary era.

CR: the former PHIL 2400

3010

Plato

(same as the former PHIL 3730) examines Plato’s philosophy from selections representing the Socratic, transitional, eidetic, and stoichiological dialogues, as well as Plato’s philosophy of the concrete. Plato’s thought will be examined as a development of ideas and problems raised in Pre-Socratic philosophy, and the development of his own philosophy will be traced throughout a selection of his writings.

CR: the former PHIL 3730

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3020

Aristotle

(same as the former PHIL 3740) examines Aristotle’s philosophy of nature, logical works, metaphysics, psychology, and ethics. Attention will also be given to Aristotle’s philosophy as a development of and response to Plato’s thought. Whether one is a student of Philosophy, History, English, Religion, Classics, Political Science or History of Science, a familiarity with the thought of Aristotle is indispensable. For all these disciplines, not only is his place in history foundational, but his influence often remains formidable today.

CR: the former PHIL 3740

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3110

Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

(same as the former Medieval Studies 3004, Medieval Studies 3110, the former PHIL 3760) examines developments in Philosophy from Augustine to Descartes, looking back on their dependence on Ancient and Hellenistic thought and forward to their influence on Modern philosophy. This course focuses on a particular question or figure during this period. Topics may include: universals and particulars, the existence of God, free will and determinism, the problem of evil, the status of nature, soul and body, and mysticism.

CR: the former Medieval Studies 3004, Medieval Studies 3110, the former PHIL 3760

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3210

Rationalism

(same as the former PHIL 3820) holds that reason is the main source of human knowledge, and it has a long history extending from the Pre-Socratics and Plato to the present. This course examines texts and thinkers from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and others. Topics may include themes and problems such as: the theory of ideas, the question of God's existence and nature, the nature of mind and body, the distinction between primary and secondary qualities, causation, induction, personal identity, and human agency.

CR: the former PHIL 3820

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3220

Empiricism

(same as the former PHIL 3830) holds that all human knowledge comes from experience, and it has a long history extending arguably from Aristotle to the present. The "British Empiricists" -- Locke, Berkeley and Hume -- crystallized empiricist concerns in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This course explores themes and problems in early modern empiricism such as: the theory of ideas, the nature of body, the distinction between primary and secondary qualities, causation, induction, personal identity, and human agency.

CR: the former PHIL 3830

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3230

Kant’s Theoretical Philosophy

(same as the former PHIL 3850) is an introduction to Kant’s theoretical philosophy, concentrating on his theory of knowledge, particularly as stated in the Critique of Pure Reason.

CR: the former PHIL 3850

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3231

Kant's Practical Philosophy

(same as the former PHIL 3851) is an introduction to Kant’s practical philosophy, concentrating on his ethics, particularly as stated in The Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals and the Critique of Practical Reason.

CR: the former PHIL 3851

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3310

German Idealism

(same as the former PHIL 3860) is a study of post-Kantian classical German philosophy from 1787-1831. The generation of philosophers immediately following Kant - most notably Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel - took his ideas and developed systematic interpretations of human experience, emphasizing its embodied and social nature, and interpreting history in terms of the struggle between freedom and oppression. This course studies these "German Idealists" who have continued to shape major developments in European philosophy.

CR: the former PHIL 3860

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3320

19th Century Philosophy

(same as the former PHIL 3880) treats some of the creative and critical thinkers of the philosophically rich 19th century. The course will explore the philosophical insights offered by movements such as Marxism, psychoanalysis, early existentialism, American pragmatism, and utilitarianism, reading work from figures such as Marx, Freud, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, James, and Mill.

CR: the former PHIL 3880

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3330

Marx and Marxism

(same as the former PHIL 3890) examines the work of Marx and Engels and their followers, focusing on analysis of the nature of modern political economy. It covers such topics as class, capital, capitalism, freedom, the labour theory of value, historical materialism, and communism.

CR: the former PHIL 3890

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3410

Analytic Philosophy

(same as the former PHIL 3910) is a loosely connected family of philosophical problems and philosophical methods. Its key precipitant was the development of modern logic, and the myriad ways in which it prompted and abetted certain philosophical projects. Primary readings for the course will stretch from roughly 1880-1950, and may include works by Frege, Russell, and Wittgenstein, among others.

CR: the former PHIL 3910

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3420

Phenomenology

(same as the former PHIL 3920) is the tradition that aims to “look on” at experience, allowing experience to teach its observer what it is and how it should be understood. This course will address primary figures in the phenomenological tradition, exploring their rich analyses of human existence and their claims about how it should be lived. Authors may include Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Merleau-Ponty.

CR: the former PHIL 3920

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3430

Existentialism

(same as the former PHIL 3940) is a philosophical tradition dedicated to thinking through the experience of human freedom and to casting doubt on conventional answers to the question of how we should live. Human beings are free to define themselves, according to existentialism, but with that freedom comes a forbidding challenge: the responsibility to define themselves, without any easy answers to the question of how. This course will address some of the central figures associated with existentialism. Authors may include Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Camus.

CR: the former PHIL 3940, the former PHIL 3980

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3440

Pragmatism

(same as the former PHIL 3930) is the first and only wholly American philosophical school of thought and remains a leading school of thought within American philosophy. We will discuss the issues of experience, truth, justification, nature, science, and method with the “classical” pragmatists C.S. Peirce, W. James and J. Dewey and continue to the pragmatists and neo-pragmatists of the mid and late 20th century, which may include Quine, Sellars, Putnam, Rorty, and Brandom.

CR: the former PHIL 3930

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3450

Philosophy of Language

(same as the former PHIL 3120) investigates various uses of language and its relationship to thought, as well as particular features of language, such as meaning, synonymy, reference, translation and interpretation.

CR: the former PHIL 3120

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3460

Philosophy of the Natural Sciences

(same as the former PHIL 3150) examines major issues in the origins, methods, and philosophical implications of science. Topics may include: science as a form of knowledge; the relations between science and metaphysics to more general theories of knowledge; and the connection between science and values.

CR: the former PHIL 3150

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

4000

Seminar in Metaphysics

(same as the former PHIL 4250) focuses on a primary text or texts surrounding a particular metaphysical question. Topics may include: the nature of being, causality, order, unity, essence and existence, and freedom.

CR: the former PHIL 4250

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4001

Seminar in Epistemology

(same as the former PHIL 4260) focuses on a primary text or texts surrounding a particular epistemological question. Topics may include: knowledge vs. mere opinion; kinds of justification or warrant; reasons and rationality; theory change, paradigm shift, among others.

CR: the former PHIL 4260

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4002

Seminar in Logic

(same as the former PHIL 4100) focuses on a primary text or texts in logic. Topics may include: inference; proof; computability; consequence; non-classical logics; meta-theory, among others.

CR: the former PHIL 4100

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4003

Seminar in Ethics

(same as the former PHIL 4300) examines ethical questions through the study of primary and secondary texts in the field. The course may focus on metaethics, examining questions such as: what is happiness? what is the ground of one’s duty?, or on applied ethics, by looking at specific cases such as euthanasia and genetic engineering, among others.

CR: the former PHIL 4300

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4004

Seminar in Social and Political Philosophy

(same as the former PHIL 4400) examines concepts at the heart of being together, such as power, justice, law, the State and the common good. It will do so by drawing from classical sources in the tradition or from contemporary writers.

CR: the former PHIL 4400

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4005

Seminar in the Philosophy of Mind

(same as the former PHIL 4200) focuses on a primary text or texts surrounding a particular question in the philosophy of mind. Topics may include: dualism vs. materialism; computational models of mind; philosophy of psychology/psychiatry, among others.

CR: the former PHIL 4200

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4006

Seminar in the Philosophy of Religion

(same as the former PHIL 4500) focuses on a primary text or texts surrounding a particular question in the philosophy of religion. Topics may include: the distinction and relation between reason and faith, the existence of God, the meaning of human existence, the problem of evil, and the religious foundations of moral action.

CR: the former PHIL 4500

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4007

Seminar in the Philosophy of Science

(same as the former PHIL 4150) focuses on a primary text or texts surrounding a particular question in the philosophy of science. Topics may include: science vs. non-science; kinds of scientific theory; the scope and range of scientific inquiry; science as a form of knowledge; the relations between science and metaphysics; and the connection between science and values.

CR: the former PHIL 4150

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4008

Seminar in the Philosophy of Language

(same as the former PHIL 4550) focuses on a primary text or texts surrounding a particular question in the philosophy of language. Topics may include: meaning, reference, truth; communication; interpretation; semantics/pragmatics interface, among others.

CR: the former PHIL 4550

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4009

Seminar in the History of Philosophy

focuses on a primary text or texts by a particular thinker or group of thinkers and traditions in the history of philosophy. Texts and philosophers will range from the ancient and medieval world to early modernity and the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4010

Seminar in Continental Philosophy

examines figures and issues important in 19th-21st-century European philosophy. Dominant schools include post-German Idealism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, structuralism, post-structuralism, and Continental realisms.

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4100-4199

Special Topics in Major Authors and Texts

(same as the former PHIL 4700-4790, the former PHIL 4800-4890) will be announced by the Department.

CR: the former PHIL 4700-4790, the former PHIL 4800-4890

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4998

Comprehensive Examination

is a course that meets regularly throughout the semester to prepare students to write the comprehensive examination at the end of the term. Lectures and review are provided by various Departmental experts throughout the semester. The examination comprises questions on figures, topics, and areas throughout the history of philosophy. To complete the Honours Program in Philosophy, students must successfully complete either the Honours Essay or the Comprehensive Examination. Normally this course is offered in the Winter Term and taken in a student’s final semester of study.

PR: enrollment in the Honours program and 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 3000 level

4999

Honours Essay

develops independent research and writing skills through regular meetings with a supervisor, the preparation of an approved research proposal, and the completion of the final Honours essay by the end of the semester. Prior to enrolling, ideally a semester in advance, students must contact the Head of the Department to identify a potential supervisor. To complete the Honours Program in Philosophy, students must successfully complete either the Honours Essay or the Comprehensive Examination.

PR: enrollment in the Honours program and permission of the Head of the Department

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).
15.24.1 Medieval Studies

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

A tentative list of upcoming Medieval Studies course offerings can be found at www.mun.ca/hss/courses.php.

Medieval Studies courses are designated by MST.

1000

The Cultural Legacy of the Middle Ages

(same as the former MST 2000) will survey the formative cultures of the Middle Ages - Latin, Celtic, Arabic - as well as the rise of the new vernacular cultures, English, Germanic and Romance. Literary trends such as the reliance on authority, the emergence of national epic and the development of court literature will be studied. The course examines the interplay of all the arts - literature, music, art and architecture.

CR: the former MST 2000

1120

Introductory Latin I

(same as Classics 1120) familiarizes students with the basics of the Latin language. Students will learn how to read simple narratives and short poems in Latin and examine the connections between language and culture. Evaluation will focus largely on comprehension of written Latin. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

CR: Classics 1120, the former Classics 120A

1121

Introductory Latin II

(same as Classics 1121) continues to familiarize students with the Latin language and Roman culture and society. Students will acquire a broad vocabulary, learn to read more complex passages of prose and poetry in Latin, and gain insights into key social concepts through study of language. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

CR: Classics 1121, the former Classics 120B

PR: Classics 1120 or MST 1120

1130

Introductory Ancient Greek I

(same as Classics 1130) familiarizes students with the basics of the Ancient Greek language. Students will master the Ancient Greek alphabet, learn how to read simple narratives in Ancient Greek, and examine the connections between language and culture. Evaluation will focus largely on comprehension of written Ancient Greek. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

CR: Classics 1130

1131

Introductory Ancient Greek II

(same as Classics 1131) continues to familiarize students with the Ancient Greek language. Students will acquire a broad vocabulary, learn to read more complex passages of prose and poetry, and gain insights into key social concepts through study of language. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

CR: Classics 1131

PR: Classics 1130 or MST 1130

2001

Medieval Europe to the Eleventh Century

(same as History 2320) is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of the early Middle Ages.

CR: History 2320

2002

Medieval Europe Since the Eleventh Century

(same as History 2330) is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe in the high and late Middle Ages.

CR: History 2330

2200

Intermediate Latin

(same as Classics 2200) provides a deeper knowledge of the Latin language while offering a window onto the culture and society of Ancient Rome. Students will read selections from works of history, literature, philosophy and oratory in Latin. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

CR: Classics 2200

PR: Classics 1121 or MST 1121

2205

History of Medieval Philosophy

(same as Philosophy 2205, Religious Studies 2205) examines and traces the historical developments of a number of philosophical themes, questions and ideas throughout medieval philosophy by reading, analyzing and discussing selected primary texts from philosophers and theologians from the 4th to 14th centuries. Authors may include Augustine, Proclus, Boethius, Al-Farabi Ibn Sina, Anselm, Ibn Rushd, Maimonides, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus and Ockham, among others.

CR: Philosophy 2205, Religious Studies 2205

2300

Intermediate Greek

(same as Classics 2300) provides a deeper knowledge of the Ancient Greek language while offering a window onto the culture and society of Ancient Greece. Students will read selections from works of history, literature, philosophy and oratory in Ancient Greek. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

CR: Classics 2300

PR: Classics 1131

2494

Game of Genders: Sex and Society in the Medieval North

(same as Archaeology 2494) introduces students to considerations and expressions of gender in northern medieval society, with particular reference to Viking and Anglo-Saxon worlds. The course explores the concept of gender and considers varied gendered identities found in material and textual evidence. Students will reflect on how significant cultural changes, such as the conversion to Christianity and the expansion to the North Atlantic and to L'Anse aux Meadows, laid the foundation for what is considered gender appropriate in Western society.

CR: Archaeology 2494

PR: it is recommended, but not obligatory, that students should have successfully completed Archaeology 1000 or the former Archaeology 1030 or Gender Studies 1000

3000

Medieval Books

(same as English 3002, History 3000, Religious Studies 3000) is an examination of the development and role of the manuscript book during the Middle Ages. Topics covered will include book production and dissemination; authors, scribes and audiences; and various kinds of books (e.g. glossed Bibles, anthologies, books of hours, etc.) and their uses.

CR: English 3002, History 3000, Religious Studies 3000

UL: this course may be substituted for a Greek and Roman Studies course in both the Classics degree programs (Honours, Joint Honours and general degree) and the Greek and Roman Studies degree programs (Honours, Joint Honours and general degree)

3001

Art, Architecture and Medieval Life

(same as the former Anthropology 3589, Archaeology 3001, Folklore 3001, History 3020) is an examination of the development of medieval art and architecture and of the ways in which they mirror various aspects of life in the Middle Ages. This course will include a discussion of art and architecture in the countryside, in the town, in the castle, in the cathedral and in the cloister.

CR: the former Anthropology 3589, Archaeology 3001, Folklore 3001, History 3020

3003

Christian Thought in the Middle Ages

(same as Religious Studies 3560) is a study of the development of Christianity in the West from the eleventh century to the eve of the Reformation, through an examination of its principal thinkers and the most significant societal forces and events: the crusades, the universities, monasticism, religious dissent and mysticism.

CR: Religious Studies 3560

3006

Women Writers of the Middle Ages

(same as English 3006, Gender Studies 3001, and the former Women's Studies 3001) will study selections from the considerable corpus of women's writings in the Medieval period, as well as issues which affected women's writing. All selections will be read in English translation.

CR: English 3006, the former MST 3351, Gender Studies 3001, the former Women's Studies 3001

3110

Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

(same as the former MST 3004, Philosophy 3110, the former Philosophy 3760) examines developments in Philosophy from Augustine to Descartes, looking back on their dependence on Ancient and Hellenistic thought and forward to their influence on Modern philosophy. This course focuses on a particular question or figure during this period. Topics may include: universals and particulars, the existence of God, free will and determinism, the problem of evil, the status of nature, soul and body, and mysticism.

CR: the former MST 3004, Philosophy 3110, the former Philosophy 3760

PR: 6 credit hours in Philosophy courses at the 1000 or 2000 level

3200

Advanced Latin

(same as Classics 3200) provides advanced knowledge of the Latin language while offering a window onto the culture and society of Ancient Rome. Students will begin to apply their knowledge to the close reading and interpretation of major works of Latin literature. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

CR: Classics 3200, the former Classics 2205

PR: Classics 2200 or MST 2200

3270

Christianity and the Roman Empire

(same as Classics 3270, History 3270, Religious Studies 3270) is a study of the relationship between Christianity and the Roman Empire from the first to the fourth century.

CR: Classics 3270, History 3270, Religious Studies 3270

3300

Advanced Ancient Greek

(same as Classics 3300) provides advanced knowledge of the Ancient Greek language while offering a window onto the culture and society of Ancient Greece. Students will begin to apply their knowledge to the close reading and interpretation of major works of Ancient Greek literature. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

CR: Classics 3300, the former Classics 2305

PR: Classics 2300 or MST 2300

3302

History of the French Language

(same as French 3302 and Linguistics 3302) is a study of the origins of French, including the influence of Gaulish, Vulgar Latin, Frankish and the langue d'oc/langue d'oïl division, a survey of the dialects, morphology and syntax of Old French and of the evolution from Old to Middle French, including phonology, morphology, syntax and vocabulary.

CR: French 3302, Linguistics 3302

PR: 15 credit hours in French and/or Linguistics at the 2000 level or permission of the Head of the Department; MST 1120 or Classics 1120 is strongly recommended

3592

Norse Archaeology

(same as Archaeology 3592) explores the influence of the Vikings on the medieval world and the place of L'Anse aux Meadows within this cultural milieu. Students will be introduced to Viking-Age archaeological and literary texts to gain knowledge of specific questions and problems concerning multicultural contact within the Viking-Age world, specifically the North Atlantic region. They will also gain an appreciation of the challenges associated with using interdisciplinary evidence as well as migration and multicultural issues in the past and present.

CR: Archaeology 3592, the former Archaeology 3685

PR: Archaeology 1000 or the former Archaeology 1030

3710-3729

Special Topics in Medieval Studies: Harlow

is available only as part of the Harlow Campus Semester.

3828

The Middle Ages and the Movies

(same as English 3828) explores the ways medieval sources are represented in modern films, and how modern cultural and political concerns influence how these medieval sources are presented. Through a selection of medieval films and their historical and literary inspirations, we will see how films shape our present-day concepts of history, identity, freedom, knowledge and creativity.

CR: English 3828

PR: 3 credit hours in English at the 2000-level

4000

Medieval Spanish Literature

- inactive course.

4001-4020

Special Topics in Medieval Studies

are seminars on such general, interdisciplinary or comparative subjects as, e.g., Popular Culture in the Middle Ages, The Medieval Stage, The Medieval Court, The Religious Orders, Women in Medieval Society, Medieval Universities, Scholasticism, Dante's Divine Comedy, Medieval Historiography, Arthurian Romance, Jewish Medieval Communities, Muslim Art and Architecture and The Byzantine World.

PR: 6 credit hours in MST courses at the 3000-level or above, or permission of the instructor

4021

Medieval Latin

- inactive course.

4300

Middle High German Language and Literature I

(same as German 4300) is an introduction to the German language, literature and culture of the eleventh to fifteenth centuries: historical linguistics, Middle High German grammar and the court epic.

CR: German 4300

PR: one of German 2011, 2511, 3011 or permission of the Head of the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).