FACULTY OF MEDICINE

MEDICINE COURSE LIST

The courses in the first two years of medical studies, also known as the preclerkship phase of the medical curriculum, form an integrated continuum. Each of the four courses is composed of several individual components. The third and fourth year of medical studies provides clinical experience in the affiliated teaching hospitals and community sites of Memorial University. The student will be a member of the patient care team and will have graded and supervised responsibility. Students will also be required to attend seminars and lectures within the clerkship and will also be required to attend a preclerkship preparation course immediately prior to starting the clinical rotations.

COURSES IN THE FIRST AND SECOND YEAR OF MEDICAL STUDIES

COURSES IN THE THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR OF MEDICAL STUDIES

COURSES OFFERED BY THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE FOR NON-MEDICAL STUDENTS


COURSES IN THE FIRST AND SECOND YEAR OF MEDICAL STUDIES

5600. Basic Science of Medicine I. (6 credit hours) This is an integrated course with several components including biochemistry, physiology of excitable tissues, systems physiology, immunology, cell biology, genetics, microbiology, nutrition, pharmacology, pathology and anatomy. This course introduces students to the biology of the normal human and provides the foundation of the basic science of medicine. A wide range of teaching methods are used including lectures, small group sessions, laboratory demonstrations, seminars and open discussions. The principles of research are also introduced and the student may initiate research opportunities that are carried through subsequent courses in the curriculum.

5610. Clinical Skills I. (6 credit hours) Students are first introduced to the main elements of the medical interview and techniques of counselling. The student is then expected to acquire skill in examining normal individuals and eliciting symptoms and signs in patients and presenting the findings in a logical and comprehensive manner. Emphasis is placed on developing a sympathetic and understanding approach to the patient being examined. The course also provides an integrated approach to clinical symptoms and signs as manifestations of disordered function or structure. Ethical issues playing a significant role in assessment and management of clinical problems are considered.

5640. Community Medicine I. (6 credit hours) This course introduces several subject areas in community medicine including health promotion, disease prevention, biostatistics, epidemiology, social and organizational factors in health, environmental and occupational health, community nutrition and behavioural sciences. Lectures and small group sessions are complemented with practical experience obtained through group research projects and field teaching in the community in both a rural and urban context. Aspects of medical ethics relative to community medicine are integrated throughout the course. Emphasis is placed on understanding the determinants of health and illness and the context in which they occur.

5650. Integrated Study of Disease I. (9 credit hours) This course will involve studying diseases of the major organ systems. This will include integration with the pathophysiological basis of disease, pathology and pharmacology. The course will also include the relevant aspects of preventive medicine, clinical genetics, clinical epidemiology and occupational medicine.

6600. Basic Science of Medicine II. (6 credit hours) Continuation of Basic Science of Medicine I.

6610. Clinical Skills II. (9 credit hours) Continuation of Clinical Skills I.

6640. Community Medicine II. (9 credit hours) Continuation of Community Medicine I.

6650. Integrated Study of Disease II. (9 credit hours) Continuation of Integrated Study of Disease I.

COURSES IN THE THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR OF MEDICAL STUDIES

Year three is approximately 12 months duration beginning September and continuing to the following September. It is composed of the core courses 7200-7250 and some elective courses. Year four begins immediately upon completion of year three and continues to the following May. Year four includes elective and selective courses and course 7280.

7200. Internal Medicine. (9 Credit Hours)

7210. Surgery. (9 Credit Hours)

7220. Psychiatry. (9 Credit Hours)

7230. Pediatrics. (9 Credit Hours)

7240. Rural Family Practice. (9 Credit Hours)

7250. Obstetrics/Gynecology. (9 Credit Hours)

7260-7269. Electives. (15 Credit Hours)

7270-7279. Selectives. (18 Credit Hours)

7280. Applied Basic and Life Science Academic Course. (3 Credit Hours)

COURSES OFFERED BY THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE FOR NON-MEDICAL STUDENTS

310A and 310B. Human Physiology (F) and (W). (Same as Biochemistry 311A and 311B) Topics covered are the properties of nerves and muscle cells, the nervous system, the special senses, blood and body fluids, the cardiovascular system, digestion, respiration, renal function, endocrinology and reproduction. Integration of the body's systems in maintaining homeostasis will be emphasized.
Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Biochemistry 3100. Permission of Instructor or Associate Dean of Basic Sciences for students other than Biochemistry Majors.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Up to three hours per week.
Registration: Limited to 48 students.
Priority for entry into this course will be given to students in the following programmes: Biochemistry, Nutrition, Dietetics, Experimental Biology.

4300. Introduction to General and Autonomic Pharmacology. (Same as Biochemistry 4220.) This course will deal with the general principles of pharmacology (receptors, absorption, distribution, metabolism, pharmacokinetics), drugs affecting peripheral nerve transmission and the cardiovascular system.

4301. General Pharmacology. This course will deal with drugs affecting the central nervous system, the kidney, hormone secretory systems, as well as a study of antibiotic action and toxicology.
Prerequisites: Biochemistry 3100, and 3102 and Medicine 310A and

310B, or their equivalent, or at the permission of the Instructor or the Associate Dean of Basic Sciences. Absolute course requirement for 4301 is 4300.
Lectures: Two hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
Registration limited to 25 students.
NOTE: Courses 4300 and 4301 will be offered at least every other year and interested students should contact the Associate Dean of Basic Sciences, 737-6897.


Last modified on October 8, 1997 by MaryJane Puxley

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