Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (2016/2017)
12.20 Linguistics

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

Linguistics courses are designated by LING.

1100

Introduction to Linguistics

is a general introduction to linguistic concepts which are important for understanding the nature of language and its function for communication. Topics include: languages as structured systems; the systematicity of language change; the classification of languages into families and their geographical distribution; language, the brain, and language disorders; the acquisition of language; and human vs animal communication.

CR: the former LING 2100

1103

Introduction to Linguistic Analysis: Syntax

(same as the former LING 2103) is an introduction to the study of grammatical patterns in the structure of phrases and sentences. This course provides students with the tools to analyze phrase structure and syntactic constituency in English and other languages. Theoretical topics covered include case theory and agreement, principles of thematic role assignment, and different types of syntactic movement.

CR: the former LING 2103

1104

Introduction to Linguistic Analysis: Phonology

(same as the former LING 2104) is an introduction to the study of sound patterns in human languages. Basic empirical and theoretical issues in phonology are demonstrated through the analysis of data selected from English and other languages. Theoretical concepts surveyed include phonological features and contrasts, and syllable structure. These are examined through the study of allophony, allomorphy, and processes such as assimilation and neutralization.

CR: the former LING 2104

1105

The Wonder of Words

(same as the former LING 2105) is an introduction to the structure of words. This course presents methods of linguistic analysis through an in-depth study of English word origins. The French, Latin and Greek origins of technical and scientific words are studied, together with the ways that these words may change in structure, sound, and meaning. The course will also provide an introduction to etymology, to writing systems and transliteration, and to the use of dictionaries.

CR: the former LING 2105; credit may not be obtained for both the former LING 2105 and the former LING 1101

1155

Linguistics for Language Learners

provides a thorough grounding in the linguistic concepts and terminology involved in university-level second language learning.

CR: LING 1100

1530

Reading and Writing in Innu-aimun I

- inactive course.

1531

Reading and Writing in Innu-aimun II

- inactive course.

2020

Introduction to the Structure of Inuttitut I

- inactive course.

2021

Introduction to the Structure of Inuttitut II

- inactive course.

2022

Issues in Oral Inuttitut

reviews the primary role of oral language in communication, language, acquisition and language maintenance in oral Inuttitut. The nature and significance of dialect differences are also discussed. Different types of oral language are examined, e.g. stories, newscasts, conversation. Students study how oral language is used within modern Labrador society and whether language attitudes are reflected in this use. Students also consider how best to teach oral Inuttitut and different ways to test for oral proficiency. This course is intended for fluent speakers of Inuttitut who are planning to complete the Diploma in Native and Northern Education (T.E.P.L.). This course is not normally offered at the St. John's Campus.

PR: LING 2020

2023

Reading and Writing in Inuttitut

- inactive course.

2025

Introduction to Inuttitut I

introduces students to Inuttitut (Eskimo). Students develop a working knowledge of basic vocabulary and grammar, as well as a number of linguistic concepts that enable them to consult a wide range of reference books. A strong emphasis is placed on oral skills. This course is intended for students who want to learn an Aboriginal language spoken in Newfoundland and Labrador. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

2026

Introduction to Inuttitut II

is a continuation of LING 2025. Students learn further vocabulary and grammar of the language. They are also required to submit a project based on their own investigation of some aspect of the grammar of the language (based on either reference books or fieldwork). A strong emphasis is placed on oral skills. This course is intended for students who want to learn an Aboriginal language spoken in Newfoundland and Labrador. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

PR: LING 2025

2030

Introduction to Innu-aimun (Montagnais/Naskapi) I

- inactive course.

2031

Introduction to Innu-aimun (Montagnais/Naskapi) II

- inactive course.

2040

Introduction to Mi'kmaq I

- inactive course.

2041

Introduction to Mi'kmaq II

- inactive course.

PR: LING 2040

2060

Aboriginal Languages of Eastern Canada

is an overview of the aboriginal languages of three language families of Eastern Canada: Eskimo-Aleut (Inuttitut) and Algonquian (Innu-aimun, Mi'kmaq, Maliseet-Pasamaquoddy and Beothuk) and Iroquoian (Mohawk) with respect to both linguistic structure and current vitality. The course also reviews a history of language suppression and revitalization efforts, within the context of the larger issues of minority language attrition and maintenance, is also considered.

2210

Language in Newfoundland and Labrador: An Introduction to Linguistic Variation

examines linguistic variation and language change in the languages of Newfoundland and Labrador. Topics covered include the concept of variation within language, both regional and social, the chief causes of such variation, and some of its societal consequences. As a Quantitative Reasoning course, practical workshops and assignments focus on producing a final scientific research report using quantitative analysis, graphical representation of numerical data, and logical reasoning involving numbers. All sections of this course follow Quantitative Reasoning guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

UL: may not be used as both a Quantitative Reasoning course and the former Research/Writing

2212

Language and Gender

(same as the former LING 3212) explores gender, sexuality and language and their relationship to culture, power, performance, interaction, social networks, language change, and language in the school and workplace. The course introduces theoretical perspectives, methodologies, and research findings, from an early focus on gender difference to more recent work on how language helps people create and perform gender and sexuality.

CR: the former LING 3212

2220

Linguistics and Law

(same as the former LING 3220) is an overview of the many relationships between linguistics and the judicial process. Topics to be covered include: the language of legal texts, and the Plain English movement; language use in legal settings (such as eyewitness testimony, jury instructions, and the language of lawyer-client interactions); the legal disadvantages which language may impose on speakers of minority languages and non-standard dialects; and the emerging discipline of forensic linguistics (which deals with such issues as voice and authorship identification, and linguistic interpretation of evidence).

CR: the former LING 3220

2300

Philosophy of Language and Mind

(same as Philosophy 2300) is a survey of philosophical thinking about human language and thought, and about how these phenomena relate to the rest of the natural world. Topics covered include the nature of language, the relations between thought and language, and the nature of consciousness.

CR: Philosophy 2300, the former LING 2710, the former Philosophy 2710

2400

History of the English Language to 1500

- inactive course.

2401

History of the English Language from 1500 to Modern Times

- inactive course.

2700-2720

Special Topics in Linguistics

is an introduction to Uncommonly Taught Languages including the following:

2700

Introduction to Irish Gaelic I

is an introduction to Irish Gaelic I. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING. 2103 or LING 1104 or the former LING 2104 is recommended.

2701

Introduction to Irish Gaelic II

is an introduction to Irish Gaelic II. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

PR: LING 2700 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

2702

Introduction to Japanese I

is an introduction to Japanese. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

2703

Introduction to Japanese II

is a continuation of LING 2702. All sections of this course follow the Language Study Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

PR: LING 2702 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

2704

Introduction to Japanese III

- inactive course.

2705

Introduction to Japanese IV

- inactive course.

2706

Introduction to Japanese V

- inactive course.

3000

Morphology

is an introduction to the study of word structure, which provides a comprehensive overview of morphological phenomena in a wide variety of languages. Topics include inflection, derivation, morphophonology, and operations which change grammatical functions.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING 2103 and LING 1104 or the former LING 2104 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

3100

Syntactic Theory

builds on the basic concepts from LING 1103 and extends them to include cross-linguistic variation from a variety of language families and language types. New topics examined include the foundations of phrase structure, binding theory, phase theory and parametric variation.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING 2103 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

3104

Phonetics

provides a thorough grounding in pronouncing, transcribing and acoustically analyzing the sounds of the world's languages. Material covered includes study of the vocal anatomy, phonetic transcription of speech data from both English and a variety of the world's languages, as well as basic concepts of acoustic analysis and speech perception. This involves the close examination of data from many of the world's languages, which illustrates how widely languages can differ in their selection and organization of speech sounds.

PR: LING 1100 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

3105

Issues in the Acquisition of English and the Adult Learner

- inactive course.

3150

Bilingualism: Linguistic, Cognitive and Educational Aspects

- inactive course.

3155

Introduction to Language Acquisition

examines critical issues in language acquisition, in light of the most central theoretical perspectives in this area of research. The course combines experimental evidence from infant speech perception with corpus data documenting speech production abilities in first language learners. Issues in second language acquisition and developmental language disorders are also discussed whenever relevant, and as part of dedicated lectures. Data from different populations of learners and across many different languages serve to illustrate the discussion, whenever relevant.

PR: LING 1100 or the former LING 2100 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

3201

Phonological Theory

presents terms, concepts, and methods of studying phonological representations and phonological processes. Topics include segmental and prosodic aspects of phonological patterning, including stress, tone, and harmony systems. The course also addresses challenges posed by transparent and opaque interactions between different components of phonological systems. These concepts are exemplified using phenomena observed across natural languages. The course also introduces the basics of constraint-based approaches to phonological theory.

PR: LING 1104 or the former LING 2104 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

3210

Introduction to Sociolinguistics

introduces the methods and theory underlying current approaches to the relationship between language and society. Topics covered include the concept of variation within language, both regional and social; the linguistic and social causes of such variation; and the means by which societies shape linguistic choices and behaviour.

PR: LING 1100 or the former LING 2100 or LING 2210 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

3302

History of the French Language

(same as French 3302) is a study of the origins of French, including the influence of Gaulish, Vulgar Latin, Frankish and the langue d'oc/langue d'oïl division, a survey of the dialects, morphology and syntax of Old French and of the evolution from Old to Middle French, including phonology, morphology, syntax and vocabulary.

CR: French 3302

PR: 15 credit hours in French and/or Linguistics at the 2000 level or permission of the Head of the Department; Classics 1120 is strongly recommended

3310

Phonology and Morphology of French

(same as French 3310) is an examination of the phonological and morphological structure of French. Data from regional and non-standard varieties contrasted with data from standard French: formal rules to deal with observed regularities. Interactions of phonology and morphology in phenomena such as liaison. Derivational and inflectional morphology. Research articles on one or more of the topics dealt with in the course will be assigned as readings, and a written report in French based on one or more of the articles is to be submitted as part of the term work. This course will normally be taught in French.

CR: French 3310

PR: 15 credit hours in French and/or Linguistics at the 2000 level or permission of the instructor

3311

Introduction to General Linguistics: Aspects of French Linguistic Theory

(same as French 3311) is a practical examination of the French verbal system, with a thorough exposition of the systems of aspect, voice, tense and mood. The fundamental concepts of linguistics will form the framework of this exposition: the langue/parole distinction and its relationship to underlying and surface entities; language as activity and the generation of surface elements from underlying subsystems. This course will normally be taught in French.

CR: French 3311

PR: 15 credit hours in French and/or Linguistics at the 2000 level or permission of the instructor

3500

Historical Linguistics

focuses on the genetic relationships between languages, using the comparative method, as well as on language change (as documented in phonetics/phonology, morphology, and syntax). Lexical and semantic change are also investigated, as is the role of language/dialect contact. The course covers the basis for comparative and internal language reconstruction, as well as the typological and genetic classification of languages.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING 2103 and LING 1104 or the former LING 2104 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

3850

Introduction to Semantics

examines the foundations of semantics, the study of linguistic meaning. The focus is on sentence-level semantics, involving both lexical meaning and logical/quantificational semantic operations. How do utterances get their meanings? How do we combine simple meanings to create complex ones? How are meanings connected to syntactic structure and intonation? What does context contribute to meaning? Set theory is introduced, as is some formal logic (from propositional logic to a typed lambda-calculus). All sections of this course follow Quantitative Reasoning guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING 2103 is required or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department. LING 3000 and 3100 are recommended.

3950-3960 (Excluding 3951)

Special Topics in Linguistics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

3951

Language Endangerment and Revitalization

provides an introduction to the key issues surrounding the discussion of endangered languages. Causes, consequences, and efforts to reverse the process of decline (language revitalization or maintenance) are examined through consideration of case studies from around the world. Theoretical models developed to evaluate the current status and future prospects of endangered languages are also considered. The course is likely to include substantial discussion of the situation in Canada and the USA.

PR: LING 1100 or the former LING 2100 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4010-4091

will focus on the linguistic structure of certain languages, and are designed to provide senior students with the opportunity to be exposed to a substantial part of the grammar of a language other than those regularly offered in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. One course in this series will be offered each year, subject to availability of instructor.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING 2103 and LING 1104 or the former LING 2104 or the permission of the instructor

4050-4054

Linguistic Structure of a North American Aboriginal Language

could study the following languages: Cree, Inuttitut (Inuktitut), Innu-aimun (Montagnais/Naskapi), etc.

CR: except where an exemption is supplied by the Head of the Department, a student may not obtain credit for more than one course in the LING 4050-4054 series. Students may not obtain credit for any of the previously offered LING 4010, 4020, 4021, 4030, 4031, 4040, 4041 in addition to a course in the LING 4050-4054 series.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING 2103 and LING 1104 or the former LING 2104 or the permission of the instructor

4055-4059

Linguistic Structure of an Uncommonly Taught Language

provides instruction about the grammar, pronunciation, and literary and/or oral tradition of a language which is not regularly taught

CR: except where an exemption is supplied by the Head of the Department, a student may not obtain credit for more than one course in the LING 4055-4059 series. Students may not obtain credit for any of the previously offered LING 4011, 4060, 4061, 4065, 4066, 4070, 4071, 4080, 4081, 4090, and 4091 in addition to a course in the LING 4055-4059 series.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING 2103 and LING 1104 or the former LING 2104 or the permission of the instructor

4100

Morphosyntactic Analysis

examines the relationship between complex morphology and syntactic structure. Data and patterns from a wide variety of languages are considered, including several polysynthetic languages. Students use readings selected from the primary literature for class discussion materials and for their own research.

PR: LING 3100 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4110

Selected Topics in Syntactic Theory

is an analysis of a wide range of linguistic data in morphology and syntax. The course focuses on essential linguistic concepts in more than one theoretical framework, and on the nature of linguistic evidence. This course is usually offered in alternate years.

PR: LING 3100 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4150

Language Acquisition II

evaluates different theoretical avenues to explain patterns of first and second language acquisition. The course explores acquisition patterns in first and second language acquisition, bilingual development, and language learning disorders. Building on these data, the discussion covers central theoretical questions about the role of linguistic principles, issues in learnability and effects related to properties of the linguistic input.

PR: LING 3155 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4151

Advanced Topics in Phonological Development

covers current empirical and theoretical questions in phonological development. The course evaluates how different theoretical frameworks can (or not) account for patterns of phonological development observed in a range of different languages. Central to these discussions is the learner's ability to perceive, interpret, and reproduce the various sounds and sound combinations present in these languages.

PR: LING 3155 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4201

Advanced Phonology

addresses current issues in phonological theory. Topics include phonology in the lexicon, segmental and prosodic representations, as well as advanced issues in constraint-based approaches to phonology. Students further develop their ability to analyze phonological data in light of current theories.

PR: LING 3201 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4202

Selected Topics in Generative Phonology

- inactive course.

4210

Sociolinguistics II

studies the detailed patterns of variation found in any given speech community, and factors which co-vary with them, and the various theoretical models proposed to account for such variability. Students acquire a thorough grounding in the methods and theory underlying current approaches to the relationship between language and society. As their major assignment, students complete a carefully restricted sociolinguistic project. This course is usually offered in alternate years.

PR: LING 3210 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4301

French Dialects, Patois and Argots

- inactive course.

4310

The French Language in Canada

- inactive course.

4350

General Romance Linguistics

- inactive course.

4400

Historical and Comparative Linguistics

- inactive course.

4403

Etymology: History of English Words

- inactive course.

4420

English Dialectology I

- inactive course.

4421

English Dialectology II

- inactive course.

4500

Introduction to Field Methods

focuses on data collection and organization for an unfamiliar language in a simulated field situation, including methods of elicitation, data filing, preliminary analysis, and hypothesis formation and testing. In this course, students learn to apply theoretical concepts from all major Linguistics sub-disciplines, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and historical linguistics. This course is usually offered in alternate years.

PR: LING 1103 or the former LING 2103 and LING 1104 or the former LING 2104 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4700

Experimental Phonetics

examines some empirical methods of studying the different stages of the 'speech chain' which links speaker to hearer, with special emphasis on the acoustic and perceptual components of the chain. The course also surveys a range of natural articulations and their acoustic effects, explained through the Source-plus-Filter theory of speech production. The discussion also considers competing theories of speech perception as well as debates on the acoustic versus perceptual bases for phonological features.

PR: LING 3104 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4750

Selected Topics in Phonology

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department. This course introduces students to more advanced topics in core linguistic disciplines.

PR: LING 3201 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4751

Selected Topics in Morpho-Syntax

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department. This course introduces students to more advanced topics in core linguistic disciplines.

PR: LING 3100 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4752

Selected Topics in Semantics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department. This course introduces students to more advanced topics in core linguistic disciplines.

PR: LING 3850 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4753

Selected Topics in Acquisition

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department. This course introduces students to more advanced topics in core linguistic disciplines.

PR: LING 3155 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4754

Selected Topics in Linguistic Variation

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department. This course introduces students to more advanced topics in core linguistic disciplines.

PR: LING 3210 or waiver in special cases by the Head of the Department

4900-4901

Independent Study

are courses that are open to advanced students wishing to do individual research in consultation with an advisor.

PR: permission of the instructor

4950-4960

Special Topics in Linguistics

will have topics to be studied announced by the Department.

PR: permission of the instructor

4999

Honours Essay

is required as part of the Honours in Linguistics

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).