Memorial University of Newfoundland

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR


FACULTY OF EDUCATION

Dean

Piper, T., B.A., M.A. New Hampshire, Ph.D. Alberta

Dean Emeritus

Hickman, G.A., B.A. Mount Allison, M.A. Acadia, Ed.D. Columbia, LL.D. Mount Allison, LL.D. Memorial

Associate Dean, Graduate Programmes and Instructional Services

Riggs, F.T., B.A.(Ed.), B.Sc. Memorial, M.Ed., Ph.D. Alberta

Associate Dean, Research and Development

Canning, P., B.A. UPEI, M.A., Ph.D. Windsor

Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programmes

Treslan, D.L., B.A., B.Ed. Saskatchewan, Dip.Ed.(Admin.), M.Ed., Ph.D. Calgary

Co-ordinator, Centre for Instructional Services

Mews, A., B.A. Memorial, M.L.S. Dalhousie

Co-ordinator, Undergraduate Programmes

Cramm, F., B.A.(Ed.), M.A. Memorial, M.Ed. Toronto, Ed.D. Boston

Executive Assistant to the Dean

Power, B.M., B.Voc.Ed. Memorial

Professor Emeritus

McCann, W.P., B.A. London, Ph.D. Manchester, F.R.Hist.S.

Professors

Baksh, I.J., B.A.(Ed.) Wales, M.A.(Ed.) McGill, Ph.D. Alberta

Bulcock, J.W., B.A. Leeds, M.Ed. British Columbia

Canning, P., B.A. UPEI, M.A., Ph.D. Windsor; Associate Dean, Research and Development

Cluett, E.J., B.A.(Ed.), B.A. Memorial, Ed.M., Ed.D. Boston

Cramm, F., B.A.(Ed.), M.A. Memorial, M.Ed. Toronto, Ed.D. Boston; Co-ordinator, Undergraduate Programmes

Crocker, R.K., B.Sc., B.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Alberta

Garlie, N.W., B.S. Wisconsin State, M.A. Wyoming, Ph.D. Utah

Griffiths, A.K., B.Sc. Wales, M.Sc. Salford, M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Alberta

Hadley, N.H., B.A., B.Ed. Acadia, M.Ed. U.N.B., Ph.D. Leeds

Jeffery, G.H., B.A. Western Ontario, M.A.(Sc.) Waterloo, Ph.D. Alberta

Karagianis, L.D., B.Com., B.Ed., M.A. Dalhousie, Ed.D. Toronto

Kelleher, R.R., B.A.(Ed.), B.A., M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Michigan State

Klas, L.D., B.S. Idaho, M.A. Ohio State, Ph.D. Utah

Ludlow, W.E., B.Sc., B.Ed., M.Ed. Memorial, Ed.D. Northern Colorado; Dean, Student Affairs and Services

Martin, W.B.W., B.A., Dip.Ed., B.Ed., M.A. Memorial, Ph.D. York

Nesbit, W.C., B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed. New Brunswick, Ph.D. Alberta; Winner of the President's Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1992-93

Netten, J.E., B.A.(Hons.) Saskatchewan, M.A. Toronto, Dip.Sup. McGill

Netten, J.W., B.A. Sir George Williams, Dip.Ed. McGill, M.Ed. Bishop's, Ed.D. Toronto, M.T.S. Queen's College

Pereira-Mendoza, L., B.Sc., M.Sc. Southampton, Ed.D. British Columbia

Phillips, L.M., B.A., B.A.(Ed.), M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Alberta; Winner of the President's Award for Outstanding Research, 1991-92

Piper, T., B.A., M.A. New Hampshire, Ph.D. Alberta; Dean, Faculty of Education

Riggs, F.T., B.A.(Ed.), B.Sc. Memorial, M.Ed., Ph.D. Alberta; Associate Dean, Graduate Programmes and Instructional Services

Sheppard, G.W., B.Ed. Memorial, M.Ed. C.A.G.S., Ed.D. Boston

Singh, A., B.Sc. Uttar Pradesh Agricultural U., M.Ed. Illinois, Ph.D. Michigan State, M.P.H. Hawaii at Manoa

Spain, W.H., B.S. Widener College, M.Ed. Shippensburg State College, Ph.D. Ohio State

Treslan, D.L., B.A., B.Ed. Saskatchewan, Dip.Ed.(Admin.), M.Ed., Ph.D. Calgary; Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programmes

Tuinman, J., Ph.D. Georgia; Vice-President (Academic)

Professor (Research)

Norris, S.P., B.Sc., B.Ed., M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Illinois; Winner of the President's Award for Outstanding Research, 1990-91

Associate Professors

Beebe, M., B.Ed. Alberta, M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Alberta

Brewster, M.A., B.Sc. Castleton, M.A., Prof. Dip. Columbia

Brown, J., B.A.(Ed.), M.Ed. Memorial, Ed.D. O.I.S.E.

Cahill, M., B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed. Memorial

Clark, G.W., B.A. Macalester, M.A., Ph.D. Stanford

Collins, A., B.A., B.Ed. Memorial, M.A., Ph.D. Ottawa

Doyle, C., B.A., B.A.(Ed.) Memorial, M.A. Providence, Ed.D. Boston

Glassman, M.S., B.S.Ed., M.Ed. State University College of New York, Brockport, Ed.D. Georgia

Haché, G.J., B.Sc. Central Connecticut State Teachers College, M.Ed. Alberta, Ph.D. Texas A&M

Hickman, G.A., B.A.(Ed.), M.Ed. Memorial, Ed.D. Toronto; Director, Department of Human Resources

Kennedy, W., B.A. St. Mary's, B.Ed. Dalhousie, M.A. St. Francis Xavier, Ph.D. Alberta

Kim, K.S., B.A. Seoul National University, M.Ed., Ph.D. Alberta

Koski, G.R., B.Ed. McGill, M.A., Ph.D. Michigan State

Mulcahy, D.M., B.A., B.Ed. Memorial, M.Ed. O.I.S.E., Ph.D. Toronto

Oldford-Matchim, J., B.A.(Ed.), B.A. Memorial, M.A., Ph.D. Ohio State

O'Sullivan, J.T., B.Sc. Trinity College, M.A., Ph.D. Western Ontario

Roberts, B.A., A.Mus., Mus.B.,Dip.Ed.(Post Grad), A.Mus., M.Mus. Western Ontario, Kuenstlerische Reifepruefung NRW Musikakadamie, Detmold, Germany, Ph.D. Stirling, Scotland

Rose, A., B.Mus., B.Mus.Ed. Memorial, M.Mus., Ph.D. Wisconsin, Madison

Sharpe, D.B., Cert.Ed. Loughborough College, B.Ed., M.Ed. Alberta, Ph.D. Texas A&M

Shuell, N.B., B.A., M.Ed. St. Mary's College, Minn., M.A., Ph.D. Marquette

Strong, E.L., B.A.(Ed.), M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Ohio State

Thistle, W.W., B.Sc.(Hons.), B.Ed., M.A. Memorial, LL.B. Dalhousie; Vice-President (Administration and Finance) and Legal Counsel

Tite, R., B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D. Toronto

Assistant Professors

Adams, C.K., B.M.E. Evangel College, M.Mus. Northwestern, Dip. Fine Arts Calgary

Barrell, B., B.A., M.S. City University of New York, B.Ed. New Brunswick, Ed.D. Toronto

Cannon, P.L., B.A.(Hons.), M.A. London, Ed.D. British Columbia

Drodge, E.N., B.Sc., B.Ed. Memorial, M.Ed. Acadia, Ed.D. Toronto

Hawksley, F., T.Cert.(Ed.) Warwick, A.D.B.(Ed.) Coventry, M.A.(Ed.) Durham

Hopkins, B.J., B.A. Dalhousie

Mann, B.L., B.A.(Hons.), Grad. Dip., M.A. Concordia, Ph.D. Toronto

Okshevsky, W., B.A. Concordia, M.A. York, Ph.D. O.I.S.E.

Schulz, H., B.Ed., M.Ed. Calgary, Ph.D. Alberta

Seifert, T.L., B.Sc. Waterloo, B.Ed., M.Ed. Windsor, Ph.D. Simon Fraser

Sheppard, L.B., B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Ottawa

Wood, G.A., B.P.E., B.Ed. Memorial, M.A.(PE.), Ph.D. Alberta

Yeoman, E., Bacc.ès.Arts Moncton, B.Ed. Mount Allison, M.Ed., Ph.D. Toronto

Adjunct Professor

Loveless, G., B.A., B.Ed., M.A. Memorial, Ph.D. Laval


FACULTY OF EDUCATION DEGREE REGULATIONS

MISSION STATEMENT FOR THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION

The Faculty of Education of Memorial University of Newfoundland, under the terms of THE MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY ACT, accepts as its primary responsibility the professional preparation of those who will give leadership in education. The responsibility includes the professional preparation of teachers, administrators and specialists who will work in elementary, and secondary schools and post-secondary institutions. The work of the Faculty incorporates undergraduate and graduate studies and continuing education. The mandate includes specialized research for the improvement of pedagogical practice, and broadly based research for the advancement of knowledge. The Faculty initiates and responds to change through a wide range of programmes and a variety of field services. It seeks to prepare educators who will have a reasoned philosophy of education, an appreciation of what knowledge is of most worth, a genuine love of learning, and the ability to think critically. It strives to prepare educators who have an understanding of the past, a plan for the present, and a vision for the future.

The following Degree and Diploma Programmes are offered through the Faculty of Education:

DEGREE PROGRAMMES

- Bachelor of Education (Primary)
- Bachelor of Education (Elementary)
- Bachelor of Education (Secondary)
- Bachelor of Music Conjoint with Bachelor of Music Education
- Bachelor of Music Education as a Second Degree
- Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern)
- Bachelor of Special Education
- Bachelor of Vocational Education

DIPLOMA PROGRAMMES

- Diploma in Vocational Education
- Diploma in Technology Education
- Diploma in Adult Teacher Education
- Diploma in Native and Northern Education (T.E.P.L.)
- Diploma in School Resource Services

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY CLAUSE

The Office of the Undergraduate Student Services, Faculty of Education, will assist students with questions or problems which may arise concerning their programmes. It is, however, the responsibility of students to see that their academic programmes meet the Faculty of Education and the General University Regulations.

TEACHER CERTIFICATION

NOTE: Teacher Certification is a Provincial responsibility. Students are advised to contact Teacher Certification and Records, Department of Education, P.O. Box 4750, St. John's, Newfoundland, A1C 5R9, for advice regarding Teacher Certification Regulations.

ADMISSION

NOTE: It is possible that individuals who have been convicted of a crime against a person may not be accepted into a school as required under the Faculty of Education degree and diploma regulations.

1) Admission to programmes within the Faculty of Education is limited, selective and highly competitive. The Faculty reserves the right to limit the number of spaces available in each programme. When the number of eligible applicants exceeds the number of spaces available in a particular programme, preference may be given to students who are permanent residents of Newfoundland and Labrador.

2) Applicants for admission to a programme within the Faculty of Education must submit the appropriate completed application form and all supporting documentation to the Office of the Registrar in accordance with the deadlines specified for each programme below. Letters of reference and personal statement as required by the application form must be forwarded directly to the Faculty of Education. Students who must apply for admission/readmission to the University must also submit the General Application for Admission/Readmission to the Office of the Registrar within the deadlines specified in the University Diary.

3) Students who have been admitted to a particular degree programme offered by the Faculty of Education and who wish to change to another degree programme within the Faculty must submit a new Faculty application form to the Office of the Registrar that will be considered in competition with all other students.

4) Admission to programmes within the Faculty of Education is determined by a Selections Committee and is based on the criteria listed for each degree/diploma programme.

5) In special cases, the Committee on Undergraduate Studies, on the recommendation of the Admissions Committee, may waive the admissions requirements.

REGULATIONS FOR RE-ADMISSION AND ADVANCEMENT

These regulations apply to all programmes except the Bachelor of Education (Secondary) which has separate re-admission and advancement regulations.

1)a) Following admission to a programme of the Faculty of Education, all full-time students must obtain a semester average of at least 60% in order to remain in clear standing in the Faculty.

b) These regulations will be applied to part-time students only after they have completed twelve consecutive credit hours on a part-time basis.

2) Students who fail to obtain a semester average of 60% but who are eligible for re-admission under general university regulations will be placed on probation in the Faculty. Probationary students who fail to obtain a 60% average during the next semester in which they complete courses will be required to withdraw from the Faculty.

3) Students who have been required to withdraw from the Faculty of Education may, after a lapse of at least two semesters, apply for re-admission to the Faculty. Students who are readmitted under this Clause will be considered probationary and must meet requirements stated in Clause 2 above.

4) Students who are required to withdraw from the University under General University Regulations will be required to withdraw from the Faculty of Education.

5) Students who have been required to withdraw from the Faculty on two occasions will be ineligible for future re-admission.

6) Notwithstanding Clauses 1 through 4, the Undergraduate Studies Committee on recommendation from the Admissions Committee reserves the right to require students to withdraw from the Faculty at any time if, in the opinion of the Committee, they are deemed unsuitable for continued attendance in the programmes.

7) Students who have been required to withdraw from the Faculty may register only in those Education courses listed as applicable for non-education students.

8) In special cases, the Committee on Undergraduate Studies may waive the Re-Admission and Advancement regulations for the Faculty of Education as stated above.

REGULATIONS FOR READMISSION AND ADVANCEMENT BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (SECONDARY)

1) To continue in the programme, students must successfully complete all courses and attain an overall average of at least 65% in courses taken in each semester.

2) Students failing to attain an average of at least 65% at the end of the first semester will be required to withdraw from the programme. Such students may reapply for admission to the programme in the next year. Their applications will be considered in competition with all others. Students, if readmitted, must repeat the first semester of their programmes.

3) Students failing to attain an average greater than 65% during their internship will either:

a) be required to withdraw from the programme

or

b) with the recommendation of the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education, repeat the internship in another school setting.

4) In exceptional circumstances, waiver of these requirements may be granted by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies, Faculty of Education, on advice of the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education.

REGISTRATION IN EDUCATION COURSES (NON-EDUCATION STUDENTS)

Registration in Education courses is normally restricted to those students who have been admitted to a degree or diploma programme in the Faculty of Education. Students in first year or students in other Faculties or Schools who have completed not fewer than twenty-four credit hours may register for the following courses in Education without acceptance to a programme:

Education 2040
Education 2050
Education 2360
Education 2610
Education 3210
Education 3220
Education 3230
Education 3290
Education 3560
Education 3570
Education 3571
Education 3580
Education 3590
Education 3660

Such students are strongly urged to consult degree regulations governing their particular degree programme to determine which, if any, of the above courses can be applied to their degree programme. The above notwithstanding, students needing Education courses for Provincial Vocational Education Certification may, with permission of the Office of Student Services, be allowed to register for the required courses.

REGISTRATION IN IN-SERVICE COURSES OR REGISTRATION IN EDUCATION COURSES (CERTIFICATION UPGRADING):

Students having completed a degree programme in Education or equivalent who wish to register in Education courses for certification upgrading purposes should contact the Office of Student Services at least two weeks in advance of registration for permission/procedure.

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (PRIMARY) AND BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY)

ADMISSION:

1) Applications for Admission are considered once a year to the Fall semester only. The deadline for submission of applications is February 1. Consideration will be given to the courses for which students are registered at the time of application.

Admission to the Bachelor of Education (Primary) or (Elementary) degree programme entitles a student to enrol in the Professional year of the programme.

2) To be considered for admission to the Bachelor of Education (Primary) or (Elementary) degree programmes, students must have successfully completed forty-five credit hours including the twenty-seven credit hours listed below with either a cumulative average of at least 60% or an average of at least 60% on the last thirty credit hours which they have successfully completed. The twenty-seven required credit hours are:

a) six credit hours in English
b) Mathematics 1050 and 1051. (For students whose concentration is Mathematics, six credit hours applicable to that concentration are acceptable).
c) Science 115A and 115B; or Science 1000 (with lab) and Science 1001 (with lab); or nine credit hours in Science, three credit hours each to be chosen from Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences or Physics. (For students whose concentration is Science, six credit hours applicable to the concentration are acceptable).
d) Education 2610
e) Education 2040
f) Education 2360

The balance of courses shall be chosen from academic subjects in accordance with Clause 2 of the Regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of Education (Primary) and (Elementary).

3) In assessing applications to the Bachelor of Education (Primary) and (Elementary) degree programmes, consideration will be given to the following:

a) student's overall academic performance, in addition to the average on the forty-five credit hours required for admission;
b) a personal statement as outlined on the application to the Faculty of Education.
c) a resume as outlined on the application to the Faculty of Education.

4) The Faculty reserves the right to deny admission to a candidate who, in the opinion of the Selections Committee, is deemed unsuitable for admission to a programme.

5) In special circumstances, the Undergraduate Studies Committee on recommendation from the Admissions Committee may, at its discretion, consider an applicant or group of applicants as an exception to the requirements outlined in Clauses 2 and 3.

NOTES: 1) In all regulations following, the Office of Student Services will consult with the Dean, Faculty of Education, regarding programme matters.

2) Students who decline an offer of admission to the Faculty of Education, or who do not register for courses during the academic year in which admission is granted must, if they wish to be subsequently considered for admission, submit a new application in competition with other applicants.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (PRIMARY)

1) a) Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Education (Primary) will be required to complete a minimum of one hundred and fifty credit hours in accordance with Clauses 2, 3 and 4 below. Subject to the general regulations governing Admission, Readmission and Advancement, appropriate courses completed prior to admission to the Faculty of Education will be included in the total number of courses completed for the degree.

b) Students will normally follow the course sequence as suggested in the outline of courses entitled 'Suggested Course Sequence - Primary Programme.'

c) Students may enrol in the Internship only after successful completion of the Professional Year. The Professional Year consists of thirty specified Education credit hours and the compulsory concurrent non-credit field experience.

2) A candidate shall be required to complete a minimum of sixty-six credit hours as follows:

a) Twelve credit hours in English.
b) Science 115A and 115B; or Science 1000 (with lab) and 1001 (with lab); or nine credit hours in Science, three credit hours each to be chosen from Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences or Physics; or a concentration in Science.
c) Mathematics 1050 and Mathematics 1051 or a concentration in Mathematics.
d) Six credit hours in Psychology.
e) Six credit hours in Sociology and/or Anthropology.
f) Further credit hours shall be chosen so that a candidate shall have completed at least eighteen and not more than twenty-seven credit hours in one of the following areas in accordance with the regulations listed below: Art**, English, Folklore, French, Geography, Home Economics*, History, Linguistics, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education, Religious Studies, or Science.

* Courses in this discipline are not available at Memorial University.

** Visual Arts courses in Art History at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College may be used to satisfy this requirement in whole or in part.

Art
- Eighteen credit hours in Art

Visual Arts courses in Art History at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College may be used to satisfy this requirement in whole or in part

English
- Six credit hours at the 1000 level
- Two of 2010* or 2020, 2390, 2400, 3395, 3650
- One of 2000 or 2110, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007, 3200, 3201
- One of 2002, 2003, 2004
- Two of 2150, 2152, 2155, 2156, 3145, 3146, 3147, 3148, 3153, 3155, 3156, 3157, 3158

* Credit may not be obtained for both English 1110 and English 2010.

Folklore
- 1000 or 2000
- 2300, 2500, 3920, 3450, 4310
- It is recommended that students complete up to three of 3100, 3200, 3500, 3930, 4400

French
- A maximum of six credit hours at the 1000 level
- 2100 or equivalent
- 2101 or equivalent
- 2300 or equivalent
- 3700 or equivalent
- At least five weeks at an approved francophone institution in a French speaking area

- It is recommended that students complete at least one of 3650, 3651, 3652

NOTE: Students may wish to select the French Immersion option listed at the end of Suggested Course Sequence - Primary Programme.

Geography
- 1000, 1001
- One of 2001, 2102, 2302
- One of 2490, 3290, 3320, 3490
- Six other credit hours in Geography

History
- 1000 and 1001 OR 1050 and 1051
- 2100 and 2110 OR 2200 and 2210
- 3110, 3120

Linguistics
- 1100 or 2100
- 2103, 2104, 2210
- Two of 2150, 2500, 3000, 3100, 3104, 3150, 3201, 3212, 3850.
- At least one of these must be a 3000-level course.

Mathematics

- Eighteen credit hours including no more than six credit hours at the 1000 level and at least three credit hours at the 3000 level

Music
- 1020 and 1021, OR 2000 and 2001
- 1113 and 1114
- 251A and 251B

Physical Education

- Eighteen credit hours to be chosen in consultation with the Director of the School of Physical Education and Athletics

Religious Studies
- One of 2013, 2130, or 2140
- 2050 and 2051
- Six credit hours at the 3000-level
- At least three additional credit hours to be chosen from 2011, 2012, 2013, 2130, 2140, 2610, or an additional 3000-level course

Science

- Eighteen credit hours including at least six credit hours in each of two subject areas selected from Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, and Physics.

g) Additional elective courses may be chosen from any subject areas outside of Education in addition to those listed in Clause 2 above.

3) A candidate shall be required to complete a minimum of sixty-nine credit hours in Education.

a) The following courses are compulsory courses on the Primary programme:

(i) Education 2040, 2360, 2610, 3005, 3120, 3130, 3270, 3305, 3310, 3370, 3540, 3615, 3940, 3950, either 4360 or 4370, 4380, 4425.

(ii) Two of Education 2050, 2150, 2193, 2194, 3050, 3220, or 3230, 4205. For students whose academic concentrations are French, Geography, History, Physical Education, or Religious Studies, at least one of these courses will be determined by the particular subject in Clause 2.f) above.

b) Further Education courses to complete the required total for the degree must be chosen from appropriate course offerings of the Faculty of Education.

4) In addition to satisfying Clause 3 above, all candidates shall be required to complete a fifteen credit hour internship. (Education 401X)

SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE - PRIMARY PROGRAMME

Years 1 and 2
- Twenty-four academic credit hours - First year university
- Science 115A/B (or courses as outlined in Clause 2.b)
- Mathematics 1050/1051
- Education 2040
- Education 2360
- Education 2610
- Three credit hours from Clause 2 above
- Three credit hours from Clause 3a)(ii) above
- Other academic courses

Professional Year
- Education 3005, 3120, 3130, 3270, 3305, 3370, 3540, 3615, 3940, 3950.

Years 4 and 5
- Education 3310
- Education 4360 or 4370
- Education 4380
- Education 4425
- Education 401X
- Three Education electives
- Credit hours from Clause 2 above to complete the required total of thirty-six
- Three credit hours from Clause 3(a) (ii) above.

FRENCH IMMERSION OPTION

NOTE: In addition to the above, there is an option within the B.Ed. (Primary) Degree programme for those students wishing to prepare themselves to teach in the French Immersion programmes of the Province. The course sequence for this option is as follows:

First Year
- Six credit hours in English
- Psychology 1000, 1001
- Mathematics 1050, 1051
- Science 115A, 115B
- French 1050, 1051 (Students who have followed an immersion programme may begin with French 1060).

Second Year

1st or 2nd Semester

- Fifteen credit hours in French and a semester of study in a French milieu. These may be taken concurrently.

NOTES: 1) Students who have successfully completed French 2159 will continue with French 2160.

2) Graduates of a high school French Immersion program are required to spend two semesters of study in a French milieu.

2nd or 1st Semester
- Education 2040
- Education 2360
- Education 2610
- French 3700 or appropriate level French course
- One English

Third Year

Professional Year - thirty Education credit hours as specified in the calendar for all students. The required school placement will be in one of the French Immersion classrooms in St. John's.

Fourth Year

This year is to be taken at a cooperating francophone university where the opportunity exists to take certain education and academic courses taught in French. This semester of study must be planned in advance and in consultation with the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education, in order to ensure that approved courses are selected.

Fifth Year

1st or 2nd Semester
- One English
- French 3701 (or appropriate level)
- Education 4425
- Education 4380, 4360 or 4370 (the particular course depends on what was taken in the fourth year)
- Education 4155

2nd or 1st Semester

- Internship in French Immersion setting in Newfoundland.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY)

1) a) Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Education (Elementary) will be required to complete a minimum of one hundred and fifty credit hours in accordance with Clauses 2, 3 and 4 below. Subject to the general regulations governing Admission, Readmission, and Advancement, appropriate courses completed prior to admission to the Faculty will be included in the total number of courses completed for the degree.

b) Students will normally follow the course sequence as suggested in the outline of courses entitled `Suggested Course Sequence - Elementary Programme.'

c) Students may enrol in the Internship only after successful completion of the Professional Year. The Professional Year consists of thirty specified Education credit hours and the compulsory concurrent non-credit field experience.

2) A candidate shall be required to complete a minimum of sixty-six credit hours as follows:

a) Twelve credit hours in English.

b) Science 115A and 115B; or Science 1000 (with lab) and 1001 (with lab); or nine credit hours in Science, three credit hours each to be chosen from Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences or Physics; or a concentration in Science.

c) Mathematics 1050 and Mathematics 1051 or a concentration in Mathematics.

d) Six credit hours in Psychology.

e) Six credit hours in Sociology and/or Anthropology.

f) Further credit hours shall be chosen so that a candidate shall have completed at least eighteen and not more than twenty-seven credit hours in one of the following areas in accordance with the regulations listed below: Art**, English, Folklore, French, Geography, Home Economics*, History, Linguistics, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education, Religious Studies, or Science.

* Courses in this discipline are not available at Memorial University.

** Visual Arts courses in Art History at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College may be used to satisfy this requirement in whole or in part.

Art

- Eighteen credit hours in Art

Visual Arts courses in Art History at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College may be used to satisfy this requirement in whole or in part

English
- Six credit hours at the 1000 level
- Two of 2010* or 2020, 2390, 2400, 3395, 3650
- One of 2000 or 2110, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007, 3200, 3201
- One of 2002, 2003, 2004
- Two of 2150, 2152, 2155, 2156, 3145, 3146, 3147, 3148, 3153, 3155, 3156, 3157, 3158

* Credit may not be obtained for both English 1110 and English 2010.

Folklore
- 1000 or 2000
- 2300, 2500, 3920, 3450, 4310
- It is recommended that students complete up to three of 3100, 3200, 3500, 3930, 4400

French
- A maximum of six credit hours at the 1000 level
- 2100 or equivalent
- 2101 or equivalent
- 2300 or equivalent
- 3700 or equivalent
- At least five weeks at an approved francophone institution in a French speaking area
- It is recommended that students complete at least one of 3650, 3651, 3652

NOTE: Students may wish to select the French Immersion option listed at the end of Suggested Course Sequence - Primary Programme.

Geography
- 1000, 1001
- One of 2001, 2102, 2302
- One of 2490, 3290, 3320, 3490
- Six other credit hours in Geography

History
- 1000 and 1001 OR 1050 and 1051
- 2100 and 2110 OR 2200 and 2210
- 3110, 3120

Linguistics
- 1100 or 2100
- 2103, 2104, 2210
- Two of 2150, 2500, 3000, 3100, 3104, 3150, 3201, 3212, 3850.
- At least one of these must be a 3000-level course.

Mathematics

- Eighteen credit hours including no more than six credit hours at the 1000 level and at least three credit hours at the 3000 level

Music
- 1020 and 1021, OR 2000 and 2001
- 1113 and 1114
- 251A and 251B

Physical Education

- Eighteen credit hours to be chosen in consultation with the Director of the School of Physical Education and Athletics

Religious Studies
- One of 2013, 2130 or 2140
- 2050 and 2051
- Six credit hours at the 3000 level
- At least three additional credit hours to be chosen from 2011, 2012, 2013, 2130, 2140, 2610, or an additional 3000-level course

Science

- Eighteen credit hours including at least six credit hours in each of two subject areas selected from Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, and Physics.

g) Additional elective courses may be chosen from any subject areas outside of Education in addition to those listed in Clause 2 above.

3) A candidate shall be required to complete a minimum of sixty-nine credit hours in Education.

a) The following courses are compulsory courses on the Elementary programme:

(i) Education 2040, 2360, 2610, 3006, 3275, 3315, 3320, 3375, 3480, 3545, 3615, 3940, 3955, 3960, 4360 or 4370, 4380, 4425.

(ii) Two of Education 2050, 2193, 2194, 3050, 3120, 3160, 3220 or 3230, 4205. For students whose academic concentrations are French, Geography, History, Physical Education, or Religious Studies, at least one of these courses will be determined by the particular subject in Clause 2.f) above. Students completing Music under Clause 2.f) must complete both Education 3160 and Education 3180.

b) Further Education courses to complete the required total for the degree must be chosen from appropriate course offerings of the Faculty of Education.

4) In addition to satisfying Clause 3 above, all candidates shall be required to complete a fifteen credit hour internship. (Education 401X)

SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE - ELEMENTARY PROGRAMME

Years 1 and 2
- Twenty-four academic credit hours - First year university
- Science 115A/B (or courses as outlined in Clause 2.b)
- Mathematics 1050/1051
- Education 2040
- Education 2360
- Education 2610
- Three credit hours from Clause 2 above
- Three credit hours from Clause 3a)(ii) above
- Other academic courses

Professional Year
- Education 3006, 3275, 3315, 3375, 3480, 3545, 3615, 3940, 3955, 3960.

Years 4 and 5
- Education 3320
- Education 4360 or 4370
- Education 4380
- Education 4425
- Education 401X
- Three Education electives
- Credit hours from Clause 2 above to complete the required total of thirty-six
- Three credit hours from Clause 3(a) (ii) above.

FRENCH IMMERSION OPTION

NOTE: In addition to the above, there is an option within the B.Ed. (Elementary) Degree programme for those students wishing to prepare themselves to teach in the French Immersion programmes in the Province. The course sequence for this option is given at the end of the regulations for the B.Ed. (Primary) Degree programme.

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (SECONDARY)

General Comment:

The Bachelor of Education (Secondary) is a second degree programme designed to prepare High School teachers. All students attend full-time and should graduate in one calendar year. The programme is designed to provide students with an early field experience, a sequenced set of courses prior to a fourteen week internship and a range of courses after the internship to allow students to build on strengths and remedy weaknesses which may have become apparent during the internship.

ADMISSION

1) Applications for admission are considered once a year and for the Fall Semester only. The deadline for submission of Faculty applications to the Registrar's Office is February 1. Consideration will be given to the courses for which students are registered at the time of application.

2) To be considered for admission to the Bachelor of Education (Secondary) degree programme individuals must have:

a) been awarded a Bachelors Degree from a university recognized by Memorial University;

b) completed thirty-six credit hours in a subject listed under Academic Disciplines in Clause 3 below.

c) completed twenty-four credit hours in a subject listed under Academic Disciplines in Clause 3 below, but different from that in (b);

d) achieved an overall average of at least 65% in each of the sets of courses chosen to meet (b)and (c)above; and,

e) achieved an overall average of at least 65% in the last 60 successfully completed credit hours.

3) Academic Disciplines are deemed to be the disciplines on the following list. Courses from other disciplines deemed by the Admissions Committee to be equivalent to courses in any of the listed Academic Disciplines will be acceptable. Students wishing to complete an internship in French Immersion must complete Education 4156 and meet the stated prerequisites for that course.

Art Geography
Biochemistry History
Biology Linguistics
Canadian Studies Mathematics (Pure and Applied Mathematics, Statistics)
Chemistry Newfoundland Studies
Computer Science Physical Education*
Earth Sciences Physics
Economics Political Science
English Religious Studies
Folklore Theatre Arts
French

*In order to be considered for admission within this Academic Discipline, students must have completed courses in the following areas: Anatomy, Physiology, Motor Learning, Kinesiology, Evaluation and Testing in Physical Education, Primary/Elementary Physical Education Curriculum and Teaching, Issues and Trends in HPERS and a minimum of 6 activities.

4) Candidates who are registered in their final semester of their first Bachelor's Degree programme during the Winter Semester must have satisfied the academic requirements set out in Clause 2 above upon completion of their first degree programme.

NOTE: Students must supply transcripts indicating Winter Semester grades no later than May 15.

5) In assessing applications to the Bachelor of Education (Secondary) Programme, consideration will be given to the following:

a) student's overall academic performance, in addition to the average on the courses required to be considered for admission;

b) demonstrated competency in written English as prescribed by the Faculty of Education; and,

c) two letters of reference, one of which must be from a student's instructor in the teachable area listed in Clause 2(b), or, in cases where the applicant has been employed during the past two years, from a direct supervisor of the applicant.

6) The Faculty reserves the right to deny admission to a candidate who, in the opinion of the Admissions Committee, is deemed unsuitable for admission to the programme.

7) In special circumstances, the Undergraduate Studies Committee on recommendation from the Admissions Committee may, at its discretion, consider an applicant or group of applicants as an exception to the requirements outlined above.

NOTES: 1) A limited number of programme spaces are allocated to each discipline. Students who are admitted with a particular Academic Discipline and who wish to change to a different Academic Discipline must obtain permission of the Office of Student Services. Such changes may not be possible in particular areas.

2) The Faculty of Education will make every effort to accommodate students. However, they are advised that admission to the programme on the basis of academic disciplines is dependent on sufficient numbers of students to warrant the offering of applicable methodology courses in those disciplines in any given year.

3) Competition for places in the secondary programme by applicants with teaching disciplines of Social Studies, English, and Biology has been very intense in the past. Many otherwise qualified applicants have been rejected because of lack of programme space. Because preference may be given to students who are permanent residents of Newfoundland and Labrador very few out-of-province students are normally accepted in these academic disciplines.

4) Because of the structured, sequential nature of this programme, students must attend full-time. Students who drop any course which is part of the programme will be dropped from the entire programme.

5) Students who have been admitted to the programme but choose not to attend in the Fall Semester of their year of admission will lose their admission status. Such a student may reapply for admission at a later date, and must submit a new application which will be considered in competition with those of all other applicants.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (SECONDARY)

1) A candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Education (Secondary) shall complete fifty-one credit hours; including a non-credit field experience, thirty-six credit hours, and a fifteen-credit hour internship in a sequence as prescribed by the Programme Plan (see below).

2) The non-credit early field experience shall include a minimum of thirty hours of school visitation during the first semester of the programme.

3) The thirty-six credit hours shall include:

a) twenty-one credit hours as follows:

(i) Education 4005, 4260, 4361, 4381, and 4950

(ii) Two of the following: Education 4120, 4121, 4142, 4143, 4150, 4161, 4168, 4170, 4171, 4180, 4181, 4190, 4203, 4270, 4271. These methodology courses must be chosen to match the Academic Disciplines under which the student was admitted. Students whose academic discipline is Linguistics are required to do Education 4142. Those whose discipline is Geography are required to do either Education 4180 or 4271. Those whose discipline is Folklore are required to do either Education 4142 or 4180. Those whose area is Social Studies (academic disciplines of Canadian Studies, Economics, Geography, History, Newfoundland Studies, and Political Science) are required to do Education 4180. Students whose first and second academic disciplines are in Social Studies are required to do Education 4180 and 4181. Students whose academic disciplines are English and Linguistics are required to do Education 4142 and 4143. Those whose discipline is Biochemistry are required to do either Education 4171 or Education 4270.

b) fifteen credit hours in electives chosen from i through iv below so that students complete at least three credit hours from each of i, ii and iii but no more than six credit hours from each of i, ii, iii or iv.

(i) Education 4350, 4352, 4354, 4356, and 4945

(ii) Education 4382, 4420, and 4580

(iii) Education 4240, 4242, and 4261

(iv) Education 2420, 2900, 3210, 3211, 3255, 3290, 3565, 3570, 3571, 3585, 3943, 4144, *4156, 4163, 4172, 4182, 4204, 4275, 4340, 4425, 4480, 4600 and 4610.

*Students wishing to complete an internship in French Immersion must complete Education 4156 and meet the stated prerequisites for that course.

NOTE: Students intending to apply to the Bachelor of Special Education Degree Programme should complete Education 4240, 4242, and one of 4350 or 4352.

PROGRAMME PLAN

*SEMESTER 1 (Fall)

Week 0 15
Classroom Observation (No Credit)
Education 4361 (Teaching in the Contemporary Classroom)
Education 4005 (Effective Teaching)
Education 4260 (Nature of Late Adolescence)
Two Methods Courses (from 3.a.ii)
Education 4950 (Evaluation of Teaching and Learning)

*Due to the Classroom Observation component this semester will extend one week longer than the regularly scheduled teaching semester.

SEMESTER 2 (Winter)

Education 405X (15-credit hour Internship)

**SEMESTER 3 (Spring)

Intersession (6 Weeks)
Summer Session (6 Weeks)
Two Electives From
Clause 3(b)
Two Electives From
Clause 3(b)
Spring Semester (14 Weeks)
Elective From Clause 3(b)
Education 4381 (Perspectives on Schooling)

**Courses may be offered in the Spring, Intersession and/or Summer Sessions.

BACHELOR OF MUSIC CONJOINT WITH BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION

ADMISSION

1) Applications for Admission to the above Bachelor of Education Conjoint Degree Programme is considered once a year for admission to the Fall Semester only. The deadline for submission of applications is February 1.

2) Applications for Admission to the above-noted programme refer to the Education component of the Conjoint Degree Programme. At the time of application, students must have been formally admitted to the School of Music.

3) To be considered for admission, students must have successfully completed a minimum of sixty credit hours with either a cumulative average of at least 60% or an average of at least 60 % on their last thirty credit hours which they have successfully completed.

Within the sixty credit hours, students must have completed the following:

a) at least six credit hours in English
b) at least six credit hours in each of any two of: History, Mathematics, a Second Language, Laboratory Science, or Music History.
c) at least twelve credit hours in Music. Consideration will be given to the Winter Semester courses for which students are registered at the time of application.

4) In assessing applications, consideration will be given to the following:

a) students' overall academic performance, in addition to the minimum academic requirements outlined in Clause 3 above;
b) demonstrated competency in written English as prescribed by the Faculty of Education at the time of consideration for admission;
c) two letters of reference, one of which must be from the student's university instructor in a course in the student's teachable subject as per Clause 3(c) above.

5) In addition to Clause 4.a), b), c) above, a personal interview and demonstration of proficiency in basic keyboard and aural skills are normally required. Sample materials and further information may be obtained from the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education.

6) The Faculty reserves the right to deny admission to a candidate, who in the opinion of the Selections Committee, is deemed unsuitable for admission to a programme.

7) In special circumstances, the Selections Committee may, at its discretion, consider an applicant or group of applicants as an exception to the minimum academic requirements outlined in Clause 3.

NOTE: Students who decline an offer of admission to the Faculty of Education, or who do not register for courses during the academic year in which admission is granted must, if they wish to be subsequently considered for admission, submit a new application in competition with other applicants.

REGULATIONS FOR THE CONJOINT DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF MUSIC (MAJOR IN GENERAL STUDIES) AND BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION

1) A candidate for the Conjoint Degrees of Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Music Education shall be required to complete a minimum of one hundred and fifty credit hours in accordance with the regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of Music, following General Musical Studies major and Clause 2 below.

2) A candidate shall complete the following forty-five credit hours in Education:

a) Education 2250 or 3615
b) Education 4360
c) Education 4370 or 4380
d) Education 2510, 2520, 2530, 3920, 3925, and 4830
e) Education 403X (15 credit hour Internship)
f) Three other credit hours in Education other than Music Education.

NOTE: One of the following courses may be used to fulfil the requirements of Regulation (b) of the Bachelor of Music degree programme: Education 4835, 4840, 4845, 4850, 4855, 4860.

REGULATIONS FOR THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION AS A SECOND DEGREE

1) A candidate who has been awarded a Bachelor's degree in Music from a recognized university may be admitted to the programme leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music Education provided that the pattern of courses for the first degree is acceptable to the Selections Committee of the Faculty of Education.

2) Subject to Regulation 1, the degree of Bachelor of Music Education may be awarded upon the successful completion of at least thirty additional credit hours provided the candidate meets the requirements in Clause 2 above of the Regulations governing the Conjoint Degrees of Bachelor of Music (Major in General Studies) and Bachelor of Music Education.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (NATIVE AND NORTHERN) - B.ED.(N&N)

This is a teacher education programme designed for Native students in Labrador who intend to pursue a teaching career in the communities of northern Labrador. It would be of particular interest to students who wish to continue their studies beyond the Diploma in Native and Northern Education.

REGULATIONS FOR ADMISSION/RE-ADMISSION AND ADVANCEMENT

1) Students who wish to enter the programme must submit an application to the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education.

2) Applicants to the B.Ed.(N&N) must complete the general application form for admission to the University and the application form for admission to the Faculty of Education, Native and Northern Programme.

3) Normally, to be considered for admission, a student must have completed a minimum of fifteen credit hours with an average of at least 55% in those courses and be in clear standing.

NOTE: Students may be considered for conditional admission to the programme upon admission to the University. Students admitted conditionally will be admitted in clear standing after successful completion of fifteen credit hours with an average of not less than 55% percent.

4) Students who have completed more than fifteen credit hours prior to admission to the programme will be permitted to apply those credit hours, where appropriate, towards the B.Ed.(N&N) provided an average of at least 60% has been obtained in all courses beyond the first fifteen credit hours.

5) Students who have been admitted to the B.Ed.(N&N) will normally be governed by Regulations 2-8 of the Regulations for Re-Admission and Advancement of the Faculty of Education. For this programme only, advancement regulations will be applied upon the completion of each fifteen credit hour segment throughout the duration of the programme and will be assessed on the basis of the average obtained on those fifteen credit hours.

6) Students who have not met the requirements for direct entry from high school, but are eligible for entry on other criteria, will be assessed for literacy in English through procedures in accordance with University regulations. Where necessary, courses may be provided to give students an opportunity to upgrade their literacy skills.

7) Within the General Academic Regulations, Section E.1, candidates for the B.Ed.(N&N) Degree shall have completed a minimum of twelve credit hours as full time students through attendance at classes for the duration of at least one semester on a campus of Memorial University.

PROGRAMME FOR STUDENTS ON THE PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ROUTE

1) Candidates for the degree of B.Ed.(N&N), Primary/Elementary route, will be required to complete a minimum of one hundred and fifty credit hours in accordance with clauses 2, 3, 4, and 5 below.

2) The following courses are compulsory:

a) Mathematics 1050 and 1051 or Mathematics 1150 and 1151 or a concentration in Mathematics.
b) Science 115A and 115B or a concentration in Science.
c) Anthropology 1031 and six other credit hours in Anthropology.
d) Linguistics 2020 and 2021; or 2030 and 2031; or 2025 and 2026.
e) Twelve credit hours in English. It is recommended that these required English courses be taken as early as possible in the programme.
f) Twelve credit hours in each of two of the following: Art, Science*, Folklore, French, Geography, History, Linguistics (Inuttut or Montagnais), Mathematics, Music/Music Education**, Physical Education, or Religious Studies.

* Students shall have taken at least six credit hours in each of two subject areas selected from Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, and Physics.

** Courses to be chosen as follows: Two of Music 1120 and 1121 or 110A/B; One of Music 1020, 1021, Education 3180, 3190; One of Education 3130 or 3160.

3) The following Education courses are compulsory: Education 2022 or 2032, 2150 or 3960, 2182, 2194, 2200, 2222, 2230 or 2240, 2350, 2361, 2430, 2610* or 3615*, 3140, 3281, 3321, 3542, 4020, 4330.

* Students who have successfully completed Education 2250 as part of the T.E.P.L. Programme would be allowed to substitute it for Education 2610 or 3615.

4) All candidates shall be required to complete a fifteen credit hour internship (Education 404X).

NOTE: Candidates who have completed the Diploma in Native and Northern Education in Labrador and have successfully completed at least five years as a teaching assistant or certified teacher may apply to the Office of Student Services for a waiver of the internship requirement. In cases where waivers are granted, candidates will be required to complete fifteen credit hours in primary or elementary education to be determined from an approved list, in consultation with the Office of Student Services.

b) Students may enrol in the Internship Programme only after successful completion of ninety semester credit hours, including the following twenty-four credit hours: Education 2150 or 3960, 2182, 2200, 2350, 2610 or 3615, 3281, 3542, 4330.

5) Further courses to complete the required total of one hundred and fifty credit hours may be selected from subject areas listed in Clause 2 above or from other non-education courses or from education courses which are appropriate for primary and elementary education.

PROGRAMME FOR STUDENTS ON THE SECONDARY EDUCATION ROUTE

1) Candidates for the degree of B.Ed.(N&N), Secondary route, will be required to complete a minimum of one hundred and fifty credit hours in accordance with clauses 2, 3 and 4 below.

2) The following courses are compulsory:

a) Twelve credit hours in English. It is recommended that these required English courses be taken as early as possible in the programme.
b)Anthropology 1031 and six other credit hours in Anthropology
c) Linguistics 2020 and 2021; or 2030 and 2031; or 2025 and 2026
d) Twenty-four credit hours in each of two of the following areas: Art, Computer Science, English, Folklore, French, Geography, History, Home Economics*, Industrial Arts, Linguistics (Inuttut or Montagnais), Mathematics, Physical Education, Religious Studies, Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, or Physics.

* Courses in Home Economics are not available at Memorial University.

e) Education 2222, 2250 or 3250, 2361, 2430, 3281, 4020, 4320, 4330.
f) Six credit hours from each of two groups listed below related to those courses selected from 2(d) above, except for those students who complete one or more concentrations in Science. Students who concentrate in Science will choose courses according to Regulations 2(g) and 2(h).
- Education 4140 and 4141
- Education 4150 and 4151
- Education 4161 and 4163
- Education 4180 and 4181
- Education 4201 and 4202
- Education 2710 and 4720
- Education 3943 and 4168
- Education 3120 and 3121
- Education 4220 and 4221, or Education 4230 and 4231
- Physical Education 4110 and 4420
g) For those students who do a concentration in a single science: Education 3171 and one of Education 4170, 4171, 4270, 4271.
h) For those students who do concentrations in two sciences: Education 3170 and 3171, and two of Education 4170, 4171, 4270, 4271.

3) a) All candidates shall be required to complete a fifteen credit hour internship (Education 404X).

NOTE: Candidates who have completed the Diploma in Native and Northern Education in Labrador and have successfully completed at least five years as a teaching assistant or certified teacher may apply to the Office of Student Services for a waiver of the internship requirement. In cases where waivers are granted, candidates will be required to complete fifteen credit hours in secondary education to be determined from an approved list in consultation with the Office of Student Services.

b) Students may enrol in the Internship Programme only after successful completion of ninety credit hours, including Education 3281, 4330, and 2250 or 3250 and appropriate teaching methodology courses from Clauses 2(f), 2(g), and 2(h).

4) Further credit hours to complete the required total of one hundred and fifty may be selected from subject areas listed in Clauses 2(a), 2(b), 2(c), and 2(d) above or from other non-education courses or from education courses which are appropriate for secondary education.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SPECIAL EDUCATION

(For the preparation of teachers of Special Education.)

NOTES: 1) Students presently holding the Diploma in Special Education or enrolled in the Diploma Programme and wishing to upgrade the Diploma to a Bachelor of Special Education Degree may do so by completing six credit hours chosen from Special Education electives approved by the Faculty of Education, provided that they meet the Residence Requirements for a Second Degree.

2) Students who update the Diploma in Special Education by completing the requirements for the Bachelor of Special Education Degree shall have the diploma designation on their transcript replaced by the degree designation.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

1) Applications for part-time and full-time admission are considered once a year. The earliest date candidates can begin the programme is Summer Session of the year of admission. The deadline for submission of applications is February 1. Consideration will be given to the courses for which students are registered at the time of application.

2) Admission to the degree programme in Special Education is limited and selective.

3) To be admitted to the Bachelor of Special Education Degree programme a candidate shall have a minimum of a 65% average in the last sixty credit hours and also meet the following requirements:

a) have met the admission requirements to the Faculty of Education; and

b) EITHER: (i) have credit for: Education 2360; Education 3220 or 3230; Education 3305 and Education 3540 or Education 3315 and 3545; and Education 3615.

OR: (ii) hold a degree in Primary or Elementary Education from Memorial University or some other recognized university or hold another Education degree deemed appropriate by the Faculty of Education. Such candidates may be required to complete additional courses to meet the prerequisites in b(i) above.

c) have successfully completed a professional internship in education or have equivalent teaching experience prior to admission.

4) Students pursuing or having completed degree programmes for the preparation of secondary school teachers who wish to enter the Bachelor of Special Education Degree Programme shall complete Education 4242, one of Education 3220, 3230 or 4240, and one of Education 4350 or 4352.

5) Applicants to the Degree Programme in Special Education must complete the application form "Application for Admission to the Special Education Programme and return it by the appropriate deadline to the Office of the Registrar. Students who must apply for admission/re-admission to the University, must also submit to the Office of the Registrar an "Application for Admission/Re-admission" form (available from the Office of the Registrar). Application forms for the Special Education programme may be obtained by writing the Faculty of Education, Office of Student Services, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, A1B 3X8.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

To be eligible for the Degree in Special Education, a student must have completed:

EITHER

a) the Memorial University Bachelor of Education Degree (Primary) or (Elementary) or another Education degree deemed appropriate by the Faculty of Education, and

b) 36 credit hours as follows:

(i) Required courses: Education 3600, 3610, 3620, 3630, 3650.
(ii) 21 credit hours selected from the elective offerings in Special Education.

OR

a) the Memorial University Bachelor of Education Degree (Primary) or (Elementary) or another Education degree deemed appropriate by the Faculty of Education, and

b) Education 365X - Extended Harlow Practicum in Special Education (15 credit hours) plus Education 3600, 3610, 3620, 3630 and 9 credit hours from the elective courses in Special Education.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS TO THE DEGREE AND DIPLOMA PROGRAMMES IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

To be admitted to the Bachelor of Vocational Education Degree and Diploma programmes, a student must meet, in addition to the general admission requirements of the University, special admission requirements as outlined by the following criteria:

1) Applications for admission are considered three times per year. The deadlines for submission of applications are June 15 for admission to the Fall Semester, October 1 for admission to the Winter Semester, and January 15 for admission to the Spring Semester.

2) Occupational training as verified by one of:

a) a certificate of qualification as a journeyman for a designated trade;
b) a certificate or diploma from a technical or business school or college;
c) an appropriate degree from a university;
d) satisfactory completion of a programme equivalent to (a), (b) or (c) above.

3) At least one year of work experience or equivalent in the occupational area in which training was obtained. This experience must be subsequent to the completion of or concurrent with the occupational training programme.

NOTE: Training and experience will be assessed and verified by the Admissions Sub-Committee for Vocational Education.

4) Students who wish to enter the programme in Vocational Education may obtain an application form from the Faculty of Education, Office of Student Services.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

A. FOR STUDENTS WHO POSSESS AN OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING DIPLOMA OR CERTIFICATE

1) A candidate for the Bachelor of Vocational Education Degree will be required to complete the equivalent of at least one hundred twenty credit hours approved by the Office of Student Services.

2) The one hundred and twenty credit hours must include:

a) Twenty-one approved credit hours in Education other than courses in the Vocational Education group. Courses in this group must be selected from those courses which are applicable to the High School Programme.
b) Eighteen credit hours from the Vocational Education group as follows: Education 2710, 2720, 2730, and three electives.
c) Education 4700.
d) Six credit hours in English.
e) Thirty credit hours patterned to strengthen the area of teaching specialization and/or provide the development of depth in a related field of study, as follows:

EITHER: (i) thirty credit hours in or related to a special area(s) other than Education,

OR: (i.) a minimum of fifteen credit hours in or related to a special area(s) other than Education and the balance of thirty credit hours as Vocational Education special topics courses.

f) Twelve elective credit hours in areas other than Education.

3) a) Advanced standing to a maximum of thirty credit hours may be awarded for students possessing at least a combined total of six years of training and work experience in the occupational area in which training was obtained.

b) Students who because of a deficiency of work experience are not eligible to receive the maximum of thirty credit hours advanced standing will be required to obtain further work experience and/or to complete additional university courses, either or both of which must be approved by the Admissions Sub-Committee for Vocational Education.

4) At least half the credit hours in Vocational Education required under Clause A.2(b) must be completed at this University.

B. FOR STUDENTS WHO POSSESS AN APPROPRIATE DEGREE FROM A RECOGNIZED UNIVERSITY

1) To be admitted to the Bachelor of Vocational Education Degree programme, a student must meet the special admission requirements outlined above.

2) A candidate shall complete at least thirty credit hours at this University beyond those required for the first degree. A candidate who has received a first degree at this University may be permitted, with the approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty Council of the Faculty of Education, to complete six of these thirty credit hours at another institution recognized by the Senate.

3) To obtain the Bachelor of Vocational Education degree a candidate must complete at least thirty-six credit hours in Education. These courses must be approved by the Office of Student Services.

4) The thirty-six credit hours must include:

a) Fifteen credit hours in Education other than from the Vocational Education group. Courses in this group must be selected from those courses which are applicable to the High School Programme.
b) Fifteen credit hours from the Vocational Education group.
c) Education 4700.
d) One elective in Education.

5) At least nine of the credit hours required under Clause B.4(b) must be completed at this University.

NOTES: 1) Regulations B.2 and B.5 will not apply to students who completed courses at the New Brunswick Institute of Technology before the appropriate courses in Vocational Education were available at this University. For those students a minimum of twelve credit hours, including six credit hours in Vocational Education, and three credit hours in Student Teaching, must be completed at this University.

2) The requirement of Education 4700 may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies on the recommendation of the Office of Student Services. (Please refer to Student Teaching Guidelines).

REGULATIONS FOR THE DIPLOMA IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

1) A candidate for the Diploma in Vocational Education will be required to complete the equivalent of at least sixty credit hours approved by the Office of Student Services.

2) The sixty credit hours must include:

a) Fifteen approved credit hours in Education other than those in the Vocational Education group. Courses in this group must be selected from those courses which are applicable to the High School Programme.
b) Twelve credit hours from the Vocational Education group as follows: Education 2710, 2720, 2730, and one elective.
c) Education 4700.

3) a) Advanced standing to a maximum of thirty credit hours may be awarded for students possessing at least a combined total of six years of training and work experience in the occupational area in which training was obtained.

b) Students who because of a deficiency of work experience are not eligible to receive the maximum of thirty credit hours advanced standing will be required to obtain further work experience and/or to complete additional University courses, either or both of which must be approved by the Admissions Sub-Committee for Vocational Education.

4) At least twenty-four of the credit hours required under Clause 2 (a), (b), and (c) must be completed at this University.

NOTES: 1) The requirement of Regulation 4 may be extended for students who completed courses at the New Brunswick Institute of Technology before the appropriate courses in Vocational Education were available at this University. For those students, a minimum of six credit hours, three in Vocational Education and three in Student Teaching, must be completed at this University.

2) The requirement of Education 4700 may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies on the recommendation of the Office of Student Services. (Please refer to Student Teaching Guidelines).

REGULATIONS FOR THE DIPLOMA IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

1) A programme leading to the Diploma in Technology Education is offered by the Faculty of Education.

2) To be admitted to the Diploma Programme in Technology Education, a student shall:

a) have been admitted to the Faculty of Education at Memorial, and
b) have completed at least twelve credit hours in Education including at least three credit hours offered by each of two disciplines in the Faculty of Education or have completed similar courses at another recognized university or college.

Admission to the programme in Technology Education requires a formal application which may be obtained from the Office of Student Services. Application forms may be obtained by writing the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, A1B 3X8.

3) To be eligible for the Diploma in Technology Education, a student must have

a) a degree in Education from a recognized university or college;
b) completed thirty credit hours from those listed below:
(i) Nine Professional Education credit hours, Education 4720 and 3700 and one of Education 2710, 2730, 3710, 3720 or 3730 which must be approved by the Office of Student Services. Students whose area of specialization in their degree in Education is Vocational Education will be allowed to substitute other Vocational Education courses for those listed above if they have already received credit for these courses on their Vocational Education degree.
(ii) Twenty-one Technology Education Technical Skills credit hours - Education 2750, 2751, 3750, 3751, 4750, 4751, and 4752.
c) At least twenty-four of the credit hours required under Clause 3(b) must be completed at this University.
d) An average of at least 1 point for the total number of courses completed on the diploma programme at this University.

NOTES: 1) The requirement of Regulation 3(c) may be extended for students who completed courses in a Technology Education programme at a recognized college or university before the appropriate courses were available at this University. For those students, a minimum of fifteen credit hours, six in Education including Student Teaching and nine in Technology Education Technical Skills must be completed at this University.

2) The requirement of Education 3700 may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies on the recommendation of the Office of Student Services. (Please refer to Student Teaching Guidelines).

REGULATIONS FOR THE DIPLOMA IN ADULT TEACHER EDUCATION

1) Applications for admission are considered three times per year. The deadlines for submission of applications are June 15 for admission to the Fall Semester, October 1 for admission to the Winter Semester, and January 15 for admission to the Spring Semester.

2) A programme leading to a Diploma in Adult Teacher Education is offered by the Faculty of Education.

3) To be admitted to the Diploma Programme in Adult Teacher Education, an applicant shall:

a) be admitted to this University,
b) satisfy at least one of the following:
(i) have been admitted to the Faculty of Education,
(ii) have been approved by the Office of Student Services.

4) Admission to the diploma programme in Adult Teacher Education requires a formal application to the Office of Student Services. Application forms may be obtained by writing the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Nfld. A1B 3X8.

5) To be eligible for the Diploma in Adult Teacher Education, a student shall complete a total of thirty Education credit hours as follows: 2710, 2800, 2801, 2803, 2806, 3430, 3440, 4450, two of 2041, 3280 or 3290, 3210, 3801.

6) A maximum of twelve credit hours referred to in Section 5 above and which have already been counted toward a degree or diploma may also be counted toward the Diploma in Adult Teacher Education.

7) At least twenty-one of the credit hours required for the Diploma in Adult Teacher Education must be completed at this University.

8) From Section 5 above a maximum of nine credit hours, completed before admission to the programme or the Faculty, may be used as credit toward the Diploma in Adult Teacher Education.

9) Students in the Adult Teacher Education diploma programme must have their courses and course sequence approved by the Office of Student Services.

10) The requirement for a specific course, or courses, may in special circumstances, and upon individual request, be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty Council of the Faculty of Education. Such waivers shall not reduce the total number of credits required for the Diploma.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DIPLOMA IN NATIVE AND NORTHERN EDUCATION IN LABRADOR (T.E.P.L.)

1) A Teacher Education Programme in Labrador, T.E.P.L., is offered by the Faculty of Education.

2) Admission to the TEPL programme requires a regular application for admission to Memorial University of Newfoundland and a special application for admission to the programme. Application forms may be obtained from the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland A1B 3X8.

3) The General Admission Requirements of the University as outlined in the Calendar will govern admission to the programme.

4) To be eligible for the Diploma in Native and Northern Education, a candidate shall complete a total of sixty credit hours as follows:

- A suitable History course at the first-year level though not History 1000-1001, to be designated.
- S/A 2220. Labrador Society and Culture.
- S/A 3210. Persistence and Change in Rural Society. (Same as Sociology 3210).
- English 100C. Survey of the English Language I. (T)
- English 101C. Survey of the English Language II. (T)
- One of Linguistics 2020, 2030, 2040.
- Education 2350. An Introduction to the Teaching of Mathematics in the Primary and Elementary Grades. (T) (P,E)
- Education 2182. An Introduction to the Teaching of Science in the Primary and Elementary Grades. (T) (P,E)
- Education 3321. Native Literature (T) (P,E,H)
- Education 2222. Teaching English as a Second Language. (T,M) (P,E,H)
- Education 2250. Educational Psychology. (H)
- Education 2361. School and Community. (T), (P,E,H)
- Education 3140. Creative Arts. (T) (P,E)
- Education 3281. Tests and Measurements. (T) (P,E)
- Education 4330. Curriculum and Instruction in Native and Northern Schools I. (T,M) (P,E,H)
- Education 2200. Introduction to Language Arts. (T) (P,E)
- Education 3001. Supervised Practice Teaching in the Native School I. (T) (P,E)
- Education 3002. Supervised Practice Teaching in the Native School II. (T) (P,E)
- One of Education 2230. Teaching Strategies in Native Schools - Primary Level. (T) (P); or Education 2240. Teaching Strategies in Native Schools - Elementary Level. (T) (E)
- Education 2194. Physical Education in the Primary and Elementary Grades. (P,E)

NOTES: 1) Courses designed for the TEPL programme (designated by T) are intended for students registered in this programme, but may be opened to other students upon permission of the Office of Student Services.

2) Students who obtain credit for Education 2230 (T) or Education 2240 (T) cannot obtain credit for Education 2245 (M).

3) Where appropriate, courses completed on this programme may be transferred to the B.Ed. (Primary), the B.Ed. (Elementary) or the conjoint degrees programmes.

REGULATIONS FOR THE DIPLOMA IN SCHOOL RESOURCE SERVICES

Regulations for a Diploma in School Resource Services:

1) A programme leading to the Diploma in School Resource Services is offered by the Faculty of Education.

2) To be admitted to the Diploma programme in School Resource Services, a student shall

a) have been admitted to the Faculty of Education at Memorial University,
b) have completed twelve credit hours in Education, and
c) normally have had at least two years experience as a classroom teacher.

3) Admission to the programme in School Resource Services requires a formal application. Application forms may be obtained by writing the Office of Student Services, Faculty of Education, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, A1B 3X8.

4) To be eligible for the Diploma in School Resource Services, a student must have

a) a degree in Education, or its equivalent, from a recognized university,
b) thirty credit hours as follows:
i. Education 3320, 3460, 3470, 3380, 3390, 3807, 3943.
ii. One of Education 3310, 3321, 3340.
iii. Education 3801 or 3480, 3802.

5) a) A maximum of twelve credit hours referred to in 4(b) above and counted toward the corequisite degree may also be counted toward the Diploma in School Resource Services. At least eighteen credit hours must be completed in addition to the corequisite degree.

b) Courses referred to in 5(a) must be in Learning Resources or related areas.

6) At least eighteen of the credit hours required under Clause 4 (b) must be completed at this University.

7) Students who have been admitted to the programme in School Resource Services must have their courses approved by the Office of Student Services.

NOTES: 1) Students should check with the Office of Student Services regarding equivalencies of former courses.

2) Either Education 3801 or Education 3480 is a prerequisite to Education 3802.

WAIVER OF REGULATIONS OF THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION

Regulations involving course prerequisites or corequisites, departmental regulations, and faculty regulations may be waived where circumstances so warrant. The routing of requests for such waivers and the procedure for appealing unfavourable decisions are outlined in the General Academic Regulations (Undergraduate) B and C.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Legend:

P: Courses for students on the PRIMARY Programme

E: Courses for students on the ELEMENTARY Programme

S: Courses for students on SECONDARY Programme

V: Courses for students on the VOCATIONAL EDUCATION Programme

I: Courses for students on the TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Programme

T: Courses for students on the T.E.P.L. Diploma Programme

A: Courses for students on the Diploma in ADULT TEACHER EDUCATION Programme

SE: Courses for students on the SPECIAL EDUCATION Programme.

NPE: Courses for students on the NATIVE AND NORTHERN Teacher Education Programme - Primary/Elementary route.

NS: Courses for students on the NATIVE AND NORTHERN Teacher Education Programme - Secondary route.

2022. The Teaching of Inuttut (NPE). Preparation of materials and classroom strategies for the teaching of Inuttut in Primary and Elementary schools in Native communities. Attention will be given to linguistic difficulties encountered in schools by children whose first language is English.

2032. The Teaching of Montagnais (NPE). Preparation of materials and classroom strategies for the teaching of Montagnais in Primary and Elementary schools in Native communities. Emphasis will be placed on instruction for students whose first language is Montagnais as well as a consideration of the difficulties associated with the teaching of Montagnais to students whose first language is English.

2040. Basic Interpersonal Communication (P,E). This course is designed to help students develop confidence through self-expression, and acquire skills in interpersonal relationships.

2041. Oral Communication (P,E). A basic course designed to give students an opportunity to develop proficiency in oral communication skills, including public speaking.

NOTE: A student may not get credit for both Education 2040 and Education 2041.

2050. Introduction to Drama Education (P,E). This course is designed to introduce students to the use of drama as a learning medium. Students will be expected to participate in and to critically analyse practical drama sessions in order to gain an understanding of the fundamental nature of drama. Students will be engaged in a variety of teacher devised drama structures to introduce them to the theory and practice of selected pioneers in the field. Reference will be made to some aspects of child development such as play, cognition, affect and language and their relationship to learning through drama. It is expected that students will begin to formulate a rationale for the use of drama education in their future classroom practice.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 2050 and the former Education 2030.

2150. Social Studies in the Primary Grades (P, NPE). An examination of various strategies appropriate for teaching the Social Studies concepts applicable to the Social Studies curriculum of the primary grades.

2182. An Introduction to the Teaching of Science in the Primary and Elementary Grades (T,NPE). An introductory course illustrating fundamental processes and concepts of Science, and how these may be communicated to the elementary child. Content will be chosen which relates to the prevailing elementary school Science programme. Typical concepts include measurement, energy in selected physical and biological systems, fundamental ecology, communities of living things, environmental change, the particulate nature of matter, and simple astronomy.

2193. Health and Safety Education in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). Students will examine the nature of health and safety education for pupils in the primary and elementary grades, with emphasis on: environment, school health services, and curriculum/instruction in health education/safety education. Classes for the most part will be conducted in workshop fashion with some attention to health science laboratory practices. All students enrolled in this course will have either to pass a basic first-aid course or to present some evidence of having successfully completed such a course.

2194. Physical Education in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E,NPE). The curriculum organization in physical education for the Primary and Elementary grades; instructional material and teaching techniques for these grades; creative, aesthetic, and health-developing aspects of physical education.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 2194 and the former Education 3070, or the former Education 2192 taken during the 1984-85 or 1985-86 academic years.

2200. Language Arts (P,E,T,NPE). An examination of the methods and materials used in the teaching of the language arts with special reference to the effect on the overall educational development of the child whose first language is not English.

2202. Education in Native and Northern Communities - An Overview (P,E,T,NPE,NS). A general introductory course for students planning to teach in a classroom where Indian and/or Inuit children are in attendance. Emphasis will be placed on creating an awareness of the religion, philosophy, cultural values and way of life of native peoples; the legal and administrative processes concerning native peoples from the past to the present; a historical perspective in native education; and contemporary issues and trends in native education. This course will provide the necessary foundation for the training of teachers who are sensitive to the influence of culture on the values, behaviour, needs and motivations of children.

2222. Teaching English as a Second Language (T,NPE,NS). This course includes selection and preparation of materials, and suitable classroom strategies for teaching English as a second language. Stress will be on the methods appropriate to cope with linguistic difficulties encountered in schools by children whose first language is not English.

2230. Teaching Strategies in Native Schools - Primary Level (T, NPE). A methods course designed to familiarize the teacher with techniques most appropriate to stimulate learning on the part of the primary school child.

2240. Teaching Strategies in Native Schools - Elementary Level (T,NPE). A methods course designed to familiarize the teacher with techniques most appropriate to stimulate learning on the part of the elementary school child.

2245. Teaching Strategies in Culturally Integrated and Geographically Isolated Classrooms (P,E). A study of the instructional strategies necessary to perform effectively in classrooms where children from various cultural backgrounds are taught.

2250. Educational Psychology (T,NS). A course designed to assist prospective teachers in acquiring competence in understanding and guiding physical, intellectual, emotional and social development, and in understanding the teaching-learning process through application of principles of learning, motivation, readiness, transfer, and individual differences.

2341. Directing Learning Experiences in Mathematics for Children in Primary and Lower Elementary Grades (P,E). A variety of teaching techniques will be explored. Prospective teachers will be expected to explore, devise and demonstrate a variety of manipulative aids to be used in providing effective learning experiences in Mathematics for all children. Some attention will also be given to diagnosing student difficulties and assessing student achievement.

Prerequisite: Education 3940 or equivalent.

2350. An Introduction to the Teaching of Mathematics in the Primary and Elementary Grades (T,NPE). Intuitive notions of a mathematical system with special emphasis on the concepts, basic mathematical properties and skills associated with the number systems of arithmetic. Additional topics will include relations, functions and basic concepts of Geometry related to the Mathematics programmes of the elementary school.

2360. School and Society (P,E). An examination of the role of the school in society. An introduction to the historical and social forces which have influenced the structure and processes of schooling, with special reference to Newfoundland education. A consideration of themes relevant to the study of the school in society. A critical discussion of selected issues and trends in education.

2361. The School and Community (T,NPE,NS). A study of the factors which constitute the educational setting in the native community in comparison with other cultural settings. The school as an institution of cultural transmission and cultural change within the Native and Northern setting will be investigated. An examination of roles played by local individuals and groups in the education process. Models to improve communication between school and the community will be studied.

2420. Educational Supervision (P,E,S). This course deals with the social process of working with people to achieve school goals, and effective styles and behaviours for promoting the professional growth of teachers. Included are such topics as leadership, development, use of motivational forces, developing professional attitudes, effective communication, and teacher involvement in organizational decision-making.

2430. Administration and Supervision in Native and Northern Education (NPE,NS). A study of the administrative structures involved in the education of children of Inuit and Indian backgrounds. The study examines the administrative structures of the past and present with particular reference to the problems which arise in the administration of schools in remote, isolated regions. Further, the study includes an overall examination of the alternative processes of education relevant to the philosophy of native people.

2510. Elementary School Music Methods. A course designed to introduce students to current philosophies and methodologies in the field of elementary classroom music. Students will examine materials currently available and be encouraged to develop and create their own. Emphasis will be on learning to evaluate materials as to suitability for musical concepts, class organizations, etc.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3180 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3180 and 2510 cannot be obtained.

2520. Voice and Choral Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for use with all levels of school choirs. In addition, this course will examine the anatomy and physiology of the changing voice as a basis for proper vocal development in the classroom setting.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3830 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3830 and 2520 cannot be obtained.

2530. Primary School Music Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for use in the Primary School music programme. The focus of this course will be on the Kodaly Method.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3815 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3815 and 2530 cannot be obtained.

2610. Introduction to Child Development (P,E,T,NPE). An introduction to the nature of physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development from birth to puberty. Emphasis is placed on individual differences and on the developmental bases for the selection of educational experiences offered children.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 2610 and the former Education 3240.

2710. Course Organization and Development (V,I,NS). The development of procedures for the identification of concepts in instructional units; analysis of tasks and identification of related competencies; development of resource units.

2720. Introduction to Vocational Education (V). Study of the background of Vocational Education and of its development and present forms in Newfoundland, other provinces of Canada, and other countries; an examination of current programmes in Vocational Education; the role of federal and provincial governments in Vocational Education.

2730. General Methods of Vocational Education (V,I). Introduction to the methodology of teaching psychomotor and cognitive skills; selection of appropriate methods for individual and group instruction; organizing laboratory and shop instruction; principles of instructional management.

2750. Introductory Materials and Processes (I). Theory and practice of selected technical skills in materials and processes and their practical application in the laboratory. Topics and practical activity will include production techniques using computer integrated design systems.

2751. Introductory Communications and Power Technology (I). Theory and practice of selected technical skills in communications and power and their practical application in the laboratory. Topics will include integrated systems approach involving electrical, mechanical and fluid power to explore power development, control, and use.

2800. Introduction to Adult Education (A). A review of the history of the Adult Education movement. The rationale for the investment of public or private resources in the education or training of adults. An examination of current educational philosophies related to Adult Education.

2801. The Adult as Learner (A,V). The implications for adult programmes and instructional strategies of difference among adults in abilities, attitudes, interests, skills, social roles.

2803. Educational Aspects of Adult Development (A,V). An examination of the educational aspects of adult development from early adulthood through middle age to later maturity.

2806. Sociology of Adult Education (A). This course explores the sociological context of adult learning. The interrelationship between particular social factors (e.g., age, sex, occupational structure) and the need for adult educational programmes are studied. The potential effects of such programmes on society are examined with reference to community development. Special emphasis is given to societal change as it relates to education as a way of life.

2900. Introduction to Statistics in Education (P,E,S). This laboratory course takes a practical case study approach to survey and quasi-experimental quantitative methods in education, together with supporting statistical concepts of probability, descriptive and inferential statistics sampling and sampling distributions, correlation and bivariate regression.

3001. Supervised Practice Teaching in Native Schools I (T). A four (4) month period as a teaching assistant involved in the preparation of teaching materials, teaching assigned lessons and participating in other activities related to the duties of a teacher. This session is to be under the direction of a co-operating teacher and a university professor.

3002. Supervised Practice Teaching in Native Schools II (T). A four (4) month continuation of the experiences provided in Education 3001 with added responsibilities, and increased development of competencies essential for teaching.

Prerequisite: Education 3001.

3005. Principles and Practices of Teaching (Primary) (P). This course will provide opportunity to examine various styles and models of teaching at the primary level through involvement in on-campus and field-based activities. It will also focus on the development of techniques and skills associated with planning and directing of a variety of learning experiences for pupils in the primary schools.

3006. Principles and Practices of Teaching (Elementary) (E). This course will provide opportunity to examine various styles and models of teaching at the elementary level through involvement in on-campus and field-based activities. It will also focus on the development of techniques and skills associated with planning and directing of a variety of learning experiences for pupils in the elementary school.

3009. Drama Education in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). The course will focus on the practice and acquisition of the basic teacher skills and strategies that are particularly appropriate to the effective implementation of drama as a learning medium in the primary and elementary grades.

Prerequisite: Education 2050.

3010. Drama Education and the Curriculum in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). This course is designed to enable students to use the acquired drama education, skills and strategies in the service of the broadly-based curriculum of the primary and elementary school.

Prerequisite: Education 3009.

3030. Methods in Speech Improvement in the Schools (P,E). The course includes the mechanism and production of speech sounds, the development of speech in children, normal speech, retarded and deviant speech, individual and group correction of voice and articulation defects, recognition of serious abnormal conditions and referral services available. Use will be made of the Speech Laboratory.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in Speech at the 2000 level (or an equivalent course in Speech under former numbering).

3040. The Assessment and Development of Children's Language Abilities (P,E,SE). This course will focus on techniques for assessing language abilities in primary and elementary grade children and will provide models for developing strategies in implementing language instruction appropriate to children's needs.

Prerequisite: Education 3540 or Education 3545, or former Education 2110 or Education 2120, or another course in developmental reading.

NOTE: This course is recommended for all candidates who anticipate working as resource-based special education teachers.

3050. The Teaching of French as a Second Language in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). An introduction to the general principles of second-language teaching, to the curriculum materials currently prescribed for use in the schools, and to a consideration of teaching strategies and evaluation techniques associated with these materials.

Prerequisite: French 2101.

3052, 3053. Institute for Teachers of Core French in the Elementary Grades (E). This institute, which will be taught in French, is designed to provide Elementary teachers with the theory and practice necessary to teach the Grades 4, 5, and 6 Core French programme. Topics include the aims and objectives of Elementary Core French for the Province, theories of second language acquisition, general principles of second language teaching, and specific strategies for teaching listening, speaking, reading and writing. The Institute will also include the teaching of culture in the second language programme. Teachers will become familiar with materials currently prescribed for use in Elementary Core French and will prepare lesson plans based on these materials. Evaluation techniques and activities will also be covered.

Prerequisite: French 2101.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for Education 3050 and 4153 in addition to credit for this Institute. Students who have completed one of these courses may receive three credit hours for the Institute.

3080. Group and Audience Communication (P,E). A course designed to develop the ability to communicate. Topics will include communication theory, the social influence of speech, barriers to human understanding, and parliamentary procedure. Different aspects of public address and discussion will be practiced and use will be made of the Speech Laboratory.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in Speech at the 2000 level (or an equivalent course in Speech under former numbering or permission of the instructor).

3081. Communication Skills and Techniques in a Cross-Cultural Environment (P,E). Various communication models will be reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on developing an increased awareness of self and others, and coping with such feelings as shyness and isolation. Concepts of individuality and community will be explored in the light of working in an isolated cross-cultural environment. The course is designed to improve communication in a cross-cultural situation between teacher and teacher, teacher and parent, teacher and child.

3120. Foundations of Art Education (P,E,NS). The principal objectives of this course are to develop an understanding of art in relation to current theories of education and art education and to provide individual exploration of an experience in appropriate techniques. Curriculum will be examined with the focus on understanding how to provide favorable conditions and experiences for high quality individual development in visual expression.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3120 and the former Education 2020, the former Education 3110, or the former Education 3112.

3121. Education Through Art (P,E,NS). This course encourages versatility with selected materials and will include an exploration of the relationship between theory in art education and practical curriculum planning.

Prerequisite: Education 3120.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3121 and the former Education 2021 or the former Education 3111.

3122. Fundamentals of Design for Teachers (P,E). This course builds upon previous student experience and may involve individual exploration of mediums according to the needs of the student as a professional teacher. Further emphasis will be placed on the needs of the classroom, school, and community.

Prerequisite: Education 3121 or permission of the instructor.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3122 and the former Education 2022.

3130. Music in the Primary Grades (P,NPE). This course is concerned with basic musical knowledge for the primary teacher, with emphasis on practical application in the classroom through song, movement, and simple melody and rhythm instruments.

NOTE: This course may not be used for credit towards the Bachelor of Music (Conjoint) and Bachelor of Music Education Degrees Programme.

3140. Creative Arts (T,NPE). A study of the relationship of music, art and drama to the teaching-learning process with emphasis on native content. An activity-centred approach will be emphasized.

3150. Bilingualism: Linguistic, Cognitive and Educational Aspects (P,E). (Same as Linguistics 3150). This course gives a comprehensive review of the major issues associated with bilingualism and second language education. It involves an interdisciplinary approach that will introduce students to the developments and major research findings in the field. Topics may include the bilingual mind, societal attitudes to bilingualism, issues in second language education and the evaluation of programmes.

Prerequisites: Linguistics 2150 or permission of the instructor.

3160. Basic Music in the Elementary Grades (E,NPE). This course is concerned with basic musical knowledge for the elementary teacher and is designed to explore classroom music through part-singing, listening, reading, playing, creating, and responding.

NOTE: This course may not be used for credit towards the Bachelor of Music (Conjoint) and Bachelor of Music Education Degrees Programme.

3180. Practical Music in the Classroom (P,E,NPE). A more advanced treatment of the topics dealt with in Education 3130 and 3160. The emphasis is on group music-making in the classroom.

Prerequisite: Education 3130 or 3160.

NOTE: Beginning in the 1995 Winter, this course will be offered in the in the Winter Semester of odd-numbered years.

3190. General Classroom Music (P,E,NPE). Organization and implementation of a classroom music programme for all grade levels with emphasis on creativity and developing musical perception through listening. (A knowledge of music rudiments is helpful but is not required.)

NOTE: This course may not be used for credit towards the Bachelor of Music (Conjoint) and Bachelor of Music Education Degrees Programme.

3210. An Introduction to Guidance Services (P,E,S). An introduction to guidance services in the modern school with specific emphasis on its history, purpose, basic concepts and principles, and services. Students are introduced to the nature of counselling, ways of developing effective interpersonal relationships within the school environment, and the role of the school counsellor and other educational personnel in the provision of guidance services.

3211. Introduction to Career Education (E,S). This course is an introduction to contemporary concepts and practices of career education and to theories of career development. Emphasis is on the practical application of theory and basic principles to the design and delivery of career education programmes and to career counselling. Attention will be given to continuing career counselling and career development needs of individuals as well as to groups with special needs.

3220. A Study of Exceptional Children - Intellectual Differences (P,E). This course studies the intellectually different child. Emphasis is given to such areas as developmental delay, mental retardation, learning disabilities, intellectual giftedness and creativity. Specific concerns include etiology, identification, characteristics, expectancies, and current and emerging practices in the provision of educational and community programmes.

3230. A Study of Exceptional Children - Physical, Sensory and Behavioural Differences (P,E). This course studies children with visual, auditory, speech, neurological, orthopaedic, social, and behavioural disabilities. Areas of concern include the nature of the disability, etiology, identification, educational/learning implications and general home, school and community programmes.

3255. Child Abuse and the School-Age Child (P,E,S). This course will discuss the general issues of child abuse including definitions, detection, reporting, protection, prevention, and the educational implications of child abuse. A number of specific issues including provincial policies presently in force in Newfoundland and Labrador and elsewhere will be examined. The teacher's role in collaboration between officials in education, social work, health and justice agencies will be explored with a view to preventing abuse and modifying the circumstances of abused children.

3270. Science in the Primary Grades (P). A practical course designed to develop approaches to Science teaching based on student investigation of scientific phenomena. Examples are drawn from the provincial curriculum and several other major curricula.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3270 and the former Education 2180.

3275. Science in the Elementary Grades (E). A practical course designed to develop approaches to Science teaching based on student investigation of scientific phenomena. Examples are drawn from provincial curriculum and several other major curricula.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3275 and the former Education 2180.

3276. The Teaching of Science in the Junior High School (E). A laboratory course designed to develop an approach to Science teaching based on student investigation of scientific phenomena. Examples are drawn from the provincial curriculum. Major emphasis is placed upon Grades 7 to 9.

Prerequisites: Eighteen laboratory Science credit hours and either of Education 3270/3275 or Education 3171.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3276 and the former Education 2181.

3277. The Teaching of Environmental Science (P,E). A course designed to familiarize students with current methods and materials for teaching environmental science from K to 9. This course will include instruction and practice in strategies appropriate to teaching environmental science through classroom and field experiences. The focus is on strategies for developing students' awareness of and knowledge about living and nonliving resources of the environment. Regular outdoor field activities will be part of the course.

Prerequisite: At least three credit hours in science teaching methods.

NOTE: This course will not replace any required science methods course.

3280. Educational Assessment (P,E). A study of the broad spectrum of educational assessment focusing specifically on the development of objectives, the construction and use of formal teacher-made tests, the use of informal assessment techniques, the interpretation and application of assessment data, continuous evaluation, criterion-referenced measurement, and emerging trends in assessment.

3281. Tests and Measurements (T,NPE,NS). Basic concepts of evaluation involving teacher-made and standardized tests, with particular reference to validity and reliability in cross-cultural situations.

3290. Psychological Tests and Measurements (P,E,S). Basic concepts of measurement and evaluation applied to the school situation; a general consideration of the nature and appraisal of scholastic aptitude, special aptitude, interest and personality. Sample tests in each of these areas will be examined. The use of non-test appraisal devices and pupil record systems will be considered.

3305. Language Arts in the Primary Grades (P). This course is concerned with the four aspects of the language arts (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and the developmental nature of language. Specific emphasis will be placed upon the importance of developing facility in listening and speaking as a foundation for developing competence in reading and writing. Instruction will also emphasize the interdependence of receptive and expressive language.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3305 and the former Education 2210.

3310. Literature for Children in Primary Grades (P). This course is designed to familiarize primary teachers with literature for young children. Books suitable for children in the primary grades are examined, an attempt is made to develop criteria for evaluating such books, and methods of integrating them into the primary programme are explored. Students in the course are expected to acquire first-hand knowledge of a large number of books for this age group.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3310 and the former Education 2060.

3315. Language Arts in the Elementary Grades (E). This course is concerned with selected basic elements of language development. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of oral and written composition, along with strategies and materials for the implementation of this knowledge. A degree of emphasis will be placed upon the analysis of oral and written modes of communication.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3315 and the former Education 2220.

3320. Literature for Children in the Elementary Grades (E). This course is designed to introduce students to the wide range of books written for elementary children and to aid students in the development of criteria for evaluating them. Included for study will be fantasy, poetry, modern realistic fiction, folktales, and animal stories.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3320 and the former Education 2065.

3321. Native Literature (T,NPE). An examination of Native literature with special emphasis on writings of Native peoples for Native children. Literature which presents the native point of view will be examined in the light of historical and current developments in Native and Northern conditions.

3370. Primary Curriculum (P). A study of curriculum in the primary grades. The course examines programmes and programme development for young children. It focuses on the child, the teacher, teaching styles, and the learning environment. It also examines current issues and recent research in early childhood education.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3370 and the former Education 4110.

3375. Curriculum in the Elementary Grades (E). An examination of the curriculum of the elementary school from the perspective of factors which influence the development of curriculum. Students will examine patterns of curriculum organization and their implications for interaction among pupils, teachers and curriculum materials.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3375 and the former Education 4340.

3380. An Introduction to the School Resource Centre - Organization, Administration and Services (P,E). A study of the school resource centre as an integral part of the school programme. Consideration will be given to the efficient operation of the school resource centre, the services to be provided to both staff and students, and the acquisition, circulation and maintenance of materials.

3390. Selection of Materials for the School Resource Centre (P,E). A study of the fundamental principles and practices involved in the selection of both print and non-print materials. Included will be the development of selection criteria and selection policies, the identification and use of standard selection aids, and consideration of problem areas in selection.

3410. Comparative Educational Administration (P,E). A study of the organization and administration of education in Canada and in selected countries, with special reference to the degree of centralization and decentralization of control.

3420. School Law for Teachers (P,E). An analysis of statutory enactments and judicial opinions regarding educational matters. Special consideration will be given to case law dealing with the rights of students to an education, to adequate supervision, to freedom of expression, and a degree of confidentiality with regard to school records. Questions dealing with teacher liability and professional and personal rights of teachers, particularly those outlined in collective agreements, will also be examined.

3430. General Methods of Instruction of Adults (A). A study of the various processes of Adult Education: discussion groups, case studies, role playing, individual and group discovery, demonstrations, simulation exercises, action research, report writing and lectures.

3440. Organization and Administration of Programmes in Adult Education (A). Alternative provincial or regional methods of organization for the provision of Adult Education. The statutory framework within which Adult Education functions.

3460. Cataloguing and Classification of Instructional Materials (P,E). A study of the principles of cataloguing, subject analysis, and classification; the application of these principles in relation to appropriate systems with particular reference to the Dewey system; cataloguing of both print and audiovisual materials.

3470. Information Services of a School Resource Centre (P,E). A study of the reference collection and other literature necessary to provide information services; the provision of information services from the community.

3480. Introduction to Learning Resources (P,E). An overview of the processes of communication in learning and the use of resources, with emphasis on the processes that use instructional materials; the place of the school library in providing learning resources to teachers and students; the principles and the practices of using available learning resources; and the application of computers to education.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3480 and Education 3801.

3510. Current Approaches to the Teaching of Reading in the Primary Grades (P). This course will include a further examination of approaches to, and materials used in, the teaching of reading in the primary grades.

Prerequisite: Education 3540 or another course in developmental reading.

3520. Current Approaches to the Teaching of Reading in the Elementary Grades (E). This course will include further examination of approaches to the teaching of reading in the elementary grades.

Prerequisite: Education 3545 or another course in developmental reading.

Education 3530, 3531, 3532. Reading Institute Courses (P,E). . This Institute is a nine credit hours in Reading. The Institute is designed for primary and elementary school teachers who desire further training in Reading instruction. It will be concerned with instructing teachers in a variety of approaches for the teaching of Reading on a developmental and remedial level. In general, instruction will be geared to acquaint teachers with certain current methodologies in the teaching of Reading. Specific instruction will be directed towards developing teacher competence in the areas of diagnosis, systematic instructional planning, the utilization of the language-experience approach, the development of learning activity centers and techniques of evaluation. The Institute will combine in-depth instruction, aimed at meeting the specific needs of classroom teachers, with a practicum experience. Participating teachers will be required to demonstrate their understanding of and competence with the teaching methodologies presented in this Institute. The demonstration of this understanding will be presented by each teacher in an actual small group and one-on-one teaching situations involving school age students.

3540. Reading in the Primary Grades (P). This course is concerned with the teaching of reading in the primary grades, with special emphasis on pre-reading development, reading readiness, and beginning reading instruction. A degree of emphasis will also be placed upon diagnosis as an integral part of the ongoing instructional process aimed at preventative rather than corrective reading approaches.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3540 and either Education 3542 or the former Education 2110.

3542. Reading in the Primary and Elementary Grades (NPE). This course is concerned with the teaching of reading in the primary and elementary grades. Special attention is given to the learning needs of children whose first language is not English. Emphasis is placed upon understanding the nature of the reading process and the current practices used in classroom reading instruction for kindergarten through grade six.

NOTE: Credit for this course is restricted to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) Degree Programme. Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3542 and either Education 3540 or Education 3545.

3545. Reading in the Elementary Grades (E). In this course emphasis is placed upon the nature of the reading process, current practices in classroom reading instruction and specific instructional strategies for the implementation of these approaches. Consideration is also given to the utilization of supplementary materials, preventative and corrective reading approaches, content area reading techniques and evaluation in the reading programme.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3545 and either Education 3542 or the former Education 2120.

3560. Comparative Education (P,E). An examination of world trends in education, involving detailed studies of educational systems of different countries.

3563. The Sociology of Teaching (P,E). This course is a study of sociological theory and research relating to the teaching process, with emphasis on analysis of the structure and process of teaching, on school life and social environments bearing upon the teaching process, on social dimensions of the curriculum, and on sociological perspectives of student assessment.

3565. Gender and Schooling (P,E,S). This course is an introduction to the study of gender and education. It includes a historical overview of the link between gender and schooling as well as an examination of contemporary theoretical perspectives and research relating to the role of the school in gender development in general and gender inequality in particular. Implications for educational policy and practices will also be explored.

3570. History of North American Education (P,E,S). Development of education in North America; the role of the church in early Canadian education; education after Canadian Confederation; the growth of the Newfoundland denominational system of education.

3571. The History of Education in Newfoundland Since 1800 (P,E,S). A survey of the main trends in the development of the educational system; the social, religious and demographic factors which have affected educational progress; the place of education in the cultural development of Newfoundland.

3573. History of Native and Northern Education in Canada (P,E,NPE,NS). Educational processes at work in Indian and Inuit society before and after the arrival of the non-native are examined. The attempts at schooling are described and analyzed. An examination is made of the origins of the contemporary issues in Indian and Northern Education.

3580. Education and Culture (P,E). This course is an examination of the nature of culture, the transmission of culture through education, the cultural component of education in traditional and modern societies, and the implications of sub-group cultures for schooling. The relationship among Newfoundland society, culture and education will also be studied.

3582. Education of Minority Groups (P,E). A study of practices, policies and theories in the education of minority groups from the perspective of the Foundations disciplines (especially the History and Sociology of Education, and Comparative Education), with special application to Native and Northern Education in Newfoundland and Labrador.

3585. Multiculturalism and Education (P,E,S). A study of historical, social and philosophical background to multiculturalism and the implications for education in Canada.

3590. Moral Education (P,E). An exploratory course which attempts to foster understanding of the nature and scope of moral education by (a) focusing on issues and problems affecting morality and on their bearing on moral education, and by (b) offering an overview of contemporary moral development theories and research, educational strategies, and relevant curricular materials.

3600. Academic and Behavioral Evaluation (SE). This course applies the theories of test development in establishing a competent understanding of the utilization of diagnostic and prescriptive instruments as well as teacher-made tests as they apply to the area of exceptional children.

3610. Nature and Characteristics of Mental Retardation (SE). The objectives of the course are an understanding of the nature and characteristics of mental retardation and the psychosocial implications of this area of exceptionality.

3615. Introduction to Human Learning (P,E,NPE). An introduction to psychological explanations of human learning and an examination of their implications for educational practice.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3615 and Education 2250, except where Education 2250 has been completed prior to the 1985 Fall Semester.

3620. Behaviour Problems of Children and Adolescent: Nature and Characteristics (P,E,SE). This course will include an examination of procedures for the early identification of children with behavioural disabilities and major systems of classification of behaviour problems. It will also include an analysis of: aberrant adjustment mechanisms, deviant development and specified behaviour problems with implication for therapeutic education.

Prerequisite: Education 3220 or 3230, or 4240.

3630. Nature and Characteristics of Learning Disabilities (SE). Survey of characteristics as well as problems of identification, and the evaluation of children who are potentially average or above in intelligence, but who are failing to learn in the school environment; and who are manifesting such behaviours as lack of motor development, auditory and visual perceptual handicaps, language deficiencies and behaviour control disorders.

NOTE: Students who have completed the former Education 3231 may not take Education 3630 for credit.

3640. Problems and Issues in Special Education (P,E,SE). This course consists of a study of special and selected problems related to the teaching of special education with particular emphasis placed on special education within the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Prerequisite: Education 3220 or 3230.

365X. Extended Harlow Practicum in Special Education (SE). (Equivalent to 15 credit hours in Special Education.) This course is a full semester school placement in a special educational environment at Harlow, England. It consists of an extensive supervised teaching component with opportunities for student analysis of and reflections on their field experiences. There are also seminars, field visits and guest lecturers intended to develop a cross-cultural perspective on exceptionality and special education in Britain and Canada.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least eighteen credit hours in the Degree Programme in Special Education including Education 3600. Students must also apply to be selected for this course.

3650. Practicum in Special Education (SE). This course encompasses practicum for Special Education students in any of the areas of exceptionality with opportunity for supervised participation in public school, private school, or institutionalized Special Education programmes. The main emphasis will be on supervised diagnosis and remediation on a one-to-one basis between the practicum student and the exceptional child. Case conferences and seminars will be held regularly throughout the term.

Prerequisite: Completion of eighteen Special Education credit hours including Education 3600.

3660. A Study of the Gifted Child (P,E,SE). An examination of the nature and characteristics of gifted children, with emphasis upon methods of identifying gifted children, implications of giftedness for learning and instruction and reviews of several educational programmes for the gifted.

3670. The Interaction of Culture and Learning (SE). A survey of the effects of cultural background on learning and development in the North American context. Aspects of learning and development theory which assist culturally different children to realize their potential within the educational structure will be examined.

3680. Behaviour Therapy for Children and Adolescents in Educational Settings (SE). This course will examine: methods of behavioural assessment; specific cognitive, respondent and operant behaviour therapy techniques. Behaviour problems and change programmes will be considered within an ecological context and the role of non-professionals as therapeutic agents will be studied.

3690. Working with Parents of Exceptional Children (SE). This course examines the wide range of personal, social, and educational problems and concerns encountered by parents of exceptional children. Emphasis is on the skills, strategies and understanding essential to establishing constructive parent-teacher relationships, guiding parental use of resources, encouraging participation in remedial programmes and enhancing the care and support provided at home.

3700. Student Teaching in Technology Education (I). This will involve a supervised experience of observing, participating in and teaching Industrial Arts in a multiple activity laboratory and will include participation in seminars and in a two-week block of student teaching after the final examination.

3710. Group Instruction in Vocational Education (V,I). An indepth study of various methods of group instruction; planning and presenting demonstration teaching units; practice in techniques of group instruction.

3720. Individualized Instruction in Vocational Education (V,I). A study of the various systems of individualized instruction; the theoretical basis for individualizing courses, individual differences, organizing individualized courses, selection and development of materials; management of individual student progress.

3730. Curriculum and Instructional Development in Vocational Education (V,I). Social, cultural, philosophical, and economic forces influencing changes in vocational curriculum and instructional methods. Study of current Vocational Education curriculum designs, problems and trends; methods of gathering curriculum information; procedures for revising and evaluating a curriculum.

3750. Intermediate Materials and Processes (I). Theory and practice of selected intermediate technical skills and in materials and processes and their practical application in the laboratory. Advanced topics will include in-depth view of emerging manufacturing practices.

3751. Intermediate Communications and Power Technology (I). Theory and practice of selected intermediate technical skills in communications and power and their practical applications in the laboratory. Topics will include emerging means of communicating information and advanced energy control systems.

3801. Educational Media I. Students are introduced to audio visual communications with emphasis on equipment operation and basic local production of instructional materials; and the application of computers to education. A two-hour laboratory period will be arranged after the first class period.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3801 and Education 3480.

3802. Education Media II (P,E). This laboratory course involves theories of communication, philosophy of educational media and advanced local production of instructional materials.

Prerequisite: Education 3801 or Education 3480.

3807. Learning Resources, Curriculum and Instruction (P,E). A study of the functions of learning resources in the teaching-learning processes; the role of the learning resource teacher as a member of the instructional team; examples of ways by which the learning resource teacher can work with classroom teachers and students to achieve common goals.

3815. Practicum in Kodaly I (P,E). An intensive practical course in the application of the pedagogical principles and materials of Zoltan Kodaly in the classroom.

3915. Practicum in Kodaly II (P,E). An intensive practical course in the application of the pedagogical principles and advanced materials of Zoltan Kodaly in the classroom.

3920. Instrumental Teaching Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for teaching brass, woodwinds, and percussion in the classroom.

Lectures: Three hours per week plus laboratory.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3820 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3820 and 3920 cannot be obtained.

3925. Secondary School Music Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for teaching Music in the secondary schools.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3930 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3930 and 3925 cannot be obtained.

3940. Mathematics in Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). A general overview of aspects of teaching Mathematics in the primary and elementary grades. Theories of child development as they relate to Mathematics teaching, characteristics of Mathematics topics in primary and elementary grades, and the implications for teaching will be the major topics to be discussed in this course.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1050/1051 or at least six Mathematics credit hours which are part of a Mathematics concentration.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3940 and the former Education 2340, the former Education 2310, or the former Education 2320.

3941. Diagnosing and Directing Learning in Primary and Elementary Mathematics (P,E,SE). A study of aspects of diagnosis and remediation in primary and elementary Mathematics, and of the basis for constructing and applying diagnostic techniques. An examination, development, and application of a variety of manipulative aids to be used in the teaching of Mathematics in the primary and elementary grades.

Prerequisite: Education 3940.

3942. Mathematics Teaching in Small Primary and Elementary Schools (P,E). The course will include a brief overview of mathematics teaching techniques in primary and elementary grades. Emphasis in the course will be placed on the identification of mathematics objectives in primary and elementary grades, and on teaching strategies appropriate in multigraded classrooms. Mathematics concepts across grades levels and mathematics in a thematic setting will also be investigated.

Prerequisite: Education 3940 or equivalent.

3943. Curricular Uses of Computers (P,E,S,NS). This laboratory course will explore the role of computing technology as a source of learning experiences in the school curriculum. The focus of the course will be on the ways teachers can use computers profitably in lessons, using drill and practice, simulation, animation and demonstration. A detailed examination of computer-assisted learning materials will be made, including criteria for the selection and evaluation of such materials. The relation of computer software to theories of learning and teaching will be explored in some depth. Neither the writing of software nor the theory of operation of computers will be part of the course.

Education 3945, 3946 Institute in Teaching of Junior High School Mathematics Courses (E). This Institute will focus on the nature of junior high Mathematics instruction and how it should differ from elementary and high school instruction. Emphasis will be placed on the transition between informal and formal approaches to the teaching of junior high Mathematics. The Van Hiel levels and their implications for instruction in geometry will be discussed.

Activities appropriate to the teaching of junior high Mathematics will be developed and demonstrated. A particular focus in this component of the Institute will be on activities appropriate to the new programme and how they can be integrated into the junior high Mathematics curriculum.

Prerequisite: Education 3940 (or equivalent) or Education 4161 (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor.

3950. The Assessment of Primary Children (P). An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing the behaviours that influence the educational development of primary school children. The course will survey several aspects of assessment such as professional issues concerning assessment, basic principles of assessment, standardized assessments, teacher-made assessments, applications of assessment information, and the implications of assessment for the primary school curriculum.

3955. The Assessment of Elementary Children (E). An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing the behaviours that influence the educational development of elementary school children. The course will focus on the nature of assessment; the production, administration and evaluation of teacher-made tests; evaluation by observational methods; and the interpretation and application of standardized test scores.

3960. Social Studies in the Elementary Grades (E,NPE). Students will examine selected pedagogical themes related to the teaching of Social Studies in the elementary grades. They will examine the content of the Social Studies curriculum with a view to identifying appropriate methods of instruction which may be employed. Class sessions will essentially be conducted in the workshop mode of learning rather than as lectures.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3960 and the former Education 2160.

4005. Effective Teaching (S). This course is an introduction to the principles and practices of effective teaching. Topics include decision making, classroom management, planning, general models of teaching such as direct teaching and inquiry-based instruction, and specific teaching strategies such as questioning, grouping, and discussion techniques. Provision will be made for students to engage in simulated teaching.

401X. Undergraduate Teaching Internship (P, E). (Equivalent to fifteen credit hours in Education.) Designed as an extended practicum affording students an opportunity to integrate theory and practice in a working situation, the internship consists of intensive classroom experience extending over one semester during the final stage of the programme. During this period, students will be provided with educational experiences in which the interrelationships among the components of the university programme are brought into focus through the teaching exercise.

The internship is intended to help students develop their individual style of teaching, to enable students to recognize the scope and complexity of a classroom teacher's role and responsibility, and to provide opportunities for the study of children as individuals and in groups, both in the classroom and other school settings.

Beginning with orientation activities early in the semester, students' responsibilities will include observing and analyzing teaching- learning activities, preparing and presenting student-learning activities, assessing both personal and class progress, and participating in discussions with co-operating teachers and faculty advisers. Throughout the internship semester, students will be required to participate in seminars related to in-school work.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the professional year. Students doing a concentration in French must have completed the courses in French required under the regulations for this concentration, and Education 3050.

Students on the French Immersion Option of the B.Ed. (P,E) must have completed the courses in French required under the regulations for the concentration in this option, and Education 4155.

Prospective interns for the Fall Semester should apply not later than March 15; prospective interns for the Winter Semester should apply not later than September 30. Prospective interns for the spring semester should apply not later than October 15. Applications received after these dates will be considered in terms of the number of spaces available.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 401X and the former Education 302X.

4020. Issues and Trends in Native Education (NPE,NS). A seminar course dealing with research, current problems and issues associated with Native Education within a Canadian, and in particular, a Newfoundland and Labrador context.

403X. Internship in Music Education. (Equivalent to 15 credit hours in Education). One-semester internship in three rotating in-school segments wherever possible, to permit student teaching experiences in choral, classroom and instrumental teaching situations in the primary, elementary and secondary schools.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 403X and Education 401X or the former Education 302X.

404X. Internship in Native and Northern Education (NPE,NS). (Equivalent to fifteen credit hours in Education). A one-semester internship in a school setting that will enable students to become directly involved in the teaching/learning process through observation and practice. Activities during the semester will involve seminars to assist students in the assessment of teaching methodologies most appropriate for the curriculum in Native schools. Student placement will be in a school setting depending upon the programme route which students have followed.

Prerequisite: See Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) Degree Regulations.

405X. Internship in the Secondary School (S). (Equivalent to fifteen credit hours in Education). The Internship is an extended practicum which is school based. The purpose of the Internship is to provide opportunities for Interns to apply theories of teaching and learning in classroom settings, to develop effective teaching practices and to become reflective practitioners. The responsibility for the professional development and evaluation of the Intern is shared between a classroom teacher and a University Supervisor.

4120. The Teaching of Art in the Secondary School (S). This course examines current philosophies and methodologies in teaching art. Topics include curriculum implementation, organization and management, evaluation, safety, and advocacy.

4121. Teaching Theatre Arts in Secondary School (S). The course will examine the place of Theatre Arts in secondary schools; the relationship between Theatre Arts and Drama in Education; and the most appropriate methods for the effective teaching of Theatre Arts.

4142. The Teaching of English Language and Literature in the Secondary School I (S). This course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of English language and literature. Topics that will be considered include the nature and structure of language and literature programmes, text analysis, the writing of non-fiction proses, media literacy, and oracy.

4143. The Teaching of English Language and Literature in the Secondary School II (S). This course builds upon the principles of effective teaching. It examines the use of writing, reading, speaking, and listening to support the teaching of various literary genre.

4144. Advanced English Teaching Methodology (S). Building upon the experiences gained in the internship, this course examines the reading and writing workshop approach to the study of English language and literature.

4150. The Teaching of Core French in the Secondary School (S,NS). This course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of Core French. Topics include an introduction to the nature and purpose of the Core French programme, an overview of approaches to second language teaching, basic principles and practices of the current teaching approaches, techniques for teaching, and characteristics of second language lesson planning.

4151. Advanced Core French Methodology (S,NS). This course is an in-depth analysis of the nature and purpose of the Core French programme. Topics include a brief overview of the history of French teaching methodologies, an introduction to the research literature, an evaluation of techniques, and a consideration of issues facing the teaching of Core French.

4152. Current Issues in the Teaching of Second Languages (E). This course examines some of the experimental programmes in progress, trends in second language teaching and curriculum development, and the implications of current research in second language teaching for the classroom teacher, with particular reference to developments in French.

Prerequisite: Education 3050 or 4150.

4153. The Teaching of Culture in French Second Language Programmes (E). This course is designed to help students acquire strategies for teaching culture in the core French programme using curriculum materials currently prescribed for schools.

Attention will also be given to supplementary activities suitable for use with second-language learners.

Prerequisite: Education 3050 or Education 4150.

NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Education 4153 and the former Education 3045.

4155. Introduction to Teaching in French Immersion in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). Brief overview of the development of French Immersion programmes; aims and objectives of French Immersion; evaluation of the extent to which objectives and materials can reflect those of the regular English classroom; analysis of differences between teaching in the French Immersion classroom and the core French, the French mother tongue, and the regular English classrooms; general teaching strategies appropriate to the level of French language development in the immersion setting.

NOTE: This course will be conducted in French.

4156. Introduction to Teaching in French Immersion in the High School (S). This course gives an introduction to the nature and purpose of the French immersion programme at the senior high school level. Topics include: an overview of the development of French immersion, basic principles of French immersion education, an analysis of teaching language through subject matter, strategies specific to the immersion classroom; texts currently prescribed for use in the schools; techniques for teaching literature.

Prerequisites: Education 4150, a major in French, and three semesters of study in an approved francophone institution, or permission of the instructor.

4161. The Teaching of Mathematics in the Secondary School (S,NS). This course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of mathematics. Topics include the purpose of mathematics, theories of learning mathematics, and lesson planning and evaluation.

4163. Advanced Mathematics Methodology (S,NS). This course builds upon the principles of effective teaching and the teaching of mathematics to address specific issues related to the teaching and learning of mathematics in the high school.

4164. Institute in the Teaching of Computer Studies Course. This Institute is designed to assist practicing teachers who intend to implement the programme in Computer Studies in Newfoundland high schools and will include both a presentation of basic concepts in Computer Science and a consideration of techniques and skills used in the teaching of Computer Studies in the high schools. Topics to be covered will include: the history of Computer Science, common terminology related to computer technology, an introduction to problem solving and programming the BASIC language, the impact of computers in society. Instruction will take several forms, including formal lectures, small group discussions, and the use of micro-computers.

4168. The Teaching of Computer Science in the Secondary School (S,NS). This course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of selected areas of computer science. Topics include theories of learning applied to computer science, lesson planning, special issues in classroom management, and evaluation.

4170. The Teaching of Physics in the Secondary School (S,NS). This laboratory course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of Physics. Topics include place and purpose of Physics in secondary schools, examination of Physics curricula and planning, development, evaluation and the teaching of Physics.

4171. The Teaching of Chemistry in the Secondary School (S,NS). This laboratory course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of Chemistry. Topics include an examination of chemistry curricula, strategies specific to the teaching of chemistry, laboratory management, planning, development, and evaluation of the teaching of chemistry.

4172. Advanced Science Education Methodology (S). This course builds upon the principles of effective teaching and subject-specific methods courses, examines the experiences gained in the internship, and introduces significant and advanced ideas related to science teaching.

4180. The Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School I (S,NS). This course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of Social Studies. Topics include the nature and purpose of social studies education, specific teaching strategies, the examination of the selection and use of learning resources for the Social Studies, unit planning, development, and evaluation.

4181. The Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School II (S,NS). This course examines the teaching of specific disciplines in Social Studies. Topics include the nature of the particular discipline, secondary school courses in the discipline, and teaching strategies appropriate to the disciplines.

4182. Advanced Social Studies Methodology (S). This course analyzes students' experiences in the internship, examines recent research in the teaching of social studies, considers alternative approaches to the teaching and learning of social studies, and explores current issues in the field.

4190. The Teaching of Physical Education in the Secondary School (S). This course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of physical education. Topics include the nature and purpose of physical education, an examination of the physical education curriculum, an analysis of quality daily physical education, approaches to teaching physical education, and evaluation of progress in physical education.

4203. The Teaching of Religious Education in the Secondary School (S). This course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of Religious Education. Topics include formulating objectives, examining theories of faith and moral development, selecting and using resources, and evaluating learning.

4204. Advanced Religious Education Methodology (S). This course builds upon the principles of effective teaching and religious education to address further the major historical issues and contemporary theories. Topics include a reflection on the internship experience, an examination of the theories of religious education, and an analysis of the foundations of religious education.

4205. Religious Education in Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). An introductory study of aims and objectives, subject matter, curriculum materials, teaching methods, learning experiences, and evaluation for Religious Education courses.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 4205 and the former Education 2080.

4220. The Teaching of Inuttut I (NS). A variety of teaching techniques will be explored and materials developed to assist in the teaching of Inuttut in Native Schools at the High School Level.

Problems associated with second-language teaching will be explored.

Prerequisite: At least twelve credit hours in Inuttut.

4221. The Teaching of Inuttut II (NS). Continued exploration of teaching techniques and material development for the teaching of Inuttut at the High school level with emphasis on linguistic difficulties encountered in Native schools by children whose first language is English.

Prerequisite: Education 4220.

4230. The Teaching of Montagnais I (NS). A variety of teaching techniques will be explored and materials developed to assist in the teaching of Montagnais in Native schools at the High School level.

Prerequisite: At least twelve credit hours in Montagnais.

4231. The Teaching of Montagnais II (NS). Continued exploration of teaching techniques and material development for the teaching of Montagnais at the High school level. Linguistic difficulties encountered by students whose first language is not Montagnais will be explored.

Prerequisite: Education 4230.

4240. An Introduction to the Exceptional Learner (S). This course is an introduction to the nature of exceptionality in the student. Topics include an examination of special needs resulting from exceptionality, approaches to meeting the special needs, issues of exceptionality, and a consideration of selected categories of exceptionality.

4242. Identification and Remediation of Learning Difficulties (S). This course examines the identification processes and remediation techniques appropriate for dealing with student learning difficulties. Topics include identification of learning difficulties, the process of programme planning, and the application of teaching and learning strategies to specific subject areas.

4250. Teaching French Language Arts in French Immersion Programmes in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). Aims and objectives of French language teaching in the French immersion classroom; teaching and evaluation techniques relating to the reading curriculum in French immersion programmes; relationships between oral and written expression in French, and an analysis of some problems related to these relationships; practical work with curriculum materials used in the teaching of French language arts in the French immersion programmes, especially those used in Newfoundland schools.

NOTE: All classes and the evaluation procedures will be conducted in French.

4251. Teaching of French Language in the General Curriculum of the French Immersion Programmes in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). An examination of the general curriculum in French immersion programmes relating to the language used in these materials and the age of the child; language needed for adequate comprehension of the curriculum materials in French immersion programmes; activities for enhancing language learning in general through the curriculum areas in the French immersion classroom suitable to the age of the child at these grade levels; practical work with the materials used in the teaching of the general curriculum in French immersion programmes, especially those used in Newfoundland schools.

Secondary school teachers interested in this Institute should check the Regulations for the Conjoint Degrees of Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Arts.

NOTE: All classes and the evaluation procedures will be conducted in French.

4252, 4253 Institute in the Teaching of Social Studies in French Immersion Courses (P,E). This institute is designed to help teachers in French Immersion Programmes acquire skills to teach Social Studies in the Primary, Elementary, or High School Grades. Topics include: an overview of the evolution of the educational system in Newfoundland and Labrador; an examination of the French Immersion Curriculum; the aims and objectives of French Immersion in relation to the goals and objectives of Social Studies; the nature and purpose of the Social Studies; principles of the teaching of Social Studies; an examination of the scope and sequence of the Social Studies curriculum in relation to the child's mental development; methods for teaching and evaluating skills to be developed through the Social Studies curriculum; the integration of Social Studies for enhancing French second language acquisition; practical work with the materials used in the Social Studies curriculum for French Immersion in Newfoundland and Labrador.

NOTE: All classes and evaluation procedures will be conducted in French.

Education 4254, 4255 Institute in the Teaching of Mathematics in French Immersion Courses (P,E). This Institute is designed to help teachers in French Immersion programmes acquire the skills to teach Mathematics in the grades Kindergarten to eight. Topics include: introduction to the Mathematics curriculum in the Province; aims and pedagogical alternatives for teaching areas such as numeration, decimals, fractions, measurement, geometry, problem solving, and evaluation. The course will emphasize the use of concrete materials. Practical work with the Mathematics curriculum in Newfoundland and Labrador will be included. Problems specific to the teaching of Mathematics in the Immersion classroom, such as counting, money, time, the division algorithm will be included, as well as questions related to Mathematics terminology and the second language competence of the learner.

Students on the conjoint B.A., B.Ed. degree programme are eligible to take these courses under regulation 3(i).

NOTE: All classes and evaluation procedures will be conducted in French.

4260. The Nature of Late Adolescence (S). This course examines the nature of late adolescence. Topics include an introduction to development theories, an examination of the considerations for teaching and learning, and an analysis of the issues and concerns of the classroom teacher.

4261. Human Learning Theories and Their Application to the Instructional Process (S). This course explores the application of learning theory to the instructional process. Topics include an historical review of learning theory and its application to education, an analysis of contemporary models and research on how young adults learn, and an examination of the factors that shape the translation of research findings into instructional applications.

4270. The Teaching of Biology in the Secondary School (S,NS). This laboratory course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of Biology. Topics include place and purpose of Biology in secondary schools, examination of Biology curricula and planning, development, evaluation and the teaching of Biology.

4271. The Teaching of Earth Science in the Secondary School (S,NS). This laboratory course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of Earth Science. Topics include place and purpose of Earth Science in secondary schools, examination of Earth Science curricula and planning, development, evaluation and the teaching of Earth Science.

4275. Environmental Education Across the Curriculum (S). This course examines various international and Canadian initiatives, models, curricula, and programmes in environmental education and explores effective methods of developing environmental awareness through the various content areas of elementary and secondary education.

4320. Teaching Strategies in Native - Secondary Level (NS). A methods course designed to familiarize the teacher with the techniques most appropriate to stimulate learning on the part of the secondary school student.

4330. Curriculum and Instruction in Native and Northern Schools I (T,NPE,NS). Principles of and techniques for curriculum development will be reviewed. Adaptation or reformulation of these will be made in the light of the needs and desires of native peoples. Critical analysis will be made of curriculum resources presently in use. Instructional materials will be prepared and produced with emphasis on printed materials relevant to the experiential background of the Indian and Inuit child.

4331. Curriculum and Instruction in Native and Northern Schools II (P,E,NPE,NS). An in-depth examination of innovations in curriculum and instruction in native communities within Canada. Emphasis will be placed on projects in curriculum planning and the development of instructional material, to be conducted in conjunction with school personnel already in the field. This course would serve as a valuable resource to school systems involved in curriculum planning and instructional development.

4340. Literature for Young Adults (S). This course is designed to explore literature for young adults and its integration into the content areas. Topics include an examination of the nature of literature for young adults, the literary genres, research on the reading interests of young adults, issues treated in young adult literature, and an historical overview of available young adult literature.

4350. Reading in the Content Areas (S). This course examines the nature of reading in subject-specific areas such as history, biology, and mathematics. Topics include the role of the teacher in the teaching of content in different areas, evaluating vocabulary, grammar, usage and text structure for instruction, and analyzing the variety of strategies for reading, writing and studying.

4352. Language Across the Curriculum (S). This course analyzes the relationship between language and thought. Topics include the forms and uses of language, unique subject-area demands upon language, the complementary nature of oracy and literacy, and evaluation.

4354. Writing in the Secondary School (S). This course analyzes the relationship between writing and learning. Topics include an examination of the variety of approaches to the teaching of writing, the role of the teacher in the teaching of writing, the composing process, and the evaluation of writing.

4356. Learning Through Drama (S). This course introduces drama as a valuable teaching and learning strategy. Topics include an examination of the foundations, values, and assumptions of drama as an effective means of curriculum implementation in subjects such as English, Social Studies, and Science.

4360. Sociology of Education (P,E). A study of sociological theories and sociological research bearing on education, involving an analysis of social structures and social pressures relating to education.

4361. Teaching and the Contemporary Classroom (S). This course is an introduction to the institutional and social context of teaching. Topics include the role of school in society, the organization and administration of schools, the dynamics of classroom culture, and school observation.

4370. History of Education (P,E). An examination of the main themes and movements in the history of education as well as the ideas of significant education theorists. Significance of the above for current educational theory and practice.

4380. Philosophy of Education (P,E). A study of the philosophical bases of education, selected philosophical theories of education, and philosophical issues and concepts in education practice.

4381. Perspectives on Schooling (S). This course examines educational theory and practice within the context of sociological, historical, and philosophical perspectives on schooling. Topics include the purpose of education, the formation of knowledge, and an analysis of issues such as equality of opportunity, and educational reform and change.

4382. Critical Thinking and Knowledge in Education (S). This course examines various conceptions of the nature of critical thinking and its role in the acquisition, justification, and production of disciplinary knowledge. Topics include the nature of critical thinking, the uses of language in reasoning and communication, criteria and principles of reasoning within the various disciplines, methods and strategies of problem-solving, negotiation, and decision-making, and the teaching and assessment of critical thinking.

4420. Legal and Moral Issues in Education (S). This course examines educational law and sources of conventional morality for the purpose of clarifying individual stances on legal and moral issues. Topics include the nature and theoretical bases of law and morality in education, the legal foundations of the Canadian education system, the legal and moral rights and responsibilities of teachers and students, and teacher liability.

4425. Introduction to Educational Administration (P,E,S). An examination of the roles of various levels of government in Education; theories of administration; management as it relates to curriculum, organization, personnel, finance, and communication; and their implications for teachers in the Newfoundland context.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 4425 and the former Education 2410.

4430. Seminar: Current Issues in Native and Northern Affairs (P,E). This course provides the student with an opportunity to integrate many of the ideas and notions expressed in other course work and in practical experience. The development of native political groups, the impact of the native person on the fabric of Canadian society, will be examined in a positive, objective light. In this particular course, a tremendous opportunity presents itself to invite native peoples and/or political leaders to share with students ideas, beliefs, or experiences vis-a-vis the development of Canadian native persons within the Canadian society.

4440. Teaching and Learning Mathematics in the Junior High School Years (E). Mathematics programmes for junior high school children will be discussed as will teaching techniques suitable for students of this age. Attention will be placed on how children of this age group learn Mathematics with emphasis given to the use of various physical models and aids. Diagnostic teaching procedures will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: Education 3940 or Education 4161.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 4440 and the former Education 3440 or the former Education 3441.

4450. Practicum in Adult Education (A). On-the-job supervised activities designed to have the student implement the theory and principles of Adult Education.

4480. Learning Resources in the Secondary School (S). This course examines the role and use of learning resources in the curriculum. Topics include an introduction to resource-based learning, an examination of the use and place of a Learning Resource Centre, and selection, development and evaluation of learning resources.

4505. Life Skills for Developmentally Disabled Adolescents and Young Adults (SE). This course will focus upon the application of educational procedures relevant to the successful employment and community adjustment of mildly and moderately developmentally disabled adolescents and young adults. Senior special education programmes and materials directed toward personal life-skills development and work-study experience in both open-community and protected work situations will be reviewed.

4510. Educational Procedures for Children with Mild Mental Disabilities (SE). Consideration will be given to: the establishment of objectives; selection, development and review of materials; the use of various instructional procedures; and the provision of appropriate experiences for the education of children with mild mental disabilities at the primary, elementary and senior levels.

Prerequisite: Education 3610.

4515. Educational Procedures for Children with Moderate Mental Disabilities (SE). This course will consider objectives, the development of programmes, and the use of various instructional procedures for the education of children with moderate mental disabilities. Emphasis will be given to the development of skills necessary for participation in the home and community as well as in the classroom setting.

Prerequisite: Education 3610.

4520. Psychoeducational Interventions for Behaviour Problems of Children and Adolescents (SE). This course will examine programmes and strategies for children with behaviour disabilities. These will include: counselling skills, case conferences, structured learning environments and therapeutic interventions for specific behaviour problems. In addition, consideration will be given to articulation with mental health specialists and procedures to develop readiness for return to regular instructional programmes.

Prerequisite: Education 3620.

4525. Educational Procedures for Severely and Multiply Handicapped Persons (SE). The focus of this course is the specialized teaching and care of persons with severe and multiple handicaps. Emphasis is placed on assessment and instructional techniques and on the changing needs of severely and multiply handicapped persons across the life span. Adaptations of the home and school environment needed by severely and multiply handicapped persons, including the use of adaptive physical aids, is also considered.

Prerequisite: Education 3610.

4530. Educational Procedures for the Learning Disabled Child (SE). An examination of individual and classroom remedial techniques developed for the amelioration of specific learning disabilities.

Prerequisite: Education 3630.

4540. Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Disabled Persons (SE). This course will examine the various augmentative and alternative communication systems currently used to aid individuals who have difficulty communicating for reasons other than deafness, such as, cerebral palsy, severe developmental delay and autism. Emphasis will be on the technical, educational, psychosocial and linguistic aspects of these strategies with stress on the development of the ability for social interaction.

4541. Communication for the Deaf (P,E,SE). An introductory course in communication strategies employed with the Deaf and Hearing Impaired. Language acquisition by individuals with normal hearing and individuals with impaired hearing will be explored and contrasted through an analysis of a variety of modes. A laboratory component of the course is designed to impart a degree of skill in practical usage of American Sign Language and Finger Spelling. The primary emphasis will be on manual systems of communication common to the deaf, as well as those systems in use as supplementary instructional methods at Schools for the Deaf.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the Special Education Degree programme or permission of the Instructor.

4542. Instructional Applications of Communication Systems for Children with Severe Communication Disorders (SE). (Offered only as part of the Institute in Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Disabled Persons). (Please refer to the Calendar Section, Institutes in Education below).

4543. Educational Psychology of Hearing Impairment (SE). This course presents a broad overview of the effects of hearing impairment on individuals. Emphasis is on the effects of impaired linguistic environments; the cognitive, social, and emotional development of hearing impaired children and adults; the use and adaptation of assessment procedures; and the administration, organization, and delivery of instructional programmes.

Prerequisite: Education 3230 or equivalent.

4550. Student Teaching in Special Education (SE). This will involve a supervised experience of observing, participating in, and teaching Special Education classes in selected schools. Provision will be made for an analysis and application of lesson types and the utilization of classroom procedures as well as responsibility for the total classroom environment. Seminars will be held regularly throughout the term.

Prerequisites: One of Education 4510, 4515, 4520, 4530 and permission from the Office of Student Services.

4580. Secondary Education and Culture (S). This course examines the nature of culture and its relationship to society and education. Topics include the process of cultural transmission through education, the significance of student culture in schooling, the influence of culture on curriculum decision-making, and cross-cultural ideology and practice in secondary education.

4600. Educational Research (P,E,S). An introduction to the methodology of educational research through lectures, seminars and laboratory experiences; participation in on-going research projects; special applications to education of design; computer technology and statistical procedures.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in Statistics and the consent of the instructor.

4610. The Nature and Management of Stress (P,E,S). This course studies the nature of stress as it is manifested in the teacher and the teaching profession, and provides approaches to coping effectively with the factors which are related to that stress. Topics include the nature of the human stress response, causes and symptoms of stress (personal and professional), self-assessment techniques, and a selection of approaches available to cope with the stress typically related to the roles and expectancies of teaching.

4700. Student Teaching in Vocational Education (V). Applying theories of education in the learning situation; observation and demonstration of lessons; seminars in teaching techniques.

4710. Seminar in Vocational Education (V). The identification, analysis and discussion of major issues, practices and problems in Vocational Education in Newfoundland and Canada.

4720. Principles and Management of Technology Education Programmes (V,I,E,NS). Study of contemporary approaches to the administration, organization, and teaching of Industrial Arts programmes; their application in Newfoundland; and the management of programmes in Industrial Arts laboratories.

4730. Educational Programmes and Practices in Industry and Labour (V). A study of the various Vocational Education programmes operated either wholly by industry and labour or jointly with educational institutions; apprenticeship, work experience and study programmes, co-operative education, training-in-industry, training on-the-job, supervisory training, management development.

4750. Advanced Materials and Processes (I). Theory and practice of selected advanced technical skills in materials and processes and their practical applications in the laboratory. Topics will include home technology and marine technology.

4751. Advanced Communications and Power (I). Theory and practice of selected advanced technical skills in communications and power and their practical application in the laboratory. Topics include mechanical, digital and fluidic systems.

4752. Technology Education, Specialized (I). Theory and practice of selected specialized technical skills and their practical application in the laboratory.

NOTE: A modular approach will be used for each of the twenty-one technical skills credit hours. Students who can demonstrate competency in a particular module will be allowed to substitute another module in its place. Students must select the substitute module in consultation with the Office of Student Services.

4760-4780. Advanced Specialized Vocational Technologies (V). The theory and practice of selected advanced specialized vocational education technical skills and their application to the laboratory, workshop and business office. Emphasis will be placed on innovative and emerging techniques in selected areas of business, industry, and the service occupations.

4800. Laboratory Band (MUNLAB BAND) (E). A laboratory course designed to provide practical band experience and methodology. A study will be made of materials and methods available for continued development of band instruments in the classroom.

4810. Advanced Elementary Music Education Methods (E). Advanced methods and materials for teaching Music in Kindergarten to 6.

4820. Advanced Secondary School Music Education Methods. Advanced methods and materials for teaching Music education (theory, general Music, and chorus), Grades 7-11.

4830. Music Education Seminar. A detailed examination of the foundations of Music education common to all levels and types of school Music. Topics include curriculum development, evaluation, psychology and philosophy of Music education and the Music teacher's administrative responsibilities.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used for credit under Regulation 2A (h) or Regulation 2B (f) of the former degree regulations.

4835. Orchestra Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for school string programmes.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3870 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3870 and Education 4835.

4840. Advanced Band Methods. Advanced pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for the development and management of the school instrumental programmes.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used for credit under Regulation 2A (h) or Regulation 2B (f) of the former degree regulations.

4845. Pre-school Music Education. A course designed to provide students with a working knowledge of materials, equipment, and basic skills which are effective in teaching Music to young children.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3900 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3900 and Education 4845 cannot be obtained.

4850. Advanced Primary School Music Methods. Advanced pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for the primary school Music programme.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3915 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3915 and Education 4850 cannot be obtained.

4855. Advanced Elementary School Music Methods. A course designed to examine advanced methods and materials for teaching Music in the elementary school. Emphasis will be on developing a methodology suited to the individual teacher.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 4810 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 4810 and Education 4855 cannot be obtained.

4860. Advanced Secondary School Music Methods. Advanced pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for the secondary school Music programme.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 4820 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 4820 and Education 4860 cannot be obtained.

4943. Computing Technology in Mathematics Education in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P, E). The course will explore the impact of computing technology on Mathematics curriculum and instruction. Topics will include the role of computers and calculators in developing mathematical concepts, computational skills and mathematical problem-solving processes; the use of computer animation and simulation to enhance Mathematics instruction; and, the evaluation and adaption of commercially developed software for Mathematics instruction. An in-depth look at LOGO and available CAL materials will be included.

Prerequisite: Education 3940.

4944. Computing Technology in Mathematics Education in the Secondary School Grades. The course will explore the role of the computer as a provider of learning experiences in the high school Mathematics curriculum. The focus of the course will be on CAL in Mathematics and will investigate drill and practice, tutoring, simulation, animation, and demonstration. The role of the computer in communication and testing in Mathematics will be included.

Prerequisite: Education 4161.

4945. Computers in Education (S). This course examines the use of computer-based technology across the curriculum. Topics include an introduction to hardware and operating systems, learning through computers, use and evaluation of computer software, and an examination of specific curriculum issues.

4950. Evaluation of Teaching and Learning (S). This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of evaluating teaching and student learning in the classroom. Topics include the nature of classroom assessment; the production, administration, interpretation, and evaluation of teacher-made tests; assessment of student products and performances by direct observation; grading and reporting progress; and the application of assessment results to the improvement of teaching.

STUDENT TEACHING

3001. Supervised Practice Teaching in Native Schools I (T). A four (4) month period as a teaching assistant involved in the preparation of teaching materials, teaching assigned lessons and participating in other activities related to the duties of a teacher. This session is to be under the direction of a co-operating teacher and a university professor.

3002. Supervised Practice Teaching in Native Schools II (T). A four (4) month continuation of the experiences provided in Education 3001 with added responsibilities, and increased development of competencies essential for teaching.

Prerequisite: Education 3001.

3005. Principles and Practices of Teaching (Primary) (P). This course will provide opportunity to examine various styles and models of teaching at the primary level through involvement in on-campus and field-based activities. It will also focus on the development of techniques and skills associated with planning and directing of a variety of learning experiences for pupils in the primary schools.

3006. Principles and Practices of Teaching (Elementary) (E). This course will provide opportunity to examine various styles and models of teaching at the elementary level through involvement in on-campus and field-based activities. It will also focus on the development of techniques and skills associated with planning and directing of a variety of learning experiences for pupils in the elementary school.

3700. Student Teaching in Technology Education (I). This will involve a supervised experience of observing, participating in and teaching Industrial Arts in a multiple activity laboratory and will include participation in seminars and in a two-week block of student teaching after the final examination.

401X. Undergraduate Teaching Internship (P, E). (Equivalent to fifteen credit hours in Education.) Designed as an extended practicum affording students an opportunity to integrate theory and practice in a working situation, the internship consists of intensive classroom experience extending over one semester during the final stage of the programme. During this period, students will be provided with educational experiences in which the interrelationships among the components of the university programme are brought into focus through the teaching exercise.

The internship is intended to help students develop their individual style of teaching, to enable students to recognize the scope and complexity of a classroom teacher's role and responsibility, and to provide opportunities for the study of children as individuals and in groups, both in the classroom and other school settings.

Beginning with orientation activities early in the semester, students' responsibilities will include observing and analyzing teaching- learning activities, preparing and presenting student-learning activities, assessing both personal and class progress, and participating in discussions with co-operating teachers and faculty advisers. Throughout the internship semester, students will be required to participate in seminars related to in-school work.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the professional year. Students doing a concentration in French must have completed the courses in French required under the regulations for this concentration, and Education 3050.

Students on the French Immersion Option of the B.Ed. (P,E) must have completed the courses in French required under the regulations for the concentration in this option, and Education 4155.

Prospective interns for the Fall Semester should apply not later than March 15; prospective interns for the Winter Semester should apply not later than September 30. Prospective interns for the spring semester should apply not later than October 15. Applications received after these dates will be considered in terms of the number of spaces available.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 401X and the former Education 302X.

403X. Internship in Music Education. (Equivalent to 15 credit hours in Education). One-semester internship in three rotating in-school segments wherever possible, to permit student teaching experiences in choral, classroom and instrumental teaching situations in the primary, elementary and secondary schools.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 403X and Education 401X or the former Education 302X.

404X. Internship in Native and Northern Education (NPE,NS). (Equivalent to fifteen credit hours in Education). A one-semester internship in a school setting that will enable students to become directly involved in the teaching/learning process through observation and practice. Activities during the semester will involve seminars to assist students in the assessment of teaching methodologies most appropriate for the curriculum in Native schools. Student placement will be in a school setting depending upon the programme route which students have followed.

Prerequisite: See Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) Degree Regulations.

405X. Internship in the Secondary School (S). (Equivalent to fifteen credit hours in Education). The Internship is an extended practicum which is school based. The purpose of the Internship is to provide opportunities for Interns to apply theories of teaching and learning in classroom settings, to develop effective teaching practices and to become reflective practitioners. The responsibility for the professional development and evaluation of the Intern is shared between a classroom teacher and a University Supervisor.

4700. Student Teaching in Vocational Education (V). This course description may be found in the Vocational Education section.

WAIVER GUIDELINES OF EDUCATION 3700, 4700, POST-SESSIONAL BLOCK, 401X

1) Students who have at least one year of teaching experience and who produce written reports from their former principal or other appropriate authority to the Office of Student Services certifying the quality of their experience to be satisfactory may be excused, at the discretion of the Office of Student Services the post-sessional block of student teaching.

2) Students who have at least three years of teaching experience, and who produce written reports from their former principal or other appropriate authority to the Office of Student Services, certifying the quality of their experience may be excused from one of Education 3700 or 4700.

Students requesting a waiver of Education 3700 must have completed at least one of these three years in Technology Education Teaching. Students requesting a waiver of Education 4700 must have completed at least one of these three years in Vocational Education teaching.

3) Education 401X may, in special circumstances and upon individual request, be waived by the Office of Student Services in accordance with the guidelines listed below. Students requesting waiver should apply in writing and submit evidence of the following:

a) Permanent certification and tenure.

b) A minimum of five years teaching experience (or equivalent) in an environment appropriate to the degree sought.

c) Recommendation from an individual in an administrative position i.e. School Principal or Superintendent, attesting to the satisfactory quality of the teaching experience.

Students whose requests for waiver of the internship are approved must substitute in its place fifteen appropriate credit hours in Education. These replacement credit hours will be determined by the Office of Student Services on an individual basis and must be approved by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies.

4) Students who are excused from taking the student teaching course must substitute in its place an appropriate course in Education to make up the required total for the degree.

5) Applications for waiver of student teaching in whole or in part not covered by these guidelines must be submitted to the Office of Student Services.

COURSES IN MUSIC EDUCATION

In order to ascertain which courses are appropriate for the Bachelor of Music Education degree programme and the semesters in which specific courses will be offered, students should check with the Office of Student Services.

2510. Elementary School Music Methods. A course designed to introduce students to current philosophies and methodologies in the field of elementary classroom music. Students will examine materials currently available and be encouraged to develop and create their own. Emphasis will be on learning to evaluate materials as to suitability for musical concepts, class organizations, etc.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3180 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3180 and 2510 cannot be obtained.

2520. Voice and Choral Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for use with all levels of school choirs. In addition, this course will examine the anatomy and physiology of the changing voice as a basis for proper vocal development in the classroom setting.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3830 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3830 and 2520 cannot be obtained.

2530. Primary School Music Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for use in the Primary School music programme. The focus of this course will be on the Kodaly Method.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3815 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3815 and 2530 cannot be obtained.

b>3130. Music in the Primary Grades (P,NPE). This course is concerned with basic musical knowledge for the primary teacher, with emphasis on practical application in the classroom through song, movement, and simple melody and rhythm instruments.

NOTE: This course may not be used for credit towards the Bachelor of Music (Conjoint) and Bachelor of Music Education Degrees Programme.

3160. Basic Music in the Elementary Grades (E,NPE). This course is concerned with basic musical knowledge for the elementary teacher and is designed to explore classroom music through part-singing, listening, reading, playing, creating, and responding.

NOTE: This course may not be used for credit towards the Bachelor of Music (Conjoint) and Bachelor of Music Education Degrees Programme.

3180. Practical Music in the Classroom (P,E,NPE). A more advanced treatment of the topics dealt with in Education 3130 and 3160. The emphasis is on group music-making in the classroom.

Prerequisite: Education 3130 or 3160.

NOTE: Beginning in the 1995 Winter, this course will be offered in the in the Winter Semester of odd-numbered years.

3190. General Classroom Music (P,E,NPE). Organization and implementation of a classroom music programme for all grade levels with emphasis on creativity and developing musical perception through listening. (A knowledge of music rudiments is helpful but is not required.)

NOTE: This course may not be used for credit towards the Bachelor of Music (Conjoint) and Bachelor of Music Education Degrees Programme.

3815. Practicum in Kodaly I (P,E). An intensive practical course in the application of the pedagogical principles and materials of Zoltan Kodaly in the classroom.

3915. Practicum in Kodaly II (P,E). An intensive practical course in the application of the pedagogical principles and advanced materials of Zoltan Kodaly in the classroom.

3920. Instrumental Teaching Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for teaching brass, woodwinds, and percussion in the classroom.

Lectures: Three hours per week plus laboratory.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3820 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3820 and 3920 cannot be obtained.

3925. Secondary School Music Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for teaching Music in the secondary schools.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3930 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3930 and 3925 cannot be obtained.

403X. Internship in Music Education. (Equivalent to 15 credit hours in Education). One-semester internship in three rotating in-school segments wherever possible, to permit student teaching experiences in choral, classroom and instrumental teaching situations in the primary, elementary and secondary schools.

NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Education 403X and Education 401X or the former Education 302X.

4800. Laboratory Band (MUNLAB BAND) (E). A laboratory course designed to provide practical band experience and methodology. A study will be made of materials and methods available for continued development of band instruments in the classroom.

4810. Advanced Elementary Music Education Methods (E). Advanced methods and materials for teaching Music in Kindergarten to 6.

4820. Advanced Secondary School Music Education Methods. Advanced methods and materials for teaching Music education (theory, general Music, and chorus), Grades 7-11.

4830. Music Education Seminar. A detailed examination of the foundations of Music education common to all levels and types of school Music. Topics include curriculum development, evaluation, psychology and philosophy of Music education and the Music teacher's administrative responsibilities.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used for credit under Regulation 2A (h) or Regulation 2B (f) of the former degree regulations.

4835. Orchestra Methods. Current pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for school string programmes.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3870 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit may not be obtained for both Education 3870 and Education 4835.

4840. Advanced Band Methods. Advanced pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for the development and management of the school instrumental programmes.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used for credit under Regulation 2A (h) or Regulation 2B (f) of the former degree regulations.

4845. Pre-school Music Education. A course designed to provide students with a working knowledge of materials, equipment, and basic skills which are effective in teaching Music to young children.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3900 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3900 and Education 4845 cannot be obtained.

4850. Advanced Primary School Music Methods. Advanced pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for the primary school Music programme.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 3915 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 3915 and Education 4850 cannot be obtained.

4855. Advanced Elementary School Music Methods. A course designed to examine advanced methods and materials for teaching Music in the elementary school. Emphasis will be on developing a methodology suited to the individual teacher.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 4810 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 4810 and Education 4855 cannot be obtained.

4860. Advanced Secondary School Music Methods. Advanced pedagogical practices, procedures and materials for the secondary school Music programme.

Lectures: Three hours per week.

NOTE: This course may be used to replace Education 4820 in the requirements for the former degree regulations. Credit for both Education 4820 and Education 4860 cannot be obtained.

COURSES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

These courses are designed for students admitted to the Degree programme in Special Education.

3040. The Assessment and Development of Children's Language Abilities (P,E,SE). This course will focus on techniques for assessing language abilities in primary and elementary grade children and will provide models for developing strategies in implementing language instruction appropriate to children's needs. Acceptance to the programme is not required to enrol in this course.

Prerequisite: Education 3540 or Education 3545, or former Education 2110 or Education 2120, or another course in developmental reading.

NOTE: This course is recommended for all candidates who anticipate working as resource-based special education teachers.

3600. Academic and Behavioral Evaluation (SE). This course applies the theories of test development in establishing a competent understanding of the utilization of diagnostic and prescriptive instruments as well as teacher-made tests as they apply to the area of exceptional children.

3610. Nature and Characteristics of Mental Retardation (SE). The objectives of the course are an understanding of the nature and characteristics of mental retardation and the psychosocial implications of this area of exceptionality.

3620. Behaviour Problems of Children and Adolescent: Nature and Characteristics (P,E,SE). This course will include an examination of procedures for the early identification of children with behavioural disabilities and major systems of classification of behaviour problems. It will also include an analysis of: aberrant adjustment mechanisms, deviant development and specified behaviour problems with implication for therapeutic education. Acceptance to the programme is not required to enrol in this course.

Prerequisite: Education 3220 or 3230, or 4240.

3630. Nature and Characteristics of Learning Disabilities (SE). Survey of characteristics as well as problems of identification, and the evaluation of children who are potentially average or above in intelligence, but who are failing to learn in the school environment; and who are manifesting such behaviours as lack of motor development, auditory and visual perceptual handicaps, language deficiencies and behaviour control disorders.

NOTE: Students who have completed the former Education 3231 may not take Education 3630 for credit.

3640. Problems and Issues in Special Education (P,E,SE). This course consists of a study of special and selected problems related to the teaching of special education with particular emphasis placed on special education within the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Acceptance to the programme is not required to enrol in this course.

Prerequisite: Education 3220 or 3230.

3650. Practicum in Special Education (SE). This course encompasses practicum for Special Education students in any of the areas of exceptionality with opportunity for supervised participation in public school, private school, or institutionalized Special Education programmes. The main emphasis will be on supervised diagnosis and remediation on a one-to-one basis between the practicum student and the exceptional child. Case conferences and seminars will be held regularly throughout the term.

Prerequisite: Completion of eighteen Special Education credit hours including Education 3600.

365X. Extended Harlow Practicum in Special Education (SE). (Equivalent to 15 credit hours in Special Education.) This course is a full semester school placement in a special educational environment at Harlow, England. It consists of an extensive supervised teaching component with opportunities for student analysis of and reflections on their field experiences. There are also seminars, field visits and guest lecturers intended to develop a cross-cultural perspective on exceptionality and special education in Britain and Canada.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least eighteen credit hours in the Degree Programme in Special Education including Education 3600. Students must also apply to be selected for this course.

3660. A Study of the Gifted Child (P,E,SE). An examination of the nature and characteristics of gifted children, with emphasis upon methods of identifying gifted children, implications of giftedness for learning and instruction and reviews of several educational programmes for the gifted. Acceptance to the programme is not required to enrol in this course.

3670. The Interaction of Culture and Learning (SE). A survey of the effects of cultural background on learning and development in the North American context. Aspects of learning and development theory which assist culturally different children to realize their potential within the educational structure will be examined.

3680. Behaviour Therapy for Children and Adolescents in Educational Settings (SE). This course will examine: methods of behavioural assessment; specific cognitive, respondent and operant behaviour therapy techniques. Behaviour problems and change programmes will be considered within an ecological context and the role of non-professionals as therapeutic agents will be studied.

3690. Working with Parents of Exceptional Children (SE). This course examines the wide range of personal, social, and educational problems and concerns encountered by parents of exceptional children. Emphasis is on the skills, strategies and understanding essential to establishing constructive parent-teacher relationships, guiding parental use of resources, encouraging participation in remedial programmes and enhancing the care and support provided at home.

3941. Diagnosing and Directing Learning in Primary and Elementary Mathematics (P,E,SE). A study of aspects of diagnosis and remediation in primary and elementary Mathematics, and of the basis for constructing and applying diagnostic techniques. An examination, development, and application of a variety of manipulative aids to be used in the teaching of Mathematics in the primary and elementary grades. Acceptance to the programme is not required to enrol in this course.

Prerequisite: Education 3940.

4505. Life Skills for Developmentally Disabled Adolescents and Young Adults (SE). This course will focus upon the application of educational procedures relevant to the successful employment and community adjustment of mildly and moderately developmentally disabled adolescents and young adults. Senior special education programmes and materials directed toward personal life-skills development and work-study experience in both open-community and protected work situations will be reviewed.

4510. Educational Procedures for Children with Mild Mental Disabilities (SE). Consideration will be given to: the establishment of objectives; selection, development and review of materials; the use of various instructional procedures; and the provision of appropriate experiences for the education of children with mild mental disabilities at the primary, elementary and senior levels.

Prerequisite: Education 3610.

4515. Educational Procedures for Children with Moderate Mental Disabilities (SE). This course will consider objectives, the development of programmes, and the use of various instructional procedures for the education of children with moderate mental disabilities. Emphasis will be given to the development of skills necessary for participation in the home and community as well as in the classroom setting.

Prerequisite: Education 3610.

4520. Psychoeducational Interventions for Behaviour Problems of Children and Adolescents (SE). This course will examine programmes and strategies for children with behaviour disabilities. These will include: counselling skills, case conferences, structured learning environments and therapeutic interventions for specific behaviour problems. In addition, consideration will be given to articulation with mental health specialists and procedures to develop readiness for return to regular instructional programmes.

Prerequisite: Education 3620.

4525. Educational Procedures for Severely and Multiply Handicapped Persons (SE). The focus of this course is the specialized teaching and care of persons with severe and multiple handicaps. Emphasis is placed on assessment and instructional techniques and on the changing needs of severely and multiply handicapped persons across the life span. Adaptations of the home and school environment needed by severely and multiply handicapped persons, including the use of adaptive physical aids, is also considered.

Prerequisite: Education 3610.

4530. Educational Procedures for the Learning Disabled Child (SE). An examination of individual and classroom remedial techniques developed for the amelioration of specific learning disabilities.

Prerequisite: Education 3630.

4540. Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Disabled Persons (SE). This course will examine the various augmentative and alternative communication systems currently used to aid individuals who have difficulty communicating for reasons other than deafness, such as, cerebral palsy, severe developmental delay and autism. Emphasis will be on the technical, educational, psychosocial and linguistic aspects of these strategies with stress on the development of the ability for social interaction.

4541. Communication for the Deaf (P,E,SE). An introductory course in communication strategies employed with the Deaf and Hearing Impaired. Language acquisition by individuals with normal hearing and individuals with impaired hearing will be explored and contrasted through an analysis of a variety of modes. A laboratory component of the course is designed to impart a degree of skill in practical usage of American Sign Language and Finger Spelling. The primary emphasis will be on manual systems of communication common to the deaf, as well as those systems in use as supplementary instructional methods at Schools for the Deaf.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the Special Education Degree programme or permission of the Instructor.

4542. Instructional Applications of Communication Systems for Children with Severe Communication Disorders (SE). (Offered only as part of the Institute in Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Disabled Persons). (Please refer to the Calendar Section, Institutes in Education below).

4543. Educational Psychology of Hearing Impairment (SE). This course presents a broad overview of the effects of hearing impairment on individuals. Emphasis is on the effects of impaired linguistic environments; the cognitive, social, and emotional development of hearing impaired children and adults; the use and adaptation of assessment procedures; and the administration, organization, and delivery of instructional programmes. Acceptance to the programme is not required to enrol in this course.

Prerequisite: Education 3230 or equivalent.

4550. Student Teaching in Special Education (SE). This will involve a supervised experience of observing, participating in, and teaching Special Education classes in selected schools. Provision will be made for an analysis and application of lesson types and the utilization of classroom procedures as well as responsibility for the total classroom environment. Seminars will be held regularly throughout the term.

Prerequisites: One of Education 4510, 4515, 4520, 4530 and permission from the Office of Student Services.

COURSES IN NATIVE AND NORTHERN EDUCATION

2022. The Teaching of Inuttut (NPE). Preparation of materials and classroom strategies for the teaching of Inuttut in Primary and Elementary schools in Native communities. Attention will be given to linguistic difficulties encountered in schools by children whose first language is English.

2032. The Teaching of Montagnais (NPE). Preparation of materials and classroom strategies for the teaching of Montagnais in Primary and Elementary schools in Native communities. Emphasis will be placed on instruction for students whose first language is Montagnais as well as a consideration of the difficulties associated with the teaching of Montagnais to students whose first language is English.

4020. Issues and Trends in Native Education (NPE,NS). A seminar course dealing with research, current problems and issues associated with Native Education within a Canadian, and in particular, a Newfoundland and Labrador context.

4220. The Teaching of Inuttut I (NS). A variety of teaching techniques will be explored and materials developed to assist in the teaching of Inuttut in Native Schools at the High School Level.

Problems associated with second-language teaching will be explored.

Prerequisite: At least twelve credit hours in Inuttut.

4221. The Teaching of Inuttut II (NS). Continued exploration of teaching techniques and material development for the teaching of Inuttut at the High school level with emphasis on linguistic difficulties encountered in Native schools by children whose first language is English.

Prerequisite: Education 4220.

4230. The Teaching of Montagnais I (NS). A variety of teaching techniques will be explored and materials developed to assist in the teaching of Montagnais in Native schools at the High School level.

Prerequisite: At least twelve credit hours in Montagnais.

4231. The Teaching of Montagnais II (NS). Continued exploration of teaching techniques and material development for the teaching of Montagnais at the High school level. Linguistic difficulties encountered by students whose first language is not Montagnais will be explored.

Prerequisite: Education 4230.

4320. Teaching Strategies in Native - Secondary Level (NS). A methods course designed to familiarize the teacher with the techniques most appropriate to stimulate learning on the part of the secondary school student.

404X. Internship in Native and Northern Education (NPE,NS). (Equivalent to fifteen credit hours in Education). A one-semester internship in a school setting that will enable students to become directly involved in the teaching/learning process through observation and practice. Activities during the semester will involve seminars to assist students in the assessment of teaching methodologies most appropriate for the curriculum in Native schools. Student placement will be in a school setting depending upon the programme route which students have followed.

Prerequisite: See Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) Degree Regulations.

COURSES IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

These courses are primarily designed for students registered in the degree and diploma programmes in Vocational Education and the diploma programme in Technology Education.

2710. Course Organization and Development (V,I,NS). The development of procedures for the identification of concepts in instructional units; analysis of tasks and identification of related competencies; development of resource units.

2720. Introduction to Vocational Education (V). Study of the background of Vocational Education and of its development and present forms in Newfoundland, other provinces of Canada, and other countries; an examination of current programmes in Vocational Education; the role of federal and provincial governments in Vocational Education.

2730. General Methods of Vocational Education (V,I). Introduction to the methodology of teaching psychomotor and cognitive skills; selection of appropriate methods for individual and group instruction; organizing laboratory and shop instruction; principles of instructional management.

3710. Group Instruction in Vocational Education (V,I). An indepth study of various methods of group instruction; planning and presenting demonstration teaching units; practice in techniques of group instruction.

3720. Individualized Instruction in Vocational Education (V,I). A study of the various systems of individualized instruction; the theoretical basis for individualizing courses, individual differences, organizing individualized courses, selection and development of materials; management of individual student progress.

3730. Curriculum and Instructional Development in Vocational Education (V,I). Social, cultural, philosophical, and economic forces influencing changes in vocational curriculum and instructional methods. Study of current Vocational Education curriculum designs, problems and trends; methods of gathering curriculum information; procedures for revising and evaluating a curriculum.

4700. Student Teaching in Vocational Education (V). Applying theories of education in the learning situation; observation and demonstration of lessons; seminars in teaching techniques.

4710. Seminar in Vocational Education (V). The identification, analysis and discussion of major issues, practices and problems in Vocational Education in Newfoundland and Canada.

4720. Principles and Management of Technology Education Programmes (V,I,E,NS). Study of contemporary approaches to the administration, organization, and teaching of Industrial Arts programmes; their application in Newfoundland; and the management of programmes in Industrial Arts laboratories.

4730. Educational Programmes and Practices in Industry and Labour (V). A study of the various Vocational Education programmes operated either wholly by industry and labour or jointly with educational institutions; apprenticeship, work experience and study programmes, co-operative education, training-in-industry, training on-the-job, supervisory training, management development.

4760-4780. Advanced Specialized Vocational Technologies (V). The theory and practice of selected advanced specialized vocational education technical skills and their application to the laboratory, workshop and business office. Emphasis will be placed on innovative and emerging techniques in selected areas of business, industry, and the service occupations.

COURSES IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

These courses are designed for students registered in the Diploma Programme in Technology Education and can be used for credit only on this Diploma Programme.

2750. Introductory Materials and Processes (I). Theory and practice of selected technical skills in materials and processes and their practical application in the laboratory. Topics and practical activity will include production techniques using computer integrated design systems.

2751. Introductory Communications and Power Technology (I). Theory and practice of selected technical skills in communications and power and their practical application in the laboratory. Topics will include integrated systems approach involving electrical, mechanical and fluid power to explore power development, control, and use.

3700. Student Teaching in Technology Education (I). This will involve a supervised experience of observing, participating in and teaching Industrial Arts in a multiple activity laboratory and will include participation in seminars and in a two-week block of student teaching after the final examination.

3750. Intermediate Materials and Processes (I). Theory and practice of selected intermediate technical skills and in materials and processes and their practical application in the laboratory. Advanced topics will include in-depth view of emerging manufacturing practices.

3751. Intermediate Communications and Power Technology (I). Theory and practice of selected intermediate technical skills in communications and power and their practical applications in the laboratory. Topics will include emerging means of communicating information and advanced energy control systems.

4750. Advanced Materials and Processes (I). Theory and practice of selected advanced technical skills in materials and processes and their practical applications in the laboratory. Topics will include home technology and marine technology.

4751. Advanced Communications and Power (I). Theory and practice of selected advanced technical skills in communications and power and their practical application in the laboratory. Topics include mechanical, digital and fluidic systems.

4752. Technology Education, Specialized (I). Theory and practice of selected specialized technical skills and their practical application in the laboratory.

NOTE: A modular approach will be used for each of the twenty-one technical skills credit hours. Students who can demonstrate competency in a particular module will be allowed to substitute another module in its place. Students must select the substitute module in consultation with the Office of Student Services.

COURSES IN ADULT TEACHER EDUCATION

With the exception of Education 2800, 2801 and 2803, these courses are designed for students in the Diploma Programme in Adult Teacher Education and can be used for credit only in this Diploma Programme.

2800. Introduction to Adult Education (A). A review of the history of the Adult Education movement. The rationale for the investment of public or private resources in the education or training of adults. An examination of current educational philosophies related to Adult Education.

2801. The Adult as Learner (A,V). The implications for adult programmes and instructional strategies of difference among adults in abilities, attitudes, interests, skills, social roles.

2803. Educational Aspects of Adult Development (A,V). An examination of the educational aspects of adult development from early adulthood through middle age to later maturity.

2806. Sociology of Adult Education (A). This course explores the sociological context of adult learning. The interrelationship between particular social factors (e.g., age, sex, occupational structure) and the need for adult educational programmes are studied. The potential effects of such programmes on society are examined with reference to community development. Special emphasis is given to societal change as it relates to education as a way of life.

3430. General Methods of Instruction of Adults (A). A study of the various processes of Adult Education: discussion groups, case studies, role playing, individual and group discovery, demonstrations, simulation exercises, action research, report writing and lectures.

3440. Organization and Administration of Programmes in Adult Education (A). Alternative provincial or regional methods of organization for the provision of Adult Education. The statutory framework within which Adult Education functions.

4450. Practicum in Adult Education (A). On-the-job supervised activities designed to have the student implement the theory and principles of Adult Education.

INSTITUTES IN EDUCATION

The Faculty of Education, in co-operation with the Division of Continuing Studies, offers a number of Institutes in Education. These are intended primarily to provide opportunity for teachers to gain knowledge of new approaches to the teaching of existing school programmes and to gain insight into aspects of new programmes as they are introduced in the school system. These Institutes normally carry six or nine credit hours. Students who enrol in Institutes of six weeks duration or less will not normally be permitted to register for any other courses. Additional information on Institutes may be obtained from the Faculty of Education or the Division of Continuing Studies. Not all Institutes are offered every semester or summer.

NOTE: Students wishing to enrol in Institutes should contact the Office of Student Services.

INSTITUTE IN AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION FOR DISABLED PERSONS

Education 4540 and 4542 (P,E). . This Institute is intended to provide the pedagogical foundation, technical skills, and practical experience necessary to the preparation of teachers who use a variety of non-speech communication systems with disabled children. Such children have communication disorders due to conditions, such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation, neurological damage, and other causes. Increasingly, children with these disorders are being educated in modified and/or regular public school environments. The Institute is designed to provide for the integration of theory and practical instructional application by requiring participants to work, under direct supervision, for approximately 12 hours per week with children whose communication disorders require augmentative or alternative communication methods.

Enrolment will be limited to 20 students. To register for this Institute, students must be admitted to the Degree Programme in Special Education.

READING INSTITUTE

Education 3530, 3531, 3532. (P,E). . This Institute is a nine credit hours in Reading. The Institute is designed for primary and elementary school teachers who desire further training in Reading instruction. It will be concerned with instructing teachers in a variety of approaches for the teaching of Reading on a developmental and remedial level. In general, instruction will be geared to acquaint teachers with certain current methodologies in the teaching of Reading. Specific instruction will be directed towards developing teacher competence in the areas of diagnosis, systematic instructional planning, the utilization of the language-experience approach, the development of learning activity centers and techniques of evaluation. The Institute will combine in-depth instruction, aimed at meeting the specific needs of classroom teachers, with a practicum experience. Participating teachers will be required to demonstrate their understanding of and competence with the teaching methodologies presented in this Institute. The demonstration of this understanding will be presented by each teacher in an actual small group and one-on-one teaching situations involving school age students.

INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF CORE FRENCH IN THE ELEMENTARY GRADES

3052, 3053. (E). This institute, which will be taught in French, is designed to provide Elementary teachers with the theory and practice necessary to teach the Grades 4, 5, and 6 Core French programme. Topics include the aims and objectives of Elementary Core French for the Province, theories of second language acquisition, general principles of second language teaching, and specific strategies for teaching listening, speaking, reading and writing. The Institute will also include the teaching of culture in the second language programme. Teachers will become familiar with materials currently prescribed for use in Elementary Core French and will prepare lesson plans based on these materials. Evaluation techniques and activities will also be covered.

Prerequisite: French 2101.

NOTE: Students cannot receive credit for Education 3050 and 4153 in addition to credit for this Institute. Students who have completed one of these courses may receive three credit hours for the Institute.

INSTITUTE IN THE TEACHING OF COMPUTER STUDIES

Computer Science 2605.

Education 4164. This Institute is designed to assist practicing teachers who intend to implement the programme in Computer Studies in Newfoundland high schools and will include both a presentation of basic concepts in Computer Science and a consideration of techniques and skills used in the teaching of Computer Studies in the high schools. Topics to be covered will include: the history of Computer Science, common terminology related to computer technology, an introduction to problem solving and programming the BASIC language, the impact of computers in society. Instruction will take several forms, including formal lectures, small group discussions, and the use of micro-computers.

INSTITUTE FOR TEACHING FRENCH IN IMMERSION PROGRAMMES

Education 4250. Teaching French Language Arts in French Immersion Programmes in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). Aims and objectives of French language teaching in the French immersion classroom; teaching and evaluation techniques relating to the reading curriculum in French immersion programmes; relationships between oral and written expression in French, and an analysis of some problems related to these relationships; practical work with curriculum materials used in the teaching of French language arts in the French immersion programmes, especially those used in Newfoundland schools.

NOTE: All classes and the evaluation procedures will be conducted in French.

Education 4251. Teaching of French Language in the General Curriculum of the French Immersion Programmes in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). An examination of the general curriculum in French immersion programmes relating to the language used in these materials and the age of the child; language needed for adequate comprehension of the curriculum materials in French immersion programmes; activities for enhancing language learning in general through the curriculum areas in the French immersion classroom suitable to the age of the child at these grade levels; practical work with the materials used in the teaching of the general curriculum in French immersion programmes, especially those used in Newfoundland schools.

Secondary school teachers interested in this Institute should check the Regulations for the Conjoint Degrees of Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Arts.

NOTE: All classes and the evaluation procedures will be conducted in French.

INSTITUTE IN THE TEACHING OF JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS

Education 3945, 3946 (E). . This Institute will focus on the nature of junior high Mathematics instruction and how it should differ from elementary and high school instruction. Emphasis will be placed on the transition between informal and formal approaches to the teaching of junior high Mathematics. The Van Hiel levels and their implications for instruction in geometry will be discussed.

Activities appropriate to the teaching of junior high Mathematics will be developed and demonstrated. A particular focus in this component of the Institute will be on activities appropriate to the new programme and how they can be integrated into the junior high Mathematics curriculum.

Prerequisite: Education 3940 (or equivalent) or Education 4161 (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor.

INSTITUTE IN THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS IN FRENCH IMMERSION

Education 4254, 4255 (P,E). . This Institute is designed to help teachers in French Immersion programmes acquire the skills to teach Mathematics in the grades Kindergarten to eight. Topics include: introduction to the Mathematics curriculum in the Province; aims and pedagogical alternatives for teaching areas such as numeration, decimals, fractions, measurement, geometry, problem solving, and evaluation. The course will emphasize the use of concrete materials. Practical work with the Mathematics curriculum in Newfoundland and Labrador will be included. Problems specific to the teaching of Mathematics in the Immersion classroom, such as counting, money, time, the division algorithm will be included, as well as questions related to Mathematics terminology and the second language competence of the learner.

Students on the conjoint B.A., B.Ed. degree programme are eligible to take these courses under regulation 3(i).

NOTE: All classes and evaluation procedures will be conducted in French.

INSTITUTE IN THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES IN FRENCH IMMERSION

Education 4252, 4253 (P,E). . This institute is designed to help teachers in French Immersion Programmes acquire skills to teach Social Studies in the Primary, Elementary, or High School Grades. Topics include: an overview of the evolution of the educational system in Newfoundland and Labrador; an examination of the French Immersion Curriculum; the aims and objectives of French Immersion in relation to the goals and objectives of Social Studies; the nature and purpose of the Social Studies; principles of the teaching of Social Studies; an examination of the scope and sequence of the Social Studies curriculum in relation to the child's mental development; methods for teaching and evaluating skills to be developed through the Social Studies curriculum; the integration of Social Studies for enhancing French second language acquisition; practical work with the materials used in the Social Studies curriculum for French Immersion in Newfoundland and Labrador.

NOTE: All classes and evaluation procedures will be conducted in French.


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