Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (2016/2017)
11.18 Political Science

www.mun.ca/posc

11.18.1 Department of Political Science Description

How do people live together in societies, and how should people live together? Political Science is the study of the institutions, organizations and norms that determine public lives. In Political Science there are discussions on basic concepts - such as “power”, “government” or “democracy” - in order to understand the world and humanity’s place in it. Once these concepts have been explored, there will be a study of the connections between them in order to better explain political outcomes, such as: why people vote for one political party as opposed to another, why governments and public policies differ in different countries, or why armed conflicts happen in some cases but not in other cases. Memorial University of Newfoundland's Department of Political Science has research strengths in public policy; European and international politics; and elections, campaigns and voting, particularly in Canada. The quality of the Department’s research and teaching is reflected in its programs and the success of its students.

The following undergraduate programs are available in the Department of Political Science:

  1. Major in Law and Society

  2. Minor in Law and Society

  3. Honours in Political Science

  4. Major in Political Science

  5. Honours and Major in Political Science (Co-operative)

  6. Minor in Political Science

The Department also offers two Political Science concentrations: a concentration in Canadian Government and a concentration in Global Studies. These concentrations are applicable to all programs in Political Science other than the Minor.

Political Science course descriptions are found at the end of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences section under Course Descriptions, Political Science and are designated by POSC.

11.18.2 Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts requires the successful completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours. A student must meet the requirements for a departmental Major, Minor, or Honours program and also meet the Program Regulations – General and Honours Degrees for the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. A student is therefore advised to consult with the Admission to the Bachelor of Arts General Degree Programs regulations, the Program Regulations - General and Honours Degrees which also includes the Bachelor of Arts General Degree Components, The Major Program, and The Minor Program regulations. Information regarding honours programs is available at Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Degree Regulations as well as under each department’s regulations.

A student is strongly encouraged to consult with an academic advisor to discuss available programs and requirements in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences including the Core Requirements, The Major Program, The Minor Program, and the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Degree Regulations. A student is advised to declare a program of study, including a Major and a Minor, before completing the first 45 credit hours of study. Information about declaring a Major and Minor in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and a list of advisors is available at www.mun.ca/hss/programs/undergraduate/ideclare.php.

11.18.3 General Information
  1. Students for an Honours, a Major or a Minor in Political Science may consult with the Head of the Department or its Undergraduate Advisor to receive advice on Political Science course selections.

  2. The Department's website at www.mun.ca/posc features details about upcoming course offerings, course instructors, the undergraduate (Honours, Major, Minor) and graduate (Master of Arts) programs, work internships, studying abroad opportunities, special events, frequently asked questions, and more. In the event of conflicting information, the official University Calendar and information issued by the Office of the Registrar shall take precedence.

  3. Anticipated completion of an introductory course is generally recommended prior to enrolling in a corresponding course at the next level. Students following this path may opt to take courses in the same area in the same academic year (e.g., if a 2000-level course is completed in Fall then a corresponding 3000-level course may be taken in Winter). This is presented, for illustrative purposes only, in Table 1 Recommended Course Sequencing by Student’s Area of Interest

Table 1 Recommended Course Sequencing by Student’s Area of Interest

Political Theory

International Politics

Comparative Politics

Public Policy and Administration

Canadian Politics

Overview Course

POSC 1000

POSC 1000

POSC 1000

POSC 1000

POSC 1000

Area introduction

POSC 2100

POSC 2200

POSC 2300

POSC 2600

POSC 2800

Area specialization

POSC 31xx

POSC 32xx

POSC 33xx

POSC 36xx

POSC 38xx

Advanced seminar

POSC 41xx

POSC 42xx

POSC 43xx

POSC 46xx

POSC 48xx

With the written consent of the course instructor and the Head of the Department, certain prerequisite requirements may be waived.

11.18.3.1 Course Prerequisites
  1. The following prerequisite schedule applies to Political Science courses, except Co-operative work term courses.

  2. All research techniques courses POSC 3010, 4010, 4011 have prerequisites specified in their descriptions.

  3. 1000-level: No prerequisites. Suitable for students in all disciplines.

  4. 2000-level: No prerequisites. Completion of POSC 1000 and POSC 1001 is generally recommended.

  5. 3000-level: Except for POSC 3010, no prerequisites. Completion of a corresponding 2000-level area introduction course is generally recommended as outlined under Table 1 Recommended Course Sequencing by Student's Area of Interest.

  6. 4000-level: Prerequisites are specified in course descriptions. Completion of at least 12 credit hours in Political Science, including 6 at the 3000-level, is generally recommended.

11.18.3.2 Previous Calendar Regulations

Students who completed the former POSC 2010 may elect to treat it as POSC 1001 for the purposes of Political Science degree regulations and towards the Bachelor of Arts Critical Reading and Writing Requirement.

11.18.4 Honours in Political Science
  1. An Honours degree provides students with additional research and writing skills, may be required for admission to a graduate program, and may be useful preparation for law and other professional fields. Students considering the Honours program are encouraged to apply before their fourth semester and to begin considering a potential Honours research topic before their seventh semester. Admission to the program is in accordance with UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS and the Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Arts.

  2. In addition to meeting the general requirements for the degree, students for a B.A.(Hons.) in Political Science must complete at least 60 credit hours in courses offered by the Department, including:

    1. POSC 1000;

    2. a minimum of 12 credit hours at the 2000-level, which must include POSC 2100, 2800, and a minimum of two of POSC 2200, 2300, 2600;

    3. a minimum of 36 credit hours at the 3000-level or above, which must include;

      1. a minimum of 18 credit hours at the 3000-level, which must include POSC 3010, a minimum of 3 credit hours from a course numbered 32xx or 33xx, and a minimum of 3 credit hours from a course numbered 36xx or 38xx;

      2. a minimum of 15 credit hours at the 4000-level, which must include POSC 4010, 4011; and

      3. an additional 3 credit hours at the 3000-level or above; and

    4. a further 9 credit hours in Political Science (no more than 3 credit hours from POSC 1010 and 1020). Honours students are strongly encouraged to complete POSC 1001.

      Notes:

      1. No more than one of POSC 1010 or 1020 can be included among the 60 Political Science credit hours required for an Honours degree.

      2. For Honours, Philosophy 3870 and 3890 may be substituted for 3000-level Political Science credit hours (31xx), and Gender Studies 4005 may be substituted for 4000-level Political Science credit hours (41xx). No other such substitutions may apply.

      3. If the Honours essay topic encompasses one of Canadian Government or Global Studies, the POSC 4010 and/or 4011 may be applied towards the applicable Political Science concentration, upon recommendation of the Head of the Department and subject to the approval of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Committee on Undergraduate Studies. Refer to Political Science Concentrations.

  3. Students for an Honours degree are required to select courses as specified under Honours in Political Science. A possible course pattern is presented in Table 2 Course Pattern for an Honours in Political Science.

    Table 2 Course Pattern for an Honours in Political Science (POSC)

    Term

    Political Science Courses (POSC)

    Credit Hours

    • Fall
    • Academic Term 1

    POSC 1000

    3

    • Winter
    • Academic Term 2

    POSC 1001, 2800 (POSC 1001 is a recommended choice)

    6

    • Fall & Winter
    • Academic Terms 3 and 4

    12

    • Fall & Winter
    • Academic Terms 5 and 6
    • POSC 3010 and five other 3000-levels (at least one of 32xx or 33xx)
    • One POSC course at the 4000-level

    21

    • Fall
    • Academic Term 7
    • POSC 4010
    • Two other POSC courses at the 4000-level

    9

    • Winter
    • Academic Term 8
    • POSC 4011
    • Two other POSC courses at the 3000- or 4000-levels

    9

  4. Prior to enrolling in POSC 4010, all Honours students should review the Guidelines Governing Honours Essays available from the Head of the Department, and are required to follow these guidelines while enrolled in POSC 4010 and 4011.

  5. Students electing Joint Honours are required to complete at least 51 credit hours in Political Science, including 42 credit hours chosen in accordance with the pattern set out in the degree regulations for a Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Political Science. An additional 9 credit hours can be selected from POSC courses, however, no more than 3 credit hours from POSC 1010 or 1020 are eligible. If the student chooses to complete the Honours Essay (POSC 4010 and 4011) in Political Science, it must be passed with a grade of 70% or better.

11.18.5 Major in Political Science
  1. In addition to meeting the general requirements for the degree, students for a B.A. with a Major in Political Science must complete at least 42 credit hours in courses offered by the Department, including:

    1. POSC 1000;

    2. a minimum of 12 credit hours at the 2000-level, which must include: POSC 2100, 2800 and a minimum of two of 2200, 2300, 2600;

    3. a minimum of 15 credit hours at the 3000-level, which must include: POSC 3010, a minimum of 3 credit hours from a course numbered 32xx or 33xx, and a minimum of 3 credit hours from a course numbered 36xx or 38xx;

    4. a minimum of 9 credit hours at the 4000-level; and

    5. further 3 credit hours in Political Science.

      Notes:

      1. No more than one of POSC 1010 or 1020 can be included among the 42 Political Science credit hours required for a Major.

      2. POSC 1001 is a recommended choice for a Major.

      3. For a Major, Philosophy 3870 and 3890 may be substituted for 3000-level Political Science credit hours (31xx), and Gender Studies 4005 may be substituted for 4000-level Political Science credit hours (41xx). No other such substitutions may apply.

  2. Students for a Major degree are required to select courses as specified under Major in Political Science. A possible course pattern is presented in Table 3 Course Pattern for a Major in Political Science.

    Table 3 Course Pattern for a Major in Political Science (POSC)

    Term

    Political Science Courses (POSC)

    Credit Hours

    • Fall
    • Academic Term 1

    POSC 1000

    3

    • Winter
    • Academic Term 2

    6

    • Fall & Winter
    • Academic Terms 3 and 4

    12

    • Fall & Winter
    • Academic Terms 5 and 6
    • POSC 3010 and three other 3000-levels (at least one of 32xx or 33xx)

    12

    • Fall & Winter
    • Academic Terms 7 and 8

    Three 4000-level POSC courses

    9

11.18.6 Political Science Concentrations

While meeting the requirements for a program in Political Science, other than a Minor in Political Science, students may optionally select courses in one of two formal concentrations which, if completed, will be noted on the student’s transcript.

11.18.6.1 Concentration in Canadian Government

The concentration in Canadian Government is applicable to all programs in Political Science other than the Minor in Political Science. As part of their course selection, students opting for a Canadian Government concentration will complete a minimum of 24 credit hours in POSC courses emphasizing public policy (second digit is “6") and/or Canadian politics (second digit is “8"). These POSC x6xx and/or x8xx credit hours must include 2600 and 2800, and at least 6 credit hours at the 4000 level. Students are generally advised to follow the possible course pattern presented in Table 4 Course Pattern for Optional Political Science (POSC) Concentration. For Honours students. credit hours in POSC 4010 and/or POSC 4011 may be deemed eligible towards the concentration; such students must submit their request in writing to the Head of the Department who will communicate a recommendation to the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

11.18.6.2 Concentration in Global Studies

The concentration in Global Studies is applicable to all programs in Political Science other than the Minor in Political Science. As part of their course selection, students opting for a Global Studies concentration will complete a minimum of 24 credit hours in POSC courses emphasizing international politics (second digit is “2”) and/or comparative politics (second digit is “3”). These POSC x2xx and/or x3xx credit hours must include 2200 and 2300, and at least 6 credit hours at the 4000-level. Students are generally advised to follow the possible course pattern presented in Table 4 Course Pattern for Optional Political Science (POSC) Concentration. For Honours students. credit hours in POSC 4010 and/or POSC 4011 may be deemed eligible towards the concentration; such students must submit their request in writing to the Head of the Department who will communicate a recommendation to the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

Table 4 Course Pattern for Optional Political Science (POSC) Concentration

Concentration

Courses for Political Science (POSC) Honours or Major

No Concentration

Canadian Government

Follow applicable Table 2, Table 3, Table 5, or Table 6, choosing 2600, three 36xx/38xx and three 46xx/48xx courses.

Global Studies

Follow applicable Table 2, Table 3, Table 5, or Table 6, choosing 2200 and 2300, three 32xx/33xx and three 42xx/43xx courses. Up to two 31xx and/or 41xx courses may be included.

11.18.7 Honours and Major in Political Science (Co-operative)

The Political Science Co-operative Education Program (PSCE) is available to full-time Political Science Honours and Majors students only.

The PSCE provides an opportunity for students to obtain public policy and other relevant full-time employment experience in fields related to Political Science, particularly governmental organizations. Students will apply their academic knowledge to practical situations as they develop their research, analysis and writing skills, as well as their career interests. A commitment to ethical and professional conduct is expected of all students.

Candidates who are accepted into the PSCE must complete the normal requirements for their degree, as well as three full-time work terms. In addition to following the PSCE regulations, students must satisfy the Bachelor of Arts General Degree Regulations, the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Degree Regulations, and the Department’s requirements for the Honours in Political Science or the Major in Political Science, as applicable. Additional information about the PSCE can be found on the Department of Political Science website at www.mun.ca/posc.

11.18.7.1 Eligibility for Admission

Admission to the Political Science Co-operative Education Program is competitive and selective.

The primary criterion used in reaching decisions on applications is overall academic achievement.

Application forms can be obtained from the Department. The annual deadline for application is November 15 (or the next business day). An application should be made in the Fall when a student expects to have completed a minimum of 42 credit hours, including POSC 1000 and 2800, by the end of that semester.

Admission criteria include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following:

  1. students currently enrolled in the Honours in Political Science or a Major in Political Science; and

  2. an overall average of at least 65%, and a minimum average of 70% in Political Science courses.

  3. Applicants transferring from another institution must normally have completed at least one semester at Memorial University of Newfoundland before applying to the program.

  4. Applicants may be asked to attend an interview.

11.18.7.2 Program of Study
  1. In addition to the requirements below students must fulfill all requirements for either a Honours or Major in Political Science.

  2. Students’ status in the program is assessed at the end of each semester. To be eligible to continue, students must maintain full-time student status (9 or more credits in a semester) and maintain a cumulative average of at least 65% and an average of at least 70% in Political Science courses. Students who fail to maintain the required averages will be required to withdraw from the PSCE. Such students may apply for readmission in a subsequent year after re-establishing the required averages.

  3. Students must complete three work terms, at least one of which must occur during a Fall or Winter semester. No more than two of the three work terms may be completed consecutively.

  4. Work terms normally begin after the student has completed four academic terms. The final work term must be completed before the final academic term.

Course patterns may vary. Students are encouraged to meet with the undergraduate coordinator early in their program in order to establish a course pattern that meets the requirements as set out in these regulations.

Table 5 Possible Course Pattern for the PSCE Program (Honours)

Term

Political Science Courses (POSC)

Credit Hours

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 1

POSC 1000

3

  • Winter
  • Academic Term 2

6

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 3

6

  • Winter
  • Academic Term 4
  • One of POSC 2200, 2300
  • One of POSC36xx or 38xx

6

  • Spring
  • Work Term 1

POSC 260W

0

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 5
  • POSC 3010
  • One of POSC 32xx or 33xx
  • One other POSC course at the 3000-level

9

  • Winter
  • Academic Term 6
  • Two 3000-level POSC courses
  • One 4000-level POSC course

9

  • Fall
  • Work Term 2

POSC 360W

0

  • Winter or Spring
  • Academic Term 7
  • POSC 4010
  • Two other POSC courses at the 3000 or 4000-level

9

  • Winter or Spring
  • Work Term 3

POSC 460W

3

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 8
  • POSC 4011
  • Two 4000-level POSC courses

9

Table 6 Possible Course Pattern for the PSCE Program (Major)

Term

Political Science Courses (POSC)

Credit Hours

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 1

POSC 1000

3

  • Winter
  • Academic Term 2

6

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 3

6

  • Winter
  • Academic Term 4
  • One of POSC 2200, 2300
  • One of POSC 36xx or 38xx

6

  • Spring
  • Work Term 1

POSC 260W

0

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 5
  • POSC 3010
  • One of POSC 32xx or 33xx

6

  • Winter
  • Academic Term 6

One 3000-level POSC course

3

  • Fall
  • Work Term 2

POSC 360W

0

  • Winter or Spring
  • Academic Term 7

One 4000-level POSC course

3

  • Winter or Spring
  • Work Term 3

POSC 460W

3

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 8

Two 4000-level POSC courses

6

11.18.7.3 Preparation for Work Placements

The Program is coordinated by the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education in consultation with a designated Department faculty member.

  1. A student admitted to the co-op program gives permission to the University to provide a copy of the student’s résumé and university transcript to potential employers.

  2. The dates for starting and finishing each work term are shown in the University Diary. At the start of the job competition students will normally be provided with a detailed description of each available position. Work placements cannot be guaranteed though every effort is made to ensure that appropriate employment is made available. With the express permission of the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education, students may identify and initiate contact with a potential employer outside of the placement competition, though the designated faculty member must ultimately approve all positions. Such jobs must be confirmed by letter from the employer before the first day of the work period.

11.18.7.4 Delivery of Work Term Placements
  1. At least one work term must occur in a Fall or Winter semester. The final work term must be completed before the final academic term. Competition for placements is heaviest in the Spring semester and students are strongly recommended to complete one Spring placement outside of the St. John’s area. With permission of the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education, and in consultation with the designated faculty member, a student may complete a maximum of two work terms in consecutive semesters.

  2. Within two weeks of starting a work term, students must submit a completed confidentiality and professional conduct agreement and a plan of learning objectives for that placement to the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education. The placement should normally entail 35 hours of work per week for 12 weeks for a minimum total of 420 hours. Students must maintain an attendance form that must be regularly initialed by the employer and a completed copy must be submitted with the end of term requirements.

  3. Remuneration for work placements is determined by employers based on their internal wage structures. Students must not expect any such income to make them completely self-supporting

11.18.7.5 Evaluation of Work Term Placements
  1. The first of three components of a work term evaluation will be the preparation of policy instruments such as a briefing note on a topical issue relevant to the student’s placement. This will be assigned and assessed by the designated faculty member who will consider it when arriving at the final grade for POSC 260W, 360W or 460W as applicable. Evaluation of the policy instrument(s) will result in one of the following classifications: pass or fail.

  2. The second evaluation component will be of a student’s on-the-job performance. This will be assessed by the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education. Formal written documentation from the employer will be sought. Evaluation of on-the-job performance will result in one of the following classifications: pass with distinction, pass, or fail.

  3. The third evaluation component will be of an oral or written assignment, to be determined by the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education. The assignment must be submitted to the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education on the first day of the final examination period and will be evaluated by the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education. When preparing the assignment the student must continue to respect the confidentiality of the employer. Evaluation will result in one of the following classifications: pass with distinction, pass, or fail.

  4. Evaluation of the policy instrument(s), job performance and third evaluation component are recorded separately on the student’s transcript.

  5. Overall evaluation of the work term will result in one of the following final grades being awarded for POSC 260W, 360W or 460W as applicable, which will be noted on the student’s transcript:

    • Pass with Distinction: Indicates that the student received a passing grade on the policy instrument(s) and a pass with distinction on both the on-the-job performance and the third evaluation component.

    • Pass: Indicates that the student received a passing grade on the policy instrument(s) and at least a pass on both the on-the-job performance and the third evaluation component.

    • Fail: Indicates failing performance in one or more of the three evaluation components.

  6. To be eligible for promotion from the work term and continuation in the PSCE a student must not be awarded a Fail. Students should also refer to the UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - General Academic Regulations (Undergraduate). If a student fails the work term the student will be required to withdraw from the PSCE. Such a student may reapply to the program after a lapse of two semesters, at which time the student will be required to repeat the work term with satisfactory performance. A given work term may be repeated only once and only one work term may be repeated in the entire Program.

  7. A student who accepts a job placement and who subsequently withdraws from a work term without acceptable cause will be required to withdraw permanently from the PSCE. Students who drop a work term without prior approval from both the Academic Staff Member in Co-operative Education and the designated faculty member, or who do not honour an agreement to work with an employer, or who conduct themselves in such a manner as to cause their discharge from the job, will normally be awarded a grade of Fail for the work term in question. Permission to drop a work term does not constitute a waiver of degree requirements and students who have obtained such permission must complete an approved work term in lieu of the one dropped.

11.18.8 Minor in Political Science
  1. Students for a Minor in Political Science must complete at least 24 credit hours in courses offered by the Department, including:

    1. POSC 1000;

    2. a minimum of 6 credit hours at the 2000-level, which must include POSC 2800; and

    3. a minimum of 12 credit hours at the 3000-level or above, which must include at least 3 credit hours at the 4000-level.

      Notes:

      1. No more than one of POSC 1010 or 1020 can be included among the 24 POSC credit hours required for a Minor.

      2. POSC 1001 and 3010 are recommended choices for a Minor.

      3. For a Minor, credit hours in another discipline may not be substituted for POSC credit hours.

  2. Students for a Minor are required to select courses as specified under Minor in Political Science. A possible course pattern is presented in Table 7 Course Pattern for a Minor in Political Science.

Table 7 Course Pattern for a Minor in Political Science (POSC)

Term

Political Science Courses (POSC)

Credit Hours

  • Fall
  • Academic Term 1

POSC 1000

3

  • Winter
  • Academic Term 2

POSC 2800

3

  • Fall & Winter
  • Academic Terms 3 and 4

6

  • Fall & Winter
  • Academic Terms 5 and 6
  • POSC 1001 (POSC 1001 is a recommended choice)
  • One POSC course at the 3000-level

6

  • Fall & Winter
  • Academic Terms 7 and 8
  • One POSC course at the 3000-level
  • One POSC course at the 4000-level

6

11.18.9 Major and Minor in Law and Society

The Major and Minor in Law and Society are administered by the Department of Political Science.

The Major in Law and Society and the Minor in Law and Society are interdisciplinary programs that encourage students to engage in the academic and philosophical study of different facets of law and its role in society. They will acquaint and confront students with different aspects of the history, philosophical basis, and role of law in modern society. They include courses which deal explicitly with law, courses in social and political theory, and courses examining the role of law and its norms in diverse settings. Core courses in Law and Society integrate the material and provide a common focus at the beginning and the end of the programs. These are not pre-law programs nor do they offer a certificate or qualification in legal studies.

Law and Society course descriptions are found at the end of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences section under Course Descriptions, Political Science, Law and Society and are designated by LWSO.

11.18.9.1 Advising

Due to the nature of interdisciplinary programming, students must carefully plan their course selection and regularly consult with the program's designated academic advisor. Questions about the delivery of a course should be directed to the appropriate academic unit.

11.18.9.2 Declaring the Interdisciplinary Major or Interdisciplinary Minor in Law and Society

Students wishing to declare a Major or a Minor in Law and Society shall consult with the program's designated academic advisor to discuss the requirements of the program. Information about declaring a program of study in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences is available at www.mun.ca/hss/programs/undergraduate/ideclare.php.

11.18.9.3 Regulations for the Interdisciplinary Major in Law and Society
  1. A Major in Law and Society consists of all the general requirements of the Bachelor of Arts program, including a minimum of 36 credit hours in courses selected from Table 1 Core Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society and Table 2 Other Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society below as follows:

    1. as per the General Regulations for Interdisciplinary Major and Minor Programs, courses from a minimum of any three Humanities and Social Sciences disciplines, and no more than 15 credit hours in any one Humanities and Social Sciences discipline other than Law and Society;

    2. a minimum of 12 credit hours in Law and Society courses, which must include LWSO 1000 and 4000; and

    3. an additional 24 credit hours chosen from Table 1 Core Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society and/or Table 2 Other Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society, which must include at least 15 credit hours at the 3000-level or above, including at least 3 credit hours at the 4000-level.

      In fulfilling the requirements above, no more than 15 credit hours can be counted from Table 2 Other Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society.

  2. Before registering for any 4000-level Law and Society course, students must complete 18 credit hours selected from courses in Table 1 Core Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society, including LWSO 1000.

  3. As per the General Regulations for Interdisciplinary Major and Minor Programs, students completing a Major in Law and Society must also choose a single-discipline Minor or a Major in single-discipline.

11.18.9.4 Regulations for the Interdisciplinary Minor in Law and Society
  1. A Minor in Law and Society consists of a minimum of 24 credit hours in courses selected from Table 1 Core Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society below as follows:

    1. as per the General Regulations for Interdisciplinary Major and Minor Programs, courses from a minimum of any three Humanities and Social Sciences disciplines, and no more than 15 credit hours in any one Humanities and Social Sciences discipline other than Law and Society:

    2. a minimum of 9 credit hours in Law and Society courses, which must include LWSO 1000 and 4000; and,

    3. an additional 15 credit hours chosen from Table 1 Core Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society and/or Table 2 Other Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society, including at least 9 credit hours at the 3000-level or above. In fulfilling the requirements above, no more than 9 credit hours can be counted from Table 2 Other Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society.

  2. Before registering for any 4000-level Law and Society course, students must complete 18 credit hours selected from courses from Table 1 Core Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society, including LWSO 1000.

  3. As per the General Regulations for Interdisciplinary Major and Minor Programs, students completing a Minor in Law and Society must choose a single discipline Major.

11.18.9.5 Course List
  1. Interdisciplinary programs provide exposure to courses in various disciplines within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. Table 1 courses are Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences courses whose Calendar entry establishes a focus on law and society, and are fundamental to the program of study. Subject to the program regulations, they may be supplemented with Table 2 courses whose Calendar entry establishes an emphasis on the study of aspects of society that shape and/or are shaped by law. Not all courses are necessarily offered each year. Students must be careful not to register for different designations of the same course that is crosslisted with different departments. Normal departmental prerequisites for courses are applicable.

  2. As per the General Regulations for Interdisciplinary Major and Minor Programs, up to 6 credit hours obtained in undergraduate courses at Memorial University of Newfoundland that are not listed in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Course Descriptions may be deemed eligible towards the Major in Law and Society, or 3 such credit hours towards the Minor in Law and Society. Undergraduate courses not delivered by the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences that have been approved as Table 2 electives include Business 4000, 5000, 6040, 7322; Education 4420; Human Kinetics and Recreation 3535; Psychology 2150; Social Work 3720.

  3. Students registered in the Joint Degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) who are pursuing a Major or a Minor in Law and Society are eligible to complete up to 12 credit hours for the Major and 6 credit hours for the Minor in approved courses that do not appear in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Course Descriptions. The normal limit that is identified in the General Regulations for Interdisciplinary Major and Minor Programs does not apply to those students.

    Table 1 Core Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society

    1000 and 2000 Level Courses

    3000 Level Courses

    4000 Level Courses

    Table 2 Other Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Courses Approved for the Major or Minor in Law and Society

    1000 and 2000 Level Courses

    3000 Level Courses

    4000 Level Courses

    Political Science 4215, 4360, 4370

11.18.9.6 Previous Calendar Regulations

In accordance with UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - Degree and Departmental Regulations, Year of Degree and Departmental Regulations - Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and Faculty of Science, candidates for an Interdisciplinary Major or Minor in Law and Society will normally follow regulations in effect in the academic year in which the student first completes a course in that subject at the 2000-level or above which may be applied to the major or minor program respectively. However, the student may elect to follow subsequent regulations introduced during the student's tenure in a program. These “grandparented” students are encouraged to consult the program's designated academic advisor for assistance with course selection.