Memorial University of Newfoundland

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR


SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

Director

Duncan, G.R., B.Sc.Phm., M.Sc.Phm. Toronto, D.Phil. Basel; Professor

Professors

Herzberg, G.R., B.S., Ph.D. Maine

Virgo, B.B., B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. British Columbia

Michalski, C.J., B.S., M.S. Michigan State, Ph.D. North Carolina

Rahimtula, A.D., M.Sc., Ph.D. Southampton

Shahidi, F., B.Sc., Ph.D. Montreal

West, R., M.Sc., Ph.D. McGill

Associate Professors

Kara, M., B.Pharm., Ph.D. Bradford

Law, R.M.T., B.Sc.Phm. Toronto, Pharm.D. SUNY at Buffalo

Loomis, C.W., B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. Queen's

Turner, C.J., B.Pharm. Bradford, Ph.D. Glasgow, Scotland

Assistant Professors

Liu, Hu, B.Sc.(Pharm.), M.Sc.Pharm. Beijing Medical, Ph.D. Alberta

Johnson, A., B.S.P., M.Sc. British Columbia, Ph.D. Rhode Island

Phillips, L., B.Sc.(Pharm.) Memorial, Pharm.D. British Columbia

Richardson, V.J., Ph.D. Sheffield

Robb, D., Ph.D. Cambridge, M.D. Dublin

Tirunellai, K.R., M.Pharm., Ph.D. Dalhousie

Wang, L., B.Sc.(Pharm.), M.Sc.Pharm. Beijing Medical, Ph.D. Alberta

Adjunct Professor

Buttar, H., DUM Punjab, M.Sc., Ph.D. Alberta

Adjunct Associate Professor

Kiceniuk, J., M.Sc., Ph.D. British Columbia

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Hensman, L.R., B.Sc.(Pharm.) British Columbia, Pharm.D. SUNY at Buffalo, M.B.A. Memorial

Pharmacist & Internship Co-ordinator

Boone, D., PhC., B.Sc. Memorial, B.Ed. New Brunswick

Clinical Associates in Pharmacy
Byron Allen, Ph.C.
Lisa Boyd, Ph.C.
John Branch, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Keith Brown, Ph.C.
Evelyn Bursey, Ph.C.
Janice Chalker, Ph.C.
David Collins, Ph.C.
Tony Cornish, Ph.C.
Jackie Dale, Ph.C.
Alfred Dawe, Ph.C.
Denis Dawe, Ph.C.
Sharon Delaney, Ph.C.
LauraLee Elms, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Neil Fortune, B.Sc. (Pharm.)
Jeff Fost, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Lynette Frampton, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Elizabeth Gardiner, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Irving Gillette, Ph.C.
Susan Gladney-Martin, Ph.C.
Tom Goulding, Ph.C.
Sandra Grant-Black, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Ken Green, Ph.C., B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Lynn Hartery, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
James Hayward, Ph.C.
Donald Hillier, Ph.C.
Paul Hillier, Ph.C.
Keith Hogan, Ph.C.
Vince Hogan, Ph.C.
Joanne Howlett, Ph.C.
Dave Hoyles, Ph.C.
Perry Humphries, Ph.C.
Stephen Janes, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Bud Jenkins, Ph.C.
Theresa Johnstone, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Harold Just, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Dean Kean, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Ernest Kelly, Ph.C.
Jeff Kelly, Ph.C.
Kathy King, Ph.C.
Rod Lefort, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Linda LeMesurier, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Marilyn Lewis, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Lynn Liesch, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Wayne Little, Ph.C.
Derek Long, Ph.C.
Graham MacKenzie, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Arthur McDonough, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Denise McGrath, Ph.C.
Marie Metcalfe, Ph.C.
Denise O'Brien, Ph.C.
Patrick O'Keefe, Ph.C.
Darrin Park, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Robert Parsons, Ph.C.
Calvin Payne, Ph.C.
Gertrude Pike, Ph.C.
Ronald Pike, Ph.C.
Robert Pitcher, Ph.C.
Ann Power, Ph.C.
Karen Power, Ph.C.
Ron Power, Ph.C.
Margot Priddle, Ph.C.
David Reddy, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Paul Reynolds, Ph.C.
Marilyn Reynolds, Ph.C.
Dion Ross, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Cathy Rowe, Ph.C.
Heather Rowsell, Ph.C.
Gerard Ryan, Ph.C.
Beverly Saunders, Ph.C.
Christine Saunders, Ph.C.
Barbara Scaplen, Ph.C.
Judith Seymour, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Leonard Skanes, Ph.C.
Rowena Skinner-Doyle, Ph.C.
Rosalie Snow, Ph.C.
Lisa Theriault, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Steve Thompson, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Gerry Tilley, Ph.C.
Rob Vail, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Herman Walters, Ph.C.
Bert Warr, Ph.C.
Eldon Warren, Ph.C.
Perry Warren, Ph.C.
Teri-Anne Whitten, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Patrick Williams, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
David Wilmhurst, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Karen Winsor, Ph.C.
May Wong, B.Sc.(Pharm.)
Ian Young, B.Sc.(Pharm.)


REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTION

The School of Pharmacy is committed to providing an undergraduate programme of quality and excellence that will produce individuals who will contribute significantly in all settings of pharmacy practice. Students studying towards the B.Sc.(Pharmacy) degree will acquire, as a first priority, a substantial background in both the biological and physical sciences and the humanities. Following this, students will receive an extensive education and intensive training in the fields of pharmacy and cognate health sciences. The melding of these disciplines produces the modern pharmacist.

The programme of study leading to the B.Sc.(Pharmacy) has two phases and requires at least 5 years to complete. First, students must complete the 2 years of pre-entrance studies as described below (Admission to the School of Pharmacy, Regulation 6). Students will then be selected for Pharmacy Studies in which they will study the pharmaceutical and cognate health sciences for 3 years (see Course List). NOTE: ENTRY INTO THE FINAL 3 YEARS OF THE PROGRAMME IS COMPETITIVE. SELECTION WILL BE MADE FROM THOSE WHO HAVE COMPLETED THE PRE-ENTRANCE STUDIES (SEE REGULATION 4, ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY).

OBJECTIVES

1) To educate pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists for Newfoundland and Labrador, and to the extent possible, for other parts of Canada and elsewhere.

2) To contribute to knowledge through research conducted in the School, and through collaboration with other elements of the University, the affiliated hospitals and the community.

3) To co-operate with other health care professionals, institutions, and agencies in activities leading to improved education, research and health care.

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

1) All applications for entry to the programme for the Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar of the University on or before the deadline of March 31 in any year.

2) Applications will be reviewed after the closing date by the Admissions Committee of the School of Pharmacy. This Committee has the delegated authority of the School Council to admit or decline to admit applicants, following guidelines and procedures acceptable to that Council.

3) Admissions will normally be to the first year of pharmacy studies. In some circumstances, however, admission with advanced standing may be offered.

4) Entry to the School of Pharmacy is on the basis of competition for a fixed number of places. The Admissions Committee takes into account the applicant's academic background, performance on the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) and information on an applicant's personal qualities and achievements as given by the applicant and by referees' reports. In some cases personal interviews may be required. Priority is given to applicants who are bona fide residents of this province and who are Canadian citizens, or permanent residents.

5) The Admission Committee's decision to admit or decline to admit an applicant will be made on the basis of the competition for entry in the year of application and will be determined by the Committee's judgement of the likelihood of an applicant succeeding in the academic and professional studies leading to the award of the B.Sc.(Pharm.) and the eventual practice of pharmacy.

6) Eligibility: To be eligible for consideration, an applicant shall have completed a minimum of 60 credit hours which have been taken or accepted for credit at a recognized University or University College, before entry to the School of Pharmacy.

Students applying to enter are normally required to have completed each of the following courses or their equivalents:

- Biology 1001, 1002
- Chemistry 1000, 1001
- Chemistry 2400, 2401 and 2300
- English 1080, 1101 or equivalent
- Mathematics 1000 (or 1080 & 1081)
- Mathematics 1001
- Physics 1200, 1201
- Psychology 1000, 1001
- Statistics 2550

In addition to the above courses, students should have six credit hours, preferably from the following list:

- Anthropology - Music
- Classics - Philosophy
- English - Political Science
- Fine Arts - Religious Studies
- Folklore - Second Language
- Geography - Sociology
- History - Women's Studies
- Linguistics

No application will be considered from an applicant who cannot produce evidence that the above requirements have been met or will have been met by the time of entry into the School of Pharmacy.

7) Students are advised to declare a major in order to assist in their course enrollments. Because of the limited number of places, students are strongly advised to plan their courses with an alternative degree programme in mind.

8) Each applicant is responsible for ensuring that all the required information on the application form, e.g., transcripts, PCAT scores, referee reports, is supplied to the Admissions Committee, and for providing any further information required by the Committee. An application will not be considered to be complete until all documentation has been received.

9) Notification of the decision will be made to candidates by the Admissions Committee of the School of Pharmacy. No other form of notification can be considered official.

10) The letter of acceptance will give the successful applicant fourteen (14) days in which to confirm that she/he will accept the place offered. The signed intention to accept the offer must be accompanied by a deposit of $100, which will be credited towards tuition fees. The deposit will be forfeited if the applicant subsequently declines the offer or fails to enroll. If no reply is received within 14 days, the offer by the School of Pharmacy will be withdrawn and the applicant will be informed of this by letter.

11) Unsuccessful applicants who wish to re-apply for admission are required to submit the application forms relevant to the year of re-application and be required to enter into the competition for that year.

12) An unsuccessful applicant has the right to appeal the decision of the Admissions Committee not to offer her/him a place, if it is felt by the applicant that the decision was reached on grounds other than those specified in paragraph 4 above. The appeal should be made in writing within fourteen days of the notification of the decision and should be directed to the Director of the School of Pharmacy. The letter should state clearly and fully the grounds for the appeal. If the Director of the School of Pharmacy, in consultation with the Registrar, judges the grounds to be sufficient, the formal appeals mechanism will be initiated.

EVALUATION AND PROMOTION

1) Subject to the approval of Senate, the overall policy of evaluation and the planning of the programmes of studies leading to the degree of B.Sc.(Pharm.) is the responsibility of the Undergraduate Studies Committee, which is a standing committee of the Council of the School of Pharmacy. Responsibility for scheduling and co-ordinating courses rests with the chairperson of that committee in collaboration with those staff responsible for instruction in the courses.

2)a) Each student is expected to complete the work as described in the current regulations of the School of Pharmacy for each year of the programme and to pass the prescribed academic and professional examinations.

b) Student attendance is required at all seminar and laboratory classes, Studentship sessions and Clerkship sessions as indicated in the Course Descriptions. Classes or sessions that are missed will be excused only for medical/compassionate reasons, which will require suitable documentation. Students so excused are responsible for obtaining the material they missed. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in the student receiving a failing grade in the course.

3) a) Evaluation of each student's performance is conducted by the instructor(s) in each course. The overall average required for promotion from any given year will be sixty-five (65%). Neither promotion nor graduation will be permitted if a student has a grade below fifty (50%) percent in any course in the pharmacy programme.

b) The passing grade in Pharmacy 3004 Professional Practice is 70%, failing which the student may be required to withdraw.

c) Students in the 2nd and 3rd years of Pharmacy Studies will be permitted to meet their elective requirements from courses taken previously. However, only those courses for which credit has been granted, and that have not been used towards a previous degree or for admission to the Pharmacy programme will be acceptable.

d) A student must attain a passing grade in each elective, but these courses will not be included in calculating the student's average grade for the purposes of promotion, graduation or academic awards.

4)a) The Student Promotions Committees are subcommittees of the Undergraduate Studies Committee and are composed of the instructors of the relevant years' courses. It is the responsibility of the Student Promotions Committees to monitor each student's progress for each year of the undergraduate curriculum on the basis of grades submitted by the individual instructors.

b) The Student Promotions Committees will review the results of all evaluations in any year. On the basis of this review, the Committee will decide which students should be promoted to the next year of studies. In reaching its decision the Committee will take into account academic factors and any special circumstances which may warrant consideration.

5) Following the completion of each academic year, the Student Promotions Committee will report to the Undergraduate Studies Committee:

(i) the number of students in the class who are to be promoted and the circumstances under which promotions have not been recommended;
(ii) the grades to be awarded to students for recommendation to the Registrar for entry on the official University transcript for each student;
(iii) the names of those students who are deemed eligible for the award of the degree B.Sc.(Pharm.) for recommendation to the Senate.

6) A student who fails to meet the promotion requirements outlined in Clause 3 above may be required to repeat all or part of the studies in any year, or may be required to withdraw from the programme.

a) If a student is required to repeat a year on the grounds of unsatisfactory performance, his or her performance in the repeated year must meet the conditions of Clause 3 above. If this standard is not met, the Undergraduate Studies Committee may require the student to withdraw from the programme.

b) Normally, the option to repeat a year on the grounds of academic difficulties can only be offered once during the student's B.Sc.(Pharm.) programme. This restriction may be waived if it has been demonstrated that the student's academic performance has been adversely affected by other factors duly authenticated and acceptable to the Undergraduate Studies Committee.

c) If a student is required to withdraw from the programme by the Undergraduate Studies Committee, the chairperson will report the decision and the basis upon which it was reached to the Director of the School of Pharmacy. The Director may then recommend to the Registrar that the student be required to withdraw from the programme. Any student who is required to withdraw from the programme and who wishes to re-enter the School must apply as a regular applicant in competition with other applicants through the Admissions Office.

7) The Undergraduate Studies Committee may require a student who is deemed unlikely to benefit from continued attendance in his/her course of study to withdraw conditionally. The Chairman of the committee will advise the Director of the School of Pharmacy of the circumstances precipitating this action, the duration of the withdrawal and any conditions the student must fulfil during the withdrawal. The Director may then recommend to the Registrar that the student is on conditional withdrawal. Upon completing the conditions, the student may be permitted re-entry to the programme. If the conditions are not met, the student may be required to withdraw from the programme.

8) A student has the right to make a formal appeal against a decision of the Undergraduate Studies Committee. However, this appeal cannot be made on the basis of the grades awarded in individual courses, as the student will normally have had the opportunity of contesting grades immediately after notification. A formal appeal by a student against the decision of the Committee must be made on grounds other than the grades awarded, e.g. default of procedure. This appeal should be made in writing, clearly stating the basis for the appeal and should be directed in the first instance to the Registrar of the University. The Registrar, in consultation with the Director, will determine whether or not the grounds stated are sufficient to warrant a formal hearing of the appeal.

9) Students obtaining a failing grade in pharmacy courses due to exceptional circumstances may be permitted to write supplementary examinations subject to normal appeal process by the student. Such an appeal must be made in writing [within one week of release of grades].

10) In addition to the above clauses, the School of Pharmacy reserves the right to require a student to withdraw from the programme at any time when acceptable cause is demonstrated. In such cases, the Director, on behalf of the School, shall recommend such withdrawal to the Registrar who will then take appropriate action. Any such action is subject to the right of appeal by the student. An appeal should be made in writing clearly stating the basis for the appeal and should be directed in the first instance to the Registrar of the University. The Registrar, in consultation with the Director, will determine whether or not the grounds stated are sufficient to warrant a formal hearing of the appeal.

11) Upon completion of an academic year, a student in good standing may elect to withdraw temporarily from studies. Voluntary withdrawal at other times and for other reasons may be permitted in accordance with Section R, Withdrawals from University, General Academic Regulations (Undergraduates). In all cases, the intent to withdraw voluntarily should be discussed with the Director. The Director may then recommend to the Registrar that a student be permitted to withdraw for a stated period of time. At the end of this period, the student, in consultation with the Undergraduate Studies Committee, should ensure that sufficient revision and preparatory work is undertaken to allow studies to be resumed readily.

In the absence of good cause, any such student who does not resume studies on the specified date may be deemed to have left the programme.

12) The Director and/or Registrar will report actions regarding Clauses 6 to 10 to the Council of the School of Pharmacy for information.

PROGRAMME OF STUDIES

For the Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy a candidate must complete satisfactorily:

1) the entrance requirements for admission to the First Year of Pharmacy Studies [see Admission to the School of Pharmacy, Regulation 6]; and 2) all credit and non-credit courses included in the Course List for the First, Second and Third Years of Pharmacy Studies. After successful completion of the Third Year of Pharmacy Studies, the Undergraduate Studies Committee may recommend to Council that the degree, Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy, be awarded.

OUTLINE OF STUDENTSHIP PROGRAMME

A structured training programme will be offered after the first and second Pharmacy years in appropriate pharmacies in Newfoundland and Labrador, and successful completion of this programme will be required before a graduate can qualify for application for licensure as a pharmacist within Newfoundland and Labrador.

COURSE LIST

COURSES IN THE FIRST YEAR OF PHARMACY STUDIES

NOTE: WHERE SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES ARE NOT GIVEN, THE COURSES NORMALLY TAKEN TO MEET THE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION WILL PROVIDE ANY NECESSARY PREREQUISITES.

Pharmacy 3004. Professional Practice (W). Application of pharmacy regulations in the dispensing of medications. Pharmacy record keeping using computerized and manual systems. Dispensing of proprietary and extemporaneous prescriptions. Usage of drug delivery systems and devices.

Lecture: One hour per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week. Attendance is required.

NOTE: The passing grade in Pharmacy 3004 Professional Practice is 70%, failing which the student may be required to withdraw.

Pharmacy 3005. Pharmaceutical Preparations (W). An introduction to the theory and formulation of pharmaceutical dosage forms as they apply to pharmacy practice. The laboratory consists of exercises in compounding representative examples of the various types of preparations studied in the classroom. Examples of calculations employed in pharmacy are studied where appropriate.

Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 300W. Studentship (S). Non-credit course. Practical training in a pharmacy after classes and examinations in the Winter Semester have ended.

Prerequisites: All courses required in the Fall and Winter Semesters of the First Year.

Twelve weeks, 35 hours per week. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 3011. Orientation to Pharmacy (F). An introduction to the history, organization and the role of Pharmacy in the health care system. Special emphasis will be given to the federal and provincial regulations which govern the practice of pharmacy. The relationship between law and ethics will also be discussed. The laboratory consists of computer applications as they pertain to pharmacy practice.

Lectures: Two hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 3101. Human Anatomy (F). Cell biology, histology and gross anatomy including lymphoid, nervous, respiratory, digestive, reproduction, renal and endocrine systems. The laboratory consists of slide demonstrations of certain systems.

Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Four two-hour laboratories. Attendance as required by the instructor.

Pharmacy 3103. Microbiology of Infectious Diseases (W). The various types of micro-organisms (bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal), the environment in which they are able to multiply and their relationship to human diseases. The classifications of their morphology, mode of reproduction and the metabolic process, the physiological and epidemiological principles of infectious diseases and their manifestations are discussed including the principles of immunization.

Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: One hour per week.

Pharmacy 3105. Immunology (F). Introduction to the molecular and cellular basis of immunity and hypersensitivity. Discussion of the manipulation of the immune system in the management and treatment of disease.

Lectures/tutorials: Three per week.

Pharmacy 3110. Introduction to Biochemistry (F). An introductory course dealing with the chemistry and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. Emphasis will be given to enzyme systems and utilization of energy.

Lectures: Three hours per week.
Tutorials: As required.

NOTE: Credit cannot be received for Pharmacy 3110 and Biochemistry 3100.

Pharmacy 3111. General Biochemistry (W). Metabolism of amino acids and complex lipids. Coenzyme function of vitamins. Metabolic and functional specialization of different cells and tissues.

Lectures: Three hours per week.
Tutorials: As required.

NOTE: Credit cannot be received for Pharmacy 3111 and Biochemistry 3102.

Biochemistry 3200. Basic Human Nutrition I. A study of the nutrients essential to human health and well-being, with emphasis on carbohydrates, proteins and lipids - chemistry, dietary source, dietary requirements, metabolism, physiological importance.

Corequisite: Pharmacy 3110.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

Chemistry 3100. Analytical Chemistry I (W). Treatment of data, gravimetric analysis, volumetric analysis including oxidation-reduction titrations using electrochemical techniques, the use of specific ion electrodes, and titrations in non-aqueous systems. Spectrophotometric trace analysis and titration.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 2300.
Lectures and Laboratories: Not more than seven hours per week.
Attendance at laboratories is required.

Medicine 310A/B. Human Physiology (F)(W). Topics covered are the properties of nerves and muscle cells, the nervous system, the special senses, blood and body fluids, the cardiovascular system, digestion, respiration, renal function, endocrinology and reproduction. Integration of the body's systems in maintaining homeostasis will be emphasized.

Prerequisites or Corequisite: Pharmacy 3110. Permission of Instructor or Associate Dean of Basic Sciences for students other than Biochemistry Majors.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Up to three hours per week.

COURSES IN THE SECOND YEAR OF PHARMACY STUDIES

NOTE: WHERE SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES ARE NOT GIVEN, THE COURSE NORMALLY TAKEN TO MEET THE REQUIREMENTS FOR PROMOTION FROM FIRST TO SECOND YEAR WILL PROVIDE ANY NECESSARY PREREQUISITES.

Pharmacy 4002. Physical Pharmacy (F). The physical chemistry of pharmaceutical dosage forms. Factors which influence the design and efficacy of pharmaceutical formulations. Physical chemistry and properties of solutions, solids, emulsions, ointments, suspensions.

Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 4003. Pharmacy Administration (W). Management principles useful in operating a pharmacy. General concepts of pharmaceutical marketing and an examination of how health care is provided.

Prerequisite: Business 1000.
Lectures: One hour per week.

Pharmacy 4004. Pathophysiology (F). The nature of disease, causes and effects, and alteration in structure and function of cells. Inflammation, neoplasia, genetic and chromosomal diseases, healing and repair, stress and disease.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Pharmacy 4005. Chemotherapy (F). The structure, mechanism of action, selected chemical and physical properties and structure-activity relations of antibiotics, and anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-protozoal, and anti-neoplastic agents. Isolation and history of chemotherapeutic agents. Host defence mechanisms, selectivity, sensitivity and resistance. Interferon, immunosuppressants and immunostimulants.

Lectures: Two per week.

Pharmacy 4006. Applied Pharmacokinetics (W). Introduction to biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic principles useful in the selection, monitoring and evaluation of drug therapy. Application of these principles in evaluating drug literature and developing drug dosage regimens of selected classes of drugs for individual patients.

Prerequisite: Pharmacy 4002.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 4009. Pharmacology (W). This course will follow Medicine 4300 and will consist of lectures and laboratory demonstrations designed to explore in depth topics in general pharmacology. Topics will include: drugs affecting the central nervous system, endocrine pharmacology, chemotherapy, anti-coagulants, diuretics, broncho-dilators and anti-inflammatory drugs.

Prerequisite: Medicine 4300
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory Hours: Up to three hours per week. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 4010. Medicinal Chemistry I (F). The structures, selected chemical and physical properties, mechanisms of action, and structure-activity relationships of drugs other than chemotherapeutic agents. Theoretical aspects of drug design and drug metabolism. Medicinal agents of plant origin and inorganic pharmaceuticals are also included.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Pharmacy 4011. Medicinal Chemistry II (W). The structures, selected chemical and physical properties, mechanisms of action, and structure-activity relationships of drugs other than chemotherapeutic agents. Theoretical aspects of drug design and drug metabolism. Medicinal agents of plant origin and inorganic pharmaceuticals are also included.

Prerequisite: Pharmacy 4010.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

Pharmacy 401W (F). Non-credit course. Seminars in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Presentations by faculty and visiting scientists on topics of current importance.

The final grade, Pass or Fail, will be based on attendance and participation. Attendance is required.

NOTE: This course is a necessary prerequisite for Pharmacy 402W .

Pharmacy 402W (W). Non-credit course. Seminars in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Presentations by faculty and visiting scientists on topics of current importance.

The final grade, Pass or Fail, will be based on attendance and participation. Attendance is required.

NOTE: This course is a necessary prerequisite for Pharmacy 501W .

Pharmacy 410W. Studentship (S). Non-credit course. Practical training in a pharmacy after classes and examinations in the Winter Session have ended.

Prerequisite: All courses required in the Fall and Winter Semesters of the Second Year.

Twelve weeks: 35 hours per week. Attendance is required.

Biochemistry 3201. Basic Human Nutrition II. A study of the vitamins, minerals and trace elements essential to human health and well being - chemistry, dietary source, dietary requirements, physiological role, deficiency syndromes.

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 3200.
Corequisite: Pharmacy 3111.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

Business 1000. Introduction to Business. An overview of business in the Canadian environment is presented in the course with emphasis on the stakeholders involved and the issues confronting managers. The course examines the functional areas of the enterprise (finance, marketing, production, and human resources management) in addition to providing an overview of the business system. An analysis of actual business situations provides a framework of study.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 2001 and Business 1000.

Medicine 4300. Introduction to General and Autonomic Pharmacology (F). This course will deal with the general principles of pharmacology (receptors, absorption, distribution, metabolism, pharmacokinetics), drugs affecting peripheral nerve transmission, the central nervous system and the cardiovascular system.

Prerequisite: Medicine 310A/B.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three laboratories of three hours each. Attendance is required.

Elective (F). Any three credit hours chosen from the Calendar with the approval of a faculty member of the School of Pharmacy. (At least one of the Pharmacy elective courses must be completed to satisfy the elective requirement in the pharmacy programme.)

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Elective (W). Any three credit hours chosen from the Calendar with the approval of a faculty member of the School of Pharmacy. (At least one of the Pharmacy elective courses must be completed to satisfy the elective requirement in the pharmacy programme.)

Lectures: Three hours per week.

COURSES IN THE THIRD YEAR OF PHARMACY STUDIES

NOTE: WHERE SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES ARE NOT GIVEN, THE COURSES NORMALLY TAKEN TO MEET THE REQUIREMENTS FOR PROMOTION FROM SECOND TO THIRD YEAR WILL PROVIDE ANY NECESSARY PREREQUISITES.

Pharmacy 502X (15 credit hours). Consists of courses 5001, 5003, 5004, 5005, 5008, 5009 and 5017 described below. The grade for 502X will be the weighted average of those for the constituent courses. The weighting factor, per course, will be the number of lecture hours for that course divided by the total number of lecture hours for all courses. To obtain credit for 502X, a student must pass all the constituent courses and obtain a weighted average of not less than 65%.

Pharmacy 5001. Human Toxicology (F). This course will cover: 1) the basic principles of toxicology, including toxicokinetics, mechanisms of toxicity and the major causes of mortality; 2) the toxicology and treatment of the drugs that are the most important human poisons; 3) how new drug entities are assessed and regulated for safety.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Pharmacy 5003. Therapeutics (F). This course will provide an understanding of the therapeutic management of common disease states. The student is introduced to the pathophysiologies of common disease states, current drug and non-drug therapies, procedures used to monitor drug therapy for clinical response, adverse reactions, drug interaction and contraindications, and the process for distinguishing rational from irrational use of drugs.

Lectures: Five hours per week.

Pharmacy 5004. Self-Medication (F). An overview of non-prescription medications with discussion of their uses, effectiveness, and appropriateness for self medication treatments.

The pharmacist's role as a health information resource person is emphasized.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

Pharmacy 5005. Communication & Patient Counselling (F). The aim of this course is to help the student develop self-confidence and interpersonal communication skills, with particular emphasis on situations that he/she might encounter when practising pharmacy.

Lectures: Two hours per week for four weeks.

Pharmacy 5008. Radiopharmacy (F). An introductory course which discusses both radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear pharmacy practice. The design of the radiopharmaceutical is developed followed by a description of the chemistry and clinical uses of the individual drugs. A laboratory section emphasizes those operations which will enable the pharmacist to meet basic contemporary practice situation.

Lectures: Twelve hours.
Laboratory: Six hours. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 5009. Phamacoepidemiology (F). This course will cover 1) the principles of epidemiology and its application in public health and the health services delivery system, 2) methods used in pharmacoepidemiologic studies, 3) the use of pharmacoepidemiology studies to study the benefit risk and effectiveness of drugs, and 4) the use of clinical trials to establish the efficacy of new drugs.

Lectures: Two hours per week.

Pharmacy 500X. Clinical Clerkship (W). (15 credit hours). Provides experience in clinical practice. The student will participate as a member of a patient care team and will have supervised responsibilities. Students will be required to do inservices, attend work rounds and complete a written exam at the completion of the course. Emphasis will be placed on the therapeutics of general medicine, infectious disease, pharmacokinetics and cardiology.

Prerequisite: Pharmacy 502X

Two six week modules, 35 hours per week. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 501W. Non-credit course (F). Seminars in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Presentations by faculty and visiting scientists on topics of current importance.

The final grade, Pass or Fail will be based on attendance and participation. Attendance is required.

Pharmacy 5017. Pharmaceutical Technology (F). The principles of development and evaluation of novel delivery systems for drugs including therapeutic proteins and peptides. The course objectives are to provide knowledge of the physiochemical and biopharmaceutical aspects of the design, use and evaluation of novel drug delivery systems with emphasis on controlled release systems for oral and percutaneous delivery.

Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Up to three hours per week. Attendance is required.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Pharmacy 5017 and the former Pharmacy 5007.

Elective (F). Any three credit hours chosen from the Calendar with the approval of a faculty member of the School of Pharmacy. (At least one of the Pharmacy elective courses must be completed to satisfy the elective requirement in the pharmacy programme.)

Lectures: Three hours per week.

The following Pharmacy Elective courses may be completed to satisfy the elective requirement:

Pharmacy 5010. Pharmaceutical Analysis (F). Spectral (UV-Vis, fluorescence, IR, NMR and MS) and chromatographic (TLC, GC and HPLC) analysis for pharmaceutical agents and their metabolites. The laboratory consists of problem-solving exercises in pharmacopoeial techniques widely employed in the pharmaceutical industry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3100 or equivalent.
Lectures Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

Pharmacy 5011. Pharmaceutical Biotechnology (F). Principles of molecular biological technologies, particularly those of recombinant DNA, in the production of pharmaceuticals, especially proteins, peptides, monocional antibodies, vaccines and cytokines as well as those for gene therapy. Drug-receptor interactions and molecular modeling in drug design. Stability and delivery of protein-peptide products. Clinical and therapeutical aspects of biotechnology products.

Prerequisites: Pharmacy 3101, 3105, 3110 and 3111 or equivalents.
Lectures Three hours per week.

Pharmacy 501A/B. Pharmaceutical Research (F & W). A two semester course involving supervised laboratory research on an original scientific problem in pharmaceutics, pharmacology or toxicology. A thesis is to be submitted as a formal written document before the end of the 11th week of the Winter Semester; in addition, an oral presentation is to be given to the School before the end of the Winter Semester.

Prerequisite: Consent of the Undergraduate Studies Committee.


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Last modified October 22, 1996