2005 - 2006 Calendar

School of Pharmacy

Personnel

1 School Description
1.1 Vision Statement
1.2 Mission Statement
1.3 Accreditation Status

2 Description of Programs
2.1 Structured Practice Experience
2.2 Registration as a Pharmacy Student

3 Admission/Readmission Regulations for the School of Pharmacy
3.1 General Information
3.2 Application Forms and Deadlines
3.3 Admission Requirements to the School
3.4 Acceptance Procedures

4 Program Regulations - General Degrees
4.1 Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) for Students entering the 1 + 4 program

5 Promotion Regulations
5.1 General Information
5.2 Promotion Status
5.3 Other Information
5.4 Leave of Absence

6 Waiver of School Regulations
6.1 General Information

7 Appeal of Regulations

8 Course Descriptions

List of Tables
Table 1 Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) (1 + 4 program)


Personnel

Director
Hensman, L.R., B.Sc.(Pharm.) British Columbia, ACRP, Pharm.D. SUNY at Buffalo, M.B.A. Memorial; Associate Professor

Honorary Research Professor
West, R., M.Sc., Ph.D. McGill

Professors
Daneshtalab, M., Pharm.D. Tehran, Ph.D. Tohoku, Japan
Loomis, C.W., B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. Queen's; Vice-President (Research)
Michalski, C.J., B.S., M.S. Michigan State, Ph.D. North Carolina; Cross appointed from Faculty of Medicine
Neuman, R., B.A. San Francisco State, Ph.D, Alberta; Cross appointed from Faculty of Medicine
Rahimtula, A.D., M.Sc., Ph.D. Southampton; Cross appointed from Department of Biochemistry

Associate Professors
Colbourne, A., B.Sc. Memorial, B.A. Oxford, M.Sc., M.D. Memorial, M.A. Oxford, FRCPC; Cross appointed from Faculty of Medicine
Kara, M., B.Pharm., Ph.D. Bradford
Law, R.M.T., B.Sc.Phm. Toronto, Pharm.D. SUNY at Buffalo
Liu, H., B.Sc.(Pharm), M.Sc. Beijing Medical, Ph.D. Alberta; Cross appointed to Department of Biochemistry
Phillips, L., B.Sc. (Pharm.) Memorial, Pharm.D. British Columbia; Cross appointed to Faculty of Medicine
Richardson, V.J., Ph.D. Sheffield; Cross appointed from Faculty of Medicine
Wang, L., B.Sc. M.Sc. Beijing Medical, Ph.D. Alberta

Assistant Professors

Hawboldt, J., BSP Saskatchewan, ACRP, Pharm. D., Washington
Kelly, D., B.Sc.(Pharm.) Memorial, ACRP, Pharm.D. Toronto; Cross appointed to Faculty of Medicine
Kozyra, E., B. Sc.(Hon),  B.Sc.(Pharm.) Memorial, Pharm.D. Toronto
Mugford, J.G., B.Sc., Ph.D., CMH, Memorial, Joint appointment with Faculty of Medicine
Younes, H.M., B.Sc. Al-Mansourah, M.Sc. Jordan, Ph.D. Alberta

Sessional Instructors
Abouchehade, K., B.Sc. Lebanese, M.Sc. Alberta, M.Sc. Beirut
Duggan, K., B.Sc (Pharm) Alberta, ACRP
Hefferan, M.P., B.Sc. (Eng.) Queen’s
Turner, M., B.Sc.Pharm. Memorial, ACRP
   
Clinical Assistant Professor
Young, S.W., B.Sc. (Pharm.) Memorial, ACRP, Pharm.D. Idaho State

Visiting Assistant Professor
Rimsay, R.L., B.Sc. Knox, Ph.D. Colorado State

Drug Information Pharmacist
Dillon, C., B.Sc. (Pharm.) Memorial, ACRP               

Structured Practice Experience Co-ordinator
Spurrell, W., B.Sc.Pharm. Memorial

Preceptor Orientation Co-ordinator
Healey, M., B.Sc.Pharm. Memorial

Laboratory Instructor
Ryan, P., B.Sc., M.Sc. Memorial


Students must meet all regulations of the School in addition to those stated in the general regulations. For information concerning fees and charges, admission/readmission to the University, and general academic regulations (Undergraduate), refer to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS.

1 School Description
The School of Pharmacy offers an undergraduate degree in pharmacy and graduate degrees in pharmaceutical sciences. The School is committed to providing an undergraduate program of quality and excellence that will prepare individuals who will contribute significantly in all settings of pharmacy practice. The experiential learning component of the program ensures students have the opportunity to integrate academic learning with professional practice and to develop the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes required of practising pharmacists. The School encourages a close working relationship among students, faculty, and staff, and prides itself on its strong association with and support of the pharmacy community at both the provincial and national level.

1.1 Vision Statement
Fostering the development of pharmacy graduates committed to enhancing the health of individuals and the community.

1.2 Mission Statement
Through the scholarly pursuits of teaching, research and service, the School of Pharmacy is dedicated to:
        •    preparing pharmaceutical care practitioners committed to life long learning
        •    fostering excellence and innovation in research and graduate studies
        •    developing and participating in professional practice and community outreach
        •    advancing the profession

1.3 Accreditation Status
The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP) to June 2010.

2 Description of Program
The School of Pharmacy offers an undergraduate program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy). This degree is designed to prepare graduates for careers primarily in community and hospital settings but also in the pharmaceutical industry, pharmacy organizations, health sciences research, government, and educational environments. After successful completion of national examinations, a graduate of the program is eligible to apply to be licensed as a pharmacist in Newfoundland and Labrador and other provinces in Canada.

The program of study leading to the Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) degree has two phases and requires at least five years to complete. Prior to entry to the program students will acquire a background in the mathematical and physical sciences. Once in the program students will take courses in the basic health sciences, pharmacy sub-specialties and social/administrative sciences. At the end of each year students will have an opportunity to apply the academic knowledge acquired and to develop and practice patient care skills by participating in experiential learning within community and hospital settings. During the program students will develop an understanding of the professional and societal responsibilities of a pharmacist, and will recognize the need for lifelong learning.

2.1 Structured Practice Experience
Students are required to successfully complete all experiential components of the program, including the Structured Practice Experience (SPE). During SPEs students are placed in community or hospital pharmacy practice settings and are brought into direct contact with patients, pharmacists and other health professionals. Students become involved in the practice of pharmaceutical care and are expected to assume ever-increasing responsibility as their education advances. Such practice experiences ensure students are exposed in situations which cannot be provided in the classroom.

2.1.1 The Joint Committee on Structured Practice Experience, consisting of representatives from both the School of Pharmacy and the Newfoundland and Labrador Pharmacy Board, is responsible for providing the overall direction for the program and recommending policies and procedures for its operation.
           
2.1.2 Students will be placed at sites by the School. The Structured Practice Experience Coordinator liaises with students to determine placements.

2.1.3 While every effort will be made to accommodate a student’s request to complete SPEs in a specific location, a student may be assigned to any participating site within the province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

2.1.4 Students are responsible for all travel and accommodation costs associated with the SPE.

2.1.5 Students who conduct themselves in such a manner as to cause their termination from the SPE site, including breaches in confidentiality, violation of policies and professional misconduct will be assigned a grade of FAL (fail) for that SPE.

2.1.6 Students are required to complete three SPEs, each of four weeks duration, and one SPE of twelve weeks duration. The first three SPEs are completed at the end of the Winter semester in the first, second, and third years of the program. The final SPE is completed in the Winter semester of the final year of the program.

2.1.7 Students will be evaluated on their performance during the SPE and on written assignments including workbooks, pharmaceutical care case work-ups and drug information requests. Students may have workbooks audited or they may be formally examined on material learned during the SPE period. The overall evaluation of SPEs will result in the assignment of one of the following grades: PWD (pass with distinction), PAS (pass), or FAL (fail).

2.2 Registration as a Pharmacy Student
•    A student must be registered as a “Pharmacy Student” with the respective provincial or territorial licensing body prior to the commencement of Structured Practice Experiences. Students must meet any requirements which such authorities stipulate. A student who fails to meet the requirements for licensing as a pharmacy student may be required to withdraw from the program.

3 Admission Regulations for the School of Pharmacy
In addition to meeting UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS students applying for admissionfor the 1 + 4 program must meet the admission regulations of the School. Admissions regulations for the 2 + 3 program are in the 2003-2004 Calendar.

3.1 General Information
3.1.1 Admissions will normally be to the first year of pharmacy studies. In some circumstances, however, admission with advanced standing may be offered.
3.1.2 Entry to the School is competitive for a limited number of placements. Priority is given to applicants who are bona fide residents of this province and who are Canadian citizens or permanent residents. The final decision on admission rests with the Admissions Committee of the School.
3.1.3 The Admissions Committee considers each applicant's academic background and information on the applicant's personal characteristics and achievements as given by the applicant and by referees' reports. Personal interviews, which may include both a written and oral component, may be required.

3.2 Application Forms and Deadlines
3.2.1 Application forms are available in person from the School and the Office of the Registrar or through the School's website at  www.pharm.mun.ca. Application forms may also be obtained by writing the School of Pharmacy, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1B 3V6 or the Office of the Registrar, Admissions Office, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1C 5S7.
3.2.2 All application forms and fees for admission to the program for the Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar of the University on or before the deadline of March 1 in any year. The program commences in the Fall semester.
3.2.3 Applications will be reviewed after the closing date by the Admissions Committee of the School. This Committee has the delegated authority of the School’s academic council to admit or decline to admit applicants, following guidelines and procedures acceptable to that council.
3.2.4 Each applicant is responsible for ensuring that all the required information for application is supplied to the Admissions Committee, and for providing any further information required by the Committee. An application will not be considered to be complete until all documentation has been received.

3.3 Admission Requirements to the School
Applicants who are not currently students at Memorial University of Newfoundland must apply for admission to the University under the Categories of Applicants, Admission Criteria and Other Information outlined under UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - ADMISSION/READMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY (UNDERGRADUATE). In addition to meeting these regulations, applicants to the School must meet requirements as indicated below.

3.3.1 To be eligible for consideration an applicant shall have completed a minimum of 30 credit hours which have been taken or accepted for credit at a recognized university or university college.
3.3.2 An applicant is normally required to have completed each of the following courses or their equivalents. The course designations relate to courses taught at Memorial University of Newfoundland including Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.
            •        Biology 1001 and 1002
            •        Business 2000
            •        Chemistry 1050 and 1051 or Chemistry 1200 and 1001
            •        English 1080 or English 1000
            •        Mathematics 1000 and 1001
            •        Physics 1020 and 1021 or Physics 1050 and 1051
3.3.3 Normally an application will not be considered from an applicant who cannot produce evidence that the above requirements have been met or will have been met by the time of entry into the School.
3.3.4 An unsuccessful applicant who wishes to reapply for admission is required to submit the application forms relevant to the year of reapplication and will be required to enter into the competition for that year.

3.4 Acceptance Procedures
3.4.1 Notification of the decision of the Admissions Committee of the School will be made to applicants by the Director of the School by letter. No other form of notification will be considered official.
3.4.2 The letter of acceptance will give the successful applicant 14 days from the date of the letter of notification in which to confirm acceptance of the placement offer. The signed intention to accept the offer must be accompanied by a deposit of $100, which will be credited towards tuition fees. The deposit will be forfeited if the applicant subsequently declines the offer or fails to register. If no reply is received within 14 days, the offer by the School will be withdrawn and the applicant will be informed of this by letter.

4 Program Regulations - General Degrees

4.1 Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) for Students Entering the 1 + 4 Program

4.1.1 The 174 credit hour Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) for students in the 1 + 4 program requires 30 credit hours before admission to the program and 144 credit hours after admission to the program. The program includes four structured practice experiences, three of which are non-credit, with the other having 18 credit hours.
            •        The program courses shall normally be taken in the academic terms in the sequence and course load as set out in Table 1 Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) (1 + 4 program). Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Office of the Director.
            •        Elective courses may be taken from any academic unit.

Table 1
Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) (1 + 4 program)

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Courses required for admission
Biology 1001 and 1002
Business 2000
Chemistry 1050 and 1051 or Chemistry 1200 and 1001
English 1080 or English 1000
Mathematics 1000 and 1001
Physics 1020 and 1021 or Physics 1050 and 1051   

Fall
Academic Term 1
Chemistry 2440
PHAR 2002
PHAR 2101
PHAR 2150
PHAR 2201
Psychology 1000
3 credit hours
Winter
Academic Term 2 
PHAR 2003
PHAR 2004
PHAR 201W
PHAR 2102
PHAR 2151
PHAR 2202
PHAR 2203
Psychology 1001

Spring 


Fall
Academic Term 3
Medicine 4300
PHAR 3003
PHAR 3111
PHAR 3150
PHAR 3203
PHAR 3205
PHAR 3501

Winter
Academic Term 4
Biochemistry 2600
PHAR 3009
PHAR 302W
PHAR 3103
PHAR 3151
PHAR 3204
PHAR 3206
PHAR 3301   

Spring


Fall
Academic Term 5 
PHAR 4008
PHAR 4401
PHAR 4501
PHAR 4105
PHAR 4150
PHAR 4301
3 credit hours
Winter
Academic Term 6
PHAR 403W
PHAR 4151
PHAR 4402
PHAR 4502
PHAR 4503
Philosophy 2803
3 credit hours
Spring


Fall
Academic Term 7
PHAR 5150
PHAR 5301
PHAR 5302
PHAR 5303
PHAR 5401
PHAR 5501
3 credit hours
Winter
Academic Term 8
PHAR 500X


5 Promotion Regulations

5.1 General Information
            •    The Committee on Undergraduate Studies will determine each student’s promotion status at the end of each academic year.
            •    In addition to meeting the promotion regulations for the School students must meet the general academic regulations (undergraduate). For further information refer to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE).
            •    Success in the program depends on meeting the requirements of all terms.

5.2 Promotion Status
A student's promotion status at the end of each academic year will be in one of the following two categories:

5.2.1 Clear Promotion: Clear Promotion means a student can proceed to the next academic year without restrictions.
                •    Students will receive a Clear Promotion from an academic year by obtaining an average of 65% and having obtained at least a pass in each course. A weighted average based on credit hours in the Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) program courses will be calculated for determining eligibility for promotion. Neither promotion nor graduation will be permitted if a student has a numeric grade below 50% in any course in the program.
                •    Students completing PHAR 2102 must obtain a numeric grade of at least 70%.
                •    Students completing PHAR 201W, 302W, 401W, 402W,403W, 410W, 501W, or 500X must obtain a grade of PAS or PWD in each course.
                •    Students must attain a passing grade in each elective, but these courses will not be included in calculating the student's average grade for the purposes of promotion, graduation, or academic awards.
5.2.2 Promotion Denied: Promotion Denied indicates Clear Promotion is not achieved at the end of each academic year.
                •    A student with Promotion Denied status will be required to withdraw from the School.
                            ▫ A student who does not obtain a clear promotion may be permitted to repeat all or part of the academic year. If a student is required to repeat a year on the grounds of unsatisfactory performance, his or her performance in the repeated year must meet the conditions for Clear Promotion. If this standard is not met, the Committee on Undergraduate Studies may require the student to withdraw from the program.
                            ▫ Normally, the option to repeat a year on the grounds of academic difficulties can be offered only once during the student's Bachelor of Science (Pharmacy) program. This restriction may be waived if it has been demonstrated that the student's academic performance has been adversely affected by factors duly authenticated and acceptable to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies.
                •    A student with Promotion Denied status at the end of the final academic term will not be recommended for graduation until the student's status is changed to Clear Promotion.

5.3 Other Information
            •    Students may be required to withdraw from their program at any time, if, in the opinion of the School, they are unlikely to benefit from continued attendance.
            •    The Committee on Undergraduate Studies may require a student who is deemed unlikely to benefit from continued attendance in his/her course of study to withdraw conditionally. The Chair of the committee will advise the Director of the School of the circumstances precipitating this action, the duration of the withdrawal and any conditions the student must fulfil during the withdrawal. The Director may then recommend to the Registrar that the student is on conditional withdrawal. Upon completing the conditions, the student may be permitted re-entry to the program. If the conditions are not met, the student may be required to withdraw from the program.
            •    The School reserves the right to require a student to withdraw from the program at any time when acceptable cause is demonstrated. In such cases, the Director, on behalf of the School, shall recommend such withdrawal to the Registrar who will then take appropriate action. Any such action is subject to the right of appeal by the student. An appeal should be made in writing clearly stating the basis for the appeal and should be directed in the first instance to the Registrar of the University. The Registrar, in consultation with the Director, will determine whether or not the grounds stated are sufficient to warrant a formal hearing of the appeal.
       
5.4 Leave of Absence
            •    Upon completion of an academic year, a student in good standing may elect to withdraw temporarily from studies. Voluntary withdrawal at other times and for other reasons may be permitted in accordance with UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) - Registration. In all cases, the intent to withdraw voluntarily should be discussed with the Director. The Director may then recommend to the Registrar that a student be permitted to withdraw for a stated period of time. At the end of this period, the student, in consultation with the Committee on Undergraduate Studies, should ensure that sufficient revision and preparatory work is undertaken to allow studies to be resumed readily. In the absence of good cause, any such student who does not resume studies on the specified date may be deemed to have left the program.
       
6 Waiver of School Regulations
A student has the right to request waiver of School regulations. A student wishing waiver of University academic regulations should refer to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) - Waiver of Regulations.

6.1 General Information
            •    The School reserves the right in special circumstances to modify, alter, or waive any School regulation in its application to individual students where merit and equity so warrant in the judgment of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.
            •    All requests must be submitted to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School for consideration. A student requesting a waiver of a School regulation must submit the request in writing to the Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. Medical and/or other documentation to substantiate the request must be provided.
            •    Any waiver granted does not reduce the total number of credit hours required for the degree.

7 Appeal of Regulations
Any student whose request for waiver of School regulations has been denied has the right to appeal. For further information refer to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) - Appeal of Regulations.
•    An applicant who has been denied admission has the right to appeal this decision of the Admissions Committee if it is felt by the applicant that the decision was reached on grounds other than those outlined in Admission Regulations for the School of Pharmacy. The appeal should be made in writing within fourteen days of the notification of the decision and should be directed to the Director of the School. The letter should state clearly and fully the grounds for the appeal. If the Director of the School , in consultation with the Registrar, judges the grounds to be sufficient, the formal appeals mechanism will be initiated.
•    A student obtaining a failing grade in a pharmacy course due to exceptional circumstances may be permitted to write a supplementary examination subject to normal appeal process by the student. Such an appeal must be made in writing to the Director and within one week of release of grades.
•    A student has the right to make a formal appeal against a decision of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. However, this appeal cannot be made on the basis of the grades awarded in individual courses, as the student will normally have had the opportunity of contesting grades immediately after notification. A formal appeal by a student against the decision of the Committee must be made on grounds other than the grades awarded, e.g. default of procedure. This appeal should be made in writing, clearly stating the basis for the appeal and should be directed in the first instance to the Registrar of the University. The Registrar, in consultation with the Director, will determine whether or not the grounds stated are sufficient to warrant a formal hearing of the appeal.

8 Course Descriptions

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Director of the School.

All courses of the School are designated by PHAR and are restricted to students in the School of Pharmacy.


AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).


2002 Anatomy and Physiology I presents a survey of human anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan. It includes aspects of cytology and histology that form a foundation for the practice of pharmacy. Special emphasis is given to the skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems. The course will include both the vocabulary and concepts of anatomy and physiology with the overall goal being the understanding of the interrelationships and integration of all systems from the cell to whole organism.
    CR: Nursing 1002 and PHAR 3201
    LH: 2; attendance is required
   
2003 Anatomy and Physiology II presents a survey of human anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan. It includes aspects of cytology and histology that form a foundation for the practice of pharmacy. Special emphasis is given to the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems. The course will include both the vocabulary and concepts of anatomy and physiology with the overall goal being the understanding of the interrelationships and integration of all systems from the cell to whole organism.
    CR: Nursing 1012 and PHAR 3202
    LH: 2; attendance is required
    PR: PHAR 2002   

2004 Introduction to Biochemistry is an introduction to the major organic substances of living organisms, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids: their structure, analysis and biochemical function. Enzymes. Biochemistry of membranes: plasma membrane and specialized intracellular membranes. Biochemistry of selected differentiated cells.
    CR: Biochemistry 2101 and PHAR 3110
    OR: tutorials as required
    PR: Chemistry 2400 and 2401 or Chemistry 2440

201W Structured Practice Experience I is a structured practice experience in community pharmacy after completion of the first year which will provide an opportunity for students to apply their technical skills and introduce them to patient care activities. The structured practical experience is comprised of four weeks, 35 hours per week and is held in May/June.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 0
    LC: 0
    PR: successful completion of all courses in the 1st year of the program

2101 Pharmacy Practice I provides an overview of the Canadian Health Care System, the organization and role of pharmacy and pharmacists in the delivery of health care, and the federal and provincial regulations that govern the practice of pharmacy. An introduction to effective communication strategies in the delivery of pharmaceutical care will be discussed.
    CO: PHAR 2150
    CR: PHAR 3011

2102 Pharmacy Practice II introduces the student to the basic skills and knowledge of the practice of pharmacy. Students will learn to apply these skills to build an expertise in pharmaceutical care. Emphasis will be placed on communication and patient counselling. Students will learn to apply pharmacy regulations in the dispensing of medications. The passing grade in this course is 70%, failing which the student may be required to withdraw from the program.
    CH: 2
    CO: PHAR 2151
    CR: PHAR 3004
    LC: 2
    OR: tutorials 2 hours per week; attendance is required

2150 Pharmacy Skills provides an introduction to the pharmacy profession with emphasis on necessary learning skills and the educational outcomes of the program. Students will begin the development of drug information search skills, computer skills, public speaking and basic interpersonal communications skills necessary in practice of pharmacy. Students will participate in self-directed learning modules in medical terminology and pharmaceutical calculations.
    CH: 1
    CO: PHAR 2101
    LC: 0
    OR: practical sessions 3 hours per week; attendance is required
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week

2151 Pharmacy Skills provides an introduction to the pharmacy profession with emphasis on necessary learning skills and the educational outcomes of the program. Students will continue the development of drug information search skills, computer skills, pharmaceutical calculation skills and basic interpersonal communications skills necessary in practice of pharmacy. Basic dispensing skills and the application of the legal framework in which pharmacists practice will be developed.
    CH: 1
    CO: PHAR 2102
    LC: 0
    OR: practical sessions 3 hours per week; attendance is required
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week
    PR: PHAR 2150 and 2101

2201 Pharmaceutics I provides an insight into a number of physicochemical basics and explains them within a pharmaceutical context. The course provides the basic foundation necessary for the study of pharmaceutical dosage forms, pharmacokinetics and bio-pharmaceutics.
    CR: PHAR 3012
    LH: 3; attendance is required
    PR: Mathematics 1000 and 1001 and Chemistry 1050 and1051; or Chemistry 1200 and 1001

2202 Pharmaceutics II is designed to provide the student with an understanding of pharmaceutical dosage forms and their applications. It applies the principles taught in Pharmaceutics I to understand the design and components of the different pharmaceutical preparations.
    CR: PHAR 3005
    LH: 3; attendance is required
    PR: PHAR 2201

2203 Pharmaceutical Analysis is designed to introduce some important techniques and methods of analysis in pharmaceutical sciences. The laboratory exercises consist of both non-instrumental and instrumental analytical techniques that are widely employed in the analysis of pharmaceuticals.
    CH: 2
    LC: 2
    LH: 3 hours every other week; attendance is required
    PR: Chemistry 1050 and 1051 or Chemistry 1200 and 1001

3003 Pathophysiology examines the nature of disease, causes and effects, and alteration in structure and function of cells, inflammation, neoplasia, genetic and chromosomal diseases, healing and repair, stress and disease.
    CR: PHAR 4004

3009 Pharmacology explores topics in general pharmacology including drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, renal pharmacology, anticoagulant and antithrombotic drugs, antihyperlipidemics, drugs used in the treatment of anemia, and endocrine pharmacology.
    CR: PHAR 4009
    PR: Medicine 4300 or equivalent

302W Structured Practice Experience II is a structured practice experience in hospital pharmacy after completion of the second year which will provide an opportunity for students to apply their technical skills and introduce them to patient care activities. The practical experience is comprised of four weeks, 35 hours per week, and is held in May/June.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 0
    LC: 0
    PR: successful completion of all courses in the 2nd year of the program

3103 Microbiology of Infectious Diseases examines the various types of micro-organisms (bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal), the environment in which they are able to multiply and their relationship to human diseases. The classifications of their morphology, mode of reproduction and the metabolic process, the physiological and epidemiological principles of infectious diseases and their manifestations are discussed including the principles of immunization.
    LH: 1; attendance is required

3111 General Biochemistry covers the catabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids. Mitochondria, chloroplasts and ATP synthesis. Biosynthesis of carbohydrates and lipids. Metabolic specialization of differentiated cells and tissues. Integration of metabolism.
    CR: Biochemistry 3106
    OR: tutorials as required
    PR: PHAR 2004 or 3110 or Biochemistry 2101

3150 Pharmacy Skills continues the development of the learning skills necessary for pharmacy practice in order to meet the educational outcomes for the second year of the pharmacy program. Students will continue to develop skills of drug information, communication, pharmaceutical calculations and sterile product preparation relating to the courses of study in the second year. Students will complete a first aid course.
    CH: 1
    CO: all 2nd year Fall semester pharmacy courses
    LC: 0
    OR: practical sessions 3 hours per week; attendance is required OR: tutorials 1 hour per week

3151 Pharmacy Skills continues the development of the learning skills necessary for pharmacy practice in order to meet the educational outcomes for the second year of the pharmacy program. Students will continue to develop skills of drug information, communication and pharmaceutical calculations relating to the courses of study in the second year. Students will participate in practice sessions necessary to develop an understanding of and skills required in clinical kinetics.
    CH: 1
    CO: all 2nd year Winter semester pharmacy courses
    LC: 0
    OR: practical sessions 3 hours per week; attendance is required
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week
    PR: PHAR 3150
   
3203 Medicinal Chemistry I presents topics covering the molecular basis of action, metabolism, and toxicity of drugs. It provides an orientation to medicinally important nuclei and their nomenclature, followed by principles of drug discovery and development. The relationship between molecular structure and biological action of drugs together with elementary molecular modeling, and theories related to receptors and drug action will be presented. Concepts of drug metabolism and the relevant metabolic pathways in relationship to drug inactivation and toxicity, along with the principles of drug latentiation and prodrugs is covered. The structures, selected physicochemical properties, mechanism of action, structure-activity relationships, toxic effects at molecular level, and metabolism of drugs including central nervous system.
    CO: Medicine 4300 and PHAR 3003
    CR: PHAR 4010
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week; attendance is required
    PR: Chemistry 2440.

3204 Medicinal Chemistry II is a continuation of Pharmacy 3203 and focuses on the structures, selected physicochemical properties, mechanism of action, structure-activity relationships, toxic effects at molecular level, and metabolism of different pharmacological classes of drugs including cholinergic agents, analgetic and anti-inflammatory agents, insulin and oral antidiabetic drugs, steroids and related compounds, antihyperlipidemic agents, histamine and antihistaminic agents, diuretic agents, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and antagonists, and calcium channel blockers.
    CO: PHAR 3009
    CR: PHAR 4011
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week; attendance is required
    PR: PHAR 3203

3205 Pharmaceutics III examines the principles governing the development and evaluation of novel delivery systems for drugs including therapeutic proteins and peptides will be discussed. The standards of manufacture and practice, design and preparation of sterile dosage forms, including parenteral preparations will be covered. The basic principles of the application of radiation and radioactive compounds in medical diagnosis and therapy, rationale for the use, preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals is also discussed.
    CR: PHAR 5017
    PR: PHAR 2201 and 2202

3206 Applied Pharmacokinetics is an introduction to biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic principles used in the selection, dosing, monitoring and evaluation of drug therapy. Application of these principles in evaluating drug literature and developing drug dosage regimens of selected classes of drugs for individual patients will be discussed.
    CO: PHAR 3009
    CR: PHAR 4006
    PR: Medicine 4300, PHAR 2201and 2202

3301 Patient Care I is an introductory course in patient care, especially in the areas of self-care and self-treatment and the role of the pharmacist. The regulatory environment of non-prescription products and the prevention and treatment of health conditions amenable to self-management will be discussed.
    CO: PHAR 3009
    CR: PHAR 4104
    PR: Medicine 4300
   
3501 Pharmacy Research and Evaluation I introduces students to principle roles of health policy with a special emphasis on pharmaceutical policy and its impact on health professionals, the public and on the delivery of pharmaceutical care.
    CH: 1
    LC: 1
    PR: PHAR 2101 and 2102

4003 Pharmacy Administration will discuss the management principles required in contemporary pharmacy practice. The focus will be primarily in the areas of financial and human resource management and organizational and ownership models of pharmacies.
    CH: 1
    LC: 1
    PR: Business 1000

4004 Pathophysiology examines the nature of disease, causes and effects, and alteration in structure and function of cells, inflammation, neoplasia, genetic and chromosomal diseases, healing and repair, stress and disease.
    CR: PHAR 3003

4005 Chemotherapy examines the structure, mechanism of action, selected chemical and physical properties and structure-activity relations of antibiotics and anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-protozoal, and anti-neoplastic agents. Isolation and history of chemotherapeutic agents. Host defence mechanisms, selectivity, sensitivity and resistance. Interferon, immunosuppressants and immunostimulants.
    CH: 2
    CO: PHAR 4010
    CR: PHAR 4008
    LC: 2
    OR: tutorials 1 hour every other week; attendance is required

4006 Applied Pharmacokinetics is an introduction to biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic principles useful in the selection, monitoring and evaluation of drug therapy. Application of these principles in evaluating drug literature and developing drug dosage regimens of selected classes of drugs for individual patients.
    LH: 3; attendance is required
    PR: PHAR 3012

4008 Chemotherapy presents the principles of infectious diseases and cancer chemotherapy. Topics to be explored include molecular structure profiles in relation to mechanism of action, drug resistance, and toxicity of antimicrobial, antiviral, and antineoplastic agents. Antimicrobial activity/spectrum of activity of antibacterials, antifungals, antimalarial, antituberculosis, and antiviral/antiretroviral agents will be discussed. The classification and mechanism of action of cancer chemotherapeutic agents will be presented. Pharmacokinetic considerations, adverse effects/toxicity, and drug interactions will be explored for these agents.
    CH: 2
    CO: PHAR 4105
    CR: PHAR 4005
    LC: 2
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week
    PR: Medicine 4300, PHAR 3009, 3103, 3203 and 3204

4009 Pharmacology explores topics in general pharmacology including drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, renal pharmacology, anticoagulant and antithrombotic drugs, antihyperlipidemics, drugs used in the treatment of anemia, and endocrine pharmacology.
    OR: laboratory or tutorials up to 3 hours per week; attendance is required
    PR: Medicine 4300 or equivalent

4010 Medicinal Chemistry I examines the structures, selected chemical and physical properties, mechanisms of action, and structure-activity relationships of drugs other than chemotherapeutic agents. Theoretical aspects of drug design and drug metabolism. Medicinal agents of plant origin and inorganic pharmaceuticals are also included.
    CR: PHAR 3203
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week

4011 Medicinal Chemistry II examines the structures, selected chemical and physical properties, mechanisms of action, and structure-activity relationships of drugs other than chemotherapeutic agents. Theoretical aspects of drug design and drug metabolism. Medicinal agents of plant origin and inorganic pharmaceuticals are also included.
    CR: PHAR 3204
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week
    PR: PHAR 4010

401W Seminar consists of presentations given by students, and occasional visiting speakers, on pharmacy related topics. The final grade of PWD, PAS, or FAL is based on performance, attendance and participation.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 0
    LC: 0 

402W Seminar consists of presentations given by students, and occasional visiting speakers, on pharmacy related topics. The final grade of PWD, PAS, or FAL is based on performance, attendance and participation.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 0
    LC: 0

403W Structured Practice Experience III is a structured practice experience in community pharmacy after completion of the third year which will provide an opportunity for students to apply their technical skills and practise and participate in patient care activities. The practical experience is comprised of four weeks, 35 per week, and is held in May/June.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 0
    LC: 0
    PR: successful completion of all courses in the 3rd year of the program

4104 Therapeutics I provides an understanding of the therapeutic management of common disease states. The student is introduced to the pathophysiologies of common disease states, current drug (prescription and non-prescription) and non-drug therapies, procedures used to monitor drug therapy for clinical response, adverse reactions, drug interactions and contraindications, and the process for distinguishing the rational from the irrational use of drugs. The appropriateness and effectiveness of self-medication treatments will also be discussed.
    CO: PHAR 4009
    OR: tutorials 2 hours per week
    PR: Medicine 4300

4105 Immunology is an introduction to the molecular and cellular basis of immunity and hypersensitivity. Manipulation of the immune system in the management and treatment of disease is discussed.
    PR: PHAR 2002 and 2003 or PHAR 3201 and 3202

410W Structured Practice Experience is practical training in a pharmacy after classes and examinations in the Winter semester have ended. The structured practice experience is comprised of twelve weeks, 35 hours per week.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 0
    LC: 0
    PR: successful completion of all courses in the 2nd year of the program

4150 Pharmacy Skills continues the development of the learning skills necessary for pharmacy practice in order to meet the educational outcomes for the third year of the pharmacy program. Students will continue to develop skills of drug information and communication relating to the courses of study in the third year. Students will participate in practice sessions necessary to develop an understanding of and skills required in patient assessment. Students will build on their dispensing and education skills learned in first year through participating in dispensing and interview/counselling sessions in more complex patient situations. Students will learn to appreciate the challenges faced by, and in dealing with special patient populations.
    CH: 1
    CO: all 3rd year Fall semester pharmacy courses
    LC: 0
    OR: practical sessions 3 hours per week; attendance is required
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week
   
4151 Pharmacy Skills continues the development of the learning skills necessary for pharmacy practice in order to meet the educational outcomes for the third year of the pharmacy program. Students will continue to develop skills of drug information and communication relating to the courses of study in the third year. Students will participate in practice sessions necessary to develop an understanding of and skills required for in-home diagnostic testing. Students will build on their dispensing and education skills learned in first year through participating in dispensing and interview/counselling sessions in more complex patient situations. Students will learn to appreciate the challenges faced by, and in dealing with special patient populations. Health promotion and illness prevention issues will be applied through an interprofessional group project.
    CH: 1
    CO: all 3rd year Winter semester pharmacy courses
    LC: 0
    OR: practical sessions 3 hours per week; attendance is required
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week
    PR: PHAR 4150
   
4301 Patient Care II discusses the principles of health promotion and disease prevention and the role of the pharmacist.
    CH: 1
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week

4401 Therapeutics I is part of a series that looks at the therapeutic management of common diseases. Topics include infectious diseases, hematology/oncology, dermatology, and musculoskeletal disorders. For each disease state discussion will centre around several key issues including: the establishment of desired therapeutic outcomes; development of appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic alternatives; factors to be considered to aid in the selection of an individualized therapeutic regimen; and the development of a monitoring plan to evaluate efficacy and safety.
    CH: 6
    CO: PHAR 4105
    LC: 6
    OR: tutorials 2 hours per week; attendance is required
    PR: Medicine 4300, PHAR 3009 and 3206

4402 Therapeutics II is part in a series that looks at the therapeutic management of common diseases. Topics include womens’ health, mens’ health, gastroenterology, endocrine, neurological, and renal disorders. For each disease state discussion will center around several key issues including: the establishment of desired therapeutic outcomes; development of appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic alternatives; factors to be considered to aid in the selection of an individualized therapeutic regimen; and the development of a monitoring plan to evaluate efficacy and safety.
    CH: 6
    LC: 6
    OR: tutorials 2 hours per week; attendance is required
    PR: PHAR 4401

4501 Pharmacy Research and Evaluation II introduces the biostatistical, pharmacoepidemiologic and pharmacoeconomic concepts and develops the skills necessary to the practice of research and evaluation methods in applied pharmacy. The understanding of such methods is an important prerequisite in the critical appraisal of the health literature and the undertaking of evidence-based clinical practice.
    PR: PHAR 3501

4502 Pharmacy Research and Evaluation III introduces students to principles of critical appraisal and provides opportunities to apply these principles to critique and evaluate current medical literature. Students will be assigned to a tutorial group, which will meet twice during the semester to critically appraise at least two recently published studies (journal club). Emphasis will be placed on appropriate application of critical appraisal skills and group discussion of impact of study findings on clinical practice. In addition, this course will also discuss drug utilization reviews and evaluations and the role of the pharmacist, as well as adverse drug event reporting and the role of the pharmacist.
    CH: 1
    LC: 1
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week; attendance is required
    PR: PHAR 4501

4503 Pharmacy Administration introduces students to the basic principles of management as it relates to pharmacy practice. Topics will include human resources and financial management, marketing, strategic planning and the principles and issues associated with safe and appropriate drug distribution. These will be discussed from both a community and an institutional practice focus.

5001 Human Toxicology covers the basic principles of toxicology, including toxicokinetics, mechanisms of toxicity and the major causes of mortality; the toxicology and treatment of the drugs that are the most important human poisons; and how new drug entities are assessed and regulated for safety.

5005 Communication & Patient Counselling focuses on the elements of effective interviewing and communication with patients, both written and verbal. Special approaches to selected patient populations will be discussed. Communication sessions are intended to develop self-confidence and interpersonal communication skills.
    CH: 1
    LC: 0
    OR: lectures or communications sessions 2 per week for six weeks; attendance is required

5009 Pharmacoepidemiology covers the principles of epidemiology and its application in public health and the health services delivery system; the methods used in pharmacoepidemiologic studies; the use of pharmacoepidemiology to study the benefit risk and effectiveness of drugs; and the use of clinical trials to establish the efficacy of new drugs.

500X Structured Practice Experience IV provides experience in clinical practice. Students will participate as members of the health care team. They will be responsible for providing pharmaceutical care to patients. Activities will include attending patient care rounds, providing in-services and drug information, and participating in case presentations. Students will be evaluated periodically throughout the practice experience and will also be required to pass an exam. The structured practice experience is comprised of two six week modules, 35 hours per week.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 18
    LC: 0
    PR: successful completion of all course requirements for the degree and Clear Promotion

5011 Pharmaceutical Biotechnology - inactive course.

5012 Pharmaceutical Analysis - inactive course.

5013 Hospital Pharmacy Administration - inactive course.

5017 Pharmaceutical Technology examines the principles governing the development and evaluation of novel delivery systems for drugs including therapeutic proteins and peptides. The course objectives are to provide knowledge of the physicochemical and biopharmaceutical aspects of the design, use and evaluation of novel drug delivery systems with emphasis on controlled release systems for oral and percutaneous delivery. The basic principles of the application of radiation and radioactive compounds in medical diagnosis and therapy, rationale for the use, preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals is also discussed.
    AR: attendance is required
    LH: 3

501A/B Pharmaceutical Research - inactive course.

501W Seminar consists of presentations given by students, and occasional visiting speakers, on pharmacy related topics. The final grade of PWD, PAS, or FAL is based on performance, attendance and participation.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 0
    LC: 0

5104 Therapeutics II provides an understanding of the therapeutic management of common diseases. The student is introduced to the pathophysiologies of common disease states, current drug (prescription and non-prescription) and non-drug therapies, procedures used to monitor drug therapy for clinical response, adverse reactions, drug interactions and contraindications, and the process for distinguishing the rational from the irrational use of drugs. The appropriateness and effectiveness of self-medication treatments will also be discussed.
    CH: 8
    LC: 8
    OR: tutorials 2 hours per week

5150 Pharmacy Skills continues the development of the learning skills necessary for pharmacy practice. Students will continue to develop skills of drug information and communication relating to the courses of study in the fourth year. Students will participate in discussion sessions relating to current practice issues (e.g., internet pharmacy), ethical issues in practice. Students will also complete a basic CPR course.
    CH: 1
    CO: all 4th year Fall semester pharmacy courses
    LC: 0
    OR: practical sessions 3 hours per week; attendance is required
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week

5301 Clinical Toxicology covers the toxicology and clinical management of toxicity associated with common medications.
    CH: 2
    CO: PHAR 5401
    CR: PHAR 5001
    LC: 2

5302 Patient Care III focuses on pharmaceutical care considerations in special patient populations (e.g., geriatrics, neonates, pediatrics, pregnancy and lactation, critically ill, etc.). Implementation of pharmaceutical care in hospital, ambulatory and community practice settings will be discussed.
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week; attendance is required

5303 Patient Care IV provides the student with a basic understanding of herbal products and supplements and will focus on pharmaceutical care considerations in using these products for the therapeutic management of common diseases.
    CH: 2
    LC: 2
    OR: tutorials 2 hours per week; attendance is required

5401 Therapeutics III is part in a series that looks at the therapeutic management of common diseases. Topics include transplantation, psychiatric, respiratory and cardiovascular disorders. For each disease state discussion will center around several key issues including: the establishment of desired therapeutic outcomes; development of appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic alternatives; factors to be considered to aid in the selection of an individualized therapeutic regimen; and the development of a monitoring plan to evaluate efficacy and safety.
    CH: 6
    LC: 6
    OR: tutorials 2 hours per week
    PR: PHAR 4402

5501 Pharmacy Research and Evaluation IV discusses the principles of critical appraisal and provides opportunities to apply these principles to critique and evaluate current medical literature. Students will be assigned to a tutorial group, which will meet twice during the semester to critically appraise at least two recently published studies. Emphasis will be placed on appropriate application of critical appraisal skills and group discussion of impact of study findings on clinical practice.
    CH: 1
    LC: 0
    OR: tutorials 1 hour per week
    PR: PHAR 4502



Please direct inquiries to hbugler@mun.ca.


Last modified on April 26, 2005 R. Bruce

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