Memorial University of Newfoundland

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR


SCHOOL OF NURSING

Director

Lamb, M., B.Sc.N.Ed. Ottawa, M.N. Alberta; Associate Professor

Associate Director (Graduate Programme and Research)

Roberts, P., B.Sc. Nottingham, M.Sc. London, Ph.D.(Med.) Memorial; Associate Professor

Associate Director (Undergraduate Programmes)

Beaton, M., B.Sc. Memorial M.Sc.N. New York Medical College; Associate Professor

Executive Assistant

Smith, T.

Professors

Gien, L., B.Sc.N. Loretta Heights College, M.Ed.N. Columbia, Ph.D. London

Kozma, A., M.A., Ph.D. Western Ontario

Sen, P., B.Sc.N. Delhi, M.Sc.N., Western Ontario

Associate Professors

Banoub-Baddour, S., B.Sc.N., M.Sc.N., D.N.Sc. Alexandria

Basu, A., B.Sc.N. Delhi, M.Sc.N. Wayne State

Beck, D., B.N., M.Sc., Ph.D. Memorial

Hackett, M., B.Sc.N. Hunter College, New York, M.Sc.(A) McGill

Herbert, P., B.N., B.Ed., M.Sc. Dalhousie

Hustins, K., B.N. New Brunswick, M.N. Memorial

Laryea, M., B.A. OPEN, M.Phil. C.N.A.A., D.Phil. Ulster

LeFort, S., B.A. Trent, B.N., M.N. Memorial

Marsh, M., B.N., M.Ed. Memorial

Matthews, M.K., B.N., M.N. Memorial

McKim, E., B.Sc.N. Western, M.N. Memorial

Ribeiro, V., B.N.Sc. Queen's, M.S., D.N.Sc. Boston

Rockwell, B., B.N., M.Sc. Memorial

Solberg, S.M., B.A., B.N. Memorial, M.N. Alberta

Way, C., B.N., B.A. Memorial, M.Sc.(A) McGill, Ph.D. Virginia

Westera, D., B.N. Memorial, M.Sc.N. Toronto

Assistant Professors

Bennett, L., B.N., M.N. Memorial

Best, D., B.N. Memorial, M.N. Dalhousie

Blakeley, J., B.Sc.N. Western, M.B.A. Memorial

Brennan, A., B.Sc.N. St. Francis Xavier, M.N. Dalhousie

Dawe, D., B.N., M.Sc. Memorial

MacDonald, S., B.N., M.N. Memorial

Moralejo, D., B.A., B.Sc., M.Sc.(A) McGill

Small, S., B.N. Memorial, M.Sc.N. Toronto

Webber, K., B.Sc.N. British Columbia, M.N. Dalhousie

Adjunct Professors

Corbett, Sister P., B.Ed., B.A. Memorial, M.HSc. Alberta

Daley, K., B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed. Memorial

Dicker, J., B.N., M.Ed.(Admin) Memorial

Jones, L.M., B.N., M.B.A. Memorial

Lundrigan, E., B.N., M.N. Memorial

Norman Robbins, L., B.N., M.Sc. McGill

Pardy, M., R.N.

Peachy, G., B.N., M.Ed.(Admin) Memorial, M.HSc. Toronto

Sullivan, R., B.Sc.N. Mount St. Vincent, M.HSc. Toronto

Walsh, M.J., B.N. Memorial, M.Sc.N. Toronto

Lecturer

Curran-Smith, J., B.N., M.Ed. Memorial


SCHOOL OF NURSING

FOUR YEAR BACHELOR OF NURSING (COLLABORATIVE) PROGRAMME

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme is to prepare nurses to meet the challenges of health care today and into the 21st century. The programme reflects the collaborative efforts of the province's five schools of nursing - General Hospital School of Nursing, St. Clare's Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, Salvation Army Grace General Hospital School of Nursing, Memorial University of Newfoundland School of Nursing, and Western Memorial Regional Hospital School of Nursing.

The profession of nursing involves caring for and about people. Health, the goal of nursing practice, is achieved by working with persons in a manner that respects individuals' beliefs and values. The Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme assists students to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to help people achieve and maintain health.

The learning environment of the programme is based on the belief that students and faculty are equal partners in the educational process. Students by being actively involved in the learning process develop an appreciation of, and responsibility for the discovery of knowledge. Faculty facilitate learning by serving as resource persons and role models and by challenging students to be self-directed and creative.

The learning opportunities provided acknowledge that nursing is a practice discipline whose service is provided in any and all settings where persons function. Practicing nurses within these settings provide valuable assistance in the students development of competencies required for beginning nursing practice.

GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE BACHELOR OF NURSING (COLLABORATIVE) PROGRAMME

This Collaborative Nursing Programme is offered at Memorial University of Newfoundland School of Nursing, School of Nursing operated by the Health Care Corporation of St. John's, and Western Memorial Regional Hospital School of Nursing.

ADMISSION

1) Applicants for admission or re-admission must complete an application for the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme. In addition, students who have not registered for courses at Memorial University for either of the two immediately preceding semesters must also complete a general application for admission to the University. Applications must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar, Memorial University.

2) New applicants to the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme will be accepted for the Fall semester only. DEADLINE: Applications, including all required documents, must be received by March 1.

3) To be considered for admission to the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme applicants are required to meet the General Admissions Requirements of Memorial University. In addition, high school Advanced Math 3201 is preferred and high school science courses must include the following:

i) Biology 3201 or equivalent
ii) Chemistry 3202 or equivalent

4) Mature applicants, as defined by Memorial University of Newfoundland, may be considered for admission to the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme if they have a high school diploma, or its equivalent, as certified by the Department of Education of Newfoundland. Applicants must also meet the science course requirements stated in clause 3 in order to be considered for admission.

5) Admission to the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme is on the basis of competition for a limited number of places. Selection of candidates will be based on academic performance and on other criteria considered suitable for professional practice in nursing. Admission to the programme is denied to any student if, in the judgement of the Undergraduate Studies Committee, s/he is deemed unsuitable for admission. Priority will be given to residents of the province.

6) Applicants must satisfy the health and immunization requirements for admission to the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme.

7) Proof of certification in Standard First Aid and Basic Cardiac Life Support, offered by the Canadian Red Cross Society or St. John Ambulance Association, is required to be submitted prior to entry into the programme. Certification obtained from other organizations will be accepted if deemed equivalent by the Schools of Nursing.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND PROMOTIONS

1) The Memorial University School of Nursing constitutes the examining body for all School of Nursing examinations. The standing of every student will be assessed at the end of each academic semester by the Undergraduate Studies Committee, and a grade report will be issued by the Registrar of Memorial University of Newfoundland to the individual student.

2) Students are required to achieve a grade of at least 65% or a grade of PAS as appropriate in each of the required nursing courses.

3) A student may be required to withdraw from a nursing course with a clinical component or from the programme at any time, on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Studies Committee, if the student is deemed unlikely to profit from continued attendance in the nursing course or programme and/or is deemed unsafe in a clinical setting.

4) Students failing to achieve the requirements outlined in Clause 2 or who are required to withdraw from a nursing course under Clause 3 are permitted to repeat the given nursing course only once. A second failure or a second mandatory withdrawal from a given nursing course requires withdrawal from the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme.

5) Failure in excess of three nursing courses during the programme results in mandatory withdrawal from the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme.

6) Students who are required to withdraw from the programme and who wish to re-enter the programme may reapply in competition after the lapse of two semesters. A student who has been required to withdraw on more than one occasion may re-apply in competition for re-admission after the lapse of six semesters.

7) Students appealing matters such as admission, readmission, examinations and promotion must make their appeal in writing, clearly stating the basis of the appeal, to the Chair, Undergraduate Studies Committee. Appeals cannot be made on the basis of grades awarded in individual courses, as the student will normally have had the opportunity of contesting a grade after notification.

8) In special cases the Undergraduate Studies Committee may waive the course requirements that apply only to the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme.

SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS

Policy

Any student receiving a grade of 60% in a Nursing course is eligible to write a supplementary examination in that course. Only three supplementary examinations in Nursing courses can be written during the programme.

Guidelines

1) Supplementary examinations are allowed only in Nursing courses that have a written final examination.

2) Supplementary examinations will have the same weight as final examinations for the course in determining whether the student achieves a passing grade for the course.

3) Any student writing a supplementary examination can only obtain a maximum grade of 65% in the course.

4) Supplementary examinations will be written no later than the first week of the semester immediately following the one in which the course was failed. Normally they should coincide with the writing of deferred examinations in courses where deferred examinations are granted for the semester in question. Grades for supplementary examinations must be received by the Registrar's Office within one week following the completion of the examination.

5) A student may write a supplementary examination for any one course only once; if the result of a supplementary examination is a fail, then the course must be repeated in order to obtain credit.

6) If it is mathematically impossible to achieve a passing grade in a course, then the student will not be granted a supplementary examination.

PROGRAMME OF STUDIES: BACHELOR OF NURSING (COLLABORATIVE)

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DEGREE GRADUATE

The Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme is designed to prepare graduates who will function as beginning practitioners within acute, long term and community health care settings. The graduate is prepared to assume the roles of direct care giver, teacher, counsellor, advocate, coordinator of care and member of the nursing profession. The curriculum design empowers the graduate by providing learning experiences necessary to develop the knowledge, competencies and attitudes required to:

1) Practise nursing within a variety of settings, by collaborating with individuals, families, groups and communities, to assist them to achieve optimal functioning through promotion, prevention, maintenance, restoration and palliation.

2) Practise the caring ethic as an integral dimension of nursing.

3) Create a caring environment through effective communication with individuals, families, groups and communities.

4) Create a personal framework for nursing practice.

5) Provide competent nursing care to meet the health related needs of individuals, families, groups and communities.

6) Use management and leadership skills to co-ordinate and enhance health care within society.

7) Foster the extension of nursing knowledge through use of and participation in nursing research.

8) Use critical thinking to assist individuals, families, groups, and communities to achieve optimal functioning.

9) Promote collegial relationships among the different sectors of society participating in the delivery of health care.

10) Appraise how nursing roles emerge as the needs of society evolve.

11) Evaluate nursing practice in relation to legal, ethical and professional standards.

12) Accept responsibility for lifelong personal and professional growth using formal and informal strategies for the continuous discovery of knowledge.

13) Recognize the contributions of the nursing profession in global health affairs.

14) Accept responsibility for the promotion of change in health care in response to social, cultural, political and economic factors.

PROGRAMME REQUIREMENTS

(See Table - Suggested Sequencing of Courses, Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme.)

One hundred twenty nine credit hours are required for the completion of the degree. The required credit hours are as follows:

Nursing Credit Hours (93)

1001, 1002, 1003, 1011, 1012, 1014, 1511, 1520, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2011, 2013, 2501, 2511, 2520, 3001, 3111, 3113, 3501, 3511, 3520, 3521, 3522, 4101, 4103, 4104, 4110, 4501, 4512, 4513.

Other Credit Hours (18)

a) Six credit hours from English
b) Biochemistry 2430
c) Introduction to Microbiology
d) Psychology 1000
e) Statistics 2500 or equivalent

Elective Credit Hours (12)

Three credit hours from each of the following

a) Business
b) Philosophy 2800 to 2810 series or Religious Studies 2610
c) Political Science
d) Sociology/Anthropology

Additional Elective Credit Hours (6)

- Any credit courses within the university.

NOTE: Nursing courses which are designed for the BN (Post-RN) programme may be used as electives in the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme with permission of the Undergraduate Studies Committee and the course professor.

REGISTRATION EXAMINATIONS

To meet the licensing requirements for practising nursing in Canada, students must write the licensure examination from the Canadian Nurses Association Testing Service (CNATS).

To be eligible to write the registered nurse licensure examination, candidates must graduate from an approved School of Nursing and be recommended by the School of Nursing.

In order to be recommended for the registered nurse licensure examination, a student must complete a comprehensive examination set by the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme. The comprehensive examination may be in the form of a commercial examination, eg. Mosby Assess Test or NLN exam.


GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE BACHELOR OF NURSING DEGREE

PHILOSOPHY

The Memorial University of Newfoundland School of Nursing programmes are based on three major beliefs: (a) that nursing is a dynamic and creative process, encompassing the interaction of the nurse, the client, and the environment; (b) that, as one of the health professions, nursing develops, tests, and uses theoretical and scientific knowledge; and (c) that caring for human beings and promoting change toward health are central to nursing. Preparation for nursing requires a broad knowledge base not only in nursing and health sciences but also in the humanities and the natural and social sciences.

Nursing knowledge is concerned with the patterns of human behaviour as it evolves through interaction with the environment and affects human health.

Nursing practice is based on theoretical and scientific knowledge and aims to promote health.

OBJECTIVES

The Bachelor of Nursing programmes are designed to provide students with a liberal education which prepares them to be direct care-givers, teachers, counsellors and advocates for their clients. The students will be encouraged to perform these roles in a caring manner. The courses in the programmes will contribute to the knowledge, competencies and attitudes of graduates so that they may:

1) Provide for and facilitate comprehensive and effective client care;

2) Convey an awareness of and respect for the values, dignity, and rights of human beings;

3) Recognize the extent to which personal values and attitudes influence the interaction with and care of clients;

4) Apply current knowledge from nursing and other disciplines in any client care environment;

5) Apply scientific methods while maintaining the holistic perspective;

6) Take account of the influences of social, cultural, political and economic forces on the health and lifestyles of people;

7) Communicate and work effectively with other health professionals, agencies and governments in dealing with client care issues;

8) Become self-directed in the pursuit of excellence;

9) Be analytical, critical, and independent thinkers;

10) Use previous experience and education to enhance their knowledge base and competencies;

11) Affirm the values and standards of the nursing profession;

12) Recognize that learning is a continuous life-long process.

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF NURSING

1) Applicants for admission or re-admission to the School of Nursing must complete a School of Nursing application. Students who have not registered for courses at Memorial University for either of the two immediately preceding semesters must also complete a general application for admission to the University. Applications must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

2) New applicants to the School of Nursing will be accepted for the Fall semester only. DEADLINE: Applications, including all required documents, must be received by April 1.

3) Admission to the School of Nursing is on the basis of competition for a limited number of places. Selection of candidates will be based on academic performance in courses completed and on other criteria considered suitable for professional practice in nursing. The School reserves the right to deny admission to any student if, in the judgement of the Undergraduate Studies Committee, s/he is deemed unsuitable for admission to the School. Priority will be given to residents of the province.

4) Applicants for admission must satisfy the health and immunization requirements of the School of Nursing.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND PROMOTIONS

1) The School constitutes the examining body for all School of Nursing examinations. The standing of every student will be assessed at the end of each academic semester by the Undergraduate Studies Committee, and a grade report will be issued by the Registrar to the individual student.

2) Students in the Bachelor of Nursing Programme are required to achieve a grade of at least 65% or a grade of PAS as appropriate in each of the required Nursing courses.

3) Within one month of the release by the university of the grade reports, a student may submit (to the Associate Director for Undergraduate Studies of the School of Nursing) a request for reconsideration of the grade awarded in the clinical component of a course.

4) A student may be required to withdraw from a Nursing course with a clinical component or from the programme at any time on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Nursing, if the student is deemed unlikely to profit from continued attendance in the Nursing course or programme and/or is deemed unsafe in a clinical setting.

5) Students failing to achieve the requirements outlined in Clause 2 or who are required to withdraw from a Nursing course under Clause 4 are permitted to repeat the given Nursing course only once. A second failure or mandatory withdrawal from a Nursing Course requires withdrawal from the School of Nursing.

6) Students who are required to withdraw from the programme and who wish to re-enter the programme may re-apply in competition after the lapse of two semesters. A student who has been required to withdraw on more than one occasion may re-apply in competition for re-admission after the lapse of six semesters.

7) Students appealing matters such as admission, re-admission, examinations and promotion must make their appeal in writing, clearly stating the basis of the appeal, to the Chair, Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Nursing. Appeals cannot be made on the basis of grades awarded in individual courses, as the student will normally have had the opportunity of contesting a grade after notification.

8) In special cases the Undergraduate Studies Committee may waive the course requirements that apply only to the School of Nursing.

SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS

Policy

Any student receiving a grade of 60% in a Nursing course is eligible to write a supplementary examination in that course. Only three supplementary examinations in Nursing courses can be written during the programme.

Guidelines

1) Supplementary examinations are allowed only in Nursing courses that have a written final examination.

2) Supplementary examinations will have the same weight as final examinations for the course in determining whether the student achieves a passing grade for the course.

3) Any student writing a supplementary examination can achieve a maximum grade of 65% in the course.

4) Supplementary examinations will be written no later than the first week of the semester immediately following the one in which the course was failed. Normally they should coincide with the writing of deferred examinations in courses where deferred examinations are granted for the semester in question. Grades for supplementary examinations must be received by the Registrar's Office within one week following the completion of the examination.

5) A student may write a supplementary examination for any one course only once; if the result of a supplementary examination is a fail, then the course must be repeated in order to obtain credit.

6) If it is mathematically impossible to achieve a passing grade in a course, then the student will not be granted a supplementary examination.

PROGRAMME OF STUDIES: BACHELOR OF NURSING

The requirements listed below are to be followed ONLY by students admitted prior to the Fall 1996 semester.

ADMISSION

To be considered for admission to the School of Nursing, applicants are normally required to have successfully completed with a minimum overall average of 65%, thirty credit hours which must include the following or their equivalents.

a) Biology 1001 and 1002
b) Chemistry 1000 and 1001
c) English 1000 or 1050 or 1080 and 1101 or 1102 or 1051 or 1110
d) Mathematics 1000 or 1081 or both 1050 and 1051
e) Psychology 1000 and 1001

NOTE: English 1110 is strongly recommended.

PROGRAMME REQUIREMENTS

One hundred sixty-two credit hours are required for the completion of the degree. The required credit hours beyond the thirty normally required for admission are as follows:

Nursing Credit Hours (99)

2010, 2040, 2101, 2102, 2230, 2250, 2260, 3021, 3022, 3040, 3050, 3060, 3200, 3340, 3350, 3360, 3370, 4002, 4010, 4030, 4310, 4321, 4322, 4330, 5000, 5210, 5220, 5300, 5310 and four of 5311, 5312, 5313, 5314, 5315.

Other Credit Hours (18)

Chemistry 2420, Biochemistry 2430, Biology 3050, Business 2301, Three credit hours from the Philosophy 2800 to 2810 series or Religious Studies 2610, and Statistics 2500 or equivalent

Elective Credit Hours (15)

a) Of the fifteen elective credit hours at least nine must be at the 2000 level or above.
b) Credit hours from Sociology, Anthropology and Psychology are recommended.

Nursing courses which are designed for the BN (Post-RN) programme may be used as electives in the BN Programme with permission of the Undergraduate Studies Committee and the course professor.

REGISTRATION EXAMINATIONS

To meet the licensing requirements for practising nursing in Canada, students must write the licensure examinations from the Canadian Nurses Association Testing Service (CNATS).

To be eligible to write CNATS, candidates must graduate from an approved School of Nursing and be recommended by the School of Nursing.

In order to be recommended for CNATS a student must complete a comprehensive examination in the final year of the programme as set by the school. The comprehensive examination may be in the form of a commercial examination, eg. Mosby Assess Test or NLN examination.

PROGRAMME OF STUDIES: BACHELOR OF NURSING (POST-RN)

Admission Requirements

1) For the purpose of admission to the School of Nursing, a Registered Nurse is a Nurse who is currently registered in Newfoundland or eligible to register in Newfoundland.

b) It is required that students have a current, practising licence in Newfoundland before taking courses with clinical components.

NOTE: Qualified applicants will be admitted to the programme as resources permit.

2) Admission to the School of Nursing is on the basis of competition for a limited number of places. Selection of candidates will normally be based on academic performance in the following twelve credit hours required for the programme.

- three science credit hours (refer to science requirements below)
- three first year English credit hours
- three Philosophy credit hours from the 2800 to 2810 series or Religious Studies 2610
- three elective credit hours

b) Preference for admission will be given to applicants with at least one year of experience in clinical practice.

NOTE: Post-RN students not admitted to the School of Nursing may be permitted to take the 2000 level nursing courses as space permits.

Programme Regulations

One hundred twenty credit hours are required for the completion of the degree. Forty-five unspecified transfer Nursing credit hours are normally awarded on the basis of successful completion of a diploma programme in Nursing.

The required credit hours beyond the twelve normally required for admission are as follows:

Nursing Credit Hours (42)

2040, 2230, 2700, 3023, 4002, 4010, 4310, 4701, 4702, 5210, 5220, 5700 and six clinical focus credit hours. The clinical focus credit hours should be selected from one of the following:

a) Nursing of the Aged N4710 and N4713
b) Advanced Nursing Care of Adults N4720 and N4723
c) Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing N4730 and N4733
d) Maternity Nursing N4740 and N4742

All clinical focus courses are not offered every year. Please consult the School of Nursing for further information on when they will be offered.

Science Requirements

Either: (i) Six credit hours from the following: Biochemistry 1430, Biology 3051, Nursing 2740

or (ii) Science credit hours such that a student has at least six credit hours at the 2000 level or above in one of the following subject areas: Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics. Courses listed below cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement:

- Science 115A & B
- Biology 2040 or 2041
- Chemistry 2600 or 2601
- Mathematics 2090
- Physics 2151
- Statistics 2500 or equivalent

NOTE: a) Science courses may have prerequisites which students must fulfill and are encouraged to complete as part of their admission requirements. b) Nursing 2740, Biochemistry 1430 and Biology 3051 are highly recommended. Sciences without a laboratory component are acceptable. c) It is also highly recommended that students take the science courses early in their programme as many nursing courses build on this science foundation.

Other Credit Hours

a) Statistics 2500 or equivalent
b) Elective credit hours to make up 120 credit hours. Of these, at least nine should be at the 2000 level or above.

NOTES:
1) Students should consult the Calendar and contact the appropriate Department for prerequisite requirements.
2) Each semester selected courses in the BN (Post-RN) programme will be available through distance education. Courses which are offered through distance education may not be offered on campus during the same semester. Students are advised to check with the School of Nursing for more information regarding course offerings.
3) The School of Nursing reserves the right to select sites and nursing courses offered by distance education based on:


4) Students are encouraged to contact the School of Nursing should they change their part-time/full-time status.

DIPLOMA PROGRAMMES FOR REGISTERED NURSES

ADMISSION TO DIPLOMA PROGRAMMES

1) Applicants for all diploma programmes should be eligible for professional registration on admission to the School of Nursing. For all programmes, prior to admission to the clinical area, applicants must have a current, practicing licence from the A.R.N.N.

2) Applicants for admission or re-admission to the School of Nursing must complete a School of Nursing application form as well as the application for admission to the University. Both applications must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Students who have not registered for courses at Memorial University for either of the two immediately preceding semesters must re-apply.

3) Applications to the School of Nursing must be received by April 1. Applications received after the deadline will be considered only if a place is available in the School of Nursing. New applicants will be accepted for the Fall Semester only.

4) Applicants must have at least one year of Nursing Practice.

5) Students must plan their programme in consultation with the School of Nursing.

6) Applicants for admission must complete a School of Nursing Health Assessment form and a specified schedule of immunization.

7) On entering either the Nurse-Midwifery or Community and Primary Health Care Nursing programmes, students are required to have or obtain during the first semester, a St. John Ambulance First Aid Certificate and a C.P.R. Certificate from a recognized organization. The certificates must be valid for the complete length of the programme.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

1) Academic achievement of each student will be assessed prior to registration by the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Nursing.

2) The student has a right to appeal a decision of the Admission and Promotion Committee of the School regarding admission or re-admission to, and promotion within the School.

3) Students are required to obtain a minimum of 65% in each Clinical Nursing course and an overall average of at least 60% in all other courses.

4) A student may be required to withdraw from a Clinical Nursing course or from the programme at any time on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Nursing if the student is deemed unlikely to profit from continued attendance in the course or programme and/or is deemed unsafe in the Clinical Nursing course.

5) Students who receive below 65% in a Clinical Nursing course or who are required to withdraw from a Clinical Nursing course under Clause 4 are permitted to repeat that course only once.

6) Students who repeat a Clinical Nursing course and still do not achieve 65% will be required to withdraw from the programme. Students who are required to withdraw from the programme and who wish to re-enter the programme may re-apply in competition after the lapse of two semesters. A student who has been required to withdraw on more than one occasion may apply in competition for re-admission after the lapse of six semesters.

7) The overall evaluation of the clinical experience will be the responsibility of the Faculty of this programme with input from the staff in the clinical settings.

8) Attendance at clinical practice sessions, including one on techniques for safety and survival in the Canadian wilderness, is compulsory for all students enrolled in programmes B and C of the Outpost Nursing Diploma Programme.

9) Students appealing matters such as Admission, Readmission, Examinations, and Promotions must make their appeal in writing to the Chairperson, Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Nursing.

DIPLOMA PROGRAMMES

Diploma Programmes are offered in

A) Outpost Nursing
B) Community and Primary Health Care Nursing
C) Nurse-Midwifery

These programmes are designed to develop the student's knowledge and proficiency for the practice of Nursing in semi-isolated and isolated communities where professional health services are limited. Emphasis is on health-related concerns particular to Labrador and other northern regions of Canada.

Terminal Objectives:

The graduate will be prepared:

1) To function as a professional Nurse in rural, semi-isolated and isolated areas.

2) To apply specific knowledge and skills in the management of health care to individuals, families, and communities.

3) To assess and plan for the maintenance and promotion of health and well-being and prevention of physical, emotional and social dysfunctioning.

4) To make clinical judgements in the management of emergency health situations and the diagnosis and treatment of common health problems in collaboration with physicians and other health team members.

5) To manage the health needs of the family and in particular, the mother and her infant, during the child-bearing cycle in collaboration with physicians and other health team members.

6) To develop a greater understanding of and sensitivity to cultural, social and environmental factors and incorporating this knowledge into Nursing practice.

PROGRAMMES OF STUDY

A) Outpost Nursing

Every candidate is required to complete successfully 60 credit hours for Diploma A as specified below:

a) Nursing 2040, 2811, 2820, 2831, 2840, 3810, 3820, 3830, 3840, 455X, 480X

b) Three credit hours from below:

- Nursing 4600, 5210
- Biochemistry 2430
- Biology 1001, 3050
- Business 2301
- Chemistry 1000, 1001, 2420
- English 1000
- Philosophy: three credit hours from the 2800 to 2810 series or Religious Studies 2610
- Psychology 1000, 2010, 2011
- Sociology/Anthropology 2270 or an elective course

B) Community and Primary Health Care Nursing

Every candidate is required to successfully complete 30 credit hours for Diploma B as specified below:

a) Nursing 2040, 2811, 2820, 2831, 2840

b) Nursing 455X - Extended Clinical Field Experience

C) Nurse-Midwifery

Every candidate is required to successfully complete 30 credit hours for Diploma C as specified below:

a) Nursing 2040, 3810, 3820, 3830, 3840

b) Nursing 480X - Clinical Field Experience for 6 Months

NOTES: 1) The need for a specific course or courses may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School, for a student who applies for exemption from the course requirement in question. Such students must satisfy the Committee of a satisfactory overall standing. This regulation applies to all Nursing programmes.

2) The student's background knowledge and experience will be considered in the selection of appropriate clinical experience in all Nursing courses.

3) Students in Diploma C who completed N2830 or N2040 in Diploma B are required to complete three additional elective credit hours approved by the Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies. Similarly, students in Diploma B who completed N2830 or N2040 in Diploma C are required to complete three additional elective credit hours approved by the Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies.

4) Credit received in the Diploma Programmes may be applied to the BN (Post-RN) degree as follows:

Outpost Nursing - 39 credit hours
Community & Primary Health Care Nursing - 30 credit hours
Nurse - Midwifery - 30 credit hours

Students are advised to contact the School of Nursing for specific equivalencies.

COURSE LIST

3 CREDIT HOUR COURSES

N 1001. Introduction to Nursing. This course introduces the major concepts and theories related to the paradigm of person, health, society, nursing and nursing education in relation to the philosophy, conceptual framework and objectives of the programme. Emphasis is placed on the concept of caring as the essence of nursing practice. Students are given the opportunity to develop basic nursing skills.

Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory/Clinical: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N1001 and either of N2010 or N2400.

N 1002. Anatomy and Physiology I. This course presents a survey of human anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan. It includes aspects of cytology and histology that form a foundation for the practice of nursing. Special emphasis is given to the skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.

Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N1002 and either of N2101 or N2300.

N 1003. Developing Therapeutic Relationships. This course focuses on the application of caring theory to interpersonal communications. It emphasizes the development of the role of communicator in individual and group experiences and in professional relationships. Utilizing an experiential model, laboratory experiences focus on self-awareness and group dynamics.

Corequisite: N1001
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N1003 and N3021.

N 1011. Health Promotion throughout the Lifespan. This course explores nursing concepts and theories pertaining to health promotion/protection throughout the lifespan. Content includes principles of teaching/learning, and community health concepts. The laboratory component provides further development of psychomotor competencies.

Prerequisites: N1001; Prerequisites or Corequisites Psychology 1000, N1003.
Corequisite: N1511.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

N 1012. Anatomy and Physiology II. This course presents a survey of anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan. It includes aspects of cytology, histology and embryology that form a foundation for the practice of nursing. Special emphasis is given to the circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems, including pregnancy and delivery.

Prerequisites: N1002 Anatomy and Physiology I
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N1012 and either N2102 or N2301.

N 1014. Health Assessment. This course focuses on the development of competencies needed to assess the health status of individuals throughout the lifespan using a systematic approach. Content includes the nurses responsibilities in the health history, physical examination, interpretation of findings, and documentation.

Corequisite: N1012
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N1014 and either N2040 or N2830.

N 1511. Nursing Practice for Health Promotion. This course provides the student with opportunities to apply knowledge and practise competencies for health promotion and protection across the lifespan, as they are acquired in N1011.

Corequisite: N1011.
Clinical: Four hours per week.

N 1520. Extended Practice I. This course provides the student with the opportunity to integrate the knowledge and practise the competencies acquired to date. The focus is on nursing care for the promotion, protection and maintenance of health for individuals within the context of the family.

This course is taught at the end of the winter semester, usually beginning during the final week of the examination period.

Prerequisites: N1011, N1511, N1012, N1014.
Seminar: Four hours per week.
Clinical: Ninety-six hours over three weeks.

N 2001. Nursing Concepts for the Care of Women and the Child-bearing Family. This course covers major concepts in women's reproductive health. The two major foci are women and their families through all phases of childbirth and the neonatal period, and nursing care of women experiencing alterations in reproductive health.

Prerequisite: N1520.
Corequisite/prerequisite: N2003, N2004.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

N 2003. Pathophysiology. This course presents general concepts of disease processes and their impact on health. The course focuses on major pathophysiologic changes, including associated etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. Common illnesses are studied to illustrate these disease processes.

Prerequisites: N1012, Biochemistry 2430.
Corequisite: Introduction to Microbiology.
Lecture: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N2003 and either N2250 or N3010/N3011.

N 2004. Pharmacology and Nutrition. This course explores principles and concepts of pharmacology and nutrition. Course content includes the pharmacotherapeutic and nutritional management of common health problems. Nursing considerations pertinent to these therapies are addressed.

Prerequisites: Biochemistry 2430, N1012.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N2004 and N2260.

N 2011. Nursing Concepts for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults. This course uses a conceptual approach to focus on the nursing care of individuals and families, from infancy to young adults. The emphasis is on assisting persons experiencing health related needs to achieve optimal functioning.

Prerequisite: N1520.
Corequisite/prerequisite: N2003, N2004.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

N 2013. Professional Development. This course examines the foundations of professionalism and its application, from both an individual and professional perspective. Content areas include legal/ethical issues, professional role development, current trends and issues, and the exploration of nursing as a theory-based practice.

Prerequisite: N1001.
Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 2040. Health Assessment. This course focuses on the development of competencies needed to assess the health status of individuals. A systematic approach will be used for the collection and analysis of data related to the health status of the client. Interpretation of the health assessment findings and of the results of diagnostic tests will be discussed in the context of nurses' responsibilities.

Co-requisite: N2102 or must be a Registered Nurse.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N2830 and N2040.

N 2230. Teaching/Learning. This course is designed to familiarize the student with theories, principles and methods of learning and teaching and to allow the student to apply them in simulated client teaching situations. Must be in the BN programme or a Registered Nurse or eligible for registration.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 2501. Nursing Practice for the Care of Women and the Child-bearing Family. This course provides the student with opportunities to apply knowledge and practise competencies acquired in N2001. Selected experiences are offered in a variety of institutional and community-based clinical settings related to the provision of nursing care for women and their families.

Corequisite: N2001.
Clinical: Eight hours per week.

N 2511. Nursing Practice with Children, Adolescents and Young Adults. This course provides the student with opportunities to apply knowledge and practise competencies acquired in N2011. Selected experiences are offered in a variety of institutional and community based clinical settings related to the provision of nursing care for children, adolescents, young adults and their families.

Corequisite: N2011.
Clinical: Twelve hours per week.

N 2520. Extended Practice II. This course provides the student with the opportunity to integrate the knowledge and practise the competencies acquired to date. The focus is on caring for individuals and their families experiencing health related needs. This course is taught at the end of the winter semester, usually beginning during the final week of the examination period.

Prerequisites: N2501, N2511.
Clinical: Ninety-six hours over three weeks.
Seminar: Four hours per week.

N 2700. Nursing Theories. This course is designed to introduce the students to the key concepts, conceptual models and selected theories of nursing. Must be in the BN programme or a Registered Nurse or eligible for registration.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This is a required course for the Bachelor of Nursing (Post-RN) program and may be used as an elective in the Bachelor of Nursing program.

N 2740. Current Concepts in Human Physiology. This course reviews the physiology of the cell and of major body systems. It provides the foundation for the concepts developed in pathophysiology and pharmacology.

N 2811. Community Health Nursing. A major focus will be on community health assessment, diagnosis of health needs and nursing interventions appropriate to the well-being of individuals and families within the community. Included will be the epidemiological process.

N 2831. Introduction to Community and Primary Care Nursing. A community-based primary care focus is directed toward individuals and families within the health-illness continuum. The knowledge of skills necessary for provision of care, such as the nursing process, communication competencies, interpersonal relationships, and growth and development will be addressed.

N 2840. Health Assessment and Managements of Mental Health Problems. The focus of this course is on the development of competencies in assessment of the mental status of clients, recognition of major affective disorders, and the nursing role in the assessment, management, and prevention of mental health disorders. Emergency interventions and developmental issues across the lifespan will be considered.

N 2990. Spiritual Dimension of Nursing Practice. This course will focus on the spiritual dimension of nursing practice. Students will explore their own personal spiritual philosophy and development. Key concepts of the spiritual dimension of nursing will be examined, such as spiritual well being, spiritual needs, spiritual distress and spiritual care. Distinction will be made between religion and expressions of spirituality.

Prerequisite(s): N2010, N2040 for generic students, none for post-RNs.

N 3001. Nursing Concepts for Mental Health. This course focuses on individuals, families and small groups experiencing psychiatric/mental health problems across the lifespan. The meaning of mental health and illness to the individual, family and vulnerable populations are explored. Course content includes counselling, psychopathology, interdisciplinary psychiatric care, community mental health concepts and analysis of sociopolitical factors/issues affecting mental health.

Prerequisite: N2520.
Corequisite: N3501.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N3001 and N4321/ N4322.

N 3022. Counselling II. This course introduces the subject of group dynamics and group counselling. Selected theories will be used in the analysis of group behaviour. Students will have an opportunity to develop basic group counselling competencies in simulated, laboratory settings.

Prerequisite: N3021.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

N 3023. Counselling. The main areas of focus are on communication theories and individual and group counselling. The course content includes selected personality theories and related counselling theories.

N 3040. Nursing of the Childbearing Family I. This course focuses on the family unit through preconception, antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum periods. The assessment and nursing management of mothers, fetuses, neonates, and families, during these periods will be included.

Prerequisites: N2010, N2040, N2230, N2250, N2260, N3021.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

N 3050. Nursing Care of Children I. The focus of this course is on the nursing care of children within the context of the family and covers the period from infancy to adolescence. Core concepts include growth and development and the impact of pathological processes on children and families. Pertinent nursing interventions and strategies used to prevent and manage these health problems will be explored.

Prerequisites: N2010, N2040, N2230, N2250, N2260, N3021.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

N 3060. Nursing Care of Adults I. This course focuses on common pathophysiological conditions in adults. Family and lifestyle implications of health and illness are covered with emphasis on nursing interventions.

Prerequisites: N2010, N2040, N2230, N2250, N2260, N3021.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

N 3111. Nursing Concepts in Middle and Older Adulthood. This course uses a conceptual approach and focuses on individuals and families from middle to older adulthood. The emphasis is on assisting persons experiencing acute and chronic health related needs to achieve optimal functioning.

Prerequisite: N2520.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

N 3113. Nursing Leadership and Management. This course is designed to promote an understanding of the theories and principles of leadership and management in relation to the Coordinator of Care nursing role. Emphasis is placed on concepts of organizational structure and function, management of client care, team building, professional development, and application of nursing theories to practice. Current issues and trends are explored.

Prerequisite: N2013.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N3113 and N5000.

N 3200. Transcultural Nursing. This course will sensitize students to the importance of recognizing the diversity of the culturally-determined health-related values, beliefs and practices of people when planning professional interventions for their health and wellbeing. Focus is also on caring and curing patterns and practices in relation to different health-illness systems in Canada and elsewhere. Methods for conducting culturological assessments are included.

Prerequisite: Admission to Bachelor of Nursing Programme.
Lecture: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N2820 and N3200.

N 3340. Nursing of the Childbearing Family II. This course provides the student with opportunities to apply knowledge and practice competencies acquired in N3040. Selected experiences are offered in a variety of institutional and community-based clinical settings related to the provision of nursing care to the childbearing family.

Corequisite: N3040.
Clinical: Eight hours per week or sixteen hours alternate weeks.

N 3350. Nursing Care of Children II. This course provides the student with opportunities to apply knowledge and to further develop the competencies acquired in N3050. Selected experiences are offered in a variety of institutional and community-based, clinical settings related to the provision of nursing care to children and their families.

Corequisite: N3050.
Clinical: Eight hours per week or sixteen hours alternate weeks.

N 3360. Nursing Care of Adults II. This course focuses on the clinical nursing care of adults and the application of concepts covered in N3060 and N2250.

Corequisite: N3060.
Clinical: Eight hours per week or sixteen hours alternate weeks.

N 3370. Extended Clinical. This course provides the student with the opportunity to 1) integrate the knowledge and 2) practice the skills acquired to date in the programme.

This course is taught at the end of the Winter Semester, usually beginning during the final week of the examination period.

Prerequisites: N3040, N3340, N3050, N3350, N3060, N3360
Clinical: Ninety-six hours over three weeks.

N 3501. Nursing Practice for Mental Health. This course provides the student with opportunities to apply theoretical knowledge and to practise competencies acquired in N3001 and related courses, in a variety of settings.

Corequisite: N3001.
Clinical: Twelve hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N3501 and N4321/N4322.

N 3511. Nursing Practice with Middle and Older Adults. This clinical course focuses on the application of the concepts and practices which are covered in N3111. Selected experiences are offered in a variety of institutional and community based settings related to the provision of nursing care for middle and older adults, and their families.

Prerequisite: N2520.
Corequisite: N3111
Clinical: Twelve hours per week.

N 3520, N 3521, N 3522. Extended Practice III (Nine credit hours). These courses provide the students with the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles in coordinating care for groups of individuals within a variety of nursing care settings. Students also have the opportunity to further develop clinical competencies acquired in previous courses.

Prerequisites: N3001, N3501, N3111, N3511, N3113.
Clinical: Forty hours per week for 12 weeks
Eight weeks of leadership and management; Four week elective.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for N3520, N3521, N3522 and N5300.

N 3810. Nurse-Midwifery I. This course will prepare the Nurse to manage the care of the pregnant woman and her family during the antepartal phase of the child-bearing cycle. An additional focus will be on the early recognition of signs and symptoms of potential disorder and appropriate interventions in collaboration with physicians and other health team members.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 3820. Nurse-Midwifery II. This course will prepare the Nurse to manage the care of a medically uncomplicated intrapartal phase. The major focus will be on the early recognition of potential high-risk conditions and appropriate interventions in collaboration with physicians and other health team members.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 3830. Nurse-Midwifery III. This course will focus on the care and support of a new mother, her infant, and her family during the post-partal phase of the child-bearing cycle.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 3840. Nurse-Midwifery IV. Emphasis in this course will be on nursing interventions necessary to help assure the physical well-being of the perinate and infant and integration into the family unit.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

NOTE: The application of selected skills and knowledge appropriate to the above N3810, N3820, N3830, N3840 courses will be provided for in various clinical and community settings.

N 4002. Introduction to Nursing Research: Methodology and Critique. This course presents an overview of the principles and methods of research appropriate for investigating nursing phenomena. Particular emphasis will be given to quantitative modes of inquiry. Reference will also be made to a limited number of qualitative approaches.

Prerequisite: N4201, N4001 or Statistics 2500 or equivalency.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Tutorial: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit can be obtained for only one of the following: N4202, N4002 and N4600.

N 4010. Community Health Nursing I. This course introduces the student to the field of community health nursing. It focuses on the nursing care of individuals, families, groups, and the community. Core concepts include theoretic approaches to families, epidemiology, health promotion and the community as client.

Prerequisites: N4330, N4322 or for the Bachelor of Nursing Programme (Post-RN) N2040, N2230, N3022.
Corequisite: N 4310.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N 4010 and the former N4311 or N4312.

N 4030. Nursing the Aged I. This course focuses on the assessment and the nursing management of the elderly client. The students will be introduced to biological and selected psychosocial theories of aging. Social issues and public policy related to the aged will be discussed.

Prerequisite: N3360.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week

N 4101. Community Health Nursing. This course focuses on the knowledge required to practise nursing at the aggregate and community levels. It further examines the principles of primary health care, their application in community health nursing and the multidimensional role of the nurse. Core concepts include: community development, epidemiology, programme development, and the theoretical bases of community health nursing.

Prerequisites: N3520, N3521, N3522.
Corequisite: N4501.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Tutorial: Two hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N4101 and N4010.

N 4103. Advanced Professional Development. This course focuses on the development of a personal framework for nursing practice, nursing organizations at the international level and nursing's role and development within health care systems. Current trends and issues in health policy and health care are examined.

Prerequisite: N3113.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N4103 and N5220.

N 4104. Nursing Research. This course builds on previously introduced research concepts. It explores the research process and its inherent ethical and legal implications. The course focuses on the acquisition of concepts used to critically appraise nursing research studies and examine the relevance of these studies for nursing practice.

Prerequisite: Statistics 2500 or equivalent.
Lecture: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N4104 and either N4002 or N4202 or N4600.

N 4110. Senior Seminar. This course follows the completion of two clinical preceptorship courses taken during the final semester of the programme. It is designed to allow students to share with peers and faculty their ability to critically discuss the professional competencies used in complex work-related situations. Students present a report about a significant aspect of a nursing role in which they participated during one of the two clinical courses N4512 or N4513.

Prerequisites: N4501, N4104, N4103.
Corequisites: N4512, N4513.

N 4310. Community Health Nursing II. This course allows the student to apply the knowledge and practice the competencies acquired in N4010. Clinical experiences will focus on the nursing of selected families and population groups within the community.

Corequisite: N4010.
Clinical: Eight hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N 4310 and the former N4311 or N4312.

N 4321. Mental Health Nursing I. This course will focus on the nursing care of persons with acute psychiatric illness and other mental health problems which can occur throughout the life-span. The course content will include psychopathology, psychopharmacology, and the application of this knowledge in nursing care situations.

Prerequisite: N3022, N3370.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Clinical: Four hours per week.

N 4322. Mental Health Nursing II. This course will build on concepts from N 4321 and selected mental health problems throughout the life span. Students will have an opportunity to experience the broad spectrum of mental health issues in varied settings.

Prerequisite: N4321.
Lecture: Three hours per week.
Clinical: Four hours per week.

N 4330. Nursing the Aged II. This course focuses on the clinical nursing care of the aged and the application of content presented in N4030.

Corequisite: N4030.
Clinical: Eight hours per week.

N 4501. Community Health Nursing Practice. This course provides the student with opportunities to apply knowledge and further develop competencies acquired in community health nursing and other related courses. In the clinical experiences, students work with selected individuals/families and aggregates at the community level.

Corequisite: N4101.
Clinical: Twelve hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N4501 and N4310.

N 4512. Community Health Practicum. This course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and consolidate knowledge and competencies acquired throughout the programme and apply them to community health nursing practice. Using a primary health care framework, the student participates in strategies which facilitate the mobilization of communities toward health.

Prerequisites: N4101, N4501.
Clinical: Forty hours per week for four weeks.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N4512 and N5310.

N 4513. Nursing Practice Elective. This course provides students with the opportunity to practise nursing with a client population and in a setting of their choice. Students apply and test knowledge from nursing and related disciplines in this selected clinical setting. The course also enables students to further develop their professional roles.

Prerequisite: N4101, N4501. Approval from the Undergraduate Studies Committee.
Clinical: Forty hours per week for four weeks.

N 4701. Current Concepts in Pathophysiology. This course will review the most recent theories in pathophysiology, current trends in diagnosis and treatment and their nursing implications. This course assumes a basic understanding of physiology.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 4702. Current Concepts in Pharmacology and Nutrition. This course will explore current principles of nutrition and pharmacology in a variety of disease states. The course will be built upon previous nutrition and pharmacology knowledge. This course assumes a basic understanding of physiology.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 4710. Nursing of the Aged I. This course will explore, in depth, concepts and issues pertaining to the nursing care of the elderly. Selected theories of aging will be reviewed. Social issues and public policy related to the aged will be discussed. Assessment of the elderly client will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: N2040, N2230, N2700, N3022, N4002.
Prerequisites or Corequisites: N4701, N4702.
Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 4713. Nursing of the Aged II. This clinical course will focus on the application in institutional and/or community settings of knowledge acquired in N4710.

Prerequisites: N2230, N3023
Corequisites: N4701, N4702, N4710
Clinical: Eight hours per week.

N 4720. Advanced Nursing Care of Adults I. This seminar course allows students to explore in depth, concepts and practices which are relevant to the care of ill adults. Examples of the concepts and practices include: acuity; chronicity; sexuality in illness; spirituality; alterations in body image; sensory deprivation and overload; discharge planning; palliative care; death and dying.

Prerequisites: N2040, N2230, N2700, N3022, N4002.
Prerequisites or Corequisites: N4701, N4702.
Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 4723. Advanced Nursing Care of Adults II. This clinical course will require students to work with patients who have acute and/or chronic illnesses. The emphasis will be application of knowledge acquired in N4720.

Corequisites: N4701, N4702, N4720
Clinical: Eight hours per week.

N 4730. Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing I. This course provides opportunity for the students to explore in depth concepts and issues related to mental health and illness. Selected theories will be analyzed to explain the phenomenon of mental illness, to promote mental health and to develop a theoretical framework for practice. The course will include an exploration of sociopolitical issues and health policies pertinent to mental health.

Prerequisite: N3022
Co-requisite or Prerequisite: N4701 and N4702

N 4733. Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing II. This clinical practicum course will focus on the mental health needs and problems of clients in community based and inpatient settings. It will provide the opportunity for students to implement counselling, health teaching and advanced assessment skills with individuals, families, and groups. The course will include analysis of sociocultural and ethical-legal factors/issues affecting mental health.

Prerequisite: N3023
Corequisites: N4730, N4701, N4702
Clinical: Eight hours per week.

N 4740. Maternity Nursing I. This maternity nursing course for post-RN students will build on the student's previous knowledge and clinical experience in maternity nursing. Within a framework of women's health and family functioning, major bio-psychosocial concepts related to the mother and fetus who develop risk conditions in the antepartum or intrapartum periods will be examined. Topics will include risk conditions in the preconception period. Recent research findings will be stressed.

Prerequisite(s): N2040, N2230, N3021, N3022, N3200, and N4002.
Corequisite(s): N4701, N4702.

N 4742. Maternity Nursing II. This course will give the student clinical practice opportunities to integrate the theories learned in N4740 and N4741 with the care of mothers, fetuses/neonates and their families. Experience in the antenatal assessment and in-patient units, caseroom and postpartum units will be provided. The focus will be on advanced nursing care planning skills within a framework of women's health and family functioning.

Corequisite(s): N4740 and N4741.

This course may be taught at the end of the semester, usually beginning during the final week of the examination period. Please check with the School of Nursing.

N 4750. Primary Health Care Nursing I. This course will explore the concept and principles of primary health care, focusing on the role of the nurse. Emphasis will be placed on community development and empowerment, and population-focused strategies will be explored. Select models of primary health care nursing will be analyzed.

Corequisites: N3023, N5210
Prerequisites: N4010
Lecture: Three hours per week.

N 4751. Primary Health Care Nursing II. This course fill focus on the application of knowledge acquired in PHCI to a community setting. The focus will be on assessing a community, planning and implementing to meet an identified community health need and evaluating the implementation.

Prerequisites: N4010
Corequisites: N4750 and N5210
Clinical: 8 hours per week or 16 hours per week for 6 weeks.

N 5000. Advanced Nursing Practice I. This course is designed to promote an understanding of theories and principles of management with application to nursing practice. In addition theory related to major health problems and nursing practice standards will be incorporated.

This course is given during week 5 through 13 of the final semester of the programme.

Prerequisites: N4322, N4330.
Lecture: Four hours, 20 minutes per week.
Laboratory: Two hours, 30 minutes per week.

N 5210. Health Care Systems. This course focuses on the philosophical bases and practical considerations in the organization and administration of Health Care Delivery Systems. The planning, management and evaluation of the Canadian health care system will be compared with those of other countries. Future trends in the delivery of health care to Canadians will be discussed.

Prerequisites: N3370.
Lecture: Three hours per week.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both N5210 and N3030.

N 5220. Professional Issues. This course reviews the historical development of the nursing profession and facilitates discussion of factors influential in its evolution. Classes and seminars will focus on the current status of nursing, ethical issues and the profession's impact on health care delivery. Selected categories of nursing theory, their impact on practice and education will be analyzed in relation to major issues and future trends in nursing.

Prerequisites: Nine credit hours from the N5310-15 series.
Lecture: Three hours per week.

NOTE: One section of this course will be offered during week 5 through 13 of the semester, and will consist of 4 hours, 20 minutes per week.

N 5300. Advanced Nursing Practice II. This course focuses on the clinical nursing care of clients in acute care medical-surgical settings. Emphasis will be on the application of theories and concepts covered in N5000, and the development of leadership skills and advanced clinical competencies.

This course is given during week 5 through 13 of the final semester of the programme.

Corequisite: N5000.
Clinical: Twelve hours per week.

N 5310-15. Clinical Practicum Courses. The practicum courses will provide the opportunity to apply knowledge acquired in the previous courses. Each student will complete N5310 Community Health Nursing and twelve of the remaining fifteen practicum credit hours under the guidance of an assigned preceptor:

N5311 Care of the Childbearing Families

N5312 Care of Children and Families

N5313 Care of the Aged

N5314 Care of Adults in Acute Care Settings

N5315 Mental Health Nursing

Prerequisites: N4322, N4330 and the approval of the Undergraduate Studies Committee of the School of Nursing.
Clinical: Each course consists of 4 weeks of clinical experience and the student follows the shift schedule of the preceptor.

N5311 to N5315 will be scheduled during the Spring semester, beginning one week before and ending two weeks after the usual lecture session.

A two day skills laboratory will be scheduled prior to the first clinical course.

N5310 will be offered during the first 4 weeks of the Winter semester.

N5310 may be used as an elective in the BN (Post-RN) programme but students must notify the School by September 1 of their intention to do so. N4010 & N4310 are prerequisites for this course.

N 5700. Nursing Management. This course is designed to promote an understanding of theories and principles of management with application to management of nursing practice. Process, methods and issues are considered in lectures, seminars, case studies and simulated sessions.

Lecture: Three hours per week.

NOTES: 1) This is a required course for the Bachelor of Nursing (Post-RN) programme and shall not be used as an elective in the Bachelor of Nursing programme.

2) Credit cannot be obtained for N5700 and the former N4620.

15 CREDIT HOUR COURSES

Nursing 455X. (15 credit hours). This course will focus on knowledge and skills needed in the provision of health care to individuals of all ages with common health disorders. A community-based primary care approach will be used for assessment and management. There will be an emphasis on emergency interventions of particular concern to the northern and remote areas. The course will consist of a 6-month clinical experience under nursing and medical supervision in agencies outside of St. John's. Regular seminars and conferences will be included.

Prerequisites: N2040, N2811, N2831, N2840 and N3200.

Nursing 480X. (15 credit hours). This supervised six-month experience is designed to provide the student with clinical practice for the application of theoretical concepts and the development of skills necessary to the management of physical, mental, social needs of the family during the child-bearing cycle. Evaluation will be based on clinical performance and written assignments. The student will practice under Nursing and Medical supervision in agencies outside of St. John's. Regular seminars and conferences will be included.

Prerequisites: N2040, N3810, N3820, N3830, N3840.


Suggested Sequencing of Courses

Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) Programme

YEAR
FALL
WINTER
SPRING

1
N1001
N1002
N1003
English
Psychology 1000
N1011
N1012
N1014
N1511
N1520
Biochemistry 2430
2
N2001
N2003
N2004
N2501
Introduction to Microbiology
N2011
N2013
N2511
English
3 elective credit hours
N2520

3
N3001
N3501
3 Political Science credit hours
3 Statistics credit hours
3 Philosophy or Religious Studies credit hours
N3111
N3113
N3511
3 Business credit hours
3 Sociology/Anthropology credit hours
N3520
N3521
N3522
4
N4101
N4103
N4104
N4501
3 elective credit hours
N4110
N4512
N4513


Suggested Sequencing of Courses for the
Bachelor of Nursing Programme

FALL WINTER SPRING
YEAR 2 N3060 Adults I
N3360 Adults II
N3040 Childbearing I
N3340 Childbearing II
3 elective credit hours
N3050 Children I
N3350 Children II
N3200 Transcultural Nursing
Biology 3050
N3022 Counselling II
N3370 Extended Clinical
YEAR 3 N4321 Mental Health I
Statistics 2500 or equivalent
N4030 Aged I
N4330 Aged II
3 elective credit hours
N4002 Research II
N5210 Health Care Systems
N4322 Mental Health II
Philosophy

3 elective credit hours

CLINICAL PRACTICUM
(16 weeks)
4 of the following:
N5311 Care of Childbearing Families
N5312 Care of Children and Families
N5313 Care of the Aged
N5314 Care of Adults in Acute Care Settings
N5315 Mental Health Nursing
YEAR 4 N4010 Community I
N4310 Community II
Business 2301
6 elective credit hours
N5310 Community Health Nursing (4 week clinical practicum)
N5000 Advanced Nursing Practice I
N5300 Advanced Nursing Practice II
N5220 Professional Issues

Bachelor of Nursing (Post-RN) Programme Outline
120 Credit Hours

1. 45 Nursing credit hours are normally awarded on the basis of successful completion of a diploma programme in Nursing.
2. 12 Credit hours are required for entrance in the programme:
    3 - Science (See Science requirements)
    3 - 1st yr. English
    3 - Philosophy from the 2800-2810 series or Religious Studies 2610
    3 - elective credit hours
3. 21 Additional credit hours required to complete the programme:
    15 - elective credit hours (incl. 9 at the 2000 level or above)
    3 - Statistics 2500 or equivalent
    3 - Science
4. 42 Nursing credit hours are required:
    N2040 Health Assessment
    N2230 Teaching/Learning
    N2700 Nursing Theories
    N3023 Counselling
    N4002 Introduction to Nursing Research: Methodology & Critique
    N4010 Community Health Nursing I
    N4310 Community Health Nursing II
    N5210 Health Care Systems
    N5220 Professional Issues
    N5700 Nursing Management
    N4701 Current Concepts in Pathophysiology
    N4702 Current Concepts in Pharmacology & Nutrition
    6 Clinical Focus Credit Hours
NOT ALL COURSES ARE OFFERED EVERY YEAR. STUDENTS SHOULD CHECK WITH THE DEPARTMENT PRIOR TO REGISTRATION TO PLAN PROGRAMMES.


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Last modified October 23, 1996