Memorial University of Newfoundland

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR


UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS

FEES AND CHARGES

The fees and charges indicated herein are as of the date of printing. The University reserves the right to make changes to the regulations, fees and charges listed below.

A. REGULATIONS GOVERNING PAYMENT OF FEES AND CHARGES

1. Tuition fees, residence fees, student union fees and health insurance are due once a student registers regardless of the method of registration, and must be paid prior to or during the designated Fees Payment Days, using one of the methods of payment described below.

Students who have been awarded a scholarship, bursary, Canada Student Loan or other similar award, which may be used for the payment of fees, may be permitted to have their tuition fees outstanding until they are in receipt of the award or Canada Student Loan. All such students must attend Fees Payment Day. Failure to attend will result in the assessment of a late payment penalty assessed.

2. Methods of Payment

Cash - Must be paid in person at the Cashier's Office in St. John's or the Bursar's Office in Corner Brook.

Cheque - Mailed or delivered in person to the Cashier's Office in St. John's or Bursar's Office in Corner Brook, or placed in the night deposit slot at the Cashier's Office in St. John's.

Credit Card - Visa and MasterCard are the only accepted cards. Payment using this method should be done through the Telephone Registration System.

Telephone Banking - Available with the Royal Bank of Canada and Canada Trust telephone banking systems. Further information on the use of these banking systems can be obtained from local branches of these banks.

Student Aid - Students paying fees from Canada Student Loan must do so during scheduled fees payment days to avoid being assessed a late payment fee.

Tuition Voucher - Students receiving a tuition voucher must pay the balance of their fees by the published deadlines to avoid being assessed a late payment fee.

2. Students who have not paid all fees or arranged for fee payment with the Comptroller prior to the first day of lectures, as stated in the University Diary, will have their registration cancelled at the discretion of the University. Such students will then be required to re-register after all fees are paid and after the first day of lectures, as stated in the University Diary, but no later than the end of the Regular Registration Period.

3. Students with outstanding accounts will:

a) be ineligible to select courses for a subsequent semester until the outstanding account has been paid in full by cash, money order or certified cheque. This also applies to accounts outstanding pending the receipt of a scholarship, bursary or other similar award.

b) not be awarded a degree, diploma or certificate, and will not be issued an academic transcript until the outstanding account has been paid in full by cash, money order or certified cheque.

4. Accounts outstanding on the last day of examinations in a semester/session will be charged interest at the prime interest rate plus two percent. Such interest will apply effective the first day of lectures in that semester.

B. TUITION FEES

1. Undergraduate Students

Citizens of Canada and Permanent Residents - Fall Semester 1996 and Winter Semester 1997

Tuition fees are charged according to the credit hour value associated with the registered course(s) based upon the following scale:

Total Credit Hours
Fee
Total Credit Hours
Fee
1 $105 9 $945
2 $210 10 $1,030
3 $315 11 $1,115
4 $420 12 $1,200
5 $525 13 $1,245
6 $630 14 $1,290
7 $735 15 $1,335
8 $840

NOTES:

a) Co-operative education work terms are charged a separate fee of $375.

b) Students registered for credit hours in excess of fifteen will be charged $105 per additional credit hour.

c) Students who have been admitted to programs which require registration in excess of fifteen credit hours will be charged $200 for all the required courses beyond fifteen credit hours.

d) For the purposes of calculating tuition only, the credit hour value of each of the A and B components of a linked course shall be equivalent to one half of the credit hour value of the B component (See General Academic Regulations (undergraduate) for the definition of linked course.)

e) For the purposes of calculating tuition only, the credit hour value of foundation courses shall be three (See General Academic Regulations (undergraduate) for the definition of foundation course.)

Citizens of Canada and Permanent Residents - Spring Semester 1997

Tuition fees are charged according to the credit hour value associated with the registered course(s).

Fee per credit hour ....................................................................................................................... .........................$105

NOTES:

a) Co-operative education work terms are charged a separate fee of $400.

b) For the purposes of calculating tuition only, the credit hour value of each of the A and B components of a linked course shall be equivalent to one half of the credit hour value of the B component (See General Academic Regulations (undergraduate) for the definition of linked course.)

c) For the purposes of calculating tuition only, the credit hour value of foundation courses shall be three (See General Academic Regulations (undergraduate) for the definition of foundation course.)

International Students

Tuition fees for international students will be double the fees for Citizens of Canada and Permanent Residents.

2. Medical Students

Annual Tuition Fee ............................................................................................................................................ $6,250
Incentive Students Annual Tuition Fee (Applies only to students accepted under Pilot Project in 1995) ................ $20,000
International Students Annual Tuition Fee ........................................................................................................... $30,000
3. Graduate Students

a) All graduate students must be registered in each semester of the three-semester academic year throughout the whole period of their programme, whether they are taking courses or not. Fees are payable at the time of registration.

b) There is a minimum fee for all graduate degrees. The amount of this fee for any student will depend on the semester fees in effect during his/her period of registration. Semester fees are subject to review at least annually.

c) At the time of first registration, each student must select a payment plan. The fee payable in the first and subsequent semesters will depend upon the payment plan selected. Once selected, the payment plan will remain in effect for the duration of the student's period of registration, and cannot be changed. The options are:

For Fall Semester 1996 and Winter Semester 1997

Fee per Semester
Number of semesters fee must be paid
Masters candidate: Plan A $825
6
Masters candidate: Plan B $547 9

Doctor of Philosophy candidate $1024 9

Graduate Diploma candidate $400 9

For Spring Semester 1997

With the exception of the Graduate Diploma fee the semester fee will increase by 10%.

d) A student who completes his/her programme in a period of time shorter than that covered by the selected payment plan will, in his/her final semester be required to pay the difference between the product of the semester fee in effect in that final semester and the number of times which a fee should have been paid in accordance with the payment plan selected, and the actual amount paid.

e) A student whose programme extends beyond the period covered by the selected payment plan will be assessed the appropriate programme continuance fee for each additional semester of registration. The programme continuance fees per semester are:

For Fall Semester 1996 and Winter Semester 1997

Masters candidate $375
Doctor of Philosophy candidate $642
Graduate Diploma candidate $200

For Spring Semester 1997

With the exception of the Graduate Diploma fee the continuance fee will increase by 10%.

f) The semester fees listed above cover only the courses (if any) prescribed for the programme by the academic unit and approved by the Dean. A student taking courses which are not part of the approved programme must pay for them separately in accordance with the fee schedule for undergraduate courses.

g) A graduate student who is permitted by the Dean to transfer from a Master's to a Ph.D. programme before the former is completed will be required to pay the difference between the fees for the two programmes, based on the Ph.D. semester fee in effect at the time of first registration in the Master's programme.

h) A graduate student who wishes to withdraw from his/her graduate programme must inform the Dean of Graduate Studies, in writing, within three weeks after the first day of lectures in the semester. Failure to do so will result in the student being held responsible for the fees due to the end of that semester.

i) Thesis Binding Fee: Where a thesis is required by a particular degree or programme, a fee of $40 will be charged to graduate students to cover the cost of binding two copies of the thesis.

4. Post-Graduate Residents and Interns

Registration Fee per annum ..................................................................................................................................... $500

C. RESIDENCE FEES

1. Corner Brook Campus

Residence Fees (per semester) Room $830
Meal Charge (per semester) 15 Meals per week $1,150

2. St. John's Campus

The fees and charges below are per semester, except in the case of the fee for the married students' apartments, which is a monthly fee.

Room Charge-Paton College Double Room Single Room
$672 $830
Meal Charge (per semester)
19 meals per week $1228 $1228
14 meals per week $1178 $1178
10 meals per week $1078 $1078
Burton's Pond Apartments Single Married Students' Apartments 2 Bedroom
$845 (per student per semester) $550 (per month)

3. Between Semesters Residence Fees - Paton College and Burton's Pond

Apartments Rates: First five days ..................... $5 per day sixth and subsequent days ................................ $4 per day

Students are required to pay the full charge on receipt of notification of acceptance from the Housing Office.

4. Residence fees cover semesters only, but those who need to stay in residence at other times may be accommodated providing space is available and reasonable notice is given in writing to the Housing Office.

5. a) Residence Application Fee .............................$20 Residence Application Fee (Summer Session) ................$20

b) This fee will not be refunded and will not be credited to the student's account.

c) Students with outstanding fees will not be permitted into residence without approval from the Comptroller.

d) Residence Confirmation Fee (Applicable Only to New Students) ........................................................................ $200

Confirmation fees are creditable and may be refunded when all conditions pertaining to this fee are met. All students will be required to pay this fee unless exempted, in writing by the Director of Student Housing & Food Services.

e) Cancellation Fee (Applicable Only to Returning Students) .................................................................................... $300

Failure to cancel a room assignment by July 1 will result in a $300 cancellation fee being charged to the student's financial account with the university.

NOTE: For additional information on residences, please see the section of the Calendar dealing with Student Housing.

D. OTHER FEES AND CHARGES

1. Student Organization Fees

These fees are collected by the University as a service to the student body. They are payable prior to or at the time of registration.

a) Student Organization Fees - Undergraduate - Per Semester - Compulsory for full-time Students as Follows:

St. John's Campus Student Health Plan $71 Total
Student Union Fee $25
Canadian Federation of Students' Fee $ 3*
Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Students' Fee $ 1* $100

Corner Brook Student Health Plan $64 Total
Student Union Fee $15
S.U.B. Fund $ 5*
Canadian Federation of Students' Fee $ 3*
Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Students' Fee $ 1* $ 88

* This fee is not collected for Spring Semester.

NOTE:

Students who have coverage similar to the Student Health Plan, may opt out of the Plan by completing the required forms at the CSU office and by providing proof of existing coverage, either a plan membership card or a photocopy of the existing policy. In either case the material must show the name of the company offering the plan and the policy number. The opt out deadline is two weeks after the first day of lectures. Students who opt out of the health plan in September will automatically be opted out for the remainder of the academic year.

Effective September 1996 coverage under the Student Health Plan will be on an annual basis. Students who enroll in the plan for the fall and winter semesters will be covered for the period September to August. Students not meeting this criteria should check with the CSU for information on their status in the health plan.

Students taking fewer than nine credit hours (St. John's Campus) ............................................................................ $5

Students taking fewer than nine credit hours (Sir Wilfred Grenfell College) ............................................................... $7

b) Union fee - All Graduate Students - per semester ................................................................................................ $20

c) Union fee - Post-Graduate Residents and Interns - per annum .............................................................................. $5

NOTE: The following fees are payable when assessed:

2. Late application fee

Up to one week after deadline .................... $30 Each subsequent week to final date for receipt of applications ..... $10

3. Late registration fee

(As assessed by the Registrar) ..................................................................................................................................... $20
With additional fee per day for undergraduates ............................................................................................................. $10

4. Certificate of Standing (Transcript)

Fee for this service discontinued effective September 1, 1996

5. Application Processing Fee

Medical School ............................................................ $50 All other ................................................................... $30

This fee is payable with each application for admission/re-admission to the University and is not refundable nor will it be credited to the applicant's financial account in any circumstances. Payment should be made in the form of a certified cheque or money order, payable to Memorial University of Newfoundland.

6. Reread of Final Examination Fee ................................................................................................................. $50

7. Supplementary Examination Fee .................................................................................................................. $50
8. Challenge for Credit Fee ................................................................................................................................ $158

9. University Calendar Fee ................................................................................................................................ $5

A University Calendar will be supplied free to students newly admitted to the University.

10. Graduation Fee

Fee for this service discontinued effective with applications for the May 1997 convocation.

11. Undergraduate application for admission with advanced standing and non-Canadian application fee ...... $30

This fee is not refundable nor will it be credited to the applicant's financial account in any circumstances. Payment should be made in the form of a certified cheque or money order, payable to Memorial University of Newfoundland. This fee is in addition to the Application Processing Fee.

12. Student Parking Fees

Students may purchase permits on a semester basis at $12 per semester or $24 per annum.

13. International Student Health Insurance .......................................................................... Varies from year to year

All students studying on a student visa at Memorial University of Newfoundland will be required, as a condition of registration, to purchase health insurance. The University will have one plan for all visa students. Payment for the year will be required at the time of registration for the Fall Semester. Students entering the University in the Winter Semester will be charged on a prorated basis. The fee may vary from year to year. By purchasing the Foreign Student Health Insurance or by requesting waiver of or exemption from the Foreign Student Health Insurance, students acknowledge that for any treatment/service performed in the Province of Newfoundland, the Courts of the Province of Newfoundland shall have exclusive jurisdiction to entertain any complaint, demand, claim or cause of action, whether based on alleged breach of contract or alleged negligence arising out of the treatment. They also agree that any such legal proceedings will be commenced in the Province of Newfoundland and only in the Province of Newfoundland and thereby submit to the jurisdiction of the Courts of the Province of Newfoundland.

14. Dishonoured Cheque Charge .......................................................................................................................... $25

This charge will be made for each cheque tendered to the University and not honoured by the bank. A student with a dishonoured cheque record must pay fees by cash, certified cheque or money order.

15. Late Payment Fee (as assessed by the Comptroller) .................................................................. Maximum of $75

Students who, without approval, pay their fees later than the deadlines specified in the Calendar, will be assessed a late payment fee.

E. ADDITIONAL FEES AND CHARGES INFORMATION

1. Withdrawal and Refunds

A student who drops a course(s) within the first eleven days of lectures in any semester, as stated in the University Diary, will have 100% of the tuition fees for the dropped course(s) refunded. A student who drops a course(s) from twelve lecture days to sixteen lecture days following the first day of lectures in any semester, as stated in the University Diary, will have 50% of the tuition fees for the dropped course(s) refunded. A student who drops a course(s) from seventeen lecture days to twenty-one lecture days following the first day of lectures in any semester, as stated in the University Diary, will have 25% of the tuition fees for the dropped course(s) refunded. No tuition fees will be refunded for any course(s) dropped after twenty-one lecture days following the first day of lectures in any semester, as stated in the University Diary.

2. Books and Supplies

Students should be prepared to meet an expenditure of approximately $350 to cover the cost of textbooks and supplies each semester. Students are cautioned against the purchase of second-hand textbooks and laboratory manuals; these books may have become obsolete.

3. Damages or Destruction to University Property

Unwarranted damages or destruction to University property will be charged to the responsible party or parties, and are payable when assessed.


ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY

A. APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

1. The final dates for the submission of applications for each semester, as well as Summer Session, are listed in the University Diary. Application forms may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.

2. Applications received or bearing a mailing date later than those stated in the University Diary will be processed as time and resources permit.

3. Each application must be accompanied by a $30.00 application processing fee. This fee is not refundable nor will it be credited to the applicant's financial account in any circumstances. [See B.5.a)i. or B.6.a)ii. below for additional processing fee for international or transfer applicants.]

4. All students may be required to furnish medical evidence of their fitness to pursue university studies.

5. Students who have previously attended Memorial but who have not registered for courses for the past two consecutive semesters (Fall, Winter or Spring) and who wish to apply for readmission are required to complete a new Application for admission/Re-admission. This application must be accompanied by the appropriate application fee.

NOTES: 1) The University may set its own matriculation examinations either in separate subjects or in all those required for matriculation, and may refuse admission to any student failing to attain a satisfactory standard in these examinations.

2) The University reserves the right to refuse admission to any student.

3) Admission to certificate courses and programmes is covered by a separate set of regulations. However, in certificate programmes including degree credit courses, students must also be admitted as undergraduate students and comply with the General Regulations for Undergraduates. Students should refer to the appropriate publication of the School of Continuing Education for information.

4) Where circumstances warrant, students not meeting the General Admission Requirements outlined below may be admitted to the University with the approval of the Committee on Admissions. Such students must submit a letter to the Committee outlining the grounds for requesting special consideration and they must provide a letter from a responsible person (for example, school principal, guidance counsellor, employer) substantiating those grounds. In order to allow sufficient time for reasonable and consistent consideration of special cases, supporting letters must be received at least one week before the beginning of the semester to which admission is being sought.

5) Limitation of Enrollment. Admission to some courses, programmes and/or the University may be limited by the University when it deems the facilities and resources available to it are not adequate to provide for additional students. Consequently, possession of the minimum requirements does not guarantee that an applicant will be granted admission to a course, a programme and/or the University.

B. GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

1. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS

a) Since English is the primary language of instruction in all faculties/schools at this University, all applicants seeking admission to undergraduate programmes must possess an adequate knowledge of written and spoken English as a prerequisite to admission. Regardless of country of origin or of citizenship status, applicants will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. This demonstration may take one of the following forms:

i. Successful completion of the equivalent of three years of full-time instruction in an English language secondary institution as recognized by Memorial University of Newfoundland including successful completion of at least two courses in English Language and/or Literature at the Grade XII (or equivalent) level. Please note that these courses must be other than E.S.L. (English as a Second Language) courses.

ii. Successful completion of the equivalent of 30 credit hours including six transferable credit hours in English from a recognized post-secondary institution where English is the language of instruction and from which transfer credit is normally allowed by Memorial University of Newfoundland.

iii. Submission of official results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with an acceptable score. Applicants submitting a TOEFL score of 550 (or higher) will be considered as having demonstrated English language proficiency for admission purposes only. (For information on placement in introductory English courses see b) and c) below.) Applicants submitting a TOEFL score of less than 550 will be considered as not having met the English language requirements of this University and will not be admitted to the University until English proficiency can be demonstrated.

iv. Submission of the official results of the Michigan Test of English Proficiency with an acceptable score. Applicants submitting a Michigan Test of English result of 85 (or higher) will be considered as having demonstrated English language proficiency for admission purposes only. (For information on placement in introductory English courses see b) and c) below.) Applicants presenting a Michigan Test of English result of less than 85 will be considered as not having met the English proficiency requirements of this University and will not be admitted to the University until proficiency in English can be demonstrated.

v. Other forms that may be acceptable to the Committee on Admissions.

Information regarding the TOEFL programme is available from the Educational Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A., 08540, from U.S. embassies or consulates, or from offices of the U.S. Information Services. Information on the Michigan Test of English may be obtained from the Testing and Certificate Service, University of Michigan, 2001 North University Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A., 48109-1057. In extenuating circumstances and with the approval of the University Committee on Admissions, applicants may be permitted to provide proof of proficiency in English based on a proficiency test designed and administered by the Department of English at this University.

b) All applicants who are admitted to the University under Clause B.1.a.i., or B.1.a.iii. or B.1.a.iv. will be required to write a placement test in English prior to their initial registration at the University to determine the appropriate course in English for which they should register.

c) All students whose performance in the placement test in English indicates that appropriate placement is in English 102F will be required to register in, and successfully complete, English 102F before registering in higher level courses in English.

2. STUDENTS WHO HAVE FOLLOWED THE HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM OF THE PROVINCE OF NEWFOUNDLAND

Candidates shall have completed Graduation Requirements for high school as set down by the Department of Education and they shall have obtained credits in the following subjects, as outlined below, with an overall average mark of not less than 70% in those courses at the 3000 level:

a) English. Students will be expected to have obtained a suitable level of proficiency in both language and literature. In particular they will be expected to have examined critically each of the major forms of literary expression in English (prose fiction, including the short story and novel, drama, poetry, and prose non-fiction) and to be familiar with the various techniques and devices used. Additionally, students should be able to write narrative, descriptive, expository and argumentative essays and book reports, in which the basic rules of grammar, syntax, capitalization, spelling and punctuation are observed. Further explanatory detail is available from the University.

i. English Language - Language 3101 (1 credit)

and

ii. English Literature - one of Thematic Literature 3201 (2 credits) or Literary Heritage 3202 (2 credits)

b) Academic or Advanced Mathematics. Students will be expected to have obtained a suitable level of proficiency in: arithmetic operations including computations, estimation, ratios and an ability to apply these to real-life situations; algebra including real numbers, functions, rational expressions, radicals, exponents, logarithms, complex numbers, linear and quadratic functions; trigonometry and geometry including the circle, the trigonometric functions, fundamental trigonometric identities, solution of triangles, trigonometric equations, graphs and basic Euclidean geometry. Further explanatory detail is available from the University.

i. Mathematics 2200, 2201 or 2203 (2 credits)

and

ii. Mathematics 3200, 3201 or 3203 (2 credits).

c) Laboratory Science. Four credits in Laboratory Science (i.e. Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Geology, Physics), including at least two credits at the 3000 level chosen from:

- Biology 3201 (2 credits)
- Chemistry 3202 (2 credits)
- Geology 3203 (2 credits)
- Physics 3204 (2 credits)

d) Either: Social Science. Two credits at the 3000 level in a Social Science area

Or: Modern or Classical Language. Two credits at the 3000 level in a Modern or Classical Language

e) Electives. Two credits at the 3000 level in elective courses chosen from the subjects included in paragraphs a) to d) above or from additional courses approved by the Department of Education for offering at the 3000 level for certificate purposes, as outlined in the Public Examination Regulations.

NOTES: 1) Courses in a), b), c), and d) above should be courses designed for students who intend to seek post- secondary education at the University or any other institution whose programmes demand levels of proficiency equivalent to those required by the University.

2) PROVISIONAL ACCEPTANCE: Students in their final year of high school who have completed or who are completing a slate of courses which meets the course requirements as specified in Clause 2 above may be granted provisional acceptance prior to the writing of their final examinations. This provisional acceptance will remain valid until the public examination results are released by the provincial Department of Education at which time a final determination of each applicant's admission status will be made. Provisionally accepted applicants who meet all requirements of Clause 2 above will be granted formal acceptance whereas applicants who fail to meet all requirements of Clause 2 above will have their provisional acceptance revoked.

3) English Proficiency Requirements as stated in B.1. above will apply to all applicants.

3. a) STUDENTS WHO HAVE FOLLOWED THE ADULT BASIC EDUCATION PROGRAMME

Candidates shall have completed the Level III Adult Basic Education Certificate with the approved combination of thirty-six credits set down by the Department of Education, and they shall have successfully completed, with an overall average of at least 70%, the following courses as outlined below:

Communication Skills: CS 3113, CS 3112, CS 3215, CS 3221.

Mathematics: The group of M 3213, M 3214, M 3117 and

Either: The group of M 3119, M 3118, M 3120, M 3215

Or: The single course M 3421

Science: One of the following patterns:

Either:

For Physics: the following Science courses: P 3113, P 3111, P 3212, P 3115, P 3214, P 3116

Or:

For Chemistry: the following Science courses: C 3111, C 3112, C 3113, C 3114, C 3115, C 3116, C 3117.

Or:

For Biology: the following Science courses: B 3111, B 3212 A&B, B 3113, B 3114, B 3115, B 3316

NOTE: English Proficiency Requirements as stated in B.1 above will apply to all applicants.

b) MATURE APPLICANTS

An applicant of mature age (21 years or older within one month after the beginning of the semester or the session to which admission is being sought), who has not fulfilled the Matriculation Requirements laid down in Clause 2 above, may be admitted to the University with the approval of the Committee on Admissions. Such applicants are required to submit

i. Proof of age
ii. Two letters of reference from persons competent to assess the candidate's ability to proceed with university studies.
iii. A letter from the mature applicant outlining the grounds for requesting special consideration.
iv. high school marks and marks from post-secondary institutions, if applicable.

NOTES: 1) Mature applicants may be required to show through an interview that they possess the potential to proceed with university studies.

2) Since admission as a mature student is not on the grounds of age alone, the Committee on Admissions reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant.

3) English Proficiency Requirements as stated in B.1. above will apply to all applicants.

c) SENIOR CITIZENS

Applicants who have reached the age of 60 years or older within one month after the beginning of the semester/session to which admission is being sought, may be admitted to the University upon submission of a birth certificate or other proof of age.

4. ADMISSION: STUDENTS WHO HAVE FOLLOWED THE HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULA OF OTHER PROVINCES OF CANADA

a) i. Students from other provinces of Canada are required to have successfully completed Grade XII in the University Preparatory Program (in the case of Quebec students, Secondary V Certificate) with a passing mark in the appropriate course in each of the five areas specified for Newfoundland and Labrador students (University Calendar, Clause B.2.a-e.) and an overall average as required for those students. For information concerning specific provinces, please refer to the University Calendar or contact the Admissions Office.

ii. PROVISIONAL ACCEPTANCE: Students in their final year of high school who have completed or who are completing a slate of courses which meets the course requirements as specified in Clause 4.a.i. above may be granted provisional acceptance prior to the writing of their final examinations. This provisional acceptance will remain valid until the final examination results are released by the appropriate authorities at which time a final determination of each applicant's admission status will be made. Provisionally accepted applicants who meet all requirements of Clause 4.a.i. above will be granted a formal acceptance whereas applicants who fail to meet all requirements of Clause 4.a.i. above will have their provisional acceptance revoked.

b) The University may recognize certain Grade XII enriched courses and certain Ontario Grade XIII/OAC subjects for introductory (normally first-year) credits where applicable provided that:

i. the subjects claimed for credit are recommended as equivalent to Memorial University courses by the relevant University Departments

AND

ii. the candidate has obtained an average of not less than 65% with a passing grade in each subject claimed for credit

OR

iii. has obtained a mark of not less than 65% in individual subjects claimed for credit where the overall average requirement of 65% has not been met.

Students seeking credit for enriched Grade XII courses or for Ontario Grade XIII/OAC courses are advised to follow procedures outlined in Section B.6, Transfers From Other Universities/Colleges.

NOTES: 1) In addition to transcripts of high school records, applicants from other Canadian provinces who are seeking credit for Senior Matriculation subjects are required to submit official course outlines of courses claimed for credit. These outlines should be obtained from the applicants' high schools.

2) English Proficiency Requirements as stated in B.1. above will apply to all applicants.

5. APPLICANTS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES

a) GENERAL INFORMATION

i. In addition to the $30.00 non-refundable application processing fee required of all applicants to the University, a fee of $30.00 is required of non-Canadian applicants and applicants who apply for admission with advanced standing/transfer credits.
ii. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS as stated in B.1 above will apply to all applicants.
iii. Applicants from other countries may be required to submit with their application, a statement of satisfactory financial resources. Memorial University does not offer financial assistance to undergraduate students from outside the Province of Newfoundland.

b) UNITED KINGDOM

i. Students from the United Kingdom are required to have the General Certificate of Education or the Scottish Leaving Certificate with "Ordinary" or "Lower-Level" passes in five subjects acceptable to the Admissions Committee.
ii. The "Higher Level" subjects of the Scottish Leaving Certificate will generally be accepted for credit at the first-year level.

The "Advanced Level" subjects of the General Certificate of Education will generally be accepted for credit to a maximum of 12 credit hours in each subject, provided that the candidate:

- satisfies any particular Departmental regulation; AND

- obtains a minimum grade of 'D' in each subject claimed for credit.

c) UNITED STATES

To be eligible for admission students from the United States must have completed a High School University Preparatory Program (Grade XII) with a passing mark in the appropriate course in each of the five areas specified for Newfoundland and Labrador students (University Calendar, Clause B. 2. a-e) and an overall average, calculated from those courses, which is equivalent to that required of those students.

d) HONG KONG, MALAYSIA, WEST INDIES, WEST AFRICA

Students from Hong Kong, Malaysia, the West Indies and West Africa will be considered for admission with General Certificate of Education passes in five academic subjects at the Ordinary Level acceptable to the Admissions Committee.

NOTES: 1) Students from countries other than those listed above who require specific information regarding admission requirements should write to the Office of the Registrar.

2) Applicants from other countries should submit official matriculation certificates at least two months prior to the commencement of the semester to which they are seeking admission. Certificates in a language other than English or French should be accompanied by notarized English translations.

6. TRANSFERS FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES/COLLEGES

a) (i) Students from other universities and colleges who apply to enter this University will be considered for admission on producing satisfactory certificates. The admission of such students will be subject to the General Admission Requirements and the Regulations for Readmission. SUCH STUDENTS SHALL NOT BE GRANTED A DEGREE FROM THIS UNIVERSITY UNLESS AND UNTIL THEY HAVE COMPLIED WITH THE REGULATIONS OF THIS UNIVERSITY. In order to allow sufficient time for assessment of possible transfer credit, students should apply to the Registrar for admission to this University on or before the deadlines specified in the University Diary for the semester in which they propose to begin their studies.

(ii) In addition to the $30.00 non-refundable application processing fee required of all applicants to the University, a fee of $30.00 is required of all applicants who apply for admission with advanced standing/transfer credits from post-secondary institutions outside of Newfoundland and Labrador and/or non-Canadian applicants. The latter fee is not refundable nor will it be credited to the applicant's financial account in any circumstances.

b) (i) Students applying for transfer from other universities and colleges shall submit their High School Diploma and official transcript(s) from any universities and colleges attended. These documents must be in the Registrar's Office not later than two months prior to the first day of lectures in any semester, as stated in the University Diary. An application is not considered complete until these documents have been received.

(ii) Applicants who wish to be considered for advanced standing or transfer credits must submit, in addition to the Application for Admission, an Application for Transfer Credit Evaluation form with the following documents:

- Official transcript(s).

- Calendar descriptions of courses claimed for credit.

NOTE: In order to allow sufficient time for evaluation, these documents should be received at least two months prior to the commencement of the semester to which the applicant is seeking admission. It is the student's responsibility to provide the pertinent documents, and until they are received, the Office of the Registrar is unable to commence an evaluation or to advise students of their standing at this University. Applicants are reminded that even if complete documents are submitted before the two month deadline, results of transfer credit evaluation may not be available before the assigned registration time for the semester in which they propose to begin their studies. The Application for Transfer Credit Evaluation form can be obtained upon request from the Office of the Registrar.

c) Course credit which may be granted to any student transferring to this University from any other recognized university or university college shall be subject to appropriate Departmental evaluation and University regulations.

d) All course work completed by transfer students during the first two years of university study taken at universities/colleges that are ordinary members of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (A.U.C.C.) will be recognized and credited for the purposes of granting degrees. In the first instance, the evaluation of such course work for appropriate credit will be conducted by academic units. In instances where appropriate credit cannot be granted by academic units or where no academic unit exists at this University for the evaluation of particular transferring credits the Registrar's Office will award the appropriate unspecified credits in an unspecified discipline. The applicability of unspecified credits in an unspecified discipline will be subject to the appropriate degree, major, minor, certificate or diploma regulations.

e) Memorial University may recognize for transfer credit certain courses offered by the various campuses of the Colleges of Applied Arts, Technology and Continuing Education (i.e. Cabot College, Eastern College, Central Newfoundland Regional College, Westviking College and Labrador College), the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland, and certain other Community Colleges, Technical Colleges, Institutes and CEGEPs. Credit will be considered on an individual basis and shall be subject to appropriate Departmental evaluation and University Regulations.

f) Memorial University may recognize for transfer credit certain courses completed through the Advanced Placement Program offered by the College Board. Award of credit for AP courses will be subject to:

(i) the achievement of a minimum grade of 3 in each subject claimed for credit (In certain subjects a minimum grade of 4 may be required.)
(ii) evaluation and recommendation by the appropriate University Department

NOTE: Further information concerning Memorial University equivalents for AP courses may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.

g) Memorial University recognizes the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme for admission purposes and, where applicable, for transfer credit towards a degree programme at this University. The University will consider for transfer credit, the "higher" level subjects and certain "subsidiary" level subjects provided that:

(i) the subjects claimed for credit are recommended as equivalent to Memorial University courses by the relevant University Departments,

AND

(ii) the candidate has achieved a minimum grade of 4 in individual subjects claimed for credit. In certain subjects a minimum grade of 5 may be required.

7. CHALLENGE FOR CREDIT

Memorial University recognizes that some students may have achieved competence in certain subject areas through experience gained elsewhere which may warrant consideration for academic credit at the undergraduate level. This experience may consist of courses taken at "non-university" institutions or skills acquired from work or learning outside the university.

Since course challenge is not offered by all academic units nor for all courses within a unit, students are advised to consult with the appropriate academic unit to determine whether or not a particular course is offered for challenge. In particular it should be noted that challenge for credit is not offered for Work Terms or Internships. Where it is offered, it is available under the following conditions:

a) Challenge for credit is available only to those students who have applied for admission or who are currently registered at the university.

b) The student must apply through the Office of the Registrar and such application must receive approval from the head of the academic unit offering the course(s). The academic unit may require documentary material from the student and/or an interview before making its decision whether to accept the challenge. The academic unit involved will be responsible for deciding the scheduling and appropriate method of evaluation, which may consist of a variety of possible modes of evaluation, such as written, practical and oral.

c) A student who has applied for transfer credit evaluation may not apply for credit by challenge until the transfer credit evaluation of his/her previous university or college programme has been completed.

d) For the purpose of Residence Regulations, a successful challenge for credit shall be considered the equivalent of a transfer credit and shall be recorded on the transcript as (PAS). Challenge grades are not included in averages.

e) An appropriate fee must be paid at the time of application. If the application is accepted for consideration, the fee is not refundable nor is the student permitted to withdraw the challenge.


ACADEMIC ADVISING

During their period of study at the University, students are expected to make some very important academic decisions, the consequences of which can significantly affect the course of their academic careers. While the responsibility for making these decisions rests with students individually, they are not expected to make such decisions without access to sound academic advice.

Students should seek advice on matters such as course selection, telephone registration, dropping/adding course registrations, selecting/changing an academic programme, entrance requirements for degree programmes and interpretation of university regulations. It is especially true that students in the early stages of their degree programme should seek academic advice.

Students who are considering enroling at the University or who are in their first year of study at the University or who have not declared an academic programme can obtain academic advice from the following sources: those students attending the St. John's Campus or the Regional College campuses should contact the Academic Advising Centre, Office of the Registrar, located in the Science Building room S4053, at 737-8801; those students attending the Sir Wilfred Grenfell College campus should contact the Senior College Academic Adviser at the Office of the Registrar, located in the Arts and Science Building in room AS270, at 637-6298.

Students who have declared their major or have been accepted to a School or Faculty can obtain academic advice from a faculty adviser assigned by their School/Faculty/ Department. Students should contact the head of the relevant academic unit to be assigned a faculty adviser.

Students are also encouraged to approach their professors for academic advice or referral to the appropriate source of advice.

While it is the responsibility of students to see that their academic programmes meet regulations in all respects, academic advice is provided as a service of the University.


GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATES)

NOTE: General Regulations for certificate courses and programmes are covered by a separate set of regulations. However, in certificate programmes including degree credit courses, students must also be admitted as undergraduate students and comply with the General Regulations for Undergraduates. Students should refer to the appropriate publication of the School of Continuing Education for information.

A. EXPLANATION OF TERMS

1. a) The academic year runs from September 1 to August 31.

b) Semester means a period of approximately fourteen consecutive weeks during which the University is in regular session and in which period there are at least twelve teaching weeks as defined by the Senate. Normally the Fall Semester commences in early September, the Winter Semester in early January, and the Spring Semester in early May.

c) Session means a period of approximately seven consecutive weeks during which the University is in regular session in the Spring Semester and in which period there are at least six teaching weeks as defined by the Senate. The first half of Spring Semester will be designated as Intersession; the second half of Spring Semester will be designated as Summer Session.

2. a) A course is a unit of work in a particular subject normally extending through one semester or session, the completion of which normally carries credit toward the fulfillment of the requirements of certain degrees, diplomas or certificates.

b) A credit hour is the measure used to reflect the relative weight of a given course towards the fulfilment of appropriate degree, diploma, certificate, major, minor, or other programme requirements. Normally, a course has a credit value of three credit hours. A weight of one credit hour normally means that the course meets for lectures one hour per week for the duration of a semester or two hours per week for the duration of a session. The number of hours of required instruction, outside of lecture time, such as laboratory instruction, tutorials, etc. may or may not impact on the number of credit hours assigned to a particular course and academic units may recommend to the Senate a greater or lesser whole number of credit hours for a particular course.

c) In this Calendar, undergraduate courses are designated by four characters. The first three characters are numeric. The fourth character may be numeric or alphabetic. The first character signifies the level of the course. Where all four characters are numeric, the last three are for the use of the Department and may signify course sequence and the like. If the last character is alphabetic, special rules apply.

i. A six-credit hour linked course has the letter "A" or "B" as the fourth character. No credits or points are given for the "A" part of a linked course until the "B" part is completed. Upon completion of the "B" part, six credit hours are assigned. The grade and points for both parts of the course are the same as those obtained for the "B" part.

ii. If the last character is "M", the course represents an entire semester's work in the Faculty of Medicine and is assigned fifteen credit hours.

iii. If the last character is "X", the course represents an entire semester's work and is assigned fifteen credit hours.

iv. If the last character is "F", the course is one which does not carry credit for a degree but is intended to remedy specific academic weakness.

v. If the last character is "W", the course represents a Work Term in the co-operative programme or a special project in certain of the professional schools and faculties (e.g. School of Nursing, Faculty of Business Administration, and Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science). These courses are required components of certain degree and diploma programmes but do not carry credit.

3. A prerequisite course is a course which must be successfully completed prior to registration in the course for which it is required. A corequisite course is a course which must be taken concurrently with the course for which it is required. In the event that a student drops a course required as a corequisite, the student will be required to drop the course for which that corequisite is required. In particular cases, a department head may convert a prerequisite to a corequisite or waive it altogether.

4. A distance education course is a regular university course designed for people who wish to study outside a traditional university setting. Instructors and students are separated by time and/or space.

5. Programme means a series of courses, the completion of which, if other requirements are met, qualifies the candidate for a degree, diploma or certificate, e.g. B.A. Degree Programme, Education Diploma Programme.

6. When it is prescribed that students must COMPLETE a particular course, it is to be understood that they shall, when required, attend lectures given in the course, perform laboratory projects and exercises that may be assigned and any other written or oral exercises prescribed, write or otherwise answer tests and examinations given in the course throughout the semester or session, including any final examination, and shall obtain an overall passing grade in the course in accordance with the prescribed evaluation procedures.

B. PROVISION FOR WAIVER OF REGULATIONS

The academic regulations notwithstanding, the University reserves the right, in special circumstances, to modify, alter or waive any regulation in its application to individual students where, in the judgement of the appropriate University Officer or Committee, merit and equity so warrant. Such requests for waivers should be directed in the first instance as follows:

1. Course prerequisites/corequisites may, in special circumstances and upon individual request, be waived by the Head of the Academic Unit, or delegate of the course(s) in question, as appropriate.

2. Departmental Regulations may, in special circumstances and upon individual request, be waived by the College/ Faculty/School Committee on Undergraduate Studies or equivalent upon the recommendation of the Head of the Academic Unit.

3. Faculty or School regulations may, in special circumstances and upon individual request, be waived by the College/Faculty/School Committee on Undergraduate Studies or equivalent. Such waivers shall not reduce the total number of credit hours required for a minor, major, certificate, diploma or degree programme.

4. General University Regulations may, in special circumstances and upon individual request, be waived by the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies on the recommendation of the appropriate College/Faculty/School Committee on Undergraduate Studies or equivalent. Such waivers shall not reduce the total number of credit hours required for a minor, major, certificate, diploma or degree programme.

5. Regulations concerning the administration of Scholarships/ Bursaries/Awards/Medals/ and Prizes may be waived by the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Scholarships and Financial Aid on the recommendation/request of the Dean/ Director/Principal/Head of the appropriate Academic Unit.

C. APPEALS POLICY AND PROCEDURES

NOTE: Students who wish to attend classes, laboratories or other educational activities while an appeal is in progress can do so only with the written permission of the academic unit concerned. This provision excludes students charged with an offence under the CODE OF DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS.

Memorial University is governed by regulations whose purpose is to ensure fair and equitable treatment for the entire university community. Some of the regulations deal with the normal workings of the university (classification of degrees, registration deadlines, etc.) and pertain to all students across the board. Other regulations, however, especially those concerned with readmission and academic dishonesty, apply to certain students in certain specific situations. Every student has the right to appeal decisions resulting from the application of university regulations.

Appeals are made before specific committees that exist at the university to provide an objective review of students' cases. The appeals process is designed to assist students at critical points in their university career, not to intimidate them.

The purpose of this document is to outline the procedures by which appeals may be made and to ensure that students are given advice that will allow them to make the best possible case when preparing an appeal. Please refer to item 3. APPEALS PROCEDURES below for information concerning where appeals should be directed.

1. Policy on Student Appeals

a) The responsibility for making an appeal before the appropriate committee of the university rests with the student.

b) Reasons for initiating an appeal before the appropriate committee include the following:

i) medical problems
ii) bereavement
iii) other acceptable cause

c) Students should prepare as strong a case as possible. It is therefore recommended that students seek advice when launching their appeal. Such advice can be obtained from a variety of sources:

i) Students should consult with the Office of the Registrar for the appropriate regulations and appeal procedures.

ii) Students may use an advisor or facilitator in preparing their appeals, such as:

- a faculty advisor
- a counsellor
- designated faculty, who have made themselves familiar with the appeals process and who are willing to undertake the role of student advisor or facilitator
- the Council of the Students' Union (CSU)

d) A student submitting an appeal must present to the appropriate committee a personal letter including reasons for the appeal.

Students must present independent evidence to corroborate statements made in the letter of appeal. Preferably, this evidence will come from a professional, such as a doctor, a counsellor, or a professor, however letters from other knowledgeable parties may be acceptable.

In cases where an appeal is made on medical grounds, medical notes must be sufficiently specific to allow appropriate consideration of the student's case. The note must also clearly state that, in the opinion of the doctor, the problem was serious enough to have interfered with the student's work. Students should refer to policy respecting information required for medical certificates for more complete information.

Students claiming bereavement as grounds must provide proof of death and evidence of a close personal relationship between themselves and the deceased.

e) The committees to which appeals are made do require substantial information about the reasons for the appeal in order to make their decisions. However, the committees also recognize the student's rights to confidentiality.

With this in mind, a student may discuss the reasons for his or her appeal with a University/College counsellor, who, with the student's permission and provided sufficient reasons exist, may then write a letter to the appropriate committee confirming that there were sufficient grounds for an appeal without disclosing the special personal and confidential details of the case.

2. Memorial University Policy Respecting Information Required for Medical Certificates

Students who request permission to drop courses, to withdraw from University studies, to have examinations deferred or to obtain other waivers of university, departmental or course regulations based on medical grounds are required by the University to produce a note from a physician in support of their request. Such notes must be sufficiently specific to allow a proper consideration of the student's case. The University requests that all medical notes be on letterhead, be signed by the physician and include details on the following:

i. confirmation of the specific dates on which the student visited the doctor.
ii. the degree to which the illness (or treatment, in the case of medication, for example) is likely to have affected the student's ability to study, attend classes, or sit examinations.
iii. the length of time over which the student's abilities were likely hampered by the medical condition (e.g. recurring and severe back pain over a two-month period would likely have a more adverse effect on studies than a single episode of back pain requiring bed rest for a week).
iv. the fitness of the student to resume studies (it is in the student's best interest not to return to his/her studies prematurely).

CONFIDENTIALITY: The University respects the confidentiality of all material contained in medical notes. Physicians who are concerned with releasing any of the above information on a student's medical condition might wish to follow the practice of the Student Health Service at the University. The Health Service releases medical notes to the student, and the student then forwards the note to the University. In such cases, it is advisable to retain a copy of the note in case verification is required at a later date (there have been cases where legitimate notes have been tampered with to the student's advantage).

3. Appeals Procedures

Any student whose request for waiver of regulations has been denied has the right to appeal. Any such appeal should be made in writing clearly stating the basis for the appeal and should be directed as follows:

i. in the case of prerequisites/corequisites, to the College/ Faculty/School Committee on Undergraduate Studies or equivalent.

ii. in the case of departmental regulations, to the College/ Faculty/School Undergraduate Studies Committee where the academic unit refuses to recommend the waiver, or to the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies where the College/Faculty/School denies the request for waiver.

iii. in the case of College/Faculty/School regulations, to the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

iv. in the case of General University Regulations, to the Executive Committee of Senate.

Students whose appeals are denied will be advised in the letter of denial of the next avenue of appeal that may be taken. Should a student's appeal be denied by the Senate, he/she will be advised that within the University no further appeal is possible. For assistance in the appeals process students are advised to consult with the Office of the Registrar.

D. CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS

1.a) Full-time Students: (i) Students who have been duly admitted to this University and who are duly registered for the duration of any semester or session in at least nine credit hours or the equivalent are termed Full-time Students. For the Spring Semester (including Intersession and Summer Session), students who register for a total of at least nine credit hours, whether they be session courses or semester courses, such that the student is taking at least one course at any time during the twelve-week semester, will be deemed Full-time Students.

(ii) Students who have been admitted to any of the co-operative education programmes and who are registered for the duration of any semester in the required work term are termed Full-time Students.

Notwithstanding the above, provided he or she has been duly admitted to the University, the President of the Council of the Students' Union shall be deemed, for the purpose of membership on University committees and the Board of Regents, to be a Full-time Student during his or her tenure, to a maximum of one term, as President of the Union.

b) Part-Time Students: Students who have been duly admitted to the University and who are registered for fewer than 9 credit hours or the equivalent in any semester or session are termed Part-time Students.

2.a) First-Year Students: Students who have earned fewer than eighteen credit hours.

b) Second-Year Students: Students who have earned not fewer than eighteen credit hours.

c) Third-Year Students: Students who have earned not fewer than forty-eight credit hours.

d) Fourth-Year Students: Students who have earned not fewer than seventy-eight credit hours.

e) Fifth-Year Students: Students who have earned not fewer than one hundred and eight credit hours.

E. GUIDELINES GOVERNING YEAR OF DEGREE AND DEPARTMENTAL REGULATIONS WHICH A STUDENT WILL FOLLOW

1. A student completing a first degree programme in the Faculty of Arts or in the Faculty of Science will normally follow the degree regulations in effect in the academic year in which the student first completes a course or courses at Memorial University. However, the student may elect to follow subsequent regulations introduced during the student's tenure in a programme.

2. A student completing a second degree in the Faculty of Arts or in the Faculty of Science will normally follow the degree regulations in effect in the academic year in which a course beyond those required for the first degree is completed toward the second degree. However, the student may elect to follow subsequent regulations introduced during the student's tenure in a programme.

3. In the case of departmental regulations for a Major or Minor, a student will normally follow regulations in effect in the academic year in which the student first completes a course in that subject at the 2000 level or above which may be applied to the Major or Minor programme respectively. However, the student may elect to follow subsequent regulations introduced during the student's tenure in a programme.

4. a) A student registered in any of the Faculty of Business Administration, the Faculty of Education, the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, the Faculty of Medicine, the School of Nursing, the School of Physical Education and Athletics, the School of Music, or the School of Social Work, will normally follow regulations in effect in the academic year in which the student first completes a course or courses in that Faculty or School following formal admission to that programme.

b) Clause 4.a) notwithstanding, a student in either the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, the Faculty of Business Administration, Faculty of Education, or the Faculty of Medicine who fails to obtain promotion or, for any other reason, withdraws from full-time studies for one or more semesters, and is re-admitted later to the Faculty, will normally follow regulations in effect at the time the student is re-admitted to full-time studies in the Faculty. A student in the School of Music who is required to withdraw from the Bachelor of Music degree programme for academic reasons, or who is deemed to have withdrawn under Regulation 2 of the School of Music Admission Requirements and Academic Standards, will normally follow regulations in effect at the time the student is readmitted to the School.

c) Clauses 4.(a) and (b) notwithstanding, a student may elect to follow subsequent regulations introduced during the student's tenure in a programme.

5. Where there is doubt as to which degree or departmental regulations may be followed, the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies, on the recommendation of the appropriate Faculty Committee on Undergraduate Studies, will decide which are the appropriate regulations.

6. Notwithstanding these guidelines, the University may place limits on the time permitted to complete a programme under any given set of regulations. In addition, detailed scheduling of courses and/or Work Periods may be changed as the University deems appropriate or necessary.

F. CLASSIFICATION OF DEGREES

The following Degrees are not classified: Bachelor of Engineering, Bachelor of Education (Secondary), Bachelor of Special Education, Bachelor of Music Education, Bachelor of Vocational Education (as a second degree), Bachelor of Education (as a second degree), Bachelor of Physical Education, Bachelor of Maritime Studies, and Doctor of Medicine. No candidate can be awarded a degree, diploma or certificate unless and until he or she has obtained an average of at least 1 point on the total number of credit hours required for such degree, diploma or certificate. Points are awarded for each credit hour as follows except in the case of linked courses (see Section A Clause 2.(b)i. of the General Academic Regulations):

NOTE: The degree of Doctor of Medicine is not included in this requirement since all courses comprising the degree are evaluated on a PAS/FAL basis.

Grade A 80, 85, 90, 95, 100% 3 points
Grade B 65, 70, 75% 2 points
Grade C 55, 60% 1 point
Grade D 50% 0 points
Grade F 45% and below, or failure to complete a course without acceptable cause.

NOTE: While a pass is recorded for Grade D result, no points are given. Thus, any passes in this grade must be compensated for by sufficient passes in the higher grades to earn the required points.

1. General degrees are awarded in three classes based on the system for granting points set forth above, and determined as follows:

a) A candidate who obtains an average of 2.5 points or better on the total number of credit hours required for the degree shall be awarded the degree with First-Class Standing provided that all other degree requirements are met.

b) A candidate who fails to obtain First-Class Standing but who obtains an average of 1.75 points or better on the total number of credit hours required for the degree shall be awarded the degree with Second-Class Standing provided that all other degree requirements are met.

c) All other candidates will be awarded the degree with Third-Class Standing, provided that they obtain an average of 1 point or better on the total number of credit hours required for the degree provided that all other degree requirements are met.

2. For regulations governing classification of Honours Degrees, see that section of the University Calendar dealing with the Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Science, Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative), or Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Physical Education.

3. In addition to Clauses 1 and 2 above, candidates shall also comply with such additional regulations as may be required by the College/Faculty/School/Institute offering the Programme. See appropriate degree Regulations.

4. Where a candidate obtains credit for more credit hours than are required for the degree, his or her total points shall include only those received for the credit hours required. In eliminating from the total points those received for credit hours beyond the requirements of the degree, the credit hour(s) for which the candidate receives the fewest points shall be disregarded, provided that no credit hour is disregarded that is a requisite for the degree.

5. Where a candidate receives more than one classified Bachelor's degree, the class of each degree will be determined independently by the application of Clauses 1-3 above, provided that in determining the points total for each degree only those credit hours may be counted which are applicable towards the degree concerned.

6. A candidate who has been granted credit for courses completed at this University before September 1959, or one who has been given credit for courses completed at another university, will have the class of his or her degree determined by applying the scheme set forth in 1 and 2 above in proportion to the total of required credit hours completed at this University since September 1959. No classification will be given to the degree awarded a candidate who has completed fewer than one-half of the credit hours required for the degree at this University, or who has completed fewer than one-half of the credit hours required for the degree at this University since 1959. All such candidates shall, however, obtain an average of 1 point or better on the total number of the credit hours required for the degree taken at this University since September 1959 in order to qualify for the degree.

G. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS FOR FIRST DEGREE

1. Candidates for their first Bachelor's degree shall have completed, as full-time and/or part-time students, a minimum of twenty-four credit hours through attendance at classes on the campus of a recognized university or university college.

2. Candidates shall complete at this University the last thirty credit hours required for the degree as full-time and/or part-time students.

3. Notwithstanding the requirement in Clause 2 above, where special circumstances warrant, and only if at least half the credit hours required for the degree are completed at this University, the appropriate Committee on Undergraduate Studies may permit candidates to complete not more than twelve of the last thirty credit hours or equivalent required for the degree at another University, provided the courses which comprise those credit hours are approved by the appropriate Department.

4. Students who have taken courses in the subject of their Major at another University are required to complete at least twelve credit hours in that subject at this University.

H. REGULATIONS FOR A SECOND DEGREE

NOTE: Students who have already received a bachelor's degree may undertake a second bachelor's degree subject to the conditions outlined below. However, students are encouraged to consider proceeding to more advanced studies at the honours or graduate level.

1. Every candidate for a second Bachelor's degree shall comply with all the course requirements governing the award of that degree.

2. Every candidate for a second Bachelor's degree shall complete at least thirty credit hours at this University beyond those required for the first degree. These credit hours must be applicable to the degree sought.

3. Candidates who have completed a first degree at this University may be permitted to take at another university up to six of the thirty credit hours required in Clause 2 above.

4. Candidates may not obtain more than one undergraduate degree in the same Major subject at this University.

5. A student will not be awarded the same bachelor's degree more than once by this University (e.g. if a student has been awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree from this University he/she will not be awarded a second Memorial University Bachelor of Arts degree).

A student who has received a bachelor's degree from this University may complete the requirements for another major (or in the case of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College another specialization) within that degree. Such a student will not be awarded the same degree again but a notation indicating the completion of the second major (or in the case of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College completion of the second specialization) requirements will be included on the student's academic record.

I. APPLICATION FOR DEGREES, DIPLOMAS AND CERTAIN CERTIFICATES

Candidates in their graduating year must apply to the Registrar to be admitted to a degree or to be awarded a diploma or certain certificates. Application must be made on the prescribed form not later than the deadlines listed in the University Diary for the Spring and Fall Convocations.

It is the duty of the University Registrar to certify to the Senate that candidates for degrees, diplomas and certain certificates have met all the regulations and requirements of the University.

The Registrar or Deputies will assist students with any questions or problems which arise concerning interpretation of regulations. IT IS, HOWEVER, THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT TO SEE THAT HIS OR HER ACADEMIC PROGRAMME MEETS THE UNIVERSITY'S REGULATIONS IN ALL RESPECTS.

J. REGULAR REGISTRATION PERIOD

1. The period extending from the first prescribed day of Registration in any semester to two weeks following the first day of lectures (in any session to one week following the first day of lectures) as stated in the University Diary shall be known as the Regular Registration Period.

NOTE: In the case of accelerated courses and courses offered outside the normal time-frame of a semester or session the Regular Registration Period will be prorated accordingly.

2. Students shall register on the date and at the time and place prescribed in the Calendar or otherwise publicized by the University.

3. Students who do not register on the date prescribed may, for special reasons, be allowed to register late on payment of a late fee of $20.00 and an additional fee of $10.00 for every day after the prescribed date of registration during which the student does not register. No student may register after the expiry of the Regular Registration Period.

K. POLICY GOVERNING THE AUDITING OF COURSES (Undergraduate Students)

1. Individuals auditing courses must have met the University's admission or re-admission requirements as stated in the University Calendar.

2. In order to audit any course, an individual must receive permission from the instructor in that course and the administrative head of the unit in which the course is offered. Matters to be considered shall include class size, impact on credit students and other factors judged relevant by the academic unit; and permission cannot be given until the number of registrations for credit is known.

3. Individuals auditing courses shall limit their participation to that deemed appropriate by the instructor; auditors are not permitted to write formal examinations, nor to have their work formally assessed.

4. Audited courses will not be considered as meeting prerequisites, admission, or course requirements for any undergraduate programmes nor will audited courses be listed on the individual's transcript of university studies.

L. COURSE LOAD

1. The normal course load in a semester shall be fifteen credit hours, except where academic regulations require more than that number. No candidate shall register for more than fifteen credit hours or more credit hours than required by degree regulations in a semester except with the written permission of the Dean or Director of their Faculty or School.

2. The normal course load in a session shall be six credit hours. No candidate shall register for more than six credit hours in a session except with the written permission of the Dean or Director of their Faculty or School.

3. Where a student is registered concurrently for courses in both a semester and a session, Clause L.1 shall apply with each three-credit hour course taken in a session being considered as equivalent to six semester credit hours.

M. REGISTRATION IN COURSES NUMBERED BELOW 2000

No degree, diploma or certificate candidates beyond the third year are permitted to register for, nor shall they receive credit in, a course numbered below 2000 except with the written consent of the Dean or Director of their Faculty or School.

N. DISTANCE EDUCATION CREDIT COURSES

Memorial University offers certain credit courses by distance education, an educational process in which a significant proportion of the instruction is conducted by an instructor removed in space and/or time from the learner. These courses which may include components of correspondence instruction, video-tapes, audio-tapes and teleconferencing are open to students who have been admitted to the University and who have the necessary prerequisites for each course. Policies on enrollment limitations that may be instituted under Note 5, Regulation A. ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY apply to distance education courses as needed.

Distance education courses, offered by other recognized universities or university colleges and applicable for credit towards their degree programmes, may be recognized for transfer credit as per Admission Regulation 6. TRANSFERS FROM OTHER UNIVERSITIES/COLLEGES.

NOTES: 1) Courses completed by distance education off-campus cannot be used to fulfill Clause 1 of the Residence Requirements for a First Degree.

2) Registration in distance education courses is subject to the overall University Regulations.

O. SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES

Where a block of courses has been approved under a general heading such as selected topics, special areas, directed readings or like heading, each new course offered from that block of courses shall be approved in advance by the Faculty Undergraduate Studies Committee. To ensure an orderly use of the courses and non-duplication between course numbers, titles and contents, the Committee shall require the same quality and type of information as is needed for the approval of any single course.

P. CREDIT BY PRIVATE STUDY

Credit toward a degree, diploma or certificate shall not be given for any course taken by private study.

Q. CHANGES IN REGISTERED COURSES

Students are strongly encouraged to seek academic advice when considering dropping courses particularly once lectures have begun. For more information on sources of academic advice, refer to the section on Academic Advising immediately preceding General Academic Regulations (Undergraduate).

NOTES: 1) Students registered in a Work Period in the Faculty of Business Administration or in the School of Physical Education and Athletics, are not governed by the Regulations outlined below - see Regulations for Examination and Advancement, Clause 11, Faculty of Business Administration Section of this Calendar or Regulations for Evaluation and Promotion, Clause 21, School of Physical Education and Athletics Section of this Calendar.

2) For the purpose of these regulations, students in their first semester shall be defined as students who are attending this university for the first time and have not previously enrolled at a recognized post-secondary institution.

3) Students who withdraw from courses in the first eleven days of lectures in any semester will not be liable for tuition fees for those courses. Tuition fee refunds for withdrawal from courses after that period will be prorated in accordance with Additional Fees and Charges, Clause 1. Withdrawal and Refunds.

4) Specific deadlines for dropping and adding courses in any semester, or session, are stated in the University Diary.

5) In the case of sessions, accelerated courses and courses offered outside the normal time frame of a semester or session, deadlines for adding courses and dropping courses without academic prejudice and financial liability will be prorated accordingly.

6) The responsibility for taking all steps necessary for dropping courses is entirely that of the student. Ceasing to attend classes, or informing an instructor of intent to withdraw does not constitute an official course withdrawal.

1.a) On or before the deadlines as stated in the University Diary a student may, upon formal notification to the Registrar, change the courses for which he or she was originally registered by adding and/or dropping a course or courses. Such changes are not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the changes. No course may be added after the end of the Regular Registration Period.

b) For two weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester as stated in the University Diary, a student may, upon formal notice to the Registrar, drop a course or courses without academic prejudice. A course withdrawal is not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the course withdrawal.

2.a) From two weeks to seven weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester as stated in the University Diary, a student in his/her first semester may, upon formal notification to the Registrar drop a course or courses without academic prejudice. A grade of "DR" will be assigned in these circumstances. A course withdrawal is not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the course withdrawal.

b) From seven weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester to the last day to add courses in the following semester as stated in the University Diary, a student in his/her first semester who is prevented from completing a course by illness, bereavement, or other acceptable cause, duly authenticated in writing, may, with the approval of both the course instructor and either the head of the student's major or delegate, or, in the case of students who have not declared a major, the head of the department of the course in question and upon formal notification to the Registrar, drop a course or courses without academic prejudice. A grade of "DR" will be assigned in these circumstances. A course withdrawal is not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the course withdrawal.

c) From two weeks to five weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester as stated in the University Diary, a student beyond his/her first semester may, upon formal notification to the Registrar drop a course or courses without academic prejudice. A grade of "DR" will be assigned in these circumstances. A course withdrawal is not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the course withdrawal.

d) From five weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester to the last day to add courses in the following semester as stated in the University Diary, a student beyond his/her first semester who is prevented from completing a course by illness, bereavement, or other acceptable cause, duly authenticated in writing, may, with the approval of both the course instructor and either the head of the student's major or delegate, or, in the case of students who have not declared a major, the head of the department of the course in question and upon formal notification to the Registrar, drop a course or courses without academic prejudice. A grade of "DR" will be assigned in these circumstances. A course withdrawal is not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the course withdrawal.

3. The University will make every effort, through its various academic counselling and advising services, to ensure that students are informed of the suitability and accuracy of their registrations. Nevertheless, the responsibility for ensuring that a student's registration is appropriate, correct, and proper rests solely with that student. The University reserves the right, upon the written recommendation of the department head to the Registrar, to require a student to withdraw without academic prejudice from a course, courses, or programme in which the student is improperly registered. Students must be notified in writing by the Registrar of such a withdrawal. However, students who withdraw or who are required to withdraw from courses should refer to Additional Fees and Charges, Clause 1. Withdrawal and Refunds, for the university's tuition refund policy.

4. Any student dropping courses except under the provisions of clause 2 above will have a "DRF" grade and a zero mark entered on his or her record for each such course dropped.

R. WITHDRAWALS FROM UNIVERSITY

It is strongly recommended that students considering withdrawing from the University seek academic advice. For more information on sources of academic advice, refer to the section on Academic Advising immediately preceding General Academic Regulations (Undergraduate).

NOTES: 1) Students registered in a Work Period in the Faculty of Business Administration or in the School of Physical Education and Athletics, are not governed by the Regulations outlined below-see Regulations for Examination and Advancement, Clause 11, Faculty of Business Administration Section of this Calendar or Regulations for Evaluation and Promotion, Clause 21, School of Physical Education and Athletics Section of this Calendar.

2) Students who withdraw from courses in the first eleven days of lectures in any semester will not be liable for tuition fees for those courses. Tuition fee refunds for withdrawal from courses after that period will be prorated in accordance with Additional Fees and Charges, Clause 1. Withdrawal and Refunds.

3) Specific deadlines for dropping courses in any semester, or session, are stated in the University Diary.

4) In the case of sessions, accelerated courses and courses offered outside the normal time-frame of a semester or session, deadlines for withdrawing from the University without academic prejudice and financial liability will be prorated accordingly.

5) The responsibility for taking all steps necessary for withdrawing from the University is entirely that of the student. Ceasing to attend classes, or informing an instructor of intent to withdraw does not constitute an official course withdrawal.

6) A student withdrawing from the university, except as indicated below, shall receive a "DRF" grade and a zero mark in each such course. A withdrawal is not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the withdrawal. Students who are obliged to withdraw from the University for medical reasons may not be permitted to re-enter unless they can provide medical evidence satisfactory to the Director of the Student Health Service, of fitness to pursue their studies.

1. For five weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester as stated in the University Diary, a student, may upon formal notice to the Registrar, withdraw from the university without academic prejudice. A grade of "DR" will be assigned to all courses in these circumstances. A withdrawal is not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the course withdrawal.

2. From five weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester to the last day to add courses in the following semester as stated in the University Diary, a student who is prevented from completing the semester by illness, bereavement, or other acceptable cause, duly authenticated in writing, may, with the approval of the Dean or Director of his/her Faculty or School or the Senior Faculty Adviser for students who have not declared a major or the Principal of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, as appropriate, and upon formal notification to the Registrar, withdraw from the University without academic prejudice. A grade of "DR" will be assigned to all courses in these circumstances. A course withdrawal is not official until the Registrar is officially notified and has certified the course withdrawal.

S. ATTENDANCE

Academic units may impose an attendance regulation that may, by itself, cause students to 1) fail a course or 2) be deregistered from a course. Such a regulation must be approved by the Senate and will be allowed only in cases where the academic unit has demonstrated that attendance is necessary for safety reasons, for teaching practical skills, or for attaining other clearly specified objectives. The courses where such an attendance regulation is to be enforced must have the statement "attendance required" included in the calendar description as approved by Senate.

T. REGULATIONS FOR EXAMINATIONS AND EVALUATIONS

These regulations shall apply to undergraduate examinations:

1. The method of evaluation in any course shall be determined by the Department or the appropriate administrative equivalent concerned, subject to any College/Faculty/ School/Institute or General University Regulations.

2.a) The method of evaluation and required prerequisites or corequisites shall be made known to students before the end of the first week of lectures in any semester or session. This information shall be in typewritten or computer-generated format and shall be provided in paper form to the students present in each class during the first week of lectures.

The following shall be included in the method of evaluation:

i. the allocation of marks for all parts of the evaluation, e.g., assignments, laboratory projects, presentations, tests, mid-term exams, final exams;
ii. the approximate dates of all requirements that will take place in class, e.g., test, mid-term exams, presentations, and assignments; and the dates on which assignments to be completed out of class are due.

b) The method of evaluation as made available to the class in the first week shall be changed only if

i. exceptional circumstances warrant the change; and
ii. the head of the academic unit approves the proposed change; and
iii. accommodation is made for students who demonstrate to the faculty member that they are disadvantaged by the change approved as above.

3. When, in the judgment of the instructor, a student persistently fails to display a reasonable standard of literacy, the instructor may consider this as detracting from the quality of the student's work in the course when assigning a final mark or grade.

4. Final examinations, if any, whether of the normal two-hour duration or longer, shall be held in each course at the end of the semester during which it was given in accordance with the schedule of examinations published by the Registrar.

NOTE: Application of this clause to the Bachelor of Education (Secondary) Programme is subject to interpretation by the Undergraduate Studies Committee, Faculty of Education.

5. The academic standing of each student in his or her first semester will be based upon the courses for which he or she was registered as of seven weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester.

The academic standing of each student beyond his or her first semester will be based upon the courses for which he or she was registered as of five weeks following the first day of lectures in any semester.

6. a) i. No laboratory examinations or tests totalling more than one laboratory period in length shall be given in any course in any week during a lecturing period in any semester or session. Such examinations or tests shall be administered in the laboratory time slot assigned for that course section.

ii. Any other examinations or tests shall not extend beyond the time slot assigned to that course section in any week.

b) During the last two weeks of the lecturing period in any semester or the last week of the lecturing period in any session, no tests, examinations or assignments, whether in-class or take home, shall be administered or assigned. However, assignments, projects or term papers assigned earlier in the term and notified under T.1 and T.2 may be submitted and oral and laboratory examinations may be administered.

c) No examinations or tests of any nature shall be held between the last day of lectures and the start of the formal examination period in any semester or session.

NOTES: 1) The application of Clause 6 to the Faculty of Medicine, Clause 6(a) to the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, and Clauses 6(b) and (c) to the School of Nursing and the Faculty of Education (with respect to accelerated courses offered by the Faculty of Education) is subject to interpretation by the appropriate Faculty Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

2) The Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies may grant a waiver of Clause 6(a) for examinations or tests in individual courses in a given term upon recommendation of the Faculty/School/College/Institute Committee on Undergraduate Studies. Such waivers will be considered only if it can be shown that such examinations or tests do not conflict with regularly scheduled sessions of another course for any student involved.

3) In the event of an officially declared emergency which results in the cancellation or interruption of in-class examinations or tests previously scheduled and notified to be held in the final lecture period of the third last week of lectures of a semester or the second last week of lectures of a session, teaching units may reschedule such tests or examinations in the next regularly scheduled class or as early as possible in the second last week of lectures of a semester or the last week of lectures of a session. In no circumstances can the rescheduled tests or examinations be held in the last week of lectures of a semester.

7. The final evaluation submitted to the Registrar shall consist of one of the following letter grades with the appropriate numerical equivalent:

A 80, 85, 90, 95, or 100%
B 65, 70, or 75%
C 55 or 60%
D 50%
F below 50%
Inc. Incomplete
Pas. Pass
Fal. Fail

Description of Grades

"A" indicates EXCELLENT PERFORMANCE with clear evidence of

- a comprehensive knowledge of the subject matter and principles treated in the course
- a high degree of originality and independence of thought
- a superior ability to organize and analyze ideas and
- an outstanding ability to communicate

"B" indicates GOOD PERFORMANCE with evidence of

- a substantial knowledge of the subject matter
- a moderate degree of originality and independence of thought
- a good ability to organize and analyze ideas and
- an ability to communicate clearly and fluently.

"C" indicates SATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE with evidence of

- an acceptable grasp of the subject matter
- some ability to organize and analyze ideas and
- ability to communicate adequately

"D" indicates MINIMALLY ACCEPTABLE PERFORMANCE with evidence of

- rudimentary knowledge of the subject matter
- some evidence that organizational and analytical skills have been developed, but with significant weaknesses in some areas, and
- significant weakness in the ability to communicate

"F" indicates FAILING PERFORMANCE with evidence of

- an inadequate knowledge of the subject matter
- failure to complete required work.
- inability to organize and analyze ideas and
- inability to communicate

or failure to complete required work

8. a) Students who at the end of any semester or session do not complete any course for which they are registered at the end of the period prescribed for dropping courses without academic prejudice, shall receive the Grade "F" in that course. Exceptions may be made in accordance with Regulation Q.2(b) and (d) of the General Academic Regulations.

b) Clause 8.(a) notwithstanding, for good cause, an INCOMPLETE grade may, with the approval of the Department, be submitted. This INCOMPLETE grade shall, however, be valid only for one week following the commencement of classes in the next academic session as stated in the University Diary. In the event that a mark has not been received by the Registrar within the prescribed deadline the INCOMPLETE grade shall be changed to 0 F.

c) Clause 8.(b) notwithstanding, an extension of time not exceeding the end of the semester following that in which the INCOMPLETE was given may be permitted by the Faculty/School/College/Institute Committee on Undergraduate Studies, on the recommendation of the academic unit. In special circumstances, students registered for Social Work practice courses in the Bachelor of Social Work programme, may be given an extension not exceeding two semesters.

9. Students who are prevented by illness or bereavement or other acceptable cause, duly authenticated, from writing a final examination may apply on the appropriate form with supporting documents within one week of the original examination date to the appropriate administrative head to have their academic standing graded.

The decision of the administrative head, including information on the appeals route open to the student in the case of a negative decision, must be communicated in writing to the student and to the Dean/Director/Principal/Executive Officer and the Secretary of the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the student's Faculty/School/College/Institute within one week of the receipt of the student's complete application. In those cases where the academic unit accepts the extenuating circumstances the student may be permitted to write a deferred examination or, with the consent of both the academic unit and the student, the grade submitted may be based on term work alone. An interim grade of "ABS" (absent for acceptable cause) will be assigned by the academic unit in the case of a student granted a deferred examination. This grade will be replaced by the final grading which must be received by the Registrar's Office within one week following the commencement of classes in the next academic semester or session.

NOTE: At Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, students should submit their applications to the Registrar's Office for transmission to the appropriate departments.

10. Students who are prevented by illness or bereavement or other acceptable cause, duly authenticated, from writing a deferred examination, may apply on the appropriate form with supporting documents within one week of the scheduled date of the deferred examination to the appropriate administrative head to have the examination postponed to a time not later than the last date for examinations in the semester following that in which the student was enrolled in the course.

The decision of the administrative head, including information on the appeals route open to the student in the case of a negative decision, must be communicated to the Registrar, to the student and to the Dean/Director/Principal/Executive Officer and the Secretary of the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the student's Faculty/School/College/Institute within one week of the receipt of the student's complete application.

NOTE: At Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, students should submit their applications to the Registrar's Office for transmission to the appropriate department.

U. GUIDELINES GOVERNING THE SCHEDULING OF FINAL EXAMINATIONS

1. Normally, course sections offered during the day will have their final examinations, if any, scheduled in the day, and course sections offered in the evening will have their final examinations, if any, scheduled in the evening.

2. When the Department determines that there will be a common final examination for day and evening sections of a course, students must be so informed prior to the expiry of the Regular Registration Period.

3. When a student is unable for good reason to write a final examination scheduled outside the provisions of Clause 1, the student will be entitled to write a deferred examination.

NOTE: Where possible, Departments should inform the Timetable Committee when they submit their class schedules if it is anticipated that a common final examination will be required for day and evening sections of a course, so that this information can be publicized in the Class Schedule for the appropriate semester. Departments should indicate whether the examination is to be held during the day or the evening.

V. POLICY AND PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACCESS TO FINAL EXAMINATION SCRIPTS

Policy

A student has a right to see his or her final examination script. However, the script is deemed to be the property of the University and the University retains full possession and control of the script at all times. While the University recognizes the right of a student to have access to his/her final examination script, subject to the conditions outlined below, this policy upholds the authority and judgement of the examiner in evaluation. It should also be noted that while this policy governs students' access to examination scripts, re-reading of examination papers is governed by separate regulations included in this Calendar.

Procedures

A student may submit a written request to the Head of an academic unit (Dean or Director in the case of non-departmentalized unit) in which a course is offered for permission to view his/her final examination script subject to the following conditions:

a) Any such request must be made following release of examination results for the semester in which the course was taken, and within one month of the release by the University of the grade reports.

b) The final examination must be viewed in the presence of the course instructor or other person delegated by the Head of the academic unit (Dean or Director in the case of a non-departmentalized unit). Both the instructor and the student have the right to be accompanied by a registered student or a member of the faculty or staff of the University.

c) The final examination script must not be taken away or tampered with in any way by the student.

NOTE: In the case of the Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, for Dean, read Principal of the College, for Head of Academic Unit, read Head of Department or Co-ordinator of the Department as appropriate.

W. AEGROTAT STATUS

1. Students in their final semester or session before graduation, who have been absent from a final examination where one has been scheduled, or who have been prevented from completing the semester's or session's work, for reasons which qualify them to write a deferred examination, may, in exceptional circumstances, be given credit for the course on the recommendation of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

2. Application for Aegrotat Status, with full details duly authenticated, must be made to the Registrar, indicating each course for which the application is being made, within one week after the last day of final examinations.

X. RE-READING OF EXAMINATION PAPERS

1. Students may apply to have a final examination paper re-read whether or not they have obtained a passing grade in that course.

2. Students who wish to have a final examination paper re-read must make application in writing to the Registrar within one month of the release by the University of the grade reports. When a re-reading is requested, the University will make every reasonable attempt to have the re-reading conducted by a faculty member or faculty member(s) other than the original marker(s).

3. A fee of $50.00 per paper must be paid at the time of application. If the mark is raised after re-reading, the fee is refunded. If the mark is unchanged or lowered, the fee is forfeited.

Y. PROCEDURES GOVERNING ACADEMIC DISHONESTY (Undergraduate Students)

NOTES: 1) These PROCEDURES shall apply to all academic offences relating to undergraduate studies involving, but not limited to, those students who either have been or who are enrolled at Memorial University. Notification of an allegation of academic dishonesty will be forwarded to the last known mailing address of the student as noted on the files of the Registrar. The University reserves the right to implement action under these PROCEDURES where an allegation has been made against a student but where reasonable efforts to contact the student fail.

2) While a student can continue in a programme of studies, if eligible, while an investigation under these PROCEDURES is being carried out, the University does not accept liability for any consequences to the student's progress including retroactive effect on grades and promotion within a programme, arising from an investigation and any negative decision rendered. However, the University may take these consequences into account, as appropriate and to the extent feasible, in cases where charges are dropped or the student is not found guilty.

1. General Procedure

a) When a member of the University Community (faculty, staff, student) has grounds for belief that an academic offence has been committed, he/she shall report the matter without delay to the Head of the Department, or in the case of non-departmentalized academic units, to the Dean or Director. In the case of non-academic units, such as the Registrar's Office, Library and Computing and Communications, the matter shall be referred to the University Officer in charge of that unit. There should then be a direct attempt to resolve minor offences between the instructor or staff member and the student(s) concerned. Only if resolution proves impossible, or one party is dissatisfied with the resolution, should the Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer become further involved.

b) If, in the judgement of the Department Head, Dean, Director or University Officer, the alleged offence against University regulations is such as to warrant resolution through formal procedures, the Department Head (via the Dean of the Faculty), Dean, Director or University Officer will refer the matter to the Chairperson, Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty or School, and PROCEDURES FOR FORMAL RESOLUTION will be implemented.

c) If, in the judgment of the Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer, the offence warrants resolution through informal procedures, the individuals involved will be advised to attempt to resolve the matter without proceeding to a formal hearing. In the event that no resolution is possible through informal procedures between the individual parties, the Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer will institute formal proceedings. In all cases, it is the responsibility of the Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer to ensure that fairness and impartiality are achieved in the treatment of students.

NOTE: In the case of the Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, for Dean, read Principal of the College; for Head of Department, read Co-ordinator of the Department; for Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty or School, read Academic Committee of the College; for Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies, read Corner Brook Sub Committee of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

2. Academic Offences

NOTE: In the following section the plural shall be deemed to include the singular.

Academic offences shall be deemed to include, but shall not be limited to, the following:

a) Cheating on examinations, theses, assignments, work term reports, projects, internship reports, or any other tests

Cheating includes copying from another student's work or allowing another student to copy from one's own work, consulting with any unauthorized person during an examination or test, or using unauthorized aids; or knowingly recording or reporting false empirical or statistical data. The work referred to includes examinations, theses, assignments, work term reports, projects, internship reports, or any other tests which are to be used in judging the student's performance in a course or programme of study, or on any special tests which the University may offer.

b) Impersonating another student or allowing oneself to be impersonated

By impersonation is meant the imitation of a student or entrance into an arrangement with another person to be impersonated for purposes of taking examinations or tests or carrying out laboratory or other assignments.

c) Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of presenting the ideas or works of another as one's own. This applies to all material such as essays, laboratory reports, work term reports, design projects, seminar presentations, statistical data, computer programmes and research results. The properly acknowledged use of sources is an accepted and important part of scholarship. Use of such material without acknowledgement, however, is contrary to accepted norms of academic behaviour.

d) Theft of examination papers or other material

By theft is meant obtaining by any improper means examination papers, tests, or any other such material.

e) Use and/or distribution of stolen material

The use of material which the student knows to have been improperly obtained and/or the distribution of such material is considered to be an academic offence.

f) Submitting false information

This offence includes falsifying academic forms or records, submitting false credentials, medical or other certificates, or making a false, misleading or incomplete declaration to the University.

g) Submitting work for one course which has been or is being submitted for another course without express permission to do so

This includes the presentation of an essay, report or assignment to satisfy some or all of the requirements of a course when that essay, report, or assignment has been previously submitted or is concurrently being submitted for another course without the express permission of the professor(s) involved.

3. Procedures for Informal Resolution

If, upon receiving a report of an alleged academic offence, the Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer decides that an attempt should be made to resolve the matter informally the following procedures shall apply:

a) The Department Head (Dean, Director or Officer) shall request that the accusor and the accused meet with him (or her) and at the meeting the Department Head (Dean, Director, or Officer) shall state the allegation, indicate the range of applicable penalties, and arrange a second meeting between the accusor and the accused only.

b) At the second meeting the parties (accusor and accused) shall endeavour to obtain a mutually satisfactory resolution of the matter.

c) The parties (accusor and accused) shall report jointly to the Department Head (Dean, Director or Officer) on the result of their second meeting.

d) If the report is of a resolution which the Department Head (Dean, Director or Officer) considers to be fair and equitable the matter shall be considered closed. If the Department Head (Dean, Director or Officer) considers the reported resolution to be unfair and/or inequitable he or she will endeavour to obtain an alternative satisfactory resolution directly with the parties.

e) Should all reasonable efforts to obtain an informal resolution fail, the Department Head (Dean, Director or Officer) will refer the case to the Chairperson of the Faculty Committee on Undergraduate Studies and shall inform the accusor and the accused accordingly. From this stage onward procedures for formal resolution will apply.

NOTES: 1) A student may request, during the procedures for an informal resolution, that his or her case be referred to the Chairperson of the Faculty Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and thereafter the procedures for formal resolution will apply.

2) Procedures for Informal Resolution will not be applied to cases involving alleged offences on final examinations.

3) If at any stage of the procedure for either informal or formal resolution, the accused fails to appear or to respond to a charge, without reasonable cause, within two weeks of notification of an allegation, action may be taken on the charge in the absence of the accused.

4) If at any stage of the procedures for either informal or formal resolution, the accusor fails to appear at a scheduled hearing to defend an allegation, without reasonable cause, within two weeks of notification by the Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer, the action will be dismissed.

4. Procedures for Formal Resolution

If the matter cannot be resolved following the Procedure for Informal Resolution as outlined above, or if the allegation involves a major breach of University regulations, the following procedures shall apply:

a) If the Department Head (in consultation with the Dean), Dean, Director or Officer is satisfied that the student has a serious case to answer, he or she shall inform the student in writing of the nature of the case against him or her. In addition, the Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer shall report to the Chairperson of the Faculty Committee on Undergraduate Studies, or delegate, who will interview separately the accusor, the accused and relevant witnesses. At this interview the Chairperson of the Faculty Committee on Undergraduate Studies, the accusor, the accused and relevant witnesses all have the right to be accompanied by a registered student or a member of the Faculty or staff of the University.

b) Upon completion of these interviews, the Faculty Chairperson, or delegate, shall submit a written report of all findings to the Chairperson of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

c) The Chairperson of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies shall present this report to both the accusor and accused for perusal and comment. Once in receipt of this report, the accusor and accused shall have two weeks in which to submit to the Chairperson of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies any additional comments on the report that he or she wishes to be considered in the deliberations of the Senate Committee.

d) The Chairperson of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies shall present to the Committee for decision all information received from the Faculty Chairperson as well as comments from the accusor and accused. The Faculty Chairperson who submitted the written report shall remain at

the meeting held to consider the case to answer questions raised by the Committee and to provide information pertinent to the case, but shall be absent from the voting process.

e) The Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies shall take appropriate action in accordance with the section headed "Penalties".

NOTES: 1) If at any stage of the procedure for either informal or formal resolution, the accused fails to appear or to respond to a charge, without reasonable cause, within two weeks of notification of an allegation, action may be taken on the charge in the absence of the accused.

2) If at any stage of the procedures for either informal or formal resolution, the accusor fails to appear at a scheduled hearing to defend an allegation, without reasonable cause, within two weeks of notification by the Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer, the action will be dismissed.

5. Penalties

A student who has been found guilty of an academic offence will be subject to a penalty or penalties commensurate with the offence. The range of penalties and their determination is given below. Enforcement of penalties resulting from Formal Procedures will be overseen by the Registrar. Some cases may warrant more than one penalty for the same offence, and previous academic misconduct will be taken into account in determining penalties. Penalties resulting from informal resolution shall be limited to 5(a) and 5(b).

a) Reprimand

This shall be in the nature of a warning by the Department Head (Dean, Director or Officer) or the appropriate Committee to the student that his/her behaviour has been unacceptable to the University.

b) Reduction of grade

A reduction of grade will apply to an examination, test, or assignment to which an offence is relevant, and will be decided by the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies upon the recommendation of the Department concerned in the case of a formal resolution, or by a Department Head, (Dean, Director or Officer) in the case of an informal resolution.

c) Probation

The period of probation will be determined by the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies. The impact of being placed on probation is that the commission of any further academic offence during the period of probation may lead to suspension or expulsion.

d) Suspension

Suspension will apply to a course, department, faculty, school, or the University. The period of suspension will be determined by the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies and shall not exceed six consecutive semesters.

e) Expulsion

The recommendation for expulsion from the University will be made by the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies to the President for his/her final decision. Prior to the President's decision, the Senate Committee will notify the accused, in writing, of the recommendation for expulsion from the University. The accused will be allowed a period of two weeks following the date of release of such notification to lodge an appeal before the President's final decision concerning expulsion from the University. Any such appeal should be made in writing to the Executive Committee of Senate.

6. Transcript Entries

Transcript entries shall relate to the penalty(ies) imposed as follows:

Penalty Transcript Entry
Reprimand No transcript entry
Reduction of Grade Entry of final grade for course
Probation "On probation at the University for academic misconduct until Day, Month, Year"*
Suspension "Suspended from the University/Faculty/ School/Programme/Course for academic misconduct until Day, Month, Year"*
Expulsion "Expelled from the University for academic misconduct"

* These entries will be removed entirely upon the expiry of the period of Probation or Suspension.

7. Disposition of Documentation

The disposition of documents relating to allegations under these procedures shall be as follows:

a) In cases where the allegation was either found "not proven" or "unfounded" no documentation shall be retained.

OTHERWISE

b) In the case of a resolution effected through the PROCEDURES FOR INFORMAL RESOLUTION, all documentation shall be retained in the office of the relevant Department Head, Dean, Director or Officer.

OR

c) In the case of a resolution effected through the PROCEDURES FOR FORMAL RESOLUTION all documentation shall be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar.

8. Right of Appeal

Appeals of decisions of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies resulting from PROCEDURES FOR FORMAL RESOLUTION may be made to the Executive Committee of Senate.

Z. REGULATIONS FOR RE-ADMISSION

These regulations will be applied at the end of each semester to any student who is registered for at least nine credit hours, or equivalent, on the last day for adding courses in a semester or session, including a student who later drops courses and changes status to that of a part-time student.

NOTES: 1) These regulations notwithstanding, the re-admission of any student to this university is subject to overall university regulations.

2) Students who withdraw from this university without academic prejudice in a semester in accordance with Regulation R. WITHDRAWALS FROM UNIVERSITY, clause 2, will not, in that semester, be subject to clauses 1.a), 1.b), 2.a) or 2.b) below.

1. At the end of his/her first semester at this University, a student (except a student who has received at least fifteen transfer credit hours) must:

a) to be eligible for re-admission in clear standing (i) pass one-half or more of the credit hours for which she or he was registered at the end of the period for dropping courses without academic prejudice, and (ii) obtain an average of 50% or more.

b) to be eligible for conditional re-admission (i) pass one-half or more of the credit hours for which she or he was registered at the end of the period for dropping courses without academic prejudice, and (ii) obtain an average between 45% and 50%.

Any student not fulfilling conditions 1.(a) or 1.(b) will not be eligible for re-admission to the following two semesters in any category. A student re-admitted after the expiry of this period, will be re-admitted conditionally.

2. Any student in a semester subsequent to his/her first semester or any student in his/her first semester who has received at least fifteen transfer credit hours, must:

a) to be eligible for re-admission in clear standing (i) pass one-half or more of the credit hours for which she or he was registered at the end of the period for dropping courses without academic prejudice, and (ii) obtain an average of 55% or more.

b) to be eligible for conditional re-admission (i) pass one-half or more of the credit hours for which she or he was registered at the end of the period for dropping courses without academic prejudice, and (ii) obtain an average between 50% and 55%.

Any student not fulfilling conditions 2.(a) or 2.(b) will not be eligible for re-admission in any category for a minimum of two semesters. A student re-admitted after the expiry of the prescribed period, will be re-admitted conditionally.

NOTES: 1) In calculating averages under Clauses 1 and 2, the grades obtained in foundation courses and the "A" part of linked courses shall be included.

2) Engineering students not promoted to Term 3 after the April evaluations, who are required to repeat Term 1 of the Engineering programme under faculty regulations and who do not satisfy Clause 2.(a), may be re-admitted conditionally to Term 1 of the programme in the immediately following Fall Semester.

3) Conditions for re-admission of Medical students are covered by the Faculty of Medicine regulations on evaluations and promotions.

3. Any student re-admitted conditionally, will be permitted to register for a maximum of fifteen credit hours, during that semester, and will be required to meet the conditions of Clause 2.(a) above. Any such student who fails to meet the conditions of Clause 2.(a) will not be eligible for re-admission in any category for a period of at least two semesters. A student re-admitted after the expiry of the prescribed period, will be re-admitted conditionally.

NOTES: 1) Notwithstanding Clause 3 above, students who have been re-admitted conditionally will be permitted to register for the number of credit hours required by their programmes.

2) Any student who has been placed on conditional re-admission status, will not be re-admitted in clear standing until she or he meets the conditions of Clause 2.(a) above.

3) The University may place additional conditions on the re-admission of students who have failed to meet the requirements of any of clauses 1.a), 1.b), 2.a) or 2.b) above.

4. Only in the case of illness, bereavement or other acceptable cause, duly authenticated, will students be considered for an exemption from the provisions of Clauses 1, 2, and 3 above, through an appeal to the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies, via the Office of the Registrar.

5. A student who has failed on one occasion to meet the re-admission requirements at this or another recognized university or college will not be eligible for re-admission to the following two semesters in any category.

6. A student who has failed on two occasions to meet the re-admission requirements at this or another recognized university or college or both, will not be eligible for re-admission to the following six semesters in any category.

7. A student who has failed on three occasions to meet the re-admission requirements at this or another recognized university or college or both, will not be permitted further registration at this University in any category.

8. The foregoing notwithstanding, the appropriate Faculty or School Committee on Undergraduate Studies may, at any time, require a student to withdraw for academic reasons.

9. The foregoing notwithstanding, the University reserves the right to require students to discontinue their studies in a semester or to deny them re-admission to a subsequent semester where, in the opinion of the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies, following appropriate professional consultation, there is a reasonable likelihood that a student's health or behaviour could result in endangering the lives, health or safety of other persons on-campus or off-campus where such a location pertains to university studies.

10. The foregoing notwithstanding, Schools and Faculties reserve the right to require students to discontinue their studies, or to deny re-admission, where a student has been determined to have engaged in unprofessional conduct. The code of ethics of each profession will serve as the guideline as to what constitutes unprofessional conduct. However, should there not be any statements of what constitutes unprofessional conduct, the following standard will apply:

Unprofessional Conduct. That conduct which involves a breach of duty which professional ethics enjoin.

NOTES: 1) If the University or a School or Faculty requires a student to discontinue his/her studies or denies a student re-admission that student must be advised of the nature of the case against him/her, must be provided with an opportunity to answer the case against him/her and must be advised of the right to appeal before the penalty imposed takes effect.

2) Appeals against actions taken under Clause 9 should be directed to the Senate of the University. Any such appeal should be made in writing clearly stating the basis for the appeal, and should be directed to the Registrar of the University.

3) Appeals against actions taken under Clause 10 should be directed in the first instance to the appropriate School/Faculty Council. Appeals from the decisions of these Councils may be made to the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies and should be directed to the Secretary of the Committee, c/o the Office of the Registrar.


NON-ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

A. DISCIPLINE

The President may use all means deemed necessary for maintaining discipline. Students found guilty of misbehaviour may be suspended or fined on the authority of the President, or expelled from the University by the President on the authority of the Board of Regents. (See the Discipline Code.)

B. TRAFFIC AND PARKING REGULATIONS ON CAMPUS

Faculty, staff and students wishing to operate or park a vehicle on campus are required to register the vehicle (motorcycles included) with the security office on or before September 1st or within three working days after the arrival on campus of a vehicle at any time during the year. Traffic and parking regulations on campus are enforced by the Security Department assisted by the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary.

Application forms for vehicle permits, copies of the regulations, and information pertaining to traffic and parking on campus are available at the security office in the Services Building, SV.

C. EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Permission of the Director of University Works must be obtained for all student functions requiring the use of the University rooms or facilities. Applications for permission to use the University's facilities must be made in advance at the Office of the Director.


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Last modified October 24, 1996