Office of the Registrar
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (2017/2018)
14.16 History

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

History courses are designated by HIST.

1005

Critical Reading and Writing in Aboriginal and Indigenous Studies

(same as Archaeology 1005) features the analysis of scholarly literature, media, and other sources of knowledge related to Aboriginal and Indigenous studies. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments related to the study of both past and present. All sections of this course follow Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

CR: Archaeology 1005, the former HIST 1016

1009

Critical Reading and Writing: The Medieval and Ancient World

introduces students to reading and writing skills required for success in university, including the analysis of scholarly literature and primary sources. Significant class time is spent on instruction in these skills. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments on the medieval and/or the ancient world. All sections of this course follow Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

1010

Critical Reading and Writing: The Americas

introduces students to reading and writing skills required for success in university, including the analysis of scholarly literature and primary sources. Significant class time is spent on instruction in these skills. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments on the Americas. All sections of this course follow Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

1011

Critical Reading and Writing: Modern Europe

introduces students to reading and writing skills required for success in university, including the analysis of scholarly literature and primary sources. Significant class time is spent on instruction in these skills. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments on modern Europe. All sections of this course follow Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

1012

Critical Reading and Writing: The Twentieth Century

introduces students to reading and writing skills required for success in university, including the analysis of scholarly literature and primary sources. Significant class time is spent on instruction in these skills. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments on the twentieth century. All sections of this course follow Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

1013

Critical Reading and Writing: Canada

introduces students to reading and writing skills required for success in university, including the analysis of scholarly literature and primary sources. Significant class time is spent on instruction in these skills. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments on Canada. All sections of this course follow Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

1014

Critical Reading and Writing: The United States

introduces students to reading and writing skills required for success in university, including the analysis of scholarly literature and primary sources. Significant class time is spent on instruction in these skills. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments on the United States. All sections of this course follow Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

1015

Critical Reading and Writing: Social and Cultural History

introduces students to reading and writing skills required for success in university, including the analysis of scholarly literature and primary sources. Significant class time is spent on instruction in these skills. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments on themes in social and cultural history. All sections of this course follow Critical Reading and Writing Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.

1300

Critical Reading and Writing About Borders and Peripheries

- inactive course.

1301

Critical Reading and Writing About Historical Encounters

- inactive course.

2000

Quantitative Reasoning: Visualising the Past

introduces students to the ways we understand the complexities of the past and explain it to others. Students in this history course undertake quantitative analysis of standard nominal series used in social history. They learn how to link these diverse sources in order to construct a composite whole and how to effectively present this to a general public using graphic and pictorial evidence. All sections of this course follow Quantitative Reasoning Course Guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/qr.

2020

Ancient Near Eastern History

(same as Classics 2025) is an introduction to the history of ancient city-states, kingdoms and empires in Egypt and/or Mesopotamia, including economic, social, political and cultural developments.

CR: Classics 2025

2031

Ancient Asian History

is a study of the history of ancient India and/or China and/or Japan with emphasis on the way of life of the people, their customs, traditions, art and heritage.

2034

History of the Hellenistic World

(same as Classics 2020) is a survey of the history of the Mediterranean world and the Near East from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC until the incorporation of the Kingdom of Egypt in the Roman Empire in 30 BC. Particular attention is given to the influence of the new monarchies on political, social and cultural developments in both Greek and non-Greek communities.

CR: Classics 2020

2035

History of Classical Greece

(same as Classics 2035) is a survey of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great, with special reference to the social and political institutions of the fifth century B.C.

CR: Classics 2035

2041

History of the Roman Republic

same as Classics 2041) is a survey of Roman history from the early monarchy to the death of Julius Caesar, with special reference to the society and politics of the late Republican period.

CR: Classics 2041, the former Classics 2040, the former HIST 2040

2042

History of the Roman Empire

(same as Classics 2042) is a survey of Roman history from the death of Julius Caesar to the rise of Constantine, with special reference to the society and politics of the early Imperial period.

CR: Classics 2042, the former Classics 2040, the former HIST 2040

2050

Medieval Middle East

provides an introduction to the medieval Middle East (330-1453). Students will examine the Byzantine Empire, the Sasanian Empire, and the various Islamic Empires, as well as the minority groups living under these empires, including the Coptic, Armenian, and Syriac communities.

2060

History of War and Society to 1789

(same as the former HIST 3050) is a survey of major developments in the history of warfare from the earliest times to 1789 with particular emphasis on changes in the nature and conduct of warfare, the evolution of military thinking, the organization of military and naval forces, the impact of technological change, the emergence of professionalism, societies, and armed forces.

CR: the former HIST 3050

2065

History of War and Society from 1789 to the Present

(same as the former HIST 3060) is a global examination of warfare, including its effect on society, culture, politics, economics, and military thinking, from the French Revolution to the more recent threat posed by revolutionary and fundamentalist terrorism. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

CR: the former HIST 3060

2110

North Atlantic History Since 1820

- inactive course.

2130

Seafaring Places and Seafaring Peoples

is a study of the places and people involved in maritime activities between Europe and Asia and in India, south-east Asia, China and Japan during the period of European expansion to the region.

2140

The Atlantic Slave Trade

is a comparative survey of the Transatlantic Slave Trade 1503-1851, from West African origins through the oceanic Middle Passage to the formation of slave societies in the Americas. This course examines processes of enslavement, commodification, shipboard resistance, sale and adaptation, and the international movement to abolish the slave trade.

2150

Modern Latin American History

introduces students to the history of Latin America (including the Caribbean) from Independence in the early nineteenth century. We examine the post-colonial troubles of the nineteenth century as liberal-minded individuals and movements attempted to establish modern nation-states and economies, as well as the opposition they faced by traditional elements such as the oligarchy and the Catholic Church. Twentieth-century topics range from the Mexican Revolution, Brazilian and Argentine populism, soccer in South America, and Cuban film.

2200

Making Canada

is a survey of Canadian History to Confederation, 1867.

2210

Modern Canada

is a survey of Canadian history since Confederation.

2300

Early Modern European History, 1500-1789

is an introduction to the main issues and problems in early modern European history with an emphasis on the political, social, economic and cultural developments from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century.

2310

Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1789-1914

is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe from 1789- 1914.

2320

Medieval Europe to the Eleventh Century

(same as Medieval Studies 2001) is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of the early Middle Ages.

CR: the former HIST 2030, Medieval Studies 2001

2330

Medieval Europe Since the Eleventh Century

(same as Medieval Studies 2002) is a survey of the economic, social, religious, political and cultural developments of Europe in the high and late Middle Ages.

CR: the former HIST 2030, Medieval Studies 2002

2340

European Urban History

examines the development of urban networks and the growth of specific towns and cities in early modern and modern Europe. We will also study how these centres were perceived, and the roles of public spaces and public festivals. Much of this course is devoted to examining the conditions found in urban centres and the impact on local inhabitants. The course concludes with a study of nineteenth century urban boosterism.

PR: at least 3 credit hours in History

2350

Europe in the Twentieth Century

examines social, economic, and political changes from 1918 to the present including the collapse of monarchies, the emergence of mass politics, fascism and totalitarianism, World War II, postwar reconstruction and the welfare state, European integration, and Europe in the postwar economic and political order. The course will examine Britain, France, Germany, and Italy, and particularly the European Union. Special attention will be paid to the demise of class politics and the impact of postwar affluence.

CR: the former European Studies 2000, the former Political Science 2350, the former Political Science 2990

2500

Global History to 1945

is a study of the world-wide impact of the main events and developments in the age of global interdependence. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

CR: the former HIST 3700

2510

Global History Since 1945

is an historical analysis of the main issues in the contemporary world since 1945. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

CR: the former HIST 3710

2600

History of the United States of America to 1865

is a survey of the history of the United States of America from its colonial origins to the end of the Civil War.

CR: the former HIST 3230

2610

History of the United States of America Since 1865

is a survey of the history of the United States of America since the Civil War.

CR: the former HIST 3240

2665

Sickness and Health in Western Society

examines changing understandings of disease causation and how the human body functions, the evolution of formal medical education, and the rise of medical institutions. Examples of fine art, literature, and popular culture will be integrated into lectures and seminars to help provide a comprehensive overview of what it has been like to be ill and well over the last three millennia.

2760

Women’s History: The Gendered Past

- inactive course.

2800

Indigenous Peoples and Colonialism

is a comparative survey of Indigenous experiences with colonialism in a global context from the sixteenth century onwards. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

3000

Medieval Books

(same as English 3002, Medieval Studies 3000, Religious Studies 3000) is an examination of the development and role of the manuscript book during the Middle Ages. Topics covered will include book production and dissemination; authors, scribes and audiences; and various kinds of books (e.g. glossed Bibles, anthologies, books of hours, etc.) and their uses.

CR: English 3002, Medieval Studies 3000, Religious Studies 3000

3005

West to East: Aspects of the German Intellectual Influence on Russia

- inactive course.

3011-3019

Special Topics in Ancient and Medieval History

are specialized studies in Ancient and Medieval history. Topics to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

CR: credit may be obtained for only one of HIST 3016 and HIST 3803

3020

Art, Architecture and Medieval Life

- inactive course.

3030

Environmental History

examines human relationships to the natural environment. The focus of the course is the global history of environmental changes caused by humans, and the influence of the natural environment on human cultures and societies. Case studies will focus on issues with broad relevance to contemporary environmental issues such as energy use, the environmental impact of military conflict, species introductions, natural disasters, urban sustainability, ecological restoration, and the origins of environmentalism. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

3110

History of Newfoundland to 1815

studies the growth of settlement and the manner in which a 'migratory' fishery carried on from England and Ireland changed into a 'sedentary' fishery carried on by residents of Newfoundland.

3120

Modern Newfoundland Since 1815

examines the establishment and development of political institutions, changes in economic structure and the growth of populations.

3200

Women and the Law in Newfoundland History

- inactive course.

3270

Christianity and the Roman Empire

(same as Classics 3270 and Religious Studies 3270) is a study of the relationship between Christianity and the Roman Empire from the first to the fourth century.

CR: Classics 3270, Religious Studies 3270

3360

Revolutionary and Soviet Russia

- inactive course.

3370

German History I, to the Mid-Nineteenth Century

examines the history of the peoples and states of the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation and the Germanic Confederation with emphasis on the origins of modern Germany.

3380

German History II, Since the Mid-Nineteenth Century

examines the history of German-speaking central Europe with special reference to the evolution of modern Germany since the mid-nineteenth century.

3440

History of the British Empire and Commonwealth Since 1815

examines the transition from British Empire to Commonwealth of Nations.

3450

Tudor and Stuart Britain, 1485-1714: Reformation, Renaissance, and Revolution

examines a dynamic period of religious, cultural and political change.

3460

British History Since 1714

examines British history from the accession of the Hanoverians to the welfare state.

3480

History of Ireland, 1603 to the Great Famine

is a survey of Irish history from Hugh O'Neill's submission to the English in 1603 to the mid-nineteenth century disaster of the Great Famine.

3490

History of Ireland Since the Great Famine

is a survey of Irish history from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

CR: the former HIST 3470

3520

Aboriginal History to 1763

(same as Archaeology 3520 and the former Anthropology 3520) examines Aboriginal history in North America from before European contact to the Royal Proclamation in 1763. Particular attention will be paid to historical encounters framed by first contacts, cultural exchange, trade, disease, religious encounters, conflict and diplomacy, and territorial encroachment.

CR: Archaeology 3520, the former Anthropology 3520

UL: not applicable towards the Major or Minor in Anthropology

3525

Aboriginal History From 1763

(same as Archaeology 3525 and the former Anthropology 3525) examines the history of Aboriginal peoples in North America from 1763 to the twentieth century. Particular attention will be paid to Indigenous-settler relations, including Aboriginal policies, military encounters and diplomacy, expansion and removals, education, treaties, and politicization.

CR: Archaeology 3525, the former Anthropology 3525

UL: not applicable towards the Major or Minor in Anthropology

3535

Historical Anthropology

(same as the former Anthropology 3584 and Archaeology 3584) will explore selected issues in historical anthropology, with special reference to the Mediterranean and North Atlantic worlds. Students will read specific case studies in order to explore the theoretical issues raised by the attempt to understand historically-documented past cultures. In order to give practical examples of methodology classes will analyse primary source material. Students will be introduced to the textual analysis of myth and legal records, to the interpretation of images and to the analysis of patterns in material culture. The course will consider specific current interpretive issues, particularly the rise of individualism, the consumer revolution and the cultural construction of gender.

CR: the former Anthropology 3584, Archaeology 3584

UL: not applicable towards the Major or Minor in Anthropology

3536

Object Lessons: Putting Strange Things in Context

(same as Archaeology 3536) explores the interpretation of unique objects, especially those which have been separated, in some way, from their historical context or archaeological assemblage. Students will take a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding a specific remarkable artifact. Topics include the history of technology, the emergence of art, the invention of tradition and the role of design in industrial societies.

CR: Archaeology 3536

PR: it is recommended but not obligatory, that students should have successfully completed one of the following courses: ARCH 1000 or the former 1030, Classics 1100 or 1200, Folklore 1000, HIST 1010 or 1011

3560

A History of Human Rights

- inactive course.

3570

The Modern Middle East

is an examination of the peoples and states of the Middle East and their interaction with each other and with the great powers since the mid-nineteenth century.

3582

Historical Archaeology

(same as Archaeology 3582, the former Archaeology 2582, and the former History 2582) will introduce students to historical archaeology, with special reference to the North Atlantic, 1000 to 1900 AD. The archaeology of specific sites will be examined in order to raise issues about theory and method. Students will be introduced to paleography; historic maps; documentary archaeology; the survey, excavation and analysis of complex sites; material culture and subsistence studies; cultural resource management and theoretical approaches including historical anthropology, ethnohistory, world systems and consumer studies.

CR: Archaeology 3582, the former Archaeology 2582, the former History 2582, the former History 3530

PR: Archaeology 1000 or the former 1030

3585

Africa Since 1800

examines the history of SubSaharan Africa from the eve of colonialism until the post-independent contemporary era.

3590

The Early Modern Caribbean

examines the history of the Caribbean region in the period 1492-1848, addressing topics such as comparative labour systems, slave resistance, colonial societies, plantation landscapes, and environmental change.

3600

Industrial Revolutions of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

- inactive course.

3640

War and Society in Colonial North America

examines the struggle for empire and nationhood from the arrival of Europeans to the withdrawal of British forces from Canada in 1870. The course will take a comparative approach to examining war’s effect on social, economic, and political developments in what is now Canada, focusing on specific conflicts and themes such as the struggle for empire, the military as an institution, gender, class, ethnicity, and memory.

3641

War and Society in Modern Canada

- inactive course.

3660

The Scientific Revolution

- inactive course.

3665

Death, Disease and Medical Care in Early Modern and Modern Europe

- inactive course.

3675

Navies and Societies Since 1650

is an examination of the rise of modern navies since 1650 that places navies and naval decisions within broader national and international political, economic and social contexts.

CR: the former HIST 3822

3680

North Atlantic Seafaring to 1850

examines the maritime mercantile development of the countries on the Atlantic littoral, 1650-1850.

3690

North Atlantic Seafaring Since 1850

- inactive course.

3710-3729 (Excluding 3713, 3728)

Special Topics in British History: Harlow

are available only as part of the Harlow Campus semester

3740-3750 (Excluding 3747, 3748)

Studies in Modern Social and Intellectual History

are selected studies in the history of modern ideas and society. Aspects to be studies will be posted on the Department of History website.

3765

Gendered Indigenous History

is a thematic examination of the complexities of gender and indigeneity from a global perspective, with particular emphasis on the gendered experiences of colonialism. .All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

3780

Women in Medieval Europe, 500-1500

uses a wide variety of primary and secondary sources to examine medieval women in their social, political, cultural, and religious contexts to understand women’s lives in this important millennium of the European past.

3785

The European Family: The Age of Faith to the Welfare State

focuses on the family in Europe from the middle ages to the early twentieth century. Topics examined will include: family structure, kinship, demography, sexuality, gender relations, child-rearing, attitudes towards the elderly and care of them, and the place of the family in the larger community.

CO: at least 3 credit hours in history at the 2nd-year level, or permission of the instructors

PR: at least 3 credit hours in history at the 2nd-year level, or permission of the instructors

3790

Reel American History: United States History through its Films, 1895-1945

interprets narrative films as historical evidence to shed light on shifts in American culture and society during the first half of the twentieth century.

3795

Reel American History: United States History through its Films Since WWII

interprets narrative films as historical evidence to shed light on shifts in American culture and society during the second half of the twentieth century.

3800-3830 (Excluding 3801, 3806, 3807, 3811, 3813, 3821 and 3822)

Contemporary Problems in Historical Perspective

is an analysis of developments leading to a contemporary issue or problem selected each year or semester. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

CR: credit may be obtained for only one of HIST 3016 and HIST 3803

3801

History of Modern Revolutions

examines theoretical and thematic approaches to the study of revolution. The class will study some of the major political revolutions of the twentieth century and also explore the causes and consequences of various social, cultural, and economic upheavals such as the student revolts of the 1960s and the sexual revolution. There will be a discussion on how the way in which historians have studied revolutions has changed during the past half century.

3806

Titanic Histories

investigates the ‘unsinkable ship’, its passengers, crew and owners, and the dilemmas its loss has created for over a century. Students will examine how present-day understandings of the past are expressed in the multiple ways and diverse forms of treating the Titanic.

3807

World War I in Historical Perspective

examines one of the most important events in twentieth-century world history, the First World War, and the war’s global impact on economics, society, culture, politics, and warfare. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

3811

The Menace of Progress: Colonialism and the Making of the Modern World

encourages students to think critically about ideas of progress, enlightenment, and civilization by examining the emergence of the modern world and its relationship to colonialism. It explores the rise of the West by examining global history since tho fifteenth century. Course topics include the transatlantic slave trade, enclosure, the destruction of Indian cotton manufacturing, and consumer culture.

3813

Gendered History: Women in Newfoundland and Labrador

examines the experiences of women in Newfoundland and Labrador with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It explores the interaction of women’s lives and the province’s social, political and economic history. Topics to be covered include work (paid and unpaid); childbearing and child rearing; immigration and emigration; political activity; and legal status.

3821

Gender in Canadian History

examines the experiences of women and men and the construction of gender identities through themes such as sexuality, moral reform, immigration, racial/ethnic identity, indigeneity, and participation in the workforce.

3840

Historical Methods

is an introduction to the methods and practices of history in the modern era. This course is compulsory for Majors and Honours students, including those intending to apply for graduate studies.

CR: the former HIST 4801

PR: 12 credit hours in History

3860

Vernacular Architecture

- inactive course.

3870

An Introduction to the History of Western Architecture Since the Renaissance

(same as Folklore 3870) introduces students to the history of architecture in the western world, beginning with the revival of classical forms in Renaissance Italy.

CR: Folklore 3870

3925

The Pre-Islamic Empires of Iran

introduces students to the history of Iran from the rise of the Achaemenid Empire, through the Parthian and Sasanian Empires, to the advent of the Islamic era. Through the use of primary source material, students will be introduced to the types of historical sources available for Iran, the problems associated with this evidence, and the different ways that we construct ancient history.

3930

Byzantine History to 1453

will introduce students to the history of Byzantine society from its beginnings under Constantine to the fall of Constantinople to the Turks in 1453. In addition to the chronological history, students will also encounter several characteristics of Byzantine society, including religion, urbanization, and interaction with the Persian Empire.

3935

Islamic History to 1453

will introduce students to the history of Islamic society from its beginnings under Muhammad to the rise of the Ottomans and the fall of Constantinople in the fifteenth century. We will also discuss the non-Muslim communities which co-existed with the Muslim umma or community. Through the use of primary source material, students will be introduced to the types of historical sources available for Islamic history, as well as the problems associated with this evidence.

PR: there is no prerequisite for this course although History 2050 is strongly recommended

3940

Urban Life in Medieval Europe

will explore the origins of medieval urbanization, the development of its specific features, and the way of life of medieval town-dwellers. Although the medieval town was very different from the modern city, it had a tremendous impact on the development of European society. This can be seen in a range of phenomena ranging from participative government, secular literacy, and solutions to environmental challenges.

4000-4010 (Excluding 4003, 4009, 4010)

Special Topics in Ancient and Medieval History

are specialized studies in Ancient and Medieval history. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4003

Religion and Society in the Late Antique and Early Medieval Periods

examines a range of written and physical evidence for the interaction of religion and society in the late antique and early medieval world. This course will cover the broad topic of religion and society through an in-depth analysis of the historiography and material culture of the late antique and early medieval period.

4009

Death and the Afterlife in the Middle Ages

examines medieval ideas of what happens at and after death, starting from the premise that such ideas have great influence upon how people live their daily lives. It will look at the theology of death, ideas of heaven, hell, and purgatory, as well as conceptions of death and the afterlife in the popular culture, architecture, literature, etc., of European Christendom.

4010

Cultural Interaction in the Medieval Middle East

examines the origins of Muslim-Christian relations in the Middle East through an examination of the effect of the arrival of Islam on the communities of Iraq, Iran, and the Levant, as well as the Byzantine reaction to Islam.

4011

Nature and Culture in Medieval Europe

will introduce students to the expanding field of the environmental history of medieval Europe. Participants will study how medieval Europeans conceived of the interrelationship between natural environment and human communities, as well as how the impact of human activities on the environment can be reconstructed.

4100

History and Memory

- inactive course.

4110-4130 (Excluding 4125)

Special Topics in North Atlantic History

are specialized studies in the history of the North Atlantic. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4125

The History of Environmental Ideas in Canada and the United States

surveys major philosophical, scientific, and popular ideas of nature in Canada and the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will examine key historical manifestations of environmental thought such as romanticism, the wilderness idea, ecofeminism, deep ecology, and social ecology. Students will also be exposed to important voices from social groups who are often marginalized in environmental debates such as African-Americans, Aboriginal people, and the working class.

4200

Topics in United States Film and History

explores selected themes in the relationship between the American cinema and American national culture. Topics will vary from year to year, but may include the study of a particular period in U.S. film and history; an examination of how filmic representations of race, class, gender, and/or sexuality have changed over time in connection to broader historical shifts; or, the historical analysis of a particular genre as a way to understand shifting cultural and social values within the United States.

PR: any 2000, 3000, or 4000 level course in U.S. History or Film Studies

4210-4229 (Excluding 4212, 4213, 4214, 4216, 4219, 4220 and 4222)

Special Topics in North American History

are specialized studies in the history of North America. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4212

The North American Frontier

examines aspects of the history of the frontier in North America. The course will focus on major themes and debates in frontier history, including, but not limited to, the history of colonialism, settlement, and Aboriginal-settler relations.

4213

Topics in U.S.-Canadian Relations

explores selected themes in U.S.- Canadian relations. Beyond considering the more ‘formal’ ties between Canada and the United States from a historical perspective, such as military and diplomatic interactions, this seminar examines social and cultural interrelationships.

4216

Topics in U.S. Cultural History

explores selected themes in U.S. cultural history. Topics will vary from year to year, but may include historical approaches to such popular art forms as vaudeville, amusements parks, film, popular music, comics, television, gaming, and spectator sports.

4219

Slavery and Resistance in the Atlantic World

examines the evolution of slavery and other forms of coerced labour in the early modern period.

4220

Aboriginal Peoples and the Environment

examines the stereotypes, generalizations, and actual ways in which Aboriginal peoples interacted with the environment from the pre-European contact period to the present in North America. Course topics include: conservation. preservation and overhunting of mega-fauna. bison, beaver, and other animals; ecological manipulation, despoliation, and restoration; traditional and scientific ecological knowledge; and the creation and legacy of the "Ecological Indian" ideal in literature, film, tourism and political activism.

4222

North American Aboriginal Peoples in Historical Perspective

- inactive course.

4230

Topics in Newfoundland and Labrador History I

are specialized studies in the history of Newfoundland to the mid-nineteenth century.

4231

Topics in Newfoundland and Labrador History II

are specialized studies in the history of Newfoundland since the mid-nineteenth century.

4240-4260 (Excluding 4252, 4253, 4255)

Special Topics in Canadian History

are specialized studies in Canadian history. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4252

Canada and the North

examines the ideas and historical processes that have contributed to the colonization of land and people in the Canadian North. With a primary focus on the territorial north, the course will also analyze the many ways that Dene and Inuit have resisted and adapted to colonial processes. Using film, radio documentaries, and primary documents, this course will consider themes such as pre-contact life, northern militarization, Inuit relocations, development conflicts, and environmental injustices.

4253

Inequality In Canada since 1945

challenges the conventional wisdom that equality improved in post-war Canada, but declined from the 1970s onwards. It contrasts socio-economic experiences with those of gender, race, nation and sexual orientation. By so doing it raises complex questions about the historical dynamics of identity politics in the making of contemporary Canada.

PR: HIST 2210 or permission of the instructor

4255

The Industrial Revolution in Canada

examines the historiographical debates on industrialisation in 19th century British North America by critically evaluating representative works by leading historians of English Canada and Quebec. It also introduces the problems and advantages of the historical sources most commonly used to understand industrialisation.

PR: HIST 2200 or HIST 2210 or permission of the instructor

4310-4330 (Excluding 4330)

Special Topics in European History

are specialized studies in the history of Europe. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4330

Aspects of Modern British History: Victorian England

designates an industrial, urban, ostensibly democratic, country in the period when Britain was dominant in the world. 'Victoria' and 'England' are the starting points, however, for a critical examination of those characteristics in this seminar course.

PR: a minimum of two second year History courses, or the permission of the instructor. Students who have not previously studied history beyond first year should consult with the Instructor before registering for this course.

4360-4380

Special Topics in European History: Harlow

are available only as part of the Harlow Campus semester.

4410-4430 (Excluding 4411, 4419, 4421 and 4429)

Historical Problems

are specialized studies in historical problems. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4411

War and Society in Canada

examines various themes and topics in the military history of Canada, emphasizing the relationship between war and society.

4419

Marx and Marxism

uses a global perspective to examine Marxist thought as a product of revolutionary struggles. Emphasis will be on the nature of the historical circumstances and the concrete problems people faced. Each week there will be a critical examination of selected works produced by and through these struggles. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

4421

Imperialism

examines the global, political, economic and cultural processes of modern imperialism and its historical antecedents. Topics considered include empire building, colonial theory, and anti-imperial resistance. All sections of this course follow International Studies guidelines available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

4429

Remembering War

introduces students to the concepts of private and collective memory by focussing on the relationship between memory, violence, and armed conflict. This course will explore a number themes including but not limited to ideas about citizenship, community,. cross-cultural encounters, architecture, heroes and heroines, governance, modernity, masculinity, femininity,. trauma, and politics.

4480

Oral History

(same as Folklore 4480) examines the narratives of everyday people who tell their life experiences. This course focuses on the collection and analysis of oral narratives and how they can be used to illuminate the past. It considers the power of these narratives to shape constructions of the present and future for both narrators and audiences.

CR: Folklore 4480

4520-4529

Special Topics in Economic and Mercantile History

are specialized studies in Economic and Mercantile history. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4560-4570 (Excluding 4569, 4570)

Special Topics in Social and Intellectual History

are specialized studies in Social and Intellectual history. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4570

History of Medicine Seminar

explores the content, methodology, and historiography of the history of medicine. Course readings reflect the broad sweep across time and geography of this field, but emphasize trends in Europe and North America during the last four centuries. Students will examine the evolution of intellectual problems that have occupied historians of medicine; explore the complexities specific to researching and writing medical history; and critique and identify differing historical genres, evidence, primary source materials, and methods.

4670-4690 (Excluding 4672)

Special Topics in Maritime History

are specialized studies in Maritime history. Aspects to be studied will be posted on the Department of History website.

4672

Seafaring Lives: Sea-going Auto/Biography Since 1700

explores how life stories studied as primary sources lead to a reassessment of historian's traditional assumptions and concerns in this course. Students will research and discuss the changing, and often ambivalent, relationship of people and the sea across three centuries of auto/biographical writing and story-telling.

PR: students who have not previously studied history beyond first year should consult with the Instructor before registering for this course

4695

The Middle Ages on Film

- inactive course.

4800

Historiography

is an introduction to the major historians and historiographical traditions of the West. This course is for Honours students and other selected students, including those intending to apply for graduate studies.

PR: permission of the Head of Department

UL: may not be used to meet the requirements of a Major in History without the prior written approval of the Head of the Department of History

4810

Documents Management

- inactive course.

4821

Reading Course

is a directed reading course for Honours and selected students including those intending to apply for graduate studies. Readings will be taken from a list of works by historians, or social theorists whose works are related to history.

PR: permission of the Head of Department

UL: may not be used to meet the requirements of a Major in History without the prior written approval of the Head of the Department of History

4822

Reading Course

is a directed reading course for Honours and selected students. The readings will be chosen in such a way as to supplement a student's knowledge of his/her area of specialization and, where appropriate, to prepare the student for the honours essay. If a student intends to complete HIST 4999, a proposal for the honours essay will be a requirement of the course.

CR: the former HIST 4820

PR: permission of the Head of Department

UL: may not be used to meet the requirements of a Major in History without the prior written approval of the Head of the Department of History

4830-4850

Reading Courses

are directed reading courses for selected Bachelor of Arts students.

PR: permission of the Head of Department or delegate

4999

Honours Essay

is required as part of the Honours program.

PR: HIST 4822, admission to the Honours program

UL: may not be used to meet the requirements of a Major in History without the prior written approval of the Head of the Department of History

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).