Memorial University of Newfoundland

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR


SIR WILFRED GRENFELL COLLEGE
AT CORNER BROOK

The College, a campus of Memorial University of Newfoundland, was established in September 1975. In 1979 the College was named Sir Wilfred Grenfell College honouring the memory of the medical missionary who pioneered medicine in northern Newfoundland and along the coast of Labrador until his death in 1940.

Sir Wilfred Grenfell College offers four-year degree programmes in arts, science, fine arts and nursing. The B.A. degree is available in cognitive studies, English and psychology and the B.Sc. in environmental science. A B.A.(Hons.) is available in psychology. A four year Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) degree is offered at Western Memorial Regional Hospital School of Nursing at Corner Brook in conjunction with Sir Wilfred Grenfell College. The B.A. in cognitive studies, the B.Sc. in environmental science and the B.F.A. degree in theatre or visual arts are offered only at Sir Wilfred Grenfell campus.

Students may do the first two years of the University of New Brunswick's forest resource programme at Grenfell. In addition students may complete their first year in all programmes offered at the St. John's campus (except music). With the exception of education, social work, pharmacy and medicine, students who wish to continue their education in one of the University's professional schools normally transfer to the St. John's campus after one year. Students who wish to pursue a degree in music are advised to proceed directly to the St. John's campus for their first year of university studies.

The Division of Continuing Studies offers distance education courses in Corner Brook and in northern and western Newfoundland. The Division of Community Education also offers a wide variety of non-credit courses to the students at the College and to the general public.

The College, situated on a site overlooking the city of Corner Brook and the scenic Bay of Islands, consists of three buildings. The Arts and Science building includes, in addition to administrative and academic units, a bookstore, a dining hall for both resident and non-resident students, a physical education wing and a 200 bed student residence. The Fine Arts building contains facilities for students of Theatre and Visual Arts, the college community and the general public. The building features a 225 seat "Black Box" theatre, dressing rooms, scenery, costume, and properties workshops as well as an actors' green room and a rehearsal hall. The School also features an art gallery, art storage vault, four drawing and painting studios, a studio each for sculpture, multi-media and photography, colour and black and white darkrooms, a graphic arts darkroom as well as individual workshops for lithography, intaglio, and serigraphy. A new building housing the library, a computer lab and lecture hall was opened in the Fall of 1995, with skywalks connecting this facility to the other campus buildings.

STUDENT AFFAIRS AND SERVICES

The Department of Student Affairs and Services is concerned with all facets of student life at Grenfell College. It provides assistance in dealing with personal and social matters, and, in particular, problems associated with life at university. Professional counsellors provide individual and group counselling services.

Residence accommodations are co-ordinated through the Student Affairs Housing office. For students seeking off-campus accommodations, this office also has available a list of boarding houses and apartments in the Corner Brook area.

Student Affairs and Services is responsible for student recreation programmes, employment services, financial assistance and scholarships and awards tenable at Grenfell College. Students are encouraged to consult the Scholarships and Awards section of the Calendar.

One of the most frequently used services of the Department of Student Affairs is the Learning Centre, which offers individual help and small group tutorials in literacy and numeracy instruction. The Centre also offers a career planning programme, student success course and a variety of workshops and seminars to assist students in their academic development and personal growth.

COUNCIL OF THE STUDENTS' UNION

The Council of the Students' Union of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College represents students' interests to the College administration and on a provincial and national level through the Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Students and the Canadian Federation of Students. The Council also promotes artistic, literary, educational, social, recreational, charitable and sporting activities for the enhancement of the students of the College.

All full and part-time students pay CSU fees and upon registration, automatically become members of the Students' Union of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.

LIBRARY

The Ferriss Hodgett Library contains over 80,000 books along with collections of audio-visual materials, government documents, microforms and periodicals.

Reference, library orientation and interlibrary loan services are provided, together with seating for 215 users, including group study rooms, and audio-visual carrels. The Library also provides access to electronic information resources, as well as to the Internet, Spreadsheet, WordProcessing and Presentation Software.

As a branch of Memorial University Library, the College library also provides its users with access to the collections and services of all other MUN libraries.


STATEMENT OF ACADEMIC PURPOSE

Sir Wilfred Grenfell College has three academic roles. It continues to perform the function it had when it started in 1975 as a two-year university college from which students normally went on to complete their degrees at Memorial in St. John's or at universities elsewhere. In 1988 Grenfell College took on a second role in becoming the only institution in the province to offer professional degree programmes in Theatre and Visual Arts. In 1993 Grenfell added a third role, that of a four-year undergraduate college offering a liberal education leading to bachelor's degrees in arts and science.

At Grenfell College a liberal education means a critical and open-minded pursuit of knowledge providing students with the intellectual tools to enable them to respond to a rapidly changing world. A liberal education marks the start of preparation for a career and it may lead to graduate work in a number of fields. In a broader sense it is intended to build a foundation for social, cultural and recreational interests that will help students move toward a meaningful personal and professional life. Academically, the aim of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College is to enable students to be open to new ways of thinking and to gain a lasting intellectual self-confidence so that they may have both the ability and the desire to be life-long learners.

At Grenfell College the goal of high quality education is reflected in the following commitments:

- to teach students in a variety of challenging contexts and in general provide them with a personalized learning environment;

- to maintain high academic standards;

- to foster excellence in teaching, to encourage scholarship, research, performance and artistic endeavour, and to engage students, where appropriate, in these activities.

OFFICE OF THE PRINCIPAL

Bindon, K.M., B.A. George Williams, M.A., Ph.D. Queen's Principal

Fowler, A., B.A., M.A. Memorial Vice Principal

Gunther, G., B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. Toronto Vice Principal

Hibbitts, P.M., B.A. Toronto, M.B.A. York Director of Administration and Finance

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR

Noftall-Bennett, S., B.S.W. Memorial, M.Ed. Mount Saint Vincent College Registrar

Carlson, N., B.A. Memorial High School Liaison

STUDENT AFFAIRS AND SERVICES

Sparkes, M., B.A. Mount Saint Vincent, M.Ed. Toronto Co-ordinator

Carroll, L.D., B.A.(Ed.) Memorial Student Affairs Officer

Belbin, B., B.A., B.Ed. Memorial Manager of Residence Life

Park, L.G., B.S.W. Memorial Learning Centre Co-ordinator

Counsellors

Wilson, P., B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed. Memorial, Ed.D Toronto Associate Professor

Mitchell, T.L., B.F.A. NSCAD, M.Ed., Ph.D. Toronto Assistant Professor

Downey, P., B.Sc., M.Ed. Toronto Lecturer

Chaplains

Adams, J., Rev. United Church

Andrews, B., Pastor Pentecostal Church

Gibbons, M., Sister Roman Catholic

Noel, W., Rev. Anglican

COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND COLLEGE RELATIONS

Philpott, J., B.A. Memorial Co-ordinator

COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATIONS

Andrews, S.E., B.Sc., B.Ed., M.Sc. Memorial Manager

BURSARS OFFICE

Cohlmeyer, S., B.Com. Lakehead, C.A. Finance Officer

LIBRARY

Behrens, E., B.A. Montreal, M.A. Windsor, M.L.S. McGill College Librarian

SENIOR COLLEGE ACADEMIC ADVISOR

Newton, M.C., Cert. of Education King Alfred's College, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. McMaster Professor


ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

Leslie, A., B.A. Saskatchewan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. York; Assistant Professor and Co-ordinator

Bartels, D.A., B.A. Occidental, M.A., Ph.D. Alberta; Professor

Emke, I., B.A. Ohio State, M.A. Windsor, Ph.D. Carleton; Assistant Professor

BIOLOGY

Mann, H.E., B.A.(Hons.), M.Sc., Teach. Cert. Saskatchewan; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Andrews, S.E., B.Sc., B.Ed., M.Sc. Memorial; Associate Professor

Bateman, L.E., B.Sc.(Hons.) Dalhousie, M.Sc. Memorial; Associate Professor

Nambudiri, E.M.V., B.Sc. Kerala, M.Sc. Sardar Patel, Ph.D. Bombay; Assistant Professor

Warkentin, I.G., B.Sc., Ph.D. Saskatchewan; Assistant Professor

Knight, T.W., B.Sc. Guelph, M.Sc. Lakehead; Lecturer

CHEMISTRY

Haines, R.I., B.Sc., Ph.D. Leicester; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Rayner-Canham, G.W., B.Sc. London, D.I.C. Imperial College, Ph.D. London; Professor

Abhyankar, S.B., B.Sc., M.Sc. Bombay, M.S., Ph.D. Florida State; Associate Professor

Monaghan, P.K., B.Sc. Liverpool, Ph.D. Western Ontario; Associate Professor

Chandrasekhar, S., B.Sc., M.Sc. Bombay, Ph.D. Victoria; Assistant Professor

Dust, J.M., B.Sc.(Hons.) Waterloo, M.Sc. Dalhousie, Ph.D. Queen's; Assistant Professor

Iyer, S.S., B.Sc., M.Sc. IIT, Ph.D. Victoria; Assistant Professor

CLASSICS

Parker, M., B.A., M.A. Toronto, Ph.D. McMaster; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

EARTH SCIENCES

Iams, W.J., B.A. Johns Hopkins, M.Sc. Dalhousie, Ph.D. Memorial; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Burger, A.R., B.Sc.(Hons.) Dalhousie, M.Sc. Melbourne, Ph.D. Liverpool; Adjunct Professor

EDUCATION

Downer, D., B.Sc., B.Ed., M.Sc. Memorial, M.Ed., Ph.D. Ottawa; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Wilson, P., B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed. Memorial, Ed.D. Toronto

ENGLISH

Ware, M., B.A. Queen's, M.A., Ph.D. Dalhousie; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Fowler, A., B.A., M.A. Memorial; Professor

Freeman, D., M.A. Oxon, P.G.C.E. Leicester, Ph.D. London; Professor

Steffler, J.E., B.A. Toronto, M.A. Guelph; Professor

Maggs, W.R., B.A., M.A. Dalhousie, Ph.D. New Brunswick; Associate Professor

Pittman, A., B.A. St. Thomas; Associate Professor

Coates, J., B.A., M.A. Alberta, Ph.D. Illinois; Assistant Professor

Fabijancic, T., B.A. St. Francis Xavier, M.A. Victoria, Ph.D. New Brunswick; Assistant Professor

Pike, H., B.A. Memorial, M.A. Dalhousie, Ph.D. N.Y.; Assistant Professor

Barton, B., B.A., M.A. Guelph; Lecturer

Thackray, M., B.A. Waterloo, M.A. N.Y.; Lecturer

Jacobsen, K., B.A. Trinity Western, M.A. Queens; Lecturer

FOLKLORE

Ashton, J., B.A. London School of Economics and Political Science, M.A. Leeds, Ph.D. Memorial; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

FRENCH

Ozon, R., B.A. Laval, M.A. Memorial, D.S.M.L. Sorbonne; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Jamieson, S., B.A. Memorial, M.A. Laval, D. Nouveau Régime Sorbonne-Nouvelle; Associate Professor

Hender, C.E., B.A.(Ed.), B.A., M.A. Memorial; Associate Professor

Jordaan, C., B.A.(Hons.) London, M.A. Memorial; Lecturer

GEOGRAPHY

Nicol, K.S., B.A., M.Sc. British Columbia; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Evans, S., B.A., M.A. Cambridge, M.A., Ph.D. Calgary; Professor

Friend, P., B.A.(Hons.) Edinburgh, M.Sc. Alberta, Ph.D. Waterloo; Assistant Professor

HISTORY

Greenlee, J.G.C., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. McMaster; Professor and Co-ordinator

Janzen, O.U., B.A. McMaster, M.A., Ph.D. Queen's; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Bindon, K.M., B.A. George Williams, M.A., Ph.D. Queen's; Professor

Baehre, R., B.A., M.A., M.Phil. Waterloo, Ph.D. York; Associate Professor

Johnston, W., B.A. Simon Fraser, M.A., Ph.D. Montreal; Assistant Professor

MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

MacLeod, R., B.Sc. Concordia, M.Sc. McMaster; Assistant Professor and Co-ordinator

Gunther, G., B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. Toronto; Professor; Winner of the President's Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1994-95

Bussey, B., B.Sc., M.Sc. Memorial; Associate Professor

Richards, R.W., B.Sc. Calgary, M.Sc., Ph.D. McMaster; Associate Professor

Rowe, W., B.Sc. Memorial, M.Sc. Carleton; Associate Professor

Odiobala, P., B.Sc., M.Sc. Ibadan (Nigeria), Ph.D. Alberta; Assistant Professor

Shalaby, N., B.Sc. Ain Shams (Egypt), M.A. York, Ph.D. McMaster; Assistant Professor

Sodhi, A., B.Math. Waterloo, M.Sc., Ph.D. Queen's; Assistant Professor

PHILOSOPHY

Tomsons, S., B.A.(Hons.) Mt. Allison, M.A., Ph.D. Queen's; Assistant Professor and Co-ordinator

Tomsons, G., B.A., M.A. Manitoba, Ph.D. Queen's; Professor

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Carroll, D.A., B.P.E. Memorial, M.A. Alberta; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

PHYSICS

Haardeng-Pedersen, G.P., B.Sc., M.Sc. Waterloo, Ph.D. Memorial; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Forbes, D., B.Sc. Lyndon State, M.Sc. St. Mary's, Ph.D. Victoria; Associate Professor, Winner of the President's Award for Outstanding Research, 1993-94

Dykshoorn, W., B.Sc., Ph.D. York; Assistant Professor

Roleau, P., B.Sc. UQAM, Ph.D. Alberta; Assistant Professor

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS

Mintz, E.P., B.A. British Columbia, M.A. York; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Carreras, R.A., B.A. University of the Americas, Puebla, M.Sc., Ph.D. Texas Tech.; Assistant Professor

PSYCHOLOGY

Duffy, J., B.A., M.A. Carleton, Ph.D. York; Associate Professor and Co-ordinator

Cake, L.J., B.A. Queen's, M.Sc. Memorial, Ph.D. Queen's; Professor

Daniels, T., B.Sc. Ed., M.A. St. Francis Xavier, Ph.D. Dalhousie; Associate Professor

Ferguson, D.A., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Western Ontario; Associate Professor

Hostetter, R.C., B.A. San Jose State College, M.A., Ph.D. Illinois; Associate Professor

Stewart, D.J., B.A., M.A. Memorial, Ph.D. Miami; Associate Professor

Claxton-Oldfield, S., B.A. Queen's, M.A. Wilfrid Laurier, Ph.D. Exeter; Assistant Professor

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Newton, M.C., Cert. of Education King Alfred's College, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. McMaster; Professor, Co-ordinator, and Senior College Academic Advisor

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE

Hasnain, A., B.A. Toronto, National Theatre School of Canada; Associate Professor and Head of Department

Good, M.; Associate Professor

Livingstone, K.D., B.A. Bishop's, M.A. (Theatre) British Columbia; Associate Professor of Theatre

Robitschek, R., B.A. Ottawa, National Theatre School; Assistant Professor

DEPARTMENT OF VISUAL ARTS

Morrish, D., B.F.A. Manitoba, M.F.A. Calgary; Associate Professor and Head of Department

Coyne, M., B.F.A. Mt. Allison, M.F.A. Regina; Professor

Jones, K., B.A. California, H.D.F.A. The Slade School of Fine Art, University College London; Professor

Curtis, G., B.F.A., B.A. Calgary, Ph.D. Essex; Assistant Professor

Foulds, D., B.F.A., M.F.A. Saskatchewan; Assistant Professor

Judge, C., B.F.A. Alberta, M.F.A. Victoria; Assistant Professor

Klunder, H., Dip.Fine Arts Central Technical School, Toronto; Assistant Professor

MacCallum, M., B.F.A. Concordia, M.V.A. Alberta; Assistant Professor

Murray, L., B.F.A. Queen's, M.F.A. Alberta; Assistant Professor

Popescu, B., B.F.A. York, M.F.A. NSCAD, B.Ed. Toronto; Assistant Professor

Sasaki, L., B.F.A. Manitoba, M.F.A. NSCAD; Assistant Professor

Gallery Director

O'Neill, C., B.F.A. Concordia, M.F.A. Calgary


GENERAL REGULATIONS

Beyond the regulations and requirements specific to the Degree Programmes at Grenfell College, students will be governed by the General Academic Regulations (Undergraduates) as laid down in this University Calendar.

THE BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMMES

For the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees at Grenfell College students must complete one hundred twenty credit hours subject to the Core Programme and Specialization requirements.

The aim of the Core Programme is to ensure breadth. In the Core students will take a variety of courses representing the spectrum of human enquiry. It is through the Core that students learn to improve their basic academic skills, to think critically and independently about a broad range of subjects, and to develop their awareness of social, cultural, scientific and political issues. The aim of the Area of Specialization is to ensure depth. In the Area of Specialization students will be expected to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of a single discipline or interdisciplinary field of study.

CORE PROGRAMME RATIONALE

The Core Programme is based on the assumption that there exists a body of common knowledge shared by educated persons. This broad base of knowledge allows us to read and comprehend both popular and specialized literature, understand newspapers and magazines, news reports in the electronic media, and even understand one another's jokes. It also gives the background knowledge necessary for the acquisition of specialized information. It does not exist solely in the domain of one particular subject area but spans the whole realm of human knowledge.

This basic knowledge provides us with a vocabulary without which educated discourse is impossible. The Core Programme is intended to lead students towards this sort of literacy. In addition to education in depth in one or two academic areas, or in an interdisciplinary area with a unifying theme, Grenfell students will acquire a breadth of knowledge that is sufficient to permit clear and effective communication with other educated people and provide the background necessary for life-long learning.

The Core includes a Literacy Requirement, a Numeracy Requirement, a Scientific Concepts and Issues Requirement and a General Education Requirement. The Literacy Requirement is intended to ensure that graduates of Grenfell College are able to express themselves clearly and correctly and that they have a broad appreciation of the English language as a means of communication. The Numeracy Requirement is intended to ensure that graduates of Grenfell College are able to perform the basic mathematical functions necessary to live in modern society and that they have a broad understanding of mathematics as the language of science and technology. The Scientific Concepts and Issues Requirement is intended to ensure that students have a grasp of important concepts and discoveries in science as well as an understanding of issues that arise out of scientific endeavor.

1. CORE PROGRAMME REQUIREMENTS:

All candidates must complete the following literacy, numeracy, science literacy and general education requirements.

a) Literacy

Thirty credit hours in Writing Courses (identified with the designation W) including a first-year English sequence. Six credit hours in language may be substituted for any six credit hours in Writing Courses except for first-year English.

b) Numeracy

Successful completion of the General Mathematical Skills Test, and either six credit hours in Mathematics and/or Statistics, or a sequence of six credit hours in specially designed numeracy courses.

c) Science Concepts and Issues

Science 3000 and 3001.

d) General Education

Eighteen credit hours in General Education courses from the following groups. (The courses must be chosen from at least three groups; courses must be taken in at least four of the listed subject areas; no more than six credit hours may be chosen from each group.)

Group A: Art History, Classics, Literature, Theatre

Group B: Folklore, History, Languages, Philosophy, Religious Studies

Group C: Anthropology, Education, Geography, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology

Group D: Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Mathematics, Physics.

Courses that are to be included in these groups shall fulfill the requirements of what is defined as General Education and will be identified with the designation GE.

2. SPECIALIZATION REQUIREMENTS:

a) All students must complete the following Specialization requirements: at least sixty credit hours that satisfy the criterion of depth

EITHER by a prescribed interdisciplinary selection of courses having a strong thematic relationship;

OR by a coherent selection of at least thirty-six credit hours in a single discipline and twenty-four credit hours in one or two cognate disciplines.

b) With the permission of the appropriate coordinators, students may complete a double specialization provided that they complete all the requirements for both specializations.

c) Cognate courses will be chosen in consultation with the coordinator of the single-discipline area and the coordinator(s) or head(s) of the cognate area(s).

d) All specializations require a minimum of twelve credit hours in third-year courses, six credit hours in fourth-year courses and a fourth-year individual project ranging over one or two semesters.

e) Exceptional students, in close consultation with a faculty advisor, may devise specializations of their own choosing. Such "open" programmes will be subject to approval by the Academic Studies Committee.

The College reserves the right to limit the number of spaces available in each Specialization.

3. ELECTIVES:

Courses to make up the total of one hundred twenty credit hours, other than those required for the Core Programme and Specialization Requirements, may be chosen according to the following guidelines:

a) any courses in arts, science and fine arts;

b) up to fifteen credit hours in other subject areas.

4. WAIVER OF REQUIREMENTS:

Course prerequisites may be waived by co-ordinators/ heads/programme chairs of the disciplines in question.

In special circumstances the Academic Studies Committee may waive the requirements that apply to this degree programme.

EXPLANATORY NOTES:

1. Courses will be designated Writing Courses by the Academic Studies Committee.

A Writing Course is a course in which assignments written in English form at least 50% of the evaluated term work and the quality of writing accounts for a significant part of the evaluation. Students may substitute six credit hours in language courses for any six credit hours in writing courses except the first-year English sequence. Such courses include courses in languages other than English.

2. The General Mathematical Skills Test will be offered three times during the academic year, in September, January and April. It is intended to ensure that students have basic computational skills such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division; that they can make and use measurements in metric; that they can use effectively the mathematics of integers, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, percentages, roots, powers, elementary algebra and geometry; that they are able to make estimates and approximations, and judge the reasonableness of a result; that they understand elementary concepts in probability and statistics and know how to read graphs. A student must take the test once every semester, starting in the first semester of entry into a Grenfell Bachelor of Arts Programme, until he/she successfully completes it. The test must be passed by the end of the student's fourth semester in the programme. A student failing to do this will not be permitted to continue in the programme. Provision will be made, however, for students to be re-tested at the normal test times specified above. A student who is successful on a re-test will be permitted to re-enter the programme subject to meeting the general re-admission requirements.

3. Courses will be designated General Education Courses by the Academic Studies Committee. General Education Courses are courses from various subject areas that help to provide a broad body of shared knowledge. General Education Courses cover material within a discipline that contributes to the general body of knowledge common to educated members of society. Such courses should reflect upon the relationships between bodies of knowledge.

4. Courses that are designated both General Education and Writing Courses may be used to satisfy both requirements.

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE PROGRAMMES

SPECIALIZATION IN COGNITIVE STUDIES

The Specialization in Cognitive Studies is an inter-disciplinary programme offered to candidates at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College for the degree of Bachelor of Arts.

SPECIALIZATION SUPERVISORS:

Dr. Leslie Cake, Department of Psychology

Dr. Gunars Tomsons, Department of Philosophy

REQUIREMENTS FOR A SPECIALIZATION IN COGNITIVE STUDIES

Students at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College may complete a Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Specialization in Cognitive Studies by successfully completing one hundred twenty credit hours including the following:

1. Candidates are required to complete a total of sixty-three specified credit hours within the Cognitive Studies Specialization:

- twenty-seven credit hours in Philosophy which must include 1001, 1003, 2200, 2210, 2220, 3120, 3160, 4200, 4250.

- twenty-seven credit hours in Psychology which must include 1000, 1001, 2425, 2825, 2925, 2950, 3325, 3425, 4910.

- nine credit hours in Cognitive Studies which must include 4000, 4001, 4950.

2. Elective courses to be chosen in consultation with Specialization Supervisors.

Suggested Schedule for Courses Required by the Specialization in Cognitive Studies


YEAR 1
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Psychology 1000 Psychology 1001
Philosophy 1001 Philosophy 1003

YEAR 2
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Psychology 2925 Psychology 2950
Psychology 2425 Philosophy 2210
Philosophy 2200

YEAR 3
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Psychology 2825 Psychology 3425
Philosophy 2220 Philosophy 3120
Psychology 3325 Philosophy 3160

YEAR 4
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Psychology 4910 Philosophy 4200
Philosophy 4250 Cognitive Studies 4001
Cognitive Studies 4000
Cognitive Studies 4950

NOTE: In addition to meeting the requirements stated above for the Specialization in Cognitive Studies, students must also fulfil the Bachelor of Arts Degree requirements as defined by the CORE PROGRAMME. (See Core Programme Requirements under General Regulations above.)

SPECIALIZATION IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

The degree is a four year single-discipline General Degree following the general degree regulations for the Bachelor of Arts of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College. Students entering the programme require the approval of the Coordinator of the Department.

DEGREE REGULATIONS

The Specialization in English consists of BOTH a minimum of forty-two credit hours in English [described in Category A below], and twenty-four credit hours in Cognate courses [described in Category B below].

A. The selection of the forty-two credit hours shall be based on the following regulations:

1. One of English 1000, 1050, the former 1100 AND one of English 1001, 1051, 1110 are prerequisites for all other courses.

2. Students who choose English as their specialization must complete a twenty-four credit hour English Core Requirement including six credit hours in first year English as defined in (1) above, English 2005, 2006, 2007, 3395, 3200 or 3201, 4105. Students must complete at least six credit hours in courses having the initial digit "4".

3. In addition to the Core courses listed in (2) above students will be required to take either a concentration of eighteen credit hours chosen from one of three designated areas (Dramatic Literature, Canadian Literature, Modern Literature) or a combination of eighteen credit hours from these areas, as defined in 3.d. below.

a) Dramatic Literature Concentration

Students will be required to take English 2350, 2351, 3275 and nine more credit hours in dramatic literature which must include the Individual Project in English (4950), from the following selection:

English 3021, 3171, 3181, 3200 or 3201 (whichever course has not been used to fulfil the requirements of the English Core), 4302, 4305, 4307, 4308, 4316, 4317, 4813, 4950.

b) Canadian Literature Concentration

Students will be required to take English 2152 and fifteen more credit hours in Canadian literature, at least six credit hours of which are in courses at the 3000 level and at least three credit hours of which are in courses at the 4000 level in addition to the Individual Project in English (4950), from the following selection:

English 2155, 2156, 3145, 3146, 3147, 3148, 4307, 4825, 4950.

c) Modern Literature Concentration

Students will be required to take English 3215, 3216 and twelve more credit hours in modern literature, at least three credit hours of which are in courses at the 4000 level in addition to the Individual Project in English (4950), from the following selection:

English 2215, 2705, 2805, 3810, 3275, 4245, 4246, 4950.

The following courses from the Dramatic Literature Concentration above: English 4302, 4305, 4308

d) Combined Concentration

Students will be required to take courses comprising at least nine credit hours in one of the concentrations listed above: the first of these courses must be English 2152 for the Canadian Literature concentration; English 2350 or 2351 for the Dramatic Literature concentration; English 3215 or 3216 for the Modern Literature concentration, and one of these courses must be the Individual Project in English (English 4950). Students must also take at least three credit hours from each of the two other concentrations.

4. No students shall register in any course having an initial digit "3" unless they have successfully completed at least six credit hours in courses having an initial digit "2".

5. No students shall register in any course having an initial digit "4" unless they have successfully completed at least six credit hours in courses having an initial digit "3".

6. In their final year, all candidates for the Grenfell College English degree will prepare an individual project of a creative or critical or research character, the topic of which must be approved by the Coordinator of the department.

7. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of English 1000, 1050, 1080, 1100 or for more than one of 1001, 1051, 1101, 1102, 1103, 1110.

8. A student may not receive credit for more than six credit hours at the first-year level. This includes unspecified transfer credits.

B. The Cognate Courses part of the Specialization in English must include a coherent set of twenty-four credit hours in Cognate courses. Students will choose the Cognate Courses with the approval of the Coordinator of English and of the Coordinator(s) of the subject area(s) from which the Cognate Courses are to be taken. Students are advised to consult with the Coordinator of English concerning Cognate Courses by the beginning of their third year of studies at the latest. For general regulations covering Cognate Courses, see the Core Programme Requirements Section above under the Sir Wilfred Grenfell Section of this Calendar.

NOTE: In addition to meeting the requirements stated above for the Specialization in English students MUST also fulfil all the Bachelor of Arts Degree requirements including those defined in the CORE PROGRAMME. (See Core Programme Requirements under General Regulations above.)

SPECIALIZATION IN PSYCHOLOGY

Students at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College may take a Bachelor of Arts Degree Programme with a Specialization in Psychology.

GENERAL

Students wishing to complete a Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Specialization in Psychology should do so only after consulting with the Coordinator of the Department.

The introductory Psychology courses 1000 and 1001 are prerequisites for all other courses in Psychology. First year students will register for Psychology 1000 and 1001.

Some Psychology courses require regular laboratory classes. Others may require the completion of research, study projects or field projects.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A SPECIALIZATION IN PSYCHOLOGY

The Specialization in Psychology consists of BOTH a minimum of forty-five credit hours in Psychology [described in Category A below], and twenty-four credit hours in cognate courses [described in Category B below].

A. The forty-five credit hours in Psychology must comprise:

1) Psychology 1000, 1001, 2925, 2950, 3950, 4910, 4925, and one of 4950 or 4951.

2) At least four of the following: Psychology 2025, 2125, 2225, 2425, 2625, 2825.

3) At least nine credit hours chosen from the following Contemporary Issues courses: 3025, 3125, 3225, 3325, 3425, 3525, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3725, 3825

B. In accordance with Clause 2 (a) and 2 (b) SPECIALIZATION REQUIREMENTS, REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, the specialization in Psychology must include a coherent set of twenty-four credit hours in Cognate courses. Students will choose the cognate courses with the approval of the Coordinator of the Psychology Department and the approval of the coordinator(s) of the subject area(s) from which the cognate courses are to be taken. Students are advised to consult with the Coordinator of Psychology concerning cognate courses by the beginning of their third year of studies at the latest. For general regulations covering cognate course see the Core Programme Requirements Section under General Regulations above.

NOTE: In addition to meeting the requirements stated above for the Specialization in Psychology, students MUST also fulfil all the Bachelor of Arts Degree requirements including those defined in the CORE PROGRAMME. (See Core Programme Requirements under General Regulations above.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN PSYCHOLOGY (B.A. ONLY)

The Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in Psychology at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College offers greater concentration in a discipline than is required for the completion of a general degree while still meeting the Core Programme requirements of the Grenfell College Bachelor's degree. The Honours degree also requires a higher level of academic achievement than required for the general degree. The Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College is a 120-credit hour programme normally requiring four years for completion. The following requirements govern the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College of Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Declaration of Intent

Candidates shall submit a declaration of intent to pursue the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in Psychology to the Coordinator of the Psychology department and to the College Registrar, in writing, not later than the beginning of the candidate's fifth semester.

Academic Standing

In order to obtain the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in Psychology the candidate shall obtain:

i. A grade of 70% or better, OR an average of 75% or higher in the courses which comprise the minimum number of credit hours (including the required courses) in the Honours subject prescribed by the Department concerned, excluding the 1000-level courses. A grade of 70% or better must be obtained in the Honours thesis courses (Psychology 4951 and 4959).

AND

ii. An average of at least 1.75 points on the total number of credit hours required of the degree. (See General Regulation F, Classification of Degrees, for explanation of the point system.)

NOTE: Students who wish to fulfil the requirements of i. above using repeated of substituted courses must obtain approval of the Coordinator of Psychology and the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. The Honours thesis courses may not be repeated.

Residence Requirements

To qualify for the Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Degree in Psychology at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, a candidate shall attend Memorial University for at least six semesters as a full-time student, except with special permission of the Academic Studies Committee.

Course Requirements for Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology

a) Students must meet the Core and Cognate Requirements for Grenfell College Bachelor of Arts degree with a specialization in Psychology degree.

b) Candidates must complete: Psychology 1000, 1001, 2925, 2950, 2025, 2125, 2225, 2425, 2625, 2825, 3950, 4910, 4925.

c) Candidates must complete five of Psychology 3025, 3125, 3225, 3325, 3425, 3525, 3625, 3626, 3627, 3628, 3725, 3825.

d) Honours candidates are required to complete a two-semester research project, Psychology 4951 and 4959.

Honours Thesis

The Honours project sequence (Psychology 4951 and 4959) involves the production of an Honours thesis. This thesis will be evaluated by the thesis supervisor and an additional faculty member selected by mutual consent of the candidate and the supervisor.


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMME

SPECIALIZATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

GENERAL PROGRAMME REQUIREMENTS

The B.Sc. in Environmental Science requires the completion of at least 120 credit hours. The student will complete an Environmental Science Core (51-54 credit hours), providing a broad appreciation of the interrelationships inherent in any study of the environment, and a more specific stream (at least 30 credit hours) which will provide the depth and focus for the degree programme. Students must ensure that their chosen combination of required and elective courses meets the Sir Wilfred Grenfell College Core Programme requirements.

Environmental Science Core

The Environmental Science Core Requirements are outlined below. New courses in the Environmental Science Core are designated "EnSc" for Environmental Science and are numbered according to the scheme outlined under the heading "New Course Numbering".

The student must complete:

(a) Biology 1001, 1002, 2600

Chemistry 1200*, 1001*

Mathematics 1000* (or 1080 and 1081), 2510

Environmental Science 4080 (Computer-based Scientific Writing Environmental Science 4000(Environmental Science Seminar)

Environmental Science 4950 (Research Project in Environmental Science I)

(b) one of the following pairs:

Earth Science 1000/1001

Geography 1000/2102

Physics 1200*/1201* (or 1050/1052)

(c) at least two of:

Anthropology 3083 (Cultural Crises and the Environment)

Philosophy 2809 (Environmental Ethics)

Political Science 3731 (Environmental Policy)

(d) at least three of:

Environmental Science 2370 (Global Environmental Change)

Environmental Science 2371 (Oceanography)

Environmental Science 2430 (Energy and the Environment)

Environmental Science 2450 (Meteorology)

Geography 2195 (Introduction to Maps)

* It is strongly recommended that students considering the Chemistry stream of the Environmental Science Programme complete asterisked courses in their first year.

Stream Requirements

Courses required in each stream are listed below:

Biology stream (ESB)

(a) Biology 2010, 2122, 3041 (or 3250), 3610, 4360, 4820

Chemistry 2300 or 2440

Environmental Science 3130, 4130

Mathematics 2511

(b) a second pair beyond the pair selected from Environmental Science Core (b):

Earth Science 1000/1001

Geography 1000/2102

Physics 1200/1201 (or 1050/1052)

Chemistry stream (ESCh)

Chemistry 2210, 2300, 240A/B (or 2400/2401)

Environmental Science 2261, 3210, 3211, 3260, 3261, 4230, 4240

Mathematics 1001*

Philosophy 2809

* It is strongly recommended that students complete asterisked courses in their first year.

HONOURS PROGRAMME REQUIREMENTS

An honours degree offers depth in a discipline or coherent multidisciplinary concentration greater than that attained by completion of the general bachelor's specialization, while still meeting the Core Programme requirements of Grenfell general degree programmes. An honours programme also requires a higher level of academic achievement. The Grenfell honours Bachelor of Science degree is a 120 credit hour programme that is normally completed within four years. The following requirements govern the honours degree of Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science (B.Sc. Honours Environmental Science) at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College. (The normal sequences of courses for both streams are shown in Tables B.3 and B.5.)

Declaration of Intent

The candidate shall submit a declaration of intent to pursue the honours degree, in writing, to the co-ordinator(s)/ head(s)/programme chair(s) of the honours programme in question and to the College Registrar not later than the beginning of the applicant's fifth semester.

NOTE: Students who wish to pursue the honours degree programme in Environmental Science and who are in attendance at a recognized post-secondary institution normally may not transfer into the Environmental Science programme at a point later than the end of the fourth semester.

Course Requirements for the Honours Degree in Environmental Science

1. In addition to the College Core Programme requirements, which must be met by all Grenfell degree candidates, those who have declared an intention to pursue the honours programme in Environmental Science must complete the Environmental Science Core requirements and the course requirements of a specific stream, as well as any other courses to achieve a total of 120 credit hours.

2. Honours candidates must complete six credit hours in courses at the fourth-year level beyond those included in the general degree specialization (or stream). These courses must be drawn from the candidate's honours specialization as follows:

a) For the honours Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science (Biology):

Biology 4309 (Applied Biology)

Biology 4505 (Systematics and Biogeography)

b) For the honours Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science (Chemistry):

Environmental Science 4239 (Aquatic Chemistry II)

Environmental Science 4249 (Environmental Organic Chemistry)

3. The courses required under 2 above may be changed upon application to the Academic Studies Committee.

4. Exceptional students, in close consultation with a faculty advisor and the agreement of the co-ordinator(s) affected, may select fourth-year honours requirement courses of their own choosing, so long as such selections are consistent with the Specializations to which they are added. Such honours selections will be subject to approval by Academic Studies Committee.

5. Honours graduates of the Environmental Science Programme will have also completed a two-semester research project, consisting of the general degree one-semester project course (Environmental Science 4950) and a further one-semester research course (Environmental Science 4959).

Dissertation

The research project sequence (Environmental Science 4950/4959; see 5 above) culminates in an honours dissertation. The dissertation will be evaluated by a committee consisting of the dissertation supervisor and two other faculty members. An oral presentation may be required, at the discretion of the relevant co-ordinator/programme chair/head.

Academic Standing

To graduate with an honours degree in Environmental Science (Biology or Chemistry stream) the student must meet the academic standards for an honours Bachelor of Science degree at Memorial University, that is, the student must obtain: (i) a grade of "B" or better, OR an average of 75% or higher (whichever is to the candidate's advantage) in the courses which comprise the minimum number of credit hours in the relevant Environmental Science stream, excluding 1000 level courses but including any other Environmental Science core, stream or honours courses; and (ii) an average of at least 1.75 points on the total number of credit hours required for the degree.

Residence Requirements

To qualify for an honours degree in science, a candidate shall attend a recognized university or an equivalent institution for at least seven semesters as a full-time student. Honours candidates transferring credits to Memorial University from other universities or equivalent institutions shall EITHER spend a minimum of four of the seven semesters as full-time students at Memorial University, and take a minimum of twenty-four credit hours in their honours discipline OR take a minimum of thirty-six credit hours in their honours discipline as full-time students at Memorial University (whichever is to their advantage), PROVIDED that the total number of semesters spent as full-time students at this and other recognized universities or equivalent institutions will not be less than seven.

Table B.1. Sample Schedule for Courses Required to Complete the Biology Stream - General Degree, in which a student takes nine credit hours in lab science courses in the first year.


YEAR 1
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 1001 Biology 1002
Chemistry 1200 Chemistry 1001
Physics 1200 Physics 1201
Mathematics 1000 Mathematics 1001
English 1000 English 1001

YEAR 2
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 2600 Biology 2122
Biology 2010 EnSc 2430
Chemistry 2300 Mathematics 2511
Mathematics 2510 Philosophy 2809
Elective 1 Elective 2

YEAR 3
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 3610 Biology 3041
EnSc 3130 Geography 2102
Geography 1000 EnSc 2450
Science 3000 Science 3001
Elective 3 Elective 4

YEAR 4
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 4820 EnSc 4130
Biology 4360 EnSc 4000
EnSc 2370 EnSc 4080
EnSc 4950 Political Science 3731
Elective 5 Elective 6

Table B.2. Sample of the Biology Stream - General Degree, in which a student takes six credit hours in lab science courses in the first year.


YEAR 1
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 1001 Biology 1002
Earth Science 1000 Earth Science 1001
Mathematics 1080 (or 1000) Mathematics 1081 (or elective)
English 1000 English 1001
Elective 1 Elective 2

YEAR 2
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 2600 Biology 2122
Chemistry 1200 Biology 2010
Geography 1000 Chemistry 1001
EnSc 2370 Geography 2102
Elective 3 Elective 4

YEAR 3
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 3610 Biology 3250
EnSc 3130 EnSc 2371
Chemistry 2440 Mathematics 2511
Mathematics 2510 Science 3001
Science 3000 Elective 5

YEAR 4
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 4820 EnSc 4130
Biology 4360 EnSc 4000
EnSc 2450 EnSc 4080
EnSc 4950 Philosophy 2809
Political Science 3731 Elective 6

Table B.3. Sample of the Biology Stream - Honours Degree.


YEAR 1
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 1001 Biology 1002
Earth Science 1000 Earth Science 1001
Geography 1000 Geography 2102
Mathematics 1000 English 1001
English 1000 Elective 1

YEAR 2
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 2600 Biology 2122
Chemistry 1200 Biology 2010
EnSc 2370 Chemistry 1001
Mathematics 2510 Mathematics 2511
Elective 2 Philosophy 2809

YEAR 3
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 3610 Biology 3250
EnSc 3130 EnSc 2371
Chemistry 2440 Political Science 3731
EnSc 2450 Science 3001
Science 3000 Elective 3

YEAR 4
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Biology 4820 Biology 4309
Biology 4360 Biology 4505
EnSc 4080 EnSc 4130
EnSc 4950 EnSc 4000
Elective 4 EnSc 4959

Table B.4 Sample of the Chemistry Stream - General Degree.


YEAR 1
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Chemistry 1200 Chemistry 1001
Physics 1200 Physics 1201
Mathematics 1000 Mathematics 1001
English 1000 English 1001
Elective 1 Elective 2

YEAR 2
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Chemistry 240A Chemistry 240B
Chemistry 2300 Chemistry 2210
EnSc 2370 EnSc 2261
Biology 1001 Biology 1002
Elective 3 Elective 4

YEAR 3
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
EnSc 3210 EnSc 3261
EnSc 3260 Philosophy 2809
Mathematics 2510 Biology 2600
Geography 1000 Science 3001
Science 3000 Elective 5

YEAR 4
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
EnSc 3210 EnSc 3211
EnSc 4240 EnSc 4000
EnSc 4080 EnSc 4950
EnSc 2450 Geography 2195
Elective 6 Anthropology 3083

NOTE: It is strongly recommended that students select Earth Science 1000 and Geography 2195 as two of their electives.

Table B.5. Sample of the Chemistry Stream - Honours Degree.


YEAR 1
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Chemistry 1200 Chemistry 1001
Physics 1200 Physics 1201
Mathematics 1000 Mathematics 1001
English 1000 English 1001
Elective 1 Elective 2

YEAR 2
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
Chemistry 240A Chemistry 240B
Chemistry 2300 Chemistry 2210
Biology 1001 Biology 1002
Mathematics 2510 EnSc 2261
Philosophy 2809 Elective 3

YEAR 3
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
EnSc 3210 EnSc 3211
EnSc 3260 EnSc 3261
Biology 2600 Anthropology 3083
Science 3000 Science 3001
Elective 4 Elective 5

YEAR 4
SEMESTER 1
SEMESTER 2
EnSc 4230 EnSc 4239
EnSc 4240 EnSc 4249
EnSc 2370 EnSc 4000
EnSc 4950 EnSc4959
EnSc 4080 EnSc 2371

NOTE: It is strongly recommended that students select Earth Science 1000 and Geography 2195 as two of their electives.


DESIGNATED GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES (GE)

GROUP "A"

ART HISTORY
(Visual Arts)
CLASSICS
LITERATURE
(English)
THEATRE
2700-W-GE
VA/HIS
1100-W-GE 2005-W-GE 1000-GE
2701-W-GE
VA/HIS
1101-W-GE 2006-W-GE 1001-GE
3700-W-GE
VA/HIS
2020-W-GE 2007-W-GE
3701-W-GE
VA/HIS
2035-W-GE
CLS/HIS
2705-W-GE
3820-W-GE
VA/RELS
2040-W-GE
CLS/HIS
3200-W-GE
4730-W-GE
VA/HIS
2701-W-GE 3201-W-GE
4731-W-GE
VA/HIS
3110-W-GE
CLS/ENG
3111-W-GE
CLS/ENG
(French)
3130-W-GE
CLS/FKL
2550-GE
2551-GE

GROUP "B"

FOLKLORE
HISTORY
LANGUAGE
PHILOSOPHY
RELIGIOUS
STUDIES
1000-W-GE 1000-W-GE 1001-W-GE 1010-W-GE
1050-W-GE 1001-W-GE 1003-GE 1020-W-GE
2000-W-GE 1100-GE-W 1200-W-GE 1030-W-GE
2400-GE
FKL/ANT
1101-GE-W 2200-W-GE 2011-W-GE
2500-W-GE 2035-W-GE
CLS/HIS
2701-W-GE 2013-W-GE
3130-W-GE
FKL/CLS
2040-W-GE
CLS/HIS
2800 -
2810-W-GE
2050-W-GE
2700-W-GE
VA/HIS
3400-W-GE 2051-W-GE
2701-W-GE
VA/HIS
3600-W-GE 2610-GE
3700-W-GE
VA/HIS
3610-W-GE 2800-W-GE
3701-W-GE
VA/HIS
3620-W-GE
VA/PHIL
2801-W-GE
4730-W-GE
VA/HIS
3701-W-GE 2810-GE
4731-W-GE
VA/HIS
3730-W-GE 3820-W-GE
RELS/VA
3840-W-GE

DESIGNATED GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES (GE) cont'd

GROUP "C

ANTHROPOLOGY/
SOCIOLOGY
EDUCATION
GEOGRAPHY
POLITICAL
SCIENCE
PSYCHOLOGY
A1031-GE 2360-GE 1000-GE 1000-W-GE 1000-GE
S1000-GE 1001-GE 1020-W-GE 1001-GE
S2000-GE 2001-W-GE 2000-W-GE
2102-GE 2200-W-GE
2300-W-GE
2500-GE

GROUP "D"

BIOLOGY
CHEMISTRY
EARTH
SCIENCE
ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCE
PHYSICS
SCIENCE
1001-GE 2600-W-GE 1000-W-GE 2261-GE 1200-GE 115A-GE
1002-GE 2601-W-GE 1001-W-GE 1201-GE 115B-GE
2040-W-GE 2150-GE 2151-GE
2041-W-GE 2914-W-GE
2915-W-GE


DESIGNATED WRITING COURSES (W)

ANTHROPOLOGY/
SOCIOLOGY
EARTH SCIENCE
ENGLISH
(Cont'd)
FOLKLORE
S/A2240-W 1000-W-GE 3201-W-GE 1000-W-GE
S/A2260-W 1001-W-GE 3215-W 1050-W-GE
S/A2270-W 2914-W-GE 3216-W 2000-W-GE
S2610-W 2915-W-GE 3225-W 2300-W
FKL/ANT
2300-W
ANT/FKL
ENGLISH
3275-W 2500-W-GE
S3150-W 1000-W 3810-W 3130-W
CLS/FKL
S3290-W 1001-W 3905-W 3200-W
S3395-W 1050-W 4105-W 3300-W
BIOLOGY
1051-W 4245-W
GEOGRAPHY
2040-W-GE 1110-W 4246-W 2001-W-GE
2041-W-GE 2005-W-GE 4302-W 2302-W
2122-W 2006-W-GE 4305-W
HISTORY
2600-W 2007-W-GE 4307-W 1000-W-GE
CHEMISTRY
2152-W 4308-W 1001-W-GE
2210-W 2155-W 4310-W 1100-W-GE
CLASSICS
2156-W 4316-W 1101-W-GE
1100-W-GE 2215-W 4317-W 2035-W
CLS/HIS
1101-W-GE 2350-W 4825-
4835-W
2040-W
CLS/HIS
2020-W-GE 2351-W 4836-
4844-W
2100-W
2035-W-GE
CLS/HIS
2705-W-GE 4905-W 2110-W
2040-W-GE
CLS/HIS
2805-W 4940-W 2200-W
2701-W-GE 3110-W-GE
CLS/ENG
ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCE
2210-W
3102-W 3111-W-GE
CLS/ENG
2371-W 2300-W
3110-W-GE
CLS/ENG
3145-W 3210-W 2310-W
3111-W-GE
CLS/ENG
3146-W 3211-W 2330-W
3130-W
CLS/FKL
3147-W 4080-W 2700-W-GE
VA/HIS
COGNITIVE STUDIES
3148-W 4950-W 2701-W-GE
4950-W 3200-W-GE 4951-W 3110-W

DESIGNATED WRITING COURSES (W) Cont'd

HISTORY
(Cont'd)
PHILOSOPHY
(Cont'd)
POLITICAL SCIENCE
(Cont'd)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
(Cont'd)
3120-W 3120-W 1020-W-GE 3820-W-GE
REL/VA
3440-W 3150-W 2000-W-GE 3840-W-GE
3450-W 3160-W 2200-W-GE
THEATRE
3460-W 3400-W-GE 2300-W-GE 4050-W
3520-W 3600-W-GE 2500-W-GE 4060-W
3525-W 3610-W-GE 2710-W
VISUAL ARTS
3700-W-GE
VA/HIS
3620-W-GE
VA/PHIL
2711-W 2700-W-GE
VA/HIS
3701-W-GE
VA/HIS
3701-W-GE
PSYCHOLOGY
2701-W-GE
VA/HIS
4231-W 3730-W-GE 4910-W 3620-W
VA/PHIL
4730-W-GE
VA/HIS
3850-W 4950-W 3700-W-GE
VA/HIS
4731-W-GE
VA/HIS
4200-W 4951-W 3701-W-GE
VA/HIS
LANG (Ger.)
4250-W 4959-W 3702-
3721W
2900-W 4700-W
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
3820-W
VA/REL
2901-W
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
1010-W-GE 4700-
4729-W
PHILOSOPHY
2300-W 1020-W-GE 4730-W-GE
VA/HIS
1001-W-GE 3330-W 1030-W-GE 4731-W-GE
VA/HIS
1200-W-GE 3340-W 2011-W-GE 4740-W
2200-W-GE 3350-W 2013-W-GE 4741-W
2220-W 3410-W 2050-W-GE
WOMEN'S STUDIES
2230-W
POLITICAL SCIENCE
2051-W-GE 2001-W-GE
2701-W-GE 1000-W-GE 2800-W-GE
2800-
2810-W-GE
1010-W-GE 2801-W-GE


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

NOTES: 1) Prerequisites may be waived by the coordinator of the course area in question.

2) Upon the recommendation of the appropriate coordinator(s)/Specialization supervisor, any Specialization requirements may be waived by the Academic Studies Committee.

3) Some of the courses in this section of the Calendar are available only at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College. Students who choose to transfer from Grenfell to the St. John's campus should see their faculty advisor to determine the extent to which such courses can be applied to their new programme.

ANTHROPOLOGY

1030. Introduction to Archaeology and Physical Anthropology. A broad overview of Archaeology and Physical Anthropology introducing the concepts of human biological and cultural evolution and the methods and techniques by which these are investigated. The course is designed to provide the basis for further study in the disciplines.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Anthropology 1030 and the former Anthropology 1000 or 2000.

1031. Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology. A general introduction to Anthropology emphasizing different forms of society and culture. Cultures within and outside the Western tradition will be examined, ranging from small-scale to more complex pre-industrial societies.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Anthropology 1031 and the former Anthropology 1000 or 2000.

2200 (S/A 2200). Communities. An interdisciplinary examination of the concept of Community. Readings will include community studies from North America and Europe.

2210 (S/A 2210). Communication and Culture. An examination of verbal and non-verbal systems of communication, and the influence of language on human cognition.

2230 (S/A 2230). Newfoundland Society and Culture. (Same as Folklore 2230). The Sociology and Anthropology of the Island of Newfoundland. The focus is on social and cultural aspects of contemporary island Newfoundland.

2240 (S/A 2240). Canadian Society and Culture. A descriptive and analytic approach to the development of Canadian society and culture.

2260 (S/A 2260). War and Aggression. Critical review of ethological, psychological and sociological approaches to the understanding of violence and organized aggression.

2270 (S/A 2270). Families. A comparative and historical perspective on the family as a social institution, the range of variation in its structure and the determinants of its development.

2350 (S/A 2350). Religious Institutions. (Same as Religious Studies 2350) Comparative study of religious institutions and beliefs, calendrical feasts and solemnities, religious roles and hierarchies, ritual innovation and revitalization.

2410. Classics in Social and Cultural Anthropology. An examination of selected milestone monographs, ground-breaking studies for subdisciplinary specialties, and major syntheses.

2411. Anthropologists in the Field. Anthropologists base many of their ideas on experiences they have while living in other cultures. This course examines the human relationships through which anthropologists explore cultures and how in turn these relationships affect the anthropologists and the development of their discipline.

2412. Threatened Peoples. An examination of key social and cultural factors involved in the global extinction of small-scale societies; the intrusive influences that jeopardize small-scale societies, such as disease; economic and military incursion; the role of international non-governmental agencies in aid of threatened peoples; and the role of the anthropologist in this human crisis.

2413. Modern World Cultures. An examination of significant studies of 20th century populations and their implications for understanding the human condition.

2430. Physical Anthropology: The Human Animal. Physical Anthropology investigates the human animal as we exist now and as we developed through time. Students will discover how the study of fossil remains, living and extinct primates, and the applications of the principles of genetics, adaptation and variation of human evolution help to provide an understanding of how biology and culture have interacted to produce modern humans.

Prerequisite: Anthropology 1030.

2491. Popular Archaeology. A course on how human history is reconstructed from archaeological remains. Methods and techniques of archaeology are illustrated through discussion of archaeological research currently in progress, both in Newfoundland and Labrador and elsewhere in the world.

NOTE: This course may not be used for credit toward a major or minor concentration in Archaeology/Physical Anthropology.

3140 (S/A 3140). Social Movements. An examination of social movements which challenge prevailing social institutions and cultural values. Social movements considered may include religious cults and sects, millenarian movements, attempts at utopian and communal living, feminism, labour and revolutionary movements.

BIOLOGY

NOTE: Biology 1001 and 1002 are prerequisites to all higher courses in Biology except where noted below.

1001-1002. Principles of Biology. An introduction to the science of Biology, including a discussion of the unity, diversity and evolution of living organisms.

Three hours of lecture and a three-hour laboratory per week.

NOTE: Biology 1001 is a prerequisite for Biology 1002.

2010. Biology of Plants. A study of the structure, function and reproductive biology of plants, with emphasis on the vascular plants, and on their relationship to environment and human activities.

Three hours of lecture and a three-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Biology 1002, Chemistry 1001.

2040. Modern Biology and Human Society I. This course examines various aspects of the human body, and the implications of modern biological research for human beings. Topics include cancer; diet and nutrition and associated diseases; circulatory disease, immunity, human genetics, biorhythms, new diseases, genetic engineering and reproductive engineering.

Three hours of lectures/seminars per week.

2041. Modern Biology and Human Society II. This course examines the origins and consequences of the environmental crisis of the 20th century. Topics include the population explosion, energy, material cycles, air and water and land pollution, global food supplies, the fisheries, wildlands, renewable and non-renewable resources, environmental ethics.

Three hours of lecture/seminar per week.

NOTE: Biology 2040 and 2041 are not acceptable as any of the required courses for the Minor, Major or Honours programmes in Biology. There are no prerequisites for these courses.

2122. Biology of Invertebrates. A study of the invertebrates with emphasis on structure and function, adaptations and life histories. The laboratories will present a broad survey of the major invertebrate groups.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Biology 1002.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Biology 2122 and the former Biology 3122.

2210. Biology of Vertebrates. A study of the vertebrates, with emphasis on structure and function, adaptations and life histories.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Biology 1002.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Biology 2210 and the former Biology 3210.

2600. Principles of Ecology. A conceptual course introducing the principles of ecology, including theoretical, functional and empirical approaches.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Biology 1002.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Biology 2600 and the former Biology 3600.

3041. Boreal Flora. The identification of the terrestrial plants (vascular plants and bryophytes) of Newfoundland and Labrador. Various aspects of reproduction or floral biology, and the use of dichotomous keys will be covered.

Prerequisite: Biology 2010.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

3250. Principles of Genetics. An introduction to Mendelian, population, molecular, and developmental genetics which provides an understanding of the molecular basis of variation in organisms and their populations.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Two of: 2010, 2122, 2210.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Biology 3250 and the former Biology 2250.

3610. Boreal Ecology. A study of the principal features of terrestrial ecosystems, with emphasis on the boreal region.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: Biology 2010 and 2600. Statistics 2550 or equivalent.

4360. Community and Ecosystem Ecology. A study of the basic principles, patterns and processes of ecological communities and ecosystems.

Three hours of lecture plus a seminar/discussion group each week.

Prerequisite: Biology 2600.

Recommended: Biology 3295.

4820. Field Course in Terrestrial Biology. The course will begin with a three-week field school immediately prior to the beginning of the Fall Semester. It is designed to acquaint students with terrestrial organisms and environments, and emphasis will be placed on survey and sampling techniques. In the Fall Semester the material and data collected in the field will be used in lecture and laboratory periods dealing with identification, analytical methods, and report compilation.

Prerequisites: Biology 2010, 2122, 2210, 2600 and permission of the Head.

Recommended: Biology 4605.

BUSINESS

1000. Introduction to Business. An overview of business in the Canadian environment is presented in the course with emphasis on the stakeholders involved and the issues confronting managers. The course examines the functional areas of the enterprise (finance, marketing, production, and human resources management) in addition to providing an overview of the business system. An analysis of actual business situations provides a framework of study.

NOTE: This course was formerly Business 2001. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 2001 and Business 1000.

CHEMISTRY

1000 (F) and 1001 (W). Introductory General Chemistry. Classification and phases of matter; atomic structure; chemical bonding; periodic table illustrated by the chemistry of selected elements; mole-concept and stoichiometry; energetics; rates of reaction; chemical equilibria; an introduction to organic chemistry; Chemistry 1000 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 1001.

Lectures: Four per week including tutorials.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of the following pairs of courses: Chemistry 1000 and 1001; Chemistry 1200 and 1001; Chemistry 150A/B.

1200. Course content includes those topics covered in Chemistry 1000, with the additional time being spent on relevant topics that are normally studied in high school Chemistry or in Chemistry 1800.

Lectures: Four per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

(This course is given at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College only).

NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of the following pairs of courses: Chemistry 1000 and 1001; Chemistry 1200 and 1001; Chemistry 150A/B.

1800. Introduction to Chemistry. This course is intended for those who have had no previous exposure to Chemistry, those who have a weak background, and those returning to the subject after some years. Matter and Energy; atoms; ions, and molecules; the periodic table; stoichiometry, the mole concept; gases; nuclear chemistry.

Lectures: Four per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may not be used as one of the Chemistry courses required for a Major or Honours in Chemistry, nor towards fulfilment of the 78 credit hours in science courses required for the B.Sc. degree.

2210. Introductory Inorganic Chemistry (F) and (W). Structural chemistry of the solid state. Introduction to molecular orbital and crystal field theories. Chemistry of the s, p, and f block elements.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1001 and Mathematics 1000 or 1081.

Lectures: Three per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of Chemistry 2210 and Chemistry 3200: Credit may be obtained for only one of Chemistry 2210, Chemistry 2001, Chemistry 2041, and Chemistry 200A/B.

2300. Introductory Physical Chemistry (F) and (W). Introductory chemical thermodynamics and equilibria. Complementary laboratory work with an emphasis on quantitative analysis.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1001, Mathematics 1001, Physics 1052 or 1201.

Lectures: Three per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of the following courses: Chemistry 2000, Chemistry 2040, Chemistry 2300, Chemistry 2310, Chemistry 2500 and Chemistry 200A/B.

2400 (F) and 2401 (W). (Formerly 240A/B). Introductory Organic Chemistry. A study of the principal classes of organic compounds, their synthesis, properties and reactions.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1000 and 1001 or equivalent with a combined average of 65%. Chemistry 2400 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 2401.

Lectures: Three per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of Chemistry 240A/B, 2400, 2420 or 2440.

2440. Organic Chemistry for Biologists (F) & (W). An introduction to the principles of organic chemistry with an emphasis on material relevant to biological molecules. The laboratory will introduce techniques and illustrate concepts covered in the course.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1001 or its equivalent.

Lectures: Three per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course is designed primarily for Biology Majors. It may not be used for credit by Chemistry or Biochemistry Majors and may not serve as a prerequisite for any other Chemistry course. Credit may be obtained for only one of Chemistry 2400, 2420, 2440, 240A/B.

CLASSICS

120A and 120B. Introduction to the Latin Language. This course is designed to introduce absolute beginners to the Latin language and, by careful selection of ancient thoughts in the original tongue, to give a reading knowledge of the language. The student, furthermore, is enabled while acquiring the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin to perceive many of the linguistic principles that form the basis of English and Romance languages of our day. The course should also be of interest to students in the Faculty of Science who wish to understand the derivations of scientific terminology.

130A and 130B. Introduction to Greek (Classical and New Testament). This course is designed to introduce absolute beginners to the Greek language and to prepare them for the reading of masterpieces of Classical Greek literature and/or the New Testament in the original tongue. Students are acquainted with the alphabet in the first two or three lessons and then proceed to the study of the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary. One feature of the course is the reading of original prose passages suitably graded to match the students' increasing skill. Special attention is also given to the study of derivatives and the student learns to appreciate the extent to which Greek has enriched the vocabulary of English especially in the areas of science and technology.

1100. Introduction to Greek Civilization. A general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of Ancient Greek Civilization. The course introduces the student to Greek social and political institutions, religion and myth, and achievements in art, philosophy, science and literature, as well as the influence of Ancient Greece on the modern world.

NOTE: Students who have completed Classics 2000 may not also receive credit for Classics 1100.

1101. Introduction to Roman Civilization. A general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of Ancient Rome. The course introduces the student to social, political, and legal institutions, the growth of the Roman Empire, Roman art, literature, and religions, as well as Rome's pervasive influence in the modern world.

NOTE: Students who have completed Classics 2001 may not also receive credit for Classics 1101.

2020. Hellenistic Civilization. An illustrated survey of the political, social, intellectual and artistic developments in the Mediterranean world and the Near East from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC until the incorporation of the Kingdom of Egypt in the Roman Empire in 30 BC. Particular attention is given to the fusion of eastern and western thought-patterns and ideologies under the influence of Greek culture.

2035. History of Classical Greece. (Same as History 2035). A survey of Greek History from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great, with special reference to the social and political institutions of the fifth century, B.C.

NOTE: Students who have completed History/Classics 2030 since 1985-86 or the former History/Classics 3910 may not also receive credit for History/Classics 2035.

2040. History of Rome. (Same as History 2040). A survey of Roman History from the early monarchy to the reign of Constantine with special reference to society and politics in the late Republic and early Empire.

NOTE: Students who have completed Classics/History 3920 may not also receive credit for Classics 2040.

2055. Women in Greece and Rome. An examination of the role of women in ancient Greece and Rome from the perspectives of religion, literature, art, society, and politics. Critical assessments of the scholarship and methodologies (including feminist methodologies) relevant to this topic will be included.

2200. Intermediate Latin. Any grammar and syntax not covered in the two earlier courses is completed and the student is able to read selections from a variety of authors.

2205. Selections from Latin Authors.

NOTE: Students who have completed Classics 2201 may not also receive credit for Classics 2205.

2300. Intermediate Greek. Any grammar and syntax not covered in the two earlier courses is completed and the student is able to read selections from a variety of authors.

2305. Attic Prose Authors.

NOTE: Students who have completed Classics 2301 may not also receive credit for Classics 2305.

2701. History of Ancient Philosophy. (Same as Philosophy 2701). A survey of the origin and development of Western philosophy among the Greeks and Romans.

2800. Classical Drama I. A comprehensive study of the development of Greek tragedy and the satyr-play in their social, literary and technical context, through discussions of the origins of Greek tragedy, illustrated lectures on the development and technical aspects of the Greek theatre structures, and comprehensive analyses of plays from the major writers of the genres.

2801. Classical Drama II. A continuation of the work done in Classics 2800. A comprehensive study of the development of Greek comedy and Roman tragedy and comedy in their social, literary and technical context, through discussions of the origins of Greek comedy and Roman tragedy and comedy, illustrated lectures on the development and technical aspects of the roman theatre structures, and comprehensive analyses of plays from the major writers of the genres.

Prerequisite: Classics 2800.

3110. Greek Literature in Translation. (Same as English 3110.) Representative readings in English of the principal literary forms of Classical Greece. The literary achievement of the Greeks and their contributions to Western letters and culture.

3111. Latin Literature in Translation. (Same as English 3111.) Representative readings in English of the principal literary forms of Republican and Imperial Rome. The literary achievement of the Romans and their contribution to Western letters and culture.

3130. Greek and Roman Mythology. (Same as Folklore 3130.) A study of the major legends of Greece and Rome as embodied in the literary and artistic remains of the ancient world, and of the influence of these legends on later art and literature.

COGNITIVE STUDIES

4000. Seminar in Cognition I. This course investigates various models of mind, and the role of perception, imagery and language in cognition from the joint perspectives of Philosophy and Psychology.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2425, Psychology 3425, Philosophy 2200, 2220, or the approval of course instructors.

4001. Seminar in Cognition II. This course will consider selected topics related to Cognition from the joint perspectives of Psychology and Philosophy. This course will include issues from the general topics of memory and learning, reasoning, concept formation, artificial intelligence as applied to human cognition, and social and cultural cognition.

Prerequisite: Seminar in Cognition I.

4950. Independent Project in Cognitive Studies (W). Under the supervision of faculty members in Philosophy and/or Psychology, candidates will independently carry out projects in Cognitive Studies and submit a written report of the results of their inquiries.

Prerequisite: The approval of the Specialization Supervisors.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

2602. Computer Programming in BASIC and FORTRAN (F) & (W). (Computer Science 2602 is a service course. See Computer Sciences Service Courses in the Computer Science entry in the Faculty of Science section of the Calendar.) Introduction to computers and their use; interactive computing; the BASIC and FORTRAN programming languages and their application to the computer solution of numeric and non-numeric problems.

In addition to three one-hour lectures there will be a minimum three hour laboratory per week to be scheduled by the department.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or 1080. Recommended Mathematics 1031.

NOTE: Students who have received credit for the former Computer Science 2600, or the former 2601, or the former 2800 cannot receive credit for Computer Science 2602.

EARTH SCIENCES

1000 and 1001. Planet Earth - An Introduction to Earth Sciences. The structure of the Earth, including its origin and evolution through time; global plate tectonics and the origin of continents and oceans; the composition and geological setting of minerals and rocks; geological time, fossils and the history of life; formation, exploitation and conservation of economic mineral and hydrocarbon resources; Earth's changing environment: past, present and future; and the geological history of North America, with particular emphasis on Newfoundland scenery and structure. Laboratory work includes field trips to local features of geological interest, the study of minerals, rocks and fossils, and interpretation of topographic and geological maps.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratories: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Earth Sciences 1000 is a prerequisite for Earth Sciences 1001.

2150. The Solar System (F) (W). Basic astronomy of the Solar System, tracing the search to understand motion of the Sun, Moon and planets in the sky; modern observations of planets, moons, comets, asteroids and meteorites and what they tell us about the origin and evolution of the Solar System.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 (or 1081).

NOTE: Earth Sciences 2150 is designed for students taking Earth Sciences as an elective subject and may only be used as a non-Science elective for Earth Sciences Majors and Earth Sciences Honours students.

2914. Natural Resources and the Past (F). (Same as former Geology 2414 and Earth Sciences 2414). An analysis of the Earth's physical environment and resources, and the history of man's exploitation of them; emphasis is placed on insights provided by Earth Sciences into the contemporary human predicament.

NOTE: Earth Sciences 2914 is designed for students taking Earth Sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to teachers. This course may only be used as a non-science elective for Earth Sciences Major and Earth Sciences Honours students.

2915. Natural Resources and the Future (W). (Same as former Geology 2415 and Earth Sciences 2415). A survey of pressures on the Earth's natural resources and policies for their management; special attention is given to the role of energy in society.

NOTE: Earth Sciences 2915 is designed for students taking Earth Sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to teachers. This course may only be used as a non-science elective for Earth Sciences Majors and Earth Sciences Honours students.

3811. Paleontology (W). An outline of the major changes in life forms from Archean times through the Phanerozoic to the present day, including details of invertebrate and vertebrate faunas and major floral groups; mechanisms and effects of mega-, macro- and microevolution in the fossil record; biology and classification of organisms and summaries of their geological significance in biostratigraphy, paleoecology and rock-building; relationships between major cycles of evolution and extinction to global processes. This course has a laboratory component.

Prerequisites: EITHER Earth Sciences 1001 and Biology 2120 (or Biology 1001 and 1002), OR Biology 2122 and 2210.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Earth Sciences 3811 and Biology 3811, or either the former Earth Sciences 3801 or Biology 3800.

ECONOMICS

2010. Introduction to Microeconomics I. Scarcity and opportunity cost. Demand and supply. Elasticity. Household demand: marginal utility. Household demand: indifference curves. Production functions. Short-run and long-run cost functions. Perfect competition in the short run and the long run. Monopoly.

2020. Introduction to Macroeconomics. National income accounting, aggregate income analysis, money, banking and foreign trade.

3030. International Economics - Issues and Problems in a Canadian Context. An intermediate course in international economics. The course covers the theory of comparative advantage, the structure and policy issues of the Canadian balance of payments, the foreign exchange market and the institutional aspects of international commerce.

3070. The Structure and Problems of the Newfoundland Economy. An analysis of the structure of the economy of Newfoundland. Basic economic theory will be applied to current economic issues and problems in Newfoundland.

EDUCATION

2040. Basic Interpersonal Communication (P,E,H). This course is designed to help students develop confidence through self-expression, and acquire skills in interpersonal relationships.

2360. School and Society (P,E,H). An examination of the role of the school in society. An introduction to the historical and social forces which have influenced the structure and processes of schooling, with special reference to Newfoundland education. A consideration of themes relevant to the study of the school in society. A critical discussion of selected issues and trends in education.

2610. Introduction to Child Development (P,E). An introduction to the nature of physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development from birth to puberty. Emphasis is placed on individual differences and on the developmental bases for the selection of educational experiences offered children.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 2610 and the former Education 3240.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

ENGLISH CORE COURSES

1000. An introduction to English literature and to the use of the English language with a particular emphasis on composition.

1001. A continuation of the studies begun in English 1000.

Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1050 or the former 1100.

1050. An introduction to English literature and to the use of English language.

1051. A continuation of the studies begun in English 1050.

Prerequisite: English 1050 or 1000 or the former 1100.

1110. Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style. An introduction to the analysis of prose and to writing for various purposes, including exposition.

Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTES: 1) Students cannot receive credit for both 1110 and 2010.

2) Students cannot receive credit for both English 1020 and 1110, nor for both 1030 and 1110.

2005. Literary Survey I (The beginnings to 1660). This course introduces students to the major writers by detailed study of selected texts. The course will include such authors as Chaucer, Mallory, Shakespeare, Spenser, Bacon, Webster, Donne and works such as Beowulf, the Old English Elegies and Gawaine and the Green Knight. Recommended for English specialization students that English 2005 be taken first in the English 2005-2006-2007 sequence.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2000, 2005, and 2110.

2006. Literary Survey II (1660-1837). This course introduces students to the major writers by detailed study of selected texts. The course will include such authors as Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Fielding, Blake, Wordsworth, Austen, Byron, Keats and Shelley. Recommended for English specialization students that English 2006 be taken second in the 2005-2006-2007 sequence.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2000, 2006, and 2110.

2007. Literary Survey III (1837 to the present). This course introduces students to the major writers by detailed study of selected texts. The course will include such authors as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hardy, George Eliot, Dickens, Yeats, T.S. Eliot and Dylan Thomas. Recommended for English specialization students that English 2007 be taken third in the English 2005-2006-2007 sequence.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2001, 2007, and 2111.

3200. Shakespeare. A study of six tragedies and romances such as Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, Macbeth, The Winter's Tale, The Tempest.

3201. Shakespeare. A study of six comedies and histories such as Love's Labour's Lost, The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Henry V.

3395. The Literary Uses of English from the Earliest Times to the Present. An exploration of the development of the English language, as evidenced by its literary uses.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 3395 and 2401.

4105. Critical Approaches and Theory. A survey of critical approaches to English Literature, particularly those adopted by 20th Century readers. The course will attempt to give an account of the theories on which these approaches are based and some attention will be paid to the application of different approaches to specific works of literature.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 4101 and 4105.

4950. Individual Project in English. An individual project of a creative, or a critical, or a research character on a topic which is subject to the approval of the Coordinator. The topic will be prepared under the supervision of a designated faculty member or members.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 4950 and 4990.

DRAMATIC LITERATURE

2350. Introduction to Drama I. A survey of the major plays in the history of western drama from the Greeks to the end of the eighteenth century.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 2002 and 2350.

2351. Introduction to Drama II. A survey of the major plays in the history of western drama from the 19th Century to the present.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 2002 and 2351.

3021. English Drama to 1580. A study of the development of English drama from the Middle Ages to 1580. As well as the central dramatic texts of the period, the course will also consider the popular arts, such as folk plays and mumming.

3171. Anglo-Irish Drama. A study of representative Anglo-Irish drama by such authors as Wilde, Shaw, Yeats, Synge, Lady Gregory, O'Casey, Behan, Friel and Molloy.

NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3170 or 3180.

3181. Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. A study of major dramatic texts from 1660 to the end of the eighteenth century.

3275. Modern Drama (1830-1930). A study of western drama and performance during the period 1830-1930, with a focus on theatrical and dramatic texts and movements, as well as artistic, social, political, technological, and philosophical influences.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 3275, the former 3300, and 4300.

4302. Contemporary British Drama. A study of representative dramatic works of contemporary British drama.

4305. Contemporary Drama. A study of modern and post-modern western drama and performance from 1930 to the present, with a focus on theatrical and dramatic texts and movements, as well as artistic, social, political, technological and philosophical influences. Recommended previous course: English 3275.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 4301, the former 3301, and 4305.

4307. Contemporary Canadian Drama. A study of contemporary drama and performance in Canada, focusing on texts representative of Canada's cultural and regional diversity.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 3156 and 4307.

4308. 20th Century American Drama. A study of American drama and performance from the turn of the century to the present, focusing on the theatre's historic role in the definition, reinforcement and scrutinizing of American mythology.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 3260 and 4308.

4316. Advanced Shakespeare. A detailed study of Shakespeare's plays in their generic and cultural contexts. The course will relate Shakespeare's plays to his sources, to poetry of the period, and to the cultural contexts which inform his invention. Special emphasis will be placed on plays not considered in English 3200 and 3201.

Prerequisites: English 3200 or 3201.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only two of English 4210, 4211, and 4316.

4317. Elizabethan-Jacobean Drama. A survey of Shakespeare's dramatic rivals and the Elizabethan and Jacobean repertoires. Prerequisites: English 3200 or 3201.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 3022 and 4317.

4836-44. Special Topics in Drama. Supervised study in specialized areas of dramatic literature. Course topic, design, and requirements to be determined through consultation by the student with the instructor.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

CANADIAN LITERATURE

2152. Introduction to Canadian Literature. An introduction to the poetry and prose of selected Canadian writers.

2155. Newfoundland Literature. A study of Newfoundland literature with emphasis on representative writers since 1949.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 2155 and 3155.

2156. Canadian Short Stories. A study of Canadian short stories which aims to give the student a heightened appreciation of individual short stories, and some sense of the range of Canadian accomplishment in the genre.

3145. Canadian Prose to 1949. A study of the outstanding works of Canadian prose from the beginnings to 1949.

3146. Canadian Prose after 1949. A study of the outstanding works of Canadian prose from 1949 to the present.

3147. Canadian Poetry to 1949. A study of representative Canadian poetry from the pre-confederation period to 1949.

3148. Canadian Poetry After 1949. A study of Canadian poetry from 1949 to the present, with emphasis on the work of major poets and an examination of the various styles and theories of poetry developed during the period.

4307. Contemporary Canadian Drama. See description in dramatic literature list above.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 3156 and 4307.

4825-35. Special Topics in Canadian Literature. A variety of topics are available, to be offered as resources permit.

MODERN LITERATURE

2215. American Literature to 1900. A study of the historical origins and development of 19th Century American Literature, concentrating on a selection of works within their political, social and artistic contexts.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for both English 2214 and 2215.

2705. Modern World Literature in Translation. A study of modern world literature in English translation, with focus on writers of the 20th Century who have attained international stature.

2805. Women's Writing to 1900. A study of writing by women in the British Isles and North America from the Middle Ages to 1900, including such items as letters and journals as well as fiction, poetry, and drama.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2805, 3810, and 3830.

3215. 20th Century American Literature. A study of American poetry and fiction from 1900 to 1960.

Prerequisites: English 2215 or permission of the instructor.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only three of English 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270.

3216. 20th Century British and Irish Literature. A study of British and Anglo-Irish poetry and fiction from 1900 to 1960.

3810. 20th Century Non-Fiction Writing by Women. A study of 20th Century topical writing by women, including writing about social, political, and artistic and literary questions. Non-traditional as well as traditional genres will be studied.

Prerequisites: English 2805 or permission of the instructor.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2805, 3810, and 3830.

3905. Creative Writing. A workshop course for aspiring writers of poetry and/or fiction. Limited enrolment. Applicants will be required to submit a sampling of their previous and current work.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

NOTE: Students can receive credit for only two of English 3900, 3901, and 3905.

4245. Contemporary Fiction in English. An in-depth study of a selection of recent short fiction and novels in English. The focus will be on recent developments in American, British, Irish and Commonwealth fiction (excluding Canadian).

4246. Contemporary Poetry in English. An in-depth study of contemporary poetry in English. The focus will be on major poets and developments in the U.S.A., Britain, Ireland and the Commonwealth (excluding Canada) since 1945.

4905. Advanced Creative Writing. A workshop course for creative writers who have demonstrated considerable talent and skill in poetry and/or prose fiction. Limited enrolment.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSES

For existing MUN courses, the numbers remain the same. For new courses in Environmental Science, the following 4-digit scheme is used:

1st digit = Year

2nd digit = Parent Discipline:
0 = Multidisciplinary
1 = Biology
2 = Chemistry
3 = Earth Science
4 = Physics
9 = Project

3rd digit = Subdiscipline:

(Biology) (Chemistry) (Multidisciplinary)
1 = Botany 1 = Analytical 5 = Research
2 = Zoology 2 = Inorganic 8 = Science Writing
3 = Ecology 3 = Physical
4 = Organic
6 = Environmental

4th digit = Numerical Sequence.
= 9 for 4000 level courses that are requirements of the Honours streams.

Courses specifically designed for the environmental science programme(s) are given the designation "EnSc". Thus, for example, in the Winter semester of the 2nd year, Environmental Chemistry is offered, with a course number = EnSc 2261.

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY COURSES

3130. Freshwater Ecology. The study of freshwater ecosystems (lakes, rivers, streams, peatlands). Included are abiotic components, community structures, energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, and the evolution of natural and altered aquatic ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on field and laboratory studies of the ecology of freshwater organisms and systems in western Newfoundland.

Prerequisites: Biology 2010, 2122, 2600; Chemistry 1001.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

4130. Plant Physiological Ecology. A study of the physiological responses of plants to changes in the physical/chemical environment. Field studies of native species in stressful environments are emphasized. Topics include: environmental monitoring, photosynthetic gas exchange, water relations, nutrient relations, and stress physiology.

Prerequisites: Biology 2010, 2600, 3610.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY COURSES

2261. Survey of Environmental Chemistry. Introduction to environmental problems, underlying chemistry and approaches to pollution prevention. Stratospheric chemistry and the ozone layer. Ground level air pollution. Global warming and the Greenhouse Effect. Toxic organic chemicals (TOC's), including herbicides, pesticides. Toxicology of PCB's, dioxins and furans. Chemistry of natural waters. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals. Energy production and its impact on the environment, including nuclear energy, fossil fuels, hydrogen.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1001.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

3210. Environmental Analytical Chemistry I. Treatment of data, error analysis, wet methods of analysis of laboratory and field samples. Volumetric methods for acidity, alkalinity and hardness; chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD and BOD). Gravimetric methods for sulphate and phosphates. Theory and application of specific ion electrodes analysis of metal ions, dissolved gases and halide ions. Turbidimetric and nephelometric measures of water quality. Spectrophotometric analysis of trace metal ions.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 2300.

Lectures and Laboratory: Not more than seven hours per week.

3211. Environmental Analytical Chemistry II. Theory and application of spectroscopic methods of analysis (including error analysis) of environmentally important compounds. Spectrophotometric, FTIR, light scattering, chromatographic (GC, GC/MS, HPLC), fluorescence, phosphorescence, atomic absorption and electroanalytical methods will be studied. Synthetic laboratory samples and field samples will be examined by these techniques.

Prerequisites: Environmental Science 3210 (or equivalent).

Lectures and Laboratory: Not more than six hours per week.

3260. Industrial Chemistry. Chemical principles used in the manufacture of inorganic and organic chemical products; electrochemical, petrochemical, polymer, pulp and paper, agricultural, cement, cosmetics, detergent and paint industries. Processes, specific pollutants of current interest: inorganic (e.g. mercury, NOX and SOX gases, lead etc.) and organic (e.g. PCB's, chlorinated hydrocarbons, freons, pesticides/herbicides). Industrial sources and analytical methods of detection will be studied.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 2210, 240B, 2261.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

3261. Atmospheric Chemistry. Electronic, vibrational and rotational spectroscopy. Rates and mechanisms of gas phase reactions (particularly photochemical). Thermodynamics of the atmosphere. Formation, evolution and structure of the Earth's atmosphere. Chemical and physical properties of the atmospheric gases. Global element cycles. The stratosphere and ozone variability. The ionosphere. Atmospheric pollutants. Problems of the "greenhouse" gases. Aerosol chemistry. Wet and dry deposition.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 2300, 2210.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4230. Aquatic Chemistry I. Thermodynamics and kinetics of model systems. Acids and bases (including buffer intensity and neutralizing capacity), dissolved gases, precipitation and dissolution. Metal ions in aqueous solution. Redox control in natural waters. Pourbaix diagrams. Regulation of chemical composition of natural waters, pollution and water quality.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 2300.

Lectures and Laboratory: Not more than six hours per week.

4239. Aquatic Chemistry II. Heterogeneous aspects of aquatic chemistry. Surface chemistry of oxides, hydroxides and oxide minerals. Aggregation of colloids and the role of coagulation in natural waters. The oil-water interface. Inorganic and organic complexes in natural waters and problems of specificity.

Prerequisites: Environmental Science 4230.

Lectures and Laboratory: Not more than six hours per week.

4240. Organic Chemistry of Biomolecules. Structure and properties of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, steroids, DNA and RNA. The chemistry of the cell in relation to its toxicology; effects of bioactive agents on cells, organelles, tissues and whole organisms. Natural products including those from the rain forest and marine environments. The role of metal ions in biomolecules. Examples of biosynthesis. Chemistry and mechanisms of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 240B.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4249. Environmental Organic Chemistry. Focus on anthropogenic sources of organic chemicals and pollutants in the environment. Concepts of organic chemistry (synthesis, structure, physical properties, chirality, industrial organic processes), biological chemistry (enzymes, oxidative pathways) and physical chemistry (equilibria, partitioning) extended and applied to mass transport through soil, water and air. Kinetics and mechanisms of chemical, photochemical and biological degradation and conversion of organics. Structure-reactivity relationships for organic chemicals and degradation intermediates in the environment.

Prerequisites: Environmental Science 4240, 3261, 4230.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSES

2370. Global Environmental Change. A survey of the Earth as a dynamic system. Discussion of interacting cycles that define the Earth's environment. Material cycles and energy concepts. Evolution of the atmosphere in response to lithospheric, biospheric and hydrospheric changes. Major global environmental changes from Earth's formation to present. Emphasis on self-regulating ability of the Earth system.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: This course is restricted to students with thirty credit hours or more.

2371. Oceanography. Historical review of science of oceanography. Earth and Earth systems (including plate tectonics). Marine sediments and sedimentary environments. Chemical and physical properties of seawater. The atmosphere and the oceans, ocean circulation. Waves and tides, coastal environments, distribution of organisms. Applied oceanography.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: This course is restricted to students who have completed thirty credit hours or more.

2430. Energy and the Environment. Energy, energy conversion, heat transfer, the laws of thermodynamics, nuclear processes and radiation will be treated. Practical problems such as the energy shortage, human influences on climate, resource extraction, nuclear power etc. will be discussed.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1081 or 1000; Physics 1201

Lectures: Three hours per week.

2450. Meteorology. Meteorology as an application of physics and mathematics to the study of the atmosphere. Atmospheric motion on the global, synoptic, meso- and micro-scales. An introduction to atmospheric radiation and thermodynamics, clouds and precipitation. Vertical soundings and the analysis and interpretation of surface and upper-air weather maps.

Prerequisites: Physics 1201.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

4000. Environmental Science Seminar. Current topics in environmental science are reviewed and discussed in a seminar format. Normally, students will research and present two seminars relevant to environmental themes agreed upon by the students and the instructor(s). Seminars will also be presented on current research and environmental issues by faculty and guest speakers from universities, government and industry.

Prerequisite: This course is restricted to students who have completed 90 credit hours or more.

4080. Computer-Based Scientific Writing. Scientific English including vocabulary, structure, style and bibliography as used in standard scholarly journals and texts will be taught, with emphasis on the use of microcomputers in scientific word processing. Use will be made of commercial software for the production of scientific documents incorporating chemical structures, mathematical formulae, spectral plots and graphs. Instruction will be given in the manipulation of scanned images and spectral plots as well as spreadsheet usage for data manipulation and graphical display. Databases for information storage and retrieval will also be explored, together with on-line searching strategies, including key-word and citation methodologies.

Lectures and Laboratory: Not more than six hours per week.

Prerequisite: This course is restricted to students who have completed 90 credit hours or more.

4950. Research Project in Environmental Science I. With the guidance of a faculty member, students will conduct a scientific study based upon original research or a critical review of extant data in an appropriate area. Students are required to present both a thesis and a seminar on their research.

Prerequisite: Permission of Coordinator.

NOTE: This project fulfils the Core requirement for a fourth-year individual project in the area of specialization.

4959. Research Project in Environmental Science II. This is a continuation of Environmental Science 4950 specifically for Honours students. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students will carry out an original research project in environmental science. Students will present both a thesis and seminar on their research (One dissertation and one seminar satisfies the requirements for both Environmental Science 4950 and 4959).

Prerequisite: Environmental Science 4950.

NOTE: This course is restricted to honours candidates.

FOLKLORE

1000. Introduction to Folklore. The role that tradition plays in communication, art and society will be discussed through an examination of folklore materials from Newfoundland and the English-speaking world. Readings and "listenings" will emphasize the use of folklore in context, e.g., the proverb in speech and the folksong in childrearing. Students will be urged to analyze the traditions in their own lives through special assignments.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: A student may not receive credit for both Folklore 1000 and 2000.

1050. Folklore Studies. An examination of specific folklore studies illustrating important themes and approaches in folkloristics. These will include antiquarian, nationalistic, diffusionist, historic-contextual, functional, structural, and performance analyses as typified in selected readings from the works of leading folklorists.

NOTE: There is no prerequisite for this course. However, students should note that they will need to take Folklore 1000 (or 2000) before they can advance to other courses.

2000. Introduction to Folklore. Definitions of folklore; the concept of genre; introduction to the history of the discipline; approaches to fieldwork, methodology, classification, analysis, theory and utilization. Some collecting will be encouraged.

NOTE: A student receiving credit for Folklore 2000 may not receive credit for Folklore 1000.

2100. Folklore Research Methods - An Introduction. This course is designed to provide the basic introduction to the research resources, tools and methods regularly employed in the area of Folklore. On the one hand, the course will examine what types of Library and Archive resources can be useful to the folklorist and, on the other hand, it will explore how folklorists in fieldwork situations should handle people, and how they can capture for posterity a record of the interviews that they have conducted and the events that they have observed.

NOTE: It is strongly recommended that majors and minors take this course before taking 3000 and 4000 level courses.

2300. Newfoundland Folklore. (Same as Anthropology 2300.) A survey of the various types of Folklore: tale, song, rhyme, riddle, proverb, belief, custom, childlore and others, with stress on their function in the Newfoundland community culture. Individual collection and analysis of materials from the students' home communities, supplemented by data from the M.U.N. Folklore and Language Archive.

Prerequisite: Folklore 1000 or 2000, or Anthropology 1031.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Folklore 2300 and the former Folklore 3420.

2401. Folklife Studies. An examination of the traditional cultures of Europe and North America with special reference to Newfoundland. A selection of the following areas will be covered: settlement patterns, architecture, work and leisure patterns in the folk community, calendar customs, rites of passage, folk religion, folk medicine, language and folk culture, folk costume, foodways and folk art.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Folklore 2401 and the former Folklore 3500.

2500. Folk Literature. (Same as Anthropology 2500.) An examination of the major genres of folk literature: folk narrative, folk poetry and song, folk drama, and the traditional generic forms within folk speech. An introduction to the textual, comparative and contextual methods of analysis. The literature discussed will be international in scope.

Prerequisite: Folklore 1000 or 2000, or Anthropology 1031.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Folklore 2500 and any of the former Folklore 3400, English 3400, Sociology/Anthropology 3400.

2600. Regional Folklore. An examination of human-environment relationships as expressed in traditional culture. Emphasis will be placed upon the history of regional folkloristics as well as the theories and methods of studying folklore from a regional perspective.

Prerequisite: Folklore 1000 or 2000 or instructor's permission.

3130. Greek and Roman Mythology. (Same as Classics 3130.) A study of the major legends of Greece and Rome as embodied in the literary and artistic remains of the ancient world, and of the influence of these legends on later art and literature.

3200. Folksong. An introduction to the full range of traditional verse, song and music. Stress primarily on the songs of Canada, the United States and the British Isles, with attention to Newfoundland parallels. Examination of traditional vocal and instrumental styles as well as verse forms. Some reference to non-Western musical traditions. A knowledge of music is not a prerequisite.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Folklore 3200 and the former Folklore 2430.

3300. Folk Drama. A survey of the main forms of traditional drama found in Great Britain and North America with reference to related European and non-western traditions. The origins, history and regional variations of these forms will be considered together with questions of social function, performance and aesthetics. The history of research in the area of folk drama will be examined along with related methodological and theoretical issues.

3601-3620. Special Topic in Folklore.

FRENCH

100F. French for Beginners. A course designed to introduce the beginner to the basics of French grammar and the elements of oral and written communication.

Lectures: Four hours per week.

Laboratory: One hour per week.

1001. Elementary French. A review of elementary concepts of French grammar, with practice in oral and written communication.

Lectures: Four hours per week.

Laboratory: Two hours per week.

1050. First-Year French I. This course is designed to improve skills in speaking, aural comprehension, reading and writing.

Lectures: Four hours per week.

Laboratory: One hour per week.

1051. First-Year French II. Continuation of 1050.

Lectures: as above.

NOTE: Credit may be obtained for French 1040 or 1050 but not both, and for French 1041 or 1051 but not both.

2100. Intermediate French I. Composition, grammar and practice in oral skills.

Prerequisite: French 1041 or 1051.

2101. Intermediate French II. A continuation of 2100, with further work in composition, grammar and oral skills.

Prerequisite: French 2100.

2300. Phonetics. A practical introduction to French phonetics, including the International Phonetic Alphabet and phonetic transcription as well as corrective phonetics.

Prerequisite: French 1041 or 1051 or equivalent.

3700. Prose composition and a detailed study of grammar and idiom.

Prerequisite: French 2101.

NOTE: Students may not receive credit for both French 3700 and 2160.

GEOGRAPHY

1000. Introduction to Geography I. An introduction to Geography incorporating concepts, skills and techniques used by the geographer to understand the Earth as the home of man. The major emphasis of the course is placed on man-environmental ecological systems. The course will include seminars and practical work.

1001. Introduction to Geography II. A continuation of introduction to basic concepts and techniques in the field of Geography. This course emphasizes Geography as a social science and introduces the sub-fields of political, economic, cultural and urban Geography. The course will include seminars and practical work.

Prerequisite: Geography 1000.

2001. Cultural Geography. An examination of the basic themes of cultural Geography.

2102. Physical Geography. An examination of the natural phenomena of the earth's surface in the context of the human environment. Physical systems of the earth, weather and climate, vegetation and soils and landforms are described and analyzed.

Prerequisite: Geography 1000.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for 2102 and the former 2100 or 2101.

2220. Research Design and Quantitative Methods in Geography. An introduction to principles of research design, and to the use of quantitative techniques. The techniques examined include basic nonparametric and parametric statistical tools, as well as an introduction to modelling. Practical exercises, many of them computer based, are an essential part of the course.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1000 or 1051 or 1081.

2302. Issues in Economic Geography. Basic issues and ideas in economic geography. The development of a regional economy will be related to underlying economic, cultural and physical factors.

HISTORY

1100. Introduction to History. An introduction to the study and writing of history which will emphasize the concepts of history through a thematic approach to the history of western civilization from ca. 1300 to the eighteenth century. (See History Department Regulations). (Offered only at Sir Wilfred Grenfell Campus.)

NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed History 1000.

1101. Introduction to History. An introduction to the study and writing of history which will emphasis the concepts of history through a combination of research and writing within a thematic approach to the history of western civilization from the eighteenth century to the twentieth century. (Offered only at Sir Wilfred Grenfell Campus.)

Prerequisite: History 1100 or History 1000..

NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed History 1001. History 1100 and 1101 Sequence are the normal prerequisites for any other History course.

2035. History of Classical Greece. (Same as Classics 2035). A survey of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great, with special reference to the social and political institutions of the fifth century B.C.

NOTE: Students who have completed History/Classics 2030 since 1985-86 or the former History/Classics 3910 may not also receive credit for History/Classics 2035.

2040. History of Rome. (Same as Classics 2040). A survey of Roman history from the early monarchy to the reign of Constantine, with special reference to society and politics in the late Republic and early Empire.

NOTE: Students who have completed History/Classics 3920 may not also receive credit for History 2040.

2100. North Atlantic History to 1820. A survey of the major themes in the history of the North Atlantic region from the discovery of the New World to 1820. Emphasis will be placed on Social and Economic History.

2110. North Atlantic History Since 1820. A survey of the relations among the regions of the North Atlantic since 1820. Emphasis will be placed on Social and Economic History.

2200. Canadian History: 1497-1867. A survey of Canadian History from the era of discovery to Confederation.

2210. Canada Since 1867. A survey of Canadian History since Confederation.

2300. Introduction to Modern European History: 1500-1789. An introduction to the main issues and problems in early modern European History with an emphasis on the political, social, economic and cultural developments from the sixteenth through the eighteenth century.

2310. Europe in the Nineteenth Century: 1789-1914. A survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe from 1789-1914.

2330. Medieval Europe, 1050 to the Reformation. A survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe in the high and late Middle Ages.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 2330 and the former History 2030.

2700. Art History Survey I. (Same as Visual Arts 2700) The history of art from pre-historic times to the Renaissance.

2701. Art History Survey II. (Same as Visual Arts 2701) The history of art from the Renaissance to the 20th century.

3050. History of Warfare to 1789. A survey of major developments in the history of warfare from the earliest times to 1789 with particular emphasis on changes in the nature and conduct of warfare, the evolution of military thinking, the organization of military and naval forces, the impact of technological change, the emergence of professionalism and the relationship between societies and armed forces.

3060. History of Modern Warfare since 1789. An examination of those major developments which have affected the nature and conduct of warfare in the period since 1789, with particular emphasis on the evolution of military thinking, the impact of technology on organization and planning, the role of air power, the civil-military relationship, professionalism in the armed forces, and the changing nature of warfare: the emergence of total war, global war, guerilla warfare, and limited warfare.

3100. History of the Maritime Provinces of Canada Since 1600. The evolution of the varied societies in the Maritime provinces from the beginning of permanent European settlement.

3110. History of Newfoundland to 1815. The growth of settlement and the manner in which a `migratory' fishery carried on from England and Ireland changed into a `sedentary' fishery carried on by residents of Newfoundland.

3120. Modern Newfoundland Since 1815. The establishment and development of political institutions, changes in economic structure and the growth of populations.

3440. History of the British Empire and Commonwealth since 1815. The transition from British Empire to Commonwealth of Nations.

3450. British History: 1485-1714. The emergence of Britain under the Tudors and early Stuart monarchs.

3460. British History Since 1714. British History from the accession of the Hanoverians to the welfare state.

3520. The Early Ethnohistory of North America's Native People. (Same as Anthropology 3520). The North American native response to early European contact and initial settlement. Particular attention will be paid to cultural change resulting from the adoption of European goods, participation in the fur trade, the introduction of European disease, and the adaptation to a permanent European presence.

3525. The Later Ethnohistory of North America's Native People. (Same as Anthropology 3525). Indian and Inuit cultural history of the 18th and 19th centuries, including the fur trade, resistance and accommodation to European expansion, the emergence of revitalization movements, demographic changes, and population shifts. Special emphasis will be placed on the ethnohistory of the native peoples of what is now Canada and northern United States.

3700. Art History: The Italian Renaissance. (Same as Visual Arts 3700) An overview of the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy with an emphasis upon the historical context in which art was produced.

3701. Art History: The Renaissance Outside Italy. (Same as Visual Arts 3701) The Renaissance outside Italy from the late 14th century and the international style through the 16th century.

4230. Special Topics in Newfoundland History, I. Specialized studies in the History of Newfoundland.

4231. Special Topics in Newfoundland History, II. See description for 4230.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 4231 and Political Science 4731.

4254. Special Topics in Canadian History: A History of Social Welfare. A study of the broad theme of the state and social welfare in Canada. It examines the origins of modern forms of social control as evidenced in the nineteenth century prison, the lunatic asylum, and the poorhouse. As well, it compares Canadian and British and American social welfare institutions and policies, and traces their historical evolution into the twentieth century.

4320. Special Topics in European History: The British Empire, 1688 to the Present.

4730. Art History: Modern Art I. (Same as Visual Arts 4730) A comprehensive survey of Western art from 1750 to 1885 with an emphasis on painting and sculpture.

4731. Art History: Modern Art II. (Same as Visual Arts 4731) A comprehensive survey of Western art from 1885 to the present day.

4821. (F) & (W) Reading Course. Directed reading course for Honours and selected students including those intending to apply for graduate studies. Readings will be taken from a list of significant works in History, the Humanities, and the Social Sciences.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Head of Department.

MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS

102F, 103F, and 104F. Mathematics Skills Programme. Non-credit courses intended for those students who either have a weak background in mathematics or are returning to the subject after some years. The programme enables students to master mathematical operations such as those involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, integers, exponents, linear equations, algebraic and rational expressions, formulas, graphs, systems of linear equations, basic trigonometry, exponents and radicals, and quadratics.

1000. Calculus I. An introduction to differential Calculus including logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions.

Four hours per week.

Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Mathematics 1000 and Mathematics 1080, nor for both Mathematics 1000 and Mathematics 1081.

1001. Calculus II. An introduction to integral Calculus with applications. In addition to three lectures per week there will be a one and one-half hour problem lab.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or 1081.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both M 1001 and either Engineering 1411 or Engineering 2413.

1050. Finite Mathematics I. Topics covered include sets, logic, permutations, combinations, elementary probability, and descriptive statistics.

Four hours per week.

Prerequisite: Either Level III Academic Mathematics or Level III Advanced Mathematics.

NOTES: 1) With the exception of those already admitted at the time of registration in this course to a B.Ed. programme that requires this course, students who already have obtained credit for six or more Mathematics credit hours numbered 2000 or above are not permitted to register for this course nor can they receive credit for it.

2) Credit cannot be obtained for M 1050 and the former Mathematics 1150.

1051. Finite Mathematics II. Topics covered include elementary matrices, linear programming, elementary number theory, mathematical systems, and geometry.

Four hours per week.

Prerequisite: Either Level III Academic Mathematics or Level III Advanced Mathematics.

NOTES: 1) With the exception of those already admitted at the time of registration in this course to a B.Ed. programme that requires this course, students who already have obtained credit for six or more Mathematics credit hours numbered 2000 or above are not permitted to register for this course nor can they receive credit for it.

2) Credit cannot be obtained for M 1051 and the former Mathematics 1151.

1080. Calculus Readiness. Emphasis on development of pre-calculus topics with an introduction to the calculus.

Four hours per week.

Prerequisite: One of the following: (i) Level III Advanced Mathematics; (ii) Level III Academic Mathematics with a grade of at least 70%; (iii) Level III Academic Mathematics and a Math Skills Inventory score of at least 50%; (iv) M104F.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Mathematics 1000 and Mathematics 1080.

1081. Differential Calculus I. Continuation of Mathematics 1080. Differential calculus of functions of a single variable.

Four hours per week.

Prerequisite: M 1080.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Mathematics 1000 and Mathematics 1081.

2000. Calculus III. A study of the differential calculus of functions of two variables, an introduction to convergence of infinite sequences and series. In addition to three lectures per week there will be a one and one-half hour problem lab.

Prerequisite: M 1001.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both M 2000 and any of Engineering 1411, Engineering 1412, Engineering 2412, Engineering 2413.

2001. Introductory Real Analysis. Analysis on the real line, number systems, functions, sequences, limits, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation.

Prerequisite: M 2000.

2050. Linear Algebra I. Topics include Euclidean n-space, vector operations in R2 and R3, complex numbers, linear transformations on Rn, matrices, determinants, and systems of linear equations.

Prerequisite: M 1000 or M 1081 or M 1051.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both M 2050 and Engineering 2402.

2051. Linear Algebra II. Topics include real and complex vector spaces, basis, dimension, change of basis, eigenvectors, inner products, and diagonalization of Hermitian matrices.

Prerequisite: M 2050.

2090. Mathematics of Finance. Topics covered are: simple and compound interest and discount, forces of interest and discount, equations of value, annuities and perpetuities, amortization schedules and sinking funds, bonds and other securities.

Prerequisite: M 1001.

2320. Discrete Mathematics. Topics include fundamental principles of counting, sets and set operations, principle of inclusion-exclusion, relations including equivalence relations and partial orders, search and sort algorithms, basic properties of integers including well-ordering, mathematical induction, the division and Euclidean algorithms, and fundamental theorem of arithmetic.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1001 or Mathematics 2050.

2510. Statistics for Science Students I. (Same as Engineering 2421). Descriptive statistics, elementary probability, discrete probability distributions, the normal distribution, introduction to statistical inference, t-test, chi-square test, correlation and regression, applications to scientific disciplines.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or Mathematics 1081.

NOTE: Credit can be obtained for only one of ST 2500, ST 2510 and Psychology 2900.

2511. Statistics for Science Students II. Data presentation, estimation and hypothesis testing in two-sample problems, analysis of variance, multiple regression, nonparametric tests, special topics, applications to scientific disciplines. Statistical computer packages will be used in this course.

Prerequisite: ST 2510.

NOTE: Credit can be obtained for only one of Statistics 2501, Statistics 2511 and Psychology 2901.

2550. Statistics for Life Science Students. An introduction to basic statistical methods with an emphasis on those aspects applicable to the life sciences and, in particular, to biology. Statistical computer packages will be used in this course.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1000 or Mathematics 1081.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both ST 2550 and any of ST 2500, ST 2501, ST 2510, ST 2511, Psychology 2900, and Psychology 2901.

PHILOSOPHY

1001. Philosophy of Human Nature. An approach to philosophical thinking by way of analysis and critique of theories of human nature, classical and modern, and the world views associated with them.

1003. Critical Thinking. A practical analysis of human reasoning, emphasizing methods of critical reading and logical thinking.

1200. Principles of Philosophy. A general introduction to the study of Philosophy both as a contemporary intellectual discipline and as a body of knowledge. The course covers the main divisions, fundamental questions and essential terminology of Philosophy through a reading of classical texts. (It is a required course for further courses in Philosophy programmes. It is intended for students in first year who have completed one semester of university education).

2200. Principles of Philosophy. (Same as 1200 above but offered to students beyond first year.)

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both 1200 and 2200).

2210. Logic. An introduction to traditional and modern logic open in any year to all students wishing acquaintance with basic logical skills.

No prerequisite.

2220. Principles of Human Knowledge. Various concepts of knowledge - empirical, rational, transcendental, systematic. Their metaphysical grounds and implications. The concept of scientific knowledge; real and abstract entities; objectivity and subjectivity.

2230. Moral Philosophy. The sources and validity of ethical principles which underlie individual and social action.

2701. History of Ancient Philosophy. (Same as Classics 2701). A survey of the origin and development of Western philosophy among the Greeks and Romans.

2702. History of Modern Philosophy. A survey of the development of western Philosophy since the 17th century.

NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only ONE of 3700, 3701, 2702.

2800-2810. Contemporary Issues. Each course in this series is defined by its aim: to provide students with an opportunity to develop the philosophical dimension primarily, in areas of practical concern. Issues dealt with are chiefly contemporary ones: technology, bioethics, leisure, professional ethics, role of education, materialism, human rights and others of the kind.

3110. Elements of Symbolic Logic. Techniques and topics in the logic of propositions, of predicates and of induction and probability. Normally the second course in logic.

3120. Philosophy of Language. The course investigates various uses of language and its relationship to thought, as well as particular features of language, such as meaning, synonymy, reference, translation and interpretation.

Prerequisite: Philosophy 1200/2200 or departmental approval.

3150. Philosophy of the Natural Sciences. Major issues in the origins, methods and philosophical implications of science. Science as a form of knowledge; its relation to metaphysics; to more general theories of knowledge. Science and values.

3160. Philosophy of the Human Sciences. Methodological foundations of psychology, cognitive science and the social sciences. Philosophical presuppositions and implications of these approaches to human nature will be examined.

3400. Political Philosophy. Leading philosophical ideas concerning the origin and justification of political institutions.

3600. Philosophy of the Humanities. Expression and interpretation in the humanistic disciplines: theology, history, art and literature, language. Philosophical Hermeneutics.

3610. Philosophy and Literature. A study of the interrelationship of thought and imagination in philosophical and literary forms of writing.

3620. Philosophy of Art. (Same as Visual Arts 3620). Introduction to aesthetics; applications in visual arts, music and drama.

3730. Plato. Selections from the works of the Greek "lovers of wisdom" - the first philosophers - particularly Plato.

3840. Hume. A study of the work and influence of Hume on theories of knowledge, metaphysics and moral philosophy.

3850. Kant's Theory of Knowledge. An introduction to the work of one of the most influential thinkers of the modern era, concentrating on his theory of knowledge, particularly as stated in the Critique of Pure Reason.

3930. Pragmatism. The pragmatist standpoint from Peirce to the present.

3950. Recent Philosophy: Topics and developments in contemporary thought, e.g. post-structuralism, post modernism, relativism, realism and anti-realism etc.

4200. Seminar in the Philosophy of Mind.

4250. Seminar in Metaphysics and Epistemology.

4700. Seminar in Special Authors and Texts.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

3550. Outdoor Recreation Management. An overview of out-door recreation practices in Newfoundland and Canada. This course will examine the management of resources, conservation education and practices, development for public use or exclusion; legislation related to management of risk; viability of facilities; national and provincial agencies; private commercial ventures; future trends in management. Management strategies will form a major part of the course.

Lectures: Three hours per week

PHYSICS

1020. Introductory Physics I (F) & (W). A non-calculus based introduction to mechanics.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or 1080, which may be taken concurrently. It is recommended that students have completed at least one of level II and level III high school physics courses, however this course may be completed by someone who has no physics background provided some extra effort is made.

Lectures: Three hours per week plus an optional one hour tutorial.

Laboratory and/or Tutorial: Up to three hours per week.

1021. Introductory Physics II (W). A non-calculus based introduction to fluids, wave motion, light, optics, electricity and magnetism.

Prerequisite: Physics 1020 or 1050. Mathematics 1000 or 1081, which may be taken concurrently.

Lectures: Three hours per week plus an optional one hour tutorial.

Laboratory and/or Tutorial: Up to three hours per week.

1054. General Physics II: Computational Physics and Data Analysis (F) & (W). An introduction to computer-based data acquisition and analysis, numerical analysis, and problem solving. These processes are combined with introductions to probability and statistics, complex numbers and matrix algebra, with particular application to oscillations and waves.

Prerequisites: Physics 1050 or 1020 and Mathematics 1001. Math 1001 may be taken concurrently.

Lectures and Laboratories: Up to 5 hours per week

NOTE: This course will be offered for the first time in the Winter semester of 1997.

2000. Physics in Contemporary Society. The nature of scientific thinking; the scientific method, the logic of physics, concepts used in physical science, objectivity versus subjectivity, science and philosophy. Physical concepts; concepts of space, time, causality, identity, energy. Concepts of relativity, quantum concepts, concepts in thermodynamics, concepts of matter.

Lectures: Two hours per week - instructional address and discussion; one hour per week - general discussion.

NOTE: Physics 2000 is offered at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College only. It may not be used as one of the Physics courses required for a Major or Honours degree in Physics nor towards fulfilment of the 78 credit hours in science courses required for the Bachelor of Science degree.

2050. Introductory Physics III (F). This course prepares students who have taken Physics 1200 and 1201 for additional courses in Physics. It reviews material of Physics 1200 and 1201, but at a calculus based level, and discusses other topics which are covered in Physics 1050 and 1052 but not in Physics 1200 and 1201.

Prerequisite: Physics 1201, and Mathematics 1000 or 1081.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for Physics 2050 by students who have already completed Physics 1052.

2053. General Physics III: Fluids and Thermal Physics (F). Introduction to fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, probability and statistics.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1001. Physics 1052, or Physics 1201 and 2050. Mathematics 1001 and Physics 2050 may be taken concurrently.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

2054. General Physics IV: Electricity and Magnetism I (F). Introduction to electricity and magnetism.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1001. Physics 1052, or Physics 1201 and 2050. Mathematics 1001 and Physics 2050 may be taken concurrently.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

2055. General Physics V: Electricity and Magnetism II (W). Introduction to time dependent electric and magnetic fields, and A.C. circuits. Superconductivity.

Prerequisites: Physics 2054, Mathematics 2000 and Mathematics 2050. Mathematics 2000 and/or Mathematics 2050 may be taken concurrently.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

2056. General Physics VI: Modern Physics (W). Introduction to the special theory of relativity, quantum physics, atomic, molecular, solid state and nuclear physics. The standard model of elementary particles. Up to six lectures will be devoted to a discussion of research in Modern Physics currently in progress at Memorial.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 2000. Physics 2054. Mathematics 2000 may be taken concurrently.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Laboratory: Three hours per week.

2151. Stellar Astronomy and Astrophysics (F) & (W). Atomic structure and spectra. The sun: radiation, energetics, magnetic field. Stars: distance, velocity, size, atmospheres, interiors. Variable stars, multiple stars, clusters and stellar associations. Stellar evolution, interstellar matter, structure of the Milky Way Galaxy. Exterior galaxies, quasi-stellar objects, pulsars. Cosmology.

Prerequisites: Six credit hours in Mathematics at the first year level.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

1000. Introduction to Politics. An introduction to basic concepts in the study of politics, emphasizing the Canadian system of government and its relationship with the Canadian society.

1010. Canadian Political Problems. Analysis of the operation of the Canadian political system through close examination of three selected policy problems, such as poverty in Canada, Canadian-United States relations and French Canada.

1020. World Political Problems. An introduction to contemporary issues in world politics. The course will examine selected issues and the manner in which these reflect interests and ideologies and the larger political and economic context in which they occur.

2000. Modern Political Ideologies. An examination of the development and interaction of liberalism, capitalism, conservatism, social democracy, variants of Marxism and new left/counter culture with special emphasis on their place in contemporary society.

2200. Introduction to International Politics. An examination of the "building blocks" of international politics including determinants, means, processes and ends. Emphasis is on the post-1945 period.

2300. Introduction to Comparative Politics. An introduction to comparative analysis focusing on the differences and similarities among liberal democratic, Communist, and third world political systems.

2500. Introduction to Political Behaviour. A survey of informal and behavioural aspects of politics, focusing on citizen participation in Canada and other societies. Topics will include political socialization, public opinion, the electoral process, and dynamics of leadership, influence and persuasion. An empirical approach will be emphasized.

2710. Introduction to Canadian Politics I. An introductory survey of the structure, operation, and inter-relationships of the institutions of government at the federal level in Canada. Topics to be examined include the constitution, federalism, parliament, the executive, and the judiciary.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for either Political Science 2710 or 2711 and the former Political Science 2700.

2711. Introduction to Canadian Politics II. An introductory survey of the Canadian political process. The course will explore the linkages between Canadian society and political institutions. Topics to be examined include political culture, political parties, the electoral system, voting behaviour, interest groups, the mass media and politics, protest movements, and elites and social classes.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for either Political Science 2710 or 2711 and the former Political Science 2700.

3731. Environmental Policy. An examination of the formation, implementation, and impact of public policies concerning the environment including an examination of different policy approaches and the problems of environmental regulation.

Prerequisites: None.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

PSYCHOLOGY

1000 and 1001. Introduction to Psychology. An introduction to Psychology as a biological and social science. Topics shall include research methodology, physiological processes, perception, learning, memory and cognition, human development, animal behaviour, emotion, motivation, consciousness, personality and individuality, psychological disorders and treatment, and social psychology.

Psychology 1000 is a prerequisite for Psychology 1001.

2925. Research Methods and Data Analysis in Psychology-I. Simple one and two-group research designs and an introduction to basic descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics to be covered will include concepts of internal and external experimental validity, simple control procedures, types of experimental variables, measures of central tendency and variability, parameter estimation, and statistical hypothesis testing. The statistical procedures described will include the t-test, measures of correlation, the chi-square test, and selected non-parametric tests.

This course includes a weekly laboratory.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 1000 or any two of the following courses: Mathematics 1080, 1081, 1050, 1051.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 2925 and any one of the following courses: Psychology 2900, Statistics 2500, Statistics 2510, the former Psychology 2510, the former Mathematics 2510.

2950. Research Methods and Data Analysis in Psychology-II. Multiple group and factorial research designs, research issues, simple regression analysis, and an introduction to analysis of variance. Topics to be covered will include one and two-factor research designs, ethics in human and animal research, the research proposal, pilot studies, and computing in psychological research. The statistical procedures described will include univariate linear regression analysis, several analysis of variance models (one-factor between, one-factor within, two-factor between, and two-factor mixed, and multiple comparison procedures).

Prerequisite: Psychology 2925.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 2950 and Psychology 2901.

3950. Research Methods and Data Analysis in Psychology-III. Miscellaneous research methods and an introduction to multivariate analysis. Topics to be covered will include behavioural observation, surveys, case studies, test and scale construction, clinical research, and qualitative research methods. The statistical procedures described will include: test construction statistics, analysis of variance (two-factor within, blocked designs), analysis of covariance, multivariate linear regression analysis, and discriminant analysis.

This course includes a weekly laboratory.

Prerequisite: Psychology 2950

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 3950 and Psychology 3900.

SURVEY COURSES

2025. Survey of Developmental Psychology. A survey of the cognitive, social, and personality development of people. Development will be tracked from the prenatal stage to old age. Topics to be studied shall include: research methodology, genetics, prenatal development, environmental effects during prenatal development, attachment, emotional development, language development, intelligence, cognitive development, socialization, sex-roles and gender identity, adolescence, adulthood, and aging.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 2025 and either of Psychology 2010 or 2011.

2125. Survey of Social Psychology. A survey of how the behaviour of individuals is influenced by others. Topics to be studied shall include: methodology and ethics, social cognition, social perception, attitude formation and change, interpersonal attraction, social influence, group processes, and leadership. Additional topics may include: aggression, prosocial behaviour, sex and gender, environmental effects, organizational behaviour, health, stress, and psychology and the law.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 2125 and either of Psychology 2100 or 2120.

2225. Survey of Learning. A survey of learning phenomena and learning theories. Topics to be studied shall include: the evolutionary context of learning, habituation and sensitization, imprinting, Pavlovian conditioning, instrumental learning, generalization and discrimination in learning, and neural mechanisms of learning.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 2225 and either of Psychology 2240 or 2250.

2425. Survey of Cognitive Psychology. A survey of how humans process and retain information. Topics to be studied shall include: perception and pattern recognition, attentional processes, and memory. The influence of stored information on selected behaviours will be considered. Selected behaviours may include language processing, concept formation, problem solving, decision making, and practised and skilled performance.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 2425 and either of Psychology 2440 or 3450.

2625. Survey of Personality and Abnormal Psychology. A survey of theories of personality and models of psychopathology. Topics to be studied shall include: research methods, psychoanalysis, behaviourism, humanism, the dispositional perspective, constructivism, psychometrics, models of dysfunction, principles of disturbance, diagnosing and categorizing dysfunctional behaviour, and the major psychological disorders.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 2625 and either of Psychology 2610 or 3640.

2825. Survey of Biological Psychology. A survey of the biological bases of behaviour. Topics to be studied shall include: the structure and function of the nervous system, sensory structures and sensory coding, homeostasis, emotions, circadian rhythms and sleep, sexual behaviour, psychopharmacology, consciousness and language, behavioural evolution, and behaviour genetics.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Psychology 2825 and either of Psychology 2810 or 2850.

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES COURSES

3025. Contemporary Issues in Developmental Psychology.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2025.

3125. Contemporary Issues in Social Psychology.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2125.

3225. Contemporary Issues in Learning.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2225.

3325. Contemporary Issues in Sensation and Perception.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2425 or 2825.

3425. Contemporary Issues in Memory and Cognition.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2425.

3525. Contemporary Issues in Emotion.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and any Survey Course in Psychology from the Sir Wilfred Grenfell College Psychology Programme.

3625. Contemporary Issues in Personality.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2625.

3626. Contemporary Issues in Abnormal Psychology.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2625.

3627. Contemporary Issues in Psychotherapy.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2025 or 2125 or 2625.

3628. Contemporary Issues in Psychological Testing and Measurement.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2950 and any one of Psychology 2025, 2125, 2425, 2625.

3725. Contemporary Issues in Animal Behaviour.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2825 or Psychology 2225.

3825. Contemporary Issues in Physiological Psychology.

Prerequisites: Psychology 2925 and Psychology 2825.

SENIOR COURSES

4910. Systems of Psychology. A study of paradigms and explanations in contemporary psychology in the context of their historical antecedents.

Prerequisites: Seventy-eight credit hours in Psychology including (a) six credit hours in Psychology laboratory courses from Clause 1(b) of the Requirements for a Major in Psychology or (b) Psychology 3425 or (c) Psychology 3950.

4925. Senior Seminar in Psychology. Weekly seminars for faculty and senior students in Psychology. Current issues in academic and professional psychology shall be discussed.

Prerequisites: Thirty credit hours in Psychology including 3950 (or permission of the Coordinator of Psychology).

4950. Independent Project in Psychology. Under the supervision of a Faculty member, students will independently carry out approved projects and prepare reports of their findings.

Prerequisites: Thirty credit hours in Psychology including 3950 (or permission of the Coordinator of Psychology).

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Psychology 4950 and Psychology 4951.

4951. Honours Project in Psychology I. Under the supervision of a Faculty member, each student will independently review an area of psychology and prepare a thesis proposal for further investigation.

Prerequisites: Thirty credit hours in Psychology including 3950 (or permission of the Coordinator of Psychology).

NOTES: Credit may not be obtained for both Psychology 4950 and 4951.

Psychology 4951 is limited to Honours candidates.

4959. Honours Project in Psychology II. This is a continuation of Psychology 4951. Under the supervision of a Faculty member, each student will independently carry out an approved project which will result in an honours thesis.

Prerequisite: Psychology 4951 (or the permission of the coordinator of Psychology).

NOTE: Psychology 4959 is limited to Honours candidates.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

1010. Religion in the Modern World. An introduction to some of the major issues confronting religion in the modern world. The focus will be on such topics as freedom and determination, good and evil, love and sexuality.

1020. Christianity in Western Civilization. An introduction to Christianity and its place in the history of Western Civilization through examples from Early Christianity, the Reformation, and the Modern Period.

2011. Introduction to Asian Religious Traditions. A study of the principles and practices of Hinduism and Buddhism and an examination of the development and teachings of the Chinese traditions of Confucianism and Taoism. Special attention will be given to the interrelationships and mutual dependence of these systems.

2013. Introduction to Christianity. A study of the Christian tradition, its development and variety. The course will include an examination of the beliefs and practices of both Eastern and Western Christianity and a study of the main differences among the major Western denominations.

2050. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. The historical background, literary structure, and content of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. The relevance of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament to modern religious issues will also be treated.

2051. Introduction to the New Testament. An introduction to the history and literary structure of the documents comprising the New Testament. Emphasis will be placed on the major themes found in these documents and on the distinctiveness of approach of the individual writers.

2350. Religious Institutions. (Same as Sociology/Anthropology 2350). Psychological, anthropological, and sociological approaches to the nature of religion. Comparative study of religious institutions and beliefs, calendrical feasts and solemnities, the nature of sacrifice and the sacred, religious roles and hierarchies, ritual innovation and revitalization.

3200. Jesus: His Life and Teaching. A study of the ministry and thought of Jesus of Nazareth as contained in the Gospels and other New Testament writings. Attention will be given to the methods and conclusions of recent scholarship as applied to his principal teachings and to the study of the historical Jesus.

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 2051.

3210. Paul and His Writings. A study of the Pauline writings and an appraisal of the contribution to Christianity of his mission and theology on the basis of New Testament and other relevant material. Particular attention will be given to such related themes as salvation, reconciliation, grace, and justification.

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 2051.

3220. The Intertestamental Period. An examination of the history and literature of the Jewish people from the postexilic period to the New Testament era. Emphasis will be upon the literature (both canonical and non-canonical) of this period against the background of social, economic, political, and cultural events. Attention will also be given to the rise of the Jewish sects.

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 2050 or 2051.

3400. Buddhism. A study of the history of the Buddhist tradition in India and China, the development of the main lines of Buddhist thought, and the nature of the Chinese transformation of Buddhism.

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 2011 or departmental permission.

3820. Religion and the Arts. (Same as Visual Arts 3820). An examination of the role of art in the expression of religious ideas, together with a study of specific religious themes and concerns in one or more of the following: literature, film, music, painting, sculpture, and dance.

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 2810 or departmental permission.

3840. Psychology of Religion. A study of psychological theories of religion in both their classical and contemporary forms. Emphasis will be placed on foundational figures such as William James, Sigmund Freud, and C.G. Jung, but more recent thinkers such as Erik Erikson and Carol Gilligan will also be included. The course will focus on central problems in modern religious thought such as the nature of selfhood, religious conversion, sources of conscience and morality, and mystical experience.

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 2610 or 2810 or departmental permission.

SCIENCE

3000. Concepts, Methods and Issues in Science I. The origin of the universe; formation of matter and its nature; origin of the solar system; evolution of the earth and its biosphere; theories of origins of life; mechanisms of evolution and speciation.

Prerequisites: at least 45 credit hours.

NOTE: This course may not be used towards fulfilment of the 78 Science credit hours required for the Bachelor of Science degree.

3001. Concepts, Methods and Issues in Science II. Genetic and molecular engineering; behavioral biology: genetic determinism versus environmentalism; artificial intelligence. The paradoxes of the quantum world; the scientific method; science and pseudoscience.

Prerequisite: Science 3000.

NOTE: This course may not be used towards fulfilment of the 78 Science credit hours required for the Bachelor of Science degree.

SOCIOLOGY

1000. Introduction to Sociology. (Prerequisite to most departmental courses). An introduction to the concepts, principles, and topics of Sociology. Credit is not given for both Sociology 1000 and 2000. (Restricted primarily to first-year students.)

2100. Social Inequality. Introduces the subject of social inequality and stratification, examines social inequality in historical perspective, reviews major theories about social inequality, and considers key social developments in contemporary societies in the area of social inequality.

2110. Economy and Society. Examines the role played by economic conditions in social life, reviews the historical evolution and present nature of socio-economic systems, and explores various theoretical issues such as materialist conceptions of society and the impact of technology.

2120. Technology and Society. An examination of the role of technology in society. Topics may include the emergence of modern technological society, the impact of new technologies on social organization and culture, and the institutionalization of science and the production of scientific knowledge. The course also explores the ideological functions of science and technology in advanced industrial societies as well as the question of "the domination of nature".

S/A 2210. Communication and Culture. An examination of verbal and non-verbal systems of communication, and the influence of language on human cognition.

S/A 2230. Newfoundland Society and Culture. (Same as Folklore 2230). The Sociology and Anthropology of the Island of Newfoundland. The focus is on social and cultural aspects of contemporary island Newfoundland.

S/A 2240. Canadian Society and Culture. A descriptive and analytic approach to the development of Canadian society and culture.

2250. Changing World. Sociological analysis of contemporary world issues and social problems.

S/A 2260. War and Aggression. Critical review of ethological, psychological and sociological approaches to the understanding of violence and organized aggression.

S/A 2270. Families. A comparative and historical perspective on the family as a social institution, the range of variation in its structure and the determinants of its development.

S/A 2350. Religious Institutions. (Same as Religious Studies 2350) Comparative study of religious institutions and beliefs, calendrical feasts and solemnities, religious roles and hierarchies, ritual innovation and revitalization.

2610. Socialization. An examination of the social and social psychological processes by which individuals become members of human groups. (Formerly Sociology 4610).

3040. Introduction to the Methods of Social Research. Objectives of the course are (1) to introduce basic concepts underlying research in the social sciences, and (2) to make students familiar with some techniques that are useful in the analysis of a wide range of sociological data and that represent a good foundation for later study of more advanced techniques.

S/A 3140. Social Movements. An examination of social movements which challenge prevailing social institutions and cultural values. Social movements considered may include religious cults and sects, millenarian movements, attempts at utopian and communal living, feminism, labour and revolutionary movements.

3150. Classical Social Theory. An introduction to the work of major 19th- and early 20th-century social theorists including Marx, Durkheim, Weber and Freud.

3290. Deviance. Major sociological theories and methodological techniques central to the study of deviance and crime are outlined and evaluated. The distribution, attributes and explanations of a variety of forms of deviance are examined, which may include violence, sexual deviance, delinquency, addiction, mental disorder, theft, organized crime, political deviance and corporate deviance.

3395. Criminal Justice and Corrections. This course provides an introduction to the operation of the Canadian criminal justice system. Topics to be examined may include the origin, nature and utilization of criminal law, policing, adult and juvenile courts, sentencing, correctional institutions, and community based corrections (probation, parole, community service). Criminal justice policy formulation and application are also discussed.

Prerequisite: Sociology 3290.

3731. Sociology of Culture. A comparative examination of major contemporary sociological texts on the relationship between culture, broadly understood as symbolic systems, and social structure.

WOMEN'S STUDIES

Women's Studies 2000. An Interdisciplinary Introduction to Women's Studies. An interdisciplinary introduction to the major concepts, issues and debates of Women's Studies.

Women's Studies 2001. Women and Science. An investigation of: historical and contemporary contributions of women scientists, especially Canadians; different sciences and how they study women; and feminist and other perspectives on gender and science.

Three hours of lectures per week.

Women's Studies 3000-3010. Special Topics in Women's Studies.

Women's Studies 4000. Seminar in Women's Studies. An interdisciplinary seminar designed to focus on women's issues, and on theories and methodologies of women's studies.

Three hour seminar per week.

Prerequisites: Students must normally have completed Women's Studies 2000 and 15 credit hours in other Women's Studies Programme courses before taking Women's Studies 4000. In exceptional cases, students without these prerequisites may be accepted into the course, with the approval of the Instructor of WSTD 4000 and the Programme Coordinator.


BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (THEATRE)

This programme does not, in itself, constitute professional training for the theatre. The degree will, however, provide pre-professional training that will prepare students to enter a professional graduate school of theatre or theatre conservatory. On the other hand, a student may simply acquire a liberal arts education with a strong focus on theatre. Such a focus will, it is hoped, imbue the student with a lifelong appreciation and understanding of the performing arts.

In recognition of the relative isolation of the Sir Wilfred Grenfell Campus and the need for students of the performing arts to be exposed to examples of excellence in their field of study, provision will be made for students in their senior years to visit major theatre centres outside the province (e.g. the Harlow Campus will be utilized for studies in London and Stratford).

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

1. Academic Requirements

Applicants must satisfy the general admission requirements of the University.

2. Audition

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements of the University, applicants for the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) must undergo an audition/interview to the satisfaction of the department. Enrollment in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) is limited and selection is competitive.

3. The deadline for submission of Departmental Application Forms is April 30 of the year in which admission is sought.

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

1. Attendance at all studio courses is required.

2. Students who fail a studio course shall not take more advanced courses in that discipline until the failed course has been satisfactorily completed.

3. Students must normally complete all 1000-level studio courses before advancing to any 2000-level course.

4. A candidate whose average in Theatre courses falls below 65 percent in any semester will be placed on probation by the Department of Theatre.

5. A candidate will be required to withdraw from the programme if:

a) the candidate's average in Theatre courses falls below 65 percent in each of two consecutive semesters of his/her enrollment in the programme.

OR

b) the candidate fails to obtain a grade of 65 percent or greater in any Studio course more than once. (The "A" part of a linked course shall not be included in this proscription).

6. Candidates who have withdrawn or who have been required to withdraw from the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) programme and wish to re-enter the programme must re-apply.

7. Candidates who have been required to withdraw twice from the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) programme shall be ineligible for further admission.

8. The Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) programme is intended for full-time students only. Students will be expected to take the full course load as prescribed each semester and so progress through the degree in clearly defined blocks of courses. A student failing to take the full number of courses in a given semester would seriously jeopardize his/her ability to complete the degree.

DEGREE REGULATIONS

To be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts (Theatre) a student shall successfully complete one hundred twenty credit hours which would normally be completed over a four-year period. These one hundred twenty credit hours shall be chosen in accordance with the following pattern:

1. Six credit hours in English (English 1000 and 1001 or equivalent).

2. Six credit hours in History (History 1000 and 1001 or equivalent).

3. Six credit hours in the History of Art (Visual Arts 2700 and 2701).

Programme Core

4. Sixty credit hours in Theatre Studies chosen from one of two areas: Acting or Stagecraft.

5. Twenty-four credit hours in Dramatic Literature offered by the English Department in the following configuration: two semesters of a survey of major dramatic texts (English 2350 and 2351); two semesters of Shakespeare (English 3200 and 3201); two semesters of modern and contemporary drama (English 3275 and 4305); and two semesters of electives in special areas of other drama.

6. Eighteen credit hours in academic electives chosen in consultation with the department.

Notes: 1) Where circumstances warrant any prerequisite(s) for Theatre courses may be waived by the head of the department.

2) Any departmental regulations may be waived upon request of the head of the department by the appropriate committee on Undergraduate Studies.

Outline of Major Programmes

Students will major in one of two areas in Theatre Studies: Acting or Stagecraft. The major comprises sixty credit hours chosen in accordance with the following pattern: The introductory Theatre courses, Theatre 1000, 1001, 1010, 1020, the Theatre Masterclasses 3070, 3071, 4070, 4071, and Theatre 4030, 4040, 4050, 4060, 4080, 4081 are common to both major options. Students choosing Acting as a major will complete Theatre 201A/B, 301A/B, 401A/B in addition to the forty-two credit hours common to both majors. Students choosing Stagecraft as a major will complete Theatre 202A/B, 302A/B, 402A/B in addition to the forty-two credit hours common to both majors.

COURSE STRUCTURE FOR THE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE

1st Year
Fall

- Theatre 1000 (Introduction to Theatre I)
- Theatre 1010 (Introduction to Acting)
- English 1000/1050
- History 1000
- Elective

Winter
- Theatre 1001 (Introduction to Theatre II))
- Theatre 1020 (Introduction to Stagecraft)
- English 1001/1051
- History 1001
- Elective

2nd Year
Fall

- Theatre 201A (Acting) or Theatre 202A (Stagecraft)
- English 2350 (Drama)
- English 3200 (Drama)
- Visual Arts 2700 (Art History Survey I)
- Elective

Winter
- Theatre 201B (Acting) or Theatre 202B (Stagecraft)
- English 2351 (Drama)
- English 3201 (Drama)
- Visual Arts 2701 (Art History Survey II)
- Elective

3rd Year
Fall

- Theatre 301A (Acting) or Theatre 302A (Stagecraft)
- Theatre 3070 (Masterclass)
- English 3275 (Drama)
- Drama Elective
- Elective

Winter
- Theatre 301B (Acting) or Theatre 302B (Stagecraft)
- Theatre 3071 (Masterclass)
- English 4305 (Drama)
- Drama Elective
- Elective

4th Year
Fall

- Theatre 401A (Acting) or Theatre 402A (Stagecraft)
- Theatre 4030 (Design)
- Theatre 4050 (History)
- Theatre 4070 (Masterclass)
- Theatre 4080 (Production)

Winter
- Theatre 401B (Acting) or Theatre 402B (Stagecraft)
- Theatre 4040 (Directing)
- Theatre 4060 (Theory)
- Theatre 4071 (Masterclass)
- Theatre 4081 (Production)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

1000 and 1001. Introduction to the Theatre. An introduction to the art of the theatre. The theatre will be studied historically in terms of the evolution of the nature of performance and of the physical theatre from their origins in a variety of social rituals and contexts through to their present plurality of forms. At the same time, the nature and function of the various components of theatrical performance (acting, directing, design, etc.) will be analysed. The course will make extensive use of slides, films, video tapes and attendances at theatrical performances.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

1010. Introduction to Acting. An introduction to the fundamentals of the craft of acting. Basic exercises in voice, movement, relaxation and concentration, improvisation and script analysis will introduce the student to the imaginative and physical skills required by an actor. Participation in performance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

1020. Introduction to Stagecraft. An introduction to the vocabulary and techniques of the various theatrical crafts. Areas of concentration will include scene design and construction, costume design and construction, lighting theory and practice, property building and stage management. This is a foundation course for all theatre students regardless of their specific area of interest. Participation in production required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

201A/B. Acting II. The foundation course for those majoring in acting. Emphasis on voice and movement work and text analysis.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 1000/1001, Theatre 1010, Theatre 1020.

202A/B. Stagecraft II. The foundation course for those majoring in stagecraft. Emphasis on the fundamentals of scenic carpentry, painting and lighting.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 1000/1001, Theatre 1010, Theatre 1020.

301A/B. Acting III. Intermediate course for acting majors. Continued work on voice and movement with emphasis on scene study in period styles.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 201A/B.

302A/B. Stagecraft III. Intermediate course for Stagecraft majors. Continued work on carpentry, painting and lighting with additional emphasis on sound, properties, stage management and wardrobe.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 202A/B.

3070 and 3071. Masterclasses I and II. In each case a semester of work for both Acting and Stagecraft students with a visiting professional theatre artist in a particular area of specialization.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 201A/B or Theatre 202A/B. Theatre 3070 is a prerequisite for Theatre 3071.

401A/B. Acting IV. Advanced course for Acting majors. Concentration on scene study.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 301A/B.

402A/B. Stagecraft IV. Advanced course for Stagecraft majors with individual concentration on specific technical skills.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 302A/B.

4030. Design. An examination of the fundamentals of theatrical design as they have evolved historically, theoretically, and aesthetically.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 301A/B or Theatre 302A/B.

4040. Directing. An analysis of the major historical and contemporary theories and practices of directing for the stage.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 301A/B or Theatre 302A/B.

4050. History. A problems course in selected areas of theatre history.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 301A/B or Theatre 302A/B.

4060. Theory. A study of the major critical works in the theory of the drama from Aristotle to Artaud and beyond.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisites: Theatre 301A/B or Theatre 302A/B.

4070 and 4071. Masterclasses III and IV. In each case a semester of advanced work with a visiting professional theatre artist in a particular area of specialization.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 3070 and Theatre 3071. Theatre 4070 is a prerequisite for Theatre 4071.

4080 and 4081. Production. In each case a full semester of work on a major production in a significant capacity (i.e. leading actor, designer, stage manager, etc.).

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Theatre 301A/B or Theatre 302A/B.


BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (VISUAL ARTS)

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) degree programme is a professional programme designed to educate and train the student in the history, theory and practice of the visual arts. Courses are offered in Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Photography, Multi-media, Digital Imaging and Digital Multi-Media, and Art History. The curriculum is devised with the aim of producing well-rounded generalists with a solid grounding in all aspects of the visual arts. It illustrates the philosophy that artistic freedom and creative expression require both technical skill and intellectual vision, acquired through a disciplined application of effort and a critical awareness of artistic issues, past and present.

In addition to Studio and Art History courses, the student will take a number of appropriate academic courses, chosen in consultation with the Department. It is intended that academic courses be chosen which will enhance the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) programme and provide, as far as possible, a broad exposure to the liberal arts. The first year of the programme consists of intensive foundation courses in Drawing, Two-Dimensional Design and Three-Dimensional Design in preparation for Introductory studio courses in the second year. In the third year, two areas of studio emphasis will be chosen from among the following studio disciplines: Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Photography, Multi-media. To satisfy requirements for the studio emphasis a student must complete a total of 18 credit hours in courses from each of his/her chosen areas of emphasis consisting of two 2000 level courses, two 3000 level courses and two 4000 level courses. In the fourth year, studio courses are conducted as tutorials, that is students will work independently on projects and confer regularly with instructors.

It is recognized that students in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) programme must have occasional opportunities to view important works of art first-hand. Arrangements will therefore be made where possible for students in the third and fourth year of study to visit major art centres.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

1. Academic Requirements

Applicants will meet the regular admission requirements of the University.

2. Portfolio Submission

All applicants will be required to submit a portfolio of previous art work and a completed Departmental application form before April 30 of the year in which entry is sought. Although it is assumed that applicants will have had no previous formal training in art, evidence of suitability for study in the visual arts is required. Instructions for the submission of portfolios will be provided by the Department of Visual Arts upon request. Enrollment in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) programme is limited and selection is competitive.

3. Transfers from other universities/colleges

See Admission to the University, B.6.

GENERAL NOTES

1. All courses in Visual Arts, excepting Art History courses, are restricted to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) degree programme.

2. The Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) programme is rigorous and demanding and it is assumed that students will be enrolled for full-time study. A student who withdraws from a course may put his/her programme in jeopardy or be unable to complete the degree in the normally allotted time.

3. Where circumstances warrant, any prerequisite(s) for Visual Arts courses may be waived by the Head of the Department.

4. Any Departmental regulations may be waived upon request of the Head of the Department by the appropriate Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

5. A candidate may not change the area of his/her studio emphasis without the written permission of the Head of the Department. In cases where permission is granted, the student shall be required to fulfill all requirements for the new studio emphasis.

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

1. Attendance at all studio courses is considered vital to the programme and will be required. It will be used as part of the evaluation.

2.a) Students who fail a course in a studio discipline shall not take more advanced courses in that discipline until the failed course has been satisfactorily completed.

b) Students who fail any studio course will be required to repeat that course and obtain a grade of at least 65%.

3. Students must normally complete all 1000 level studio courses before advancing to any 2000 level studio course.

4. A candidate whose average in Visual Arts courses falls below 65% in any semester will be placed on probation by the Department of Visual Arts.

5. A candidate will be required to withdraw from the programme if:

a) The candidate's cumulative average in Visual Arts courses required for the programme falls below 65%.

OR

b) The candidate's average in Visual Arts courses falls below 65% in each of two consecutive semesters of enrolment in the programme.

6. Students who have voluntarily withdrawn from the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) programme and wish to re-enter must re-apply by April 30 for the upcoming Fall semester, or by August 30 for the upcoming Winter Semester.

7. Students who have been required to withdraw from the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) programme and wish to re-enter must re-apply in competition after a lapse of two semesters by April 30 for the upcoming academic year.

8. Candidates who have been required to withdraw twice from the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) programme shall be ineligible for further admission.

9. Students denied promotion with a cumulative average below 60% in Visual Arts courses who are re-admitted to the programme will normally be required to repeat all the Visual Arts courses of the term, including all the courses which have been passed (in a semester when the courses are normally offered).

10. Students denied promotion with a cumulative average of at least 60% in Visual Arts courses who are re-admitted to the programme will be required to repeat the failed Visual Arts courses only (in a semester when such courses are normally offered).

DEGREE REGULATIONS

To be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts (Visual Arts) a student shall successfully complete 132 credit hours as follows:

1. Six credit hours in English courses.

2. Eighteen credit hours in academic elective courses chosen in consultation with the Department.

3. Twenty-four credit hours in Art History courses, including Visual Arts 2700, 2701.

4. Visual Arts 100A/B; 110A/B; 120A/B; 2000/2001; 3000/3001.

5. Three of a, b, c, d, or e.

a) Visual Arts 2100 and 2101
b) Visual Arts 2200 and 2201
c) Visual Arts 2310 and 2311, or 2320 and 2321
d) Visual Arts 2400 and 2401
e) Visual Arts 2600 and 2601

6. Two of a, b, c, d, or e. (Studio emphasis)

a) Visual Arts 3100/3101
b) Visual Arts 3200/3201
c) Visual Arts 3310/3311 or 3320/3321
d) Visual Arts 3400/3401
e) Visual Arts 3500/3501

7. Two of a, b, c, d, e, or f. (Studio Emphasis)

a) Visual Arts 4000/4001
b) Visual Arts 4100/4101
c) Visual Arts 4200/4201
d) Visual Arts 4310/4311 or 4320/4321
e) Visual Arts 4400/4401
f) Visual Arts 4500/4501

8. Twelve credit hours in studio electives at 2000 or 3000 level (in area other than studio emphasis)

NOTES: 1) Visual Arts 2300 and 2301 are not accepted as credits towards the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree.

2) Graduation Work. One work of art done during the fourth year will be selected by the Department, in consultation with the student, and retained for the permanent collection of the College.

Programme:

Year 1 - Foundation Year

- Drawing I, A/B (100)
- Two-D Design A/B (110)
- Three-D Design A/B (120)
- Six credit hours in Art History Courses
- Six credit hours in English Language and Literature

Year 2 - Second Year Drawing I, II

- 2000/2001
- Three of:
- Introductory Painting I, II (2100, 2101)
- Introductory Sculpture I, II (2200, 2201)
- Introductory Printmaking I, II (2310 and 2311 or 2320 and 2321)
- Introductory Photography I, II (2400, 2401)
- Introductory Digital Imaging I, II (2600/2601)
- Six credit hours in Art History Courses
- Six credit hours in Academic Electives*

Year 3 - Intermediate Drawing I, II

- 3000/3001
- Two of:
- Intermediate Painting I, II (3100/3101)
- Intermediate Sculpture I, II (3200/3201)
- Intermediate Relief and/or Intaglio I, II (3310/3311), or Intermediate Serigraphy and/or Lithography I, II (3320, 3321)
- Intermediate Photography I, II (3400/3401)
- Multi-Media I, II (3500/3501)
- Six credit hours in 2000 or 3000 level Studio Electives (in area other than studio emphasis)
- Six credit hours in Art History Courses
- Six credit hours in Academic Electives*

Year 4

- Two of:
- Advanced Drawing I, II (4000/4001)
- Advanced Painting I, II (4100/4101)
- Advanced Sculpture I, II (4200/4201)
- Advanced Relief and/or Intaglio I, II (4310/4311), or Advanced Serigraphy and/or Lithography I, II (4320/4321)
- Advanced Photography I, II, (4400/4401)
- Multi-Media III, IV (4500/4501)
- Six credit hours in 2000 or 3000 level Studio Electives (in area other than studio emphasis)
- Six credit hours in Art History Courses
- Six credit hours in Academic Electives*

* To be chosen in consultation with the Department of Visual Arts.

STUDIO COURSES

Studio courses are offered in the following subjects: Drawing, Two-dimensional design, Three-dimensional design, Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Photography and Multi-media, Digital Imaging and Digital Multi-Media. Courses in a studio subject consist of six hours of practical work in a studio class each week. Assigned projects will require that considerable additional studio work be done outside scheduled class time. Students will supply their own artist's materials. Some courses may not be offered every year. Please consult the Department prior to registration to confirm course offerings.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

1st Year

100A/B. Drawing I. The fundamentals of drawing with study of line, tone, shape, volume, form, texture, space. Emphasis on drawing the human figure and studio problems. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Co-requisites: Visual Arts 110A/B, 120A/B.

110A/B. Two Dimensional Design and Media. Principles of color theory and color mixing. Painting techniques in various media. Emphasis on rendering of form in space and organization of two dimensional surface through studio problems. Attendance Required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Co-requisites: Visual Arts 100A/B, 120A/B.

120A/B. Three Dimensional Design and Media. Three dimensional form and spatial organization. Exploration of sculptural media through studio problems. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Co-requisites: Visual Arts 100A/B, 110A/B.

2nd Year

2000. Second Year Drawing I. Development of drawing skills with emphasis on the human figure and studio problems. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 100A/B.

2001. Second Year Drawing II. A continuation of the work begun in Visual Arts 2000. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2000.

2100. Introductory Painting I. Painting media applied to problems of spatial structure, light, color, volume and surface relationships.

Studio: Six hours per week. Attendance required.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 110A/B.

2101. Introductory Painting II. A continuation of the work begun in Visual Arts 2100. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2100.

2200. Introductory Sculpture I. Development of accurate and expressive control of three-dimensional media. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 120A/B.

2201. Introductory Sculpture II. A continuation of the work begun in Visual Arts 2200. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2200.

2300. Introductory Printmaking I. Introduction to printmaking techniques. Relief, Intaglio, Serigraphy, Lithography. Attendance Required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

2301. Introductory Printmaking II. A continuation of the work begun in Visual Arts 2300. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2300.

2310. Introductory Printmaking I: Relief. An intensive exploration of Relief Printmaking concepts and techniques using wood and lino. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

2311. Introductory Printmaking II: Intaglio. An intensive exploration of Intaglio Printmaking concepts and techniques. Also includes monoprint and collograph experience. A continuation of the Printmaking stream begun in 2310. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2310.

2320. Introductory Printmaking I: Serigraphy. An intensive exploration of Serigraphic Printmaking concepts and techniques. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

2321. Introductory Printmaking II: Lithography. An intensive exploration of Lithographic Printmaking concepts and techniques. A continuation of the Printmaking stream begun in 2320. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2320.

2400. Introductory Photography I. Basic techniques of black and white photography including negative exposure, film development and print production. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

2401. Introductory Photography II. A continuation of the work begun in Visual Arts 2400. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2400.

2600. Introductory Digital Imaging I. An introduction to the computer as an art-making tool. Computer basics. Creation acquisition, manipulation and output of digital images using several applications. Attendance required.

2601. Introductory Digital Imaging II. A continuation of the work begun in Visual Arts 2600. Students will learn to create original artworks directly on the computer and how to incorporate images from other sources using a color scanner. The ethics, aesthetics and theory of digital image-making for artists will also be addressed. Attendance required.

3rd Year

3000. Intermediate Drawing I. Further development of drawing skills. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2001.

3001. Intermediate Drawing II. A continuation of the work begun in Visual Arts 3000. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3000.

3100. Intermediate Painting I. Continued development of painting stressing personal expression and critical awareness. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2101.

3101. Intermediate Painting II. Continuation of Visual Arts 3100. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3100.

3200. Intermediate Sculpture I. Continued development of skills in sculpture media. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2201.

3201. Intermediate Sculpture II. Continuation of Visual Arts 3200.

Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3200.

3310. Intermediate Relief and/or Intaglio I. Projects in Printmaking. Relief and/or Intaglio. In consultation with the instructor students will select the medium or combination or media in which to work. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2311.

3311. Intermediate Relief and/or Intaglio II. Projects in Printmaking. Relief and/or Intaglio. In consultation with the instructor students will select the medium or combination or media in which to work. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3310.

3320. Intermediate Serigraphy and/or Lithography I. Projects in Printmaking. Serigraphy and/or Lithography. In consultation with the instructor students will select the medium or combination or media in which to work. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2321.

3321. Intermediate Serigraphy and/or Lithography II. Projects in Printmaking. Serigraphy and/or Lithography. In consultation with the instructor students will select the medium or combination or media in which to work. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3320.

3400. Intermediate Photography I. Critical evaluation of photographs. Continued development of photographic skills, use of color and larger camera formats. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 2401.

3401. Intermediate Photography II. Continuation of Visual Arts 3400.

Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3400.

3500. Multi-media I. Projects in combined media. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department.

3501. Multi-media II. Continuation of Visual Arts 3500. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3500.

3510. Digital Multi-Media I. An exploration of computer based multi-media production on the computer involving 2-D and 3-D graphics, animation, video, sound and text. Attendance required.

3511. Digital Multi-Media II. A continuation of the work begun in Visual Arts 3510. Students will learn how to create original artworks directly on the computer and how to incorporate still images, moving images, sound and text using a color scanner, video camera, video cassette recorder, midi devices, etc. The ethics, aesthetics and theory of digital multi-media production for artists will also be addressed. Attendance required.

4th year

4000. Advanced Drawing I. Advanced projects in drawing. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3001.

4001. Advanced Drawing II. Continuation of Visual Arts 4000. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 4000.

4100. Advanced Painting I. Advanced projects in painting. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3101.

4101. Advanced Painting II. Continuation of Visual Arts 4100. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 4100.

4200. Advanced Sculpture I. Advanced projects in sculpture. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3201.

4201. Advanced Sculpture II. Continuation of Visual Arts 4200. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 4200.

4310. Advanced Relief and/or Intaglio I. Projects in Printmaking. Relief and/or Intaglio. In consultation with the instructor students will select the medium or combination or media in which to work. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3311 or any 12 credit hours in Printmaking.

4311. Advanced Relief and/or Intaglio II. Projects in Printmaking. Relief and/or Intaglio. In consultation with the instructor students will select the medium or combination or media in which to work. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 4310.

4320. Advanced Serigraphy and/or Lithography I. Projects in Printmaking. Serigraphy and/or Lithography. In consultation with the instructor students will select the medium or combination or media in which to work. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3321 or any 12 credit hours in Printmaking.

4321. Advanced Serigraphy and/or Lithography II. Projects in Printmaking. Serigraphy and/or Lithography. In consultation with the instructor students will select the medium or combination or media in which to work. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 4320.

4400. Advanced Photography I. Advanced projects in Photography. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3401.

4401. Advanced Photography II. Continuation of Visual Arts 4400. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 4400.

4500. Multi-media III. Advanced projects in multi-media. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 3501.

4501. Multi-media IV. Continuation of Visual Arts 4500. Attendance required.

Studio: Six hours per week.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts 4500.

ART HISTORY COURSES

2700. Art History Survey I. (Same as History 2700). The history of art from pre-historic times to the Renaissance.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

2701. Art History Survey II. (Same as History 2701). The history of art from the Renaissance to the 20th century.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

3700. Art History: The Italian Renaissance. (Same as History 3700). An overview of the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy with an emphasis upon the historical context in which art was produced.

3701. Art History: The Renaissance Outside Italy. (Same as History 3701). The Renaissance outside Italy from the late 14th century and the International style through the 16th century. As with the Italian Renaissance the art and architecture will be discussed in its historical context.

3702-3721. Art History: Special Topics. The range of special topics might include:

- Early Renaissance Art
- Art of the Later Renaissance
- Canadian Art to 1900
- 20th Century Canadian Art
- American Art to 1900
- 20th Century American Art

3620. Philosophy of Art. (Same as Philosophy 3620). Introduction to aesthetics; applications in Visual Arts, music and drama.

3820. Religion and the Arts. (Same as Religious Studies 3820). An examination of the role of art in the expression of religious ideas, together with a study of specific religious themes and concerns in one or more of the following: literature, film, music, painting, sculpture, and dance.

Prerequisite: Religious Studies 2810 or permission of the Department of Religious Studies.

4700-4729. Art History: Special Topics. The range of senior topics might include:

- History of European Art in the Middle Ages
- Art of the later Middle Art
- 17th and 18th Century Art
- 19th Century Art
- Modern Art I
- Modern Art II
- Art of the Ancient Near East
- Oriental Art

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department.

4730. Art History: Modern Art I. (Same as History 4730). A comprehensive survey of Western Art from 1750 to 1885 with an emphasis on painting and sculpture.

4731. Art History: Modern Art II. (Same as History 4731). A comprehensive survey of western art from 1885 to the present day.

4740. Current Issues in Art. Studies in Contemporary Art.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: Permission of Department.

4741. Art Criticism. Theories of Art Criticism.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Prerequisite: Permission of Department.


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Last modified October 23, 1996