2005 - 2006 Calendar

Faculty of Business Administration

Faculty List

Business Co-operative Education

Programs in Business Administration

Philosophy of the Business Administration Programs

Regulations for Business Minor

Admission/Re-Admission to the Faculty

General Notes

Appeals Procedures

Regulations for the General Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative)

Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative)

Business Co-operative Education

Regulations for the Diploma in Business Administration

Regulations for the General Degree of Bachelor of Commerce

Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Commerce

Commerce Concentrations

Regulations for the General Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)

Regulations for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration

Course List

Table I - Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) Curriculum

Table II - Plan of Operation for the Co-operative Program Chart

Table III - Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) Curriculum (Completed Jointly with the Degree of Bachelor of Arts)

Table IV - Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) Curriculum [Completed Jointly with the Degree of Bachelor of Science (Computer Science)]


FACULTY LIST

Dean

Gorman, G.G., B.B.A. St. Francis Xavier, M.B.A. Western Ontario, Ph.D. Stirling; Associate Professor

Associate Dean (Academic Programs)

Clift, T.B., B.Comm.(Co-op) Memorial, M.B.A. Dalhousie; Associate Professor

Associate Dean (Research)

Parsons, B.J., B.Comm.(Co-op)(Hons.) Memorial, Ph.D. British Columbia; Professor; Cross appointment with Department of Computer Science

Vector Aerospace Chair in Irish Business Studies

Stewart, D.B., B.Sc.(Hons.) Strathclyde (Glasgow), M.Sc. City (London), Ph.D. Strathclyde (Glasgow)Professor

Director, Centre for International Business Studies

Vaughan, S.M., B.A., M.B.A. Memorial

Director, Centre for Management Development

Morrissey, W.J., B.A.Ed., M.Ed. Memorial

Interim Director, P.J. Gardiner Institute for Entrprise and Entrepreneursip

Simmons, B.L., B.Comm., MBA Memorial

Manager, Academic Programs

King, C.A., B.Comm.(Co-op), M.B.A. Memorial

Manager, Finance and Administration

Wroblewski, V.F., B.A.Music, B.Ed. Acadia, B.Comm. Dalhousie, C.A. (Nova Scotia)

Professors

Barnes, J.G., B.A., B.Comm. Memorial, M.B.A. Harvard, Ph.D. Toronto

Faseruk, A.J., B.A. Queen's, B.Comm., M.B.A. Dalhousie, D.B.A. Kentucky, M.T.S. Queen's College; Winner of the President's Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1989-90

Kubiak, W., M.Sc. Tech. Univ., Gdansk, Ph.D. Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw; Winner of the President's Award for Outstanding Research, 1995-96

May, J.D., B.Comm. Queen's, D.Phil. York (England); Cross appointment with Department of Economics

Saha, S.K., B.Com., M.Com. Rajshahi, M.B.A., Ph.D. British Columbia

Sexty, R.W., B.Com. Alberta, M.B.A. Queen's, Ph.D. Colorado

Skipton, M.D., B.Sc. Bristol, M.Sc., M.Sc.(Management), D.Phil. Warwick

Sooklal, L.R., B.Sc.(Hons.) London, Dip.Ed. U.W.I., M.B.A. McGill, Ph.D. U.W.I.

Withey, M., B.A. Queen's, M.A. McMaster, M.B.A., Ph.D. Queen's

Associate Professors

Brown, T.C., B.A. Memorial, M.I.R., Ph.D. Toronto

Cumby, J.A., B.B.A. St. Francis Xavier, M.B.A. Memorial, F.C.A. (Newfoundland)

Cummins, G.M., B.Com. Acadia, M.B.A. Alberta, LL.B. British Columbia; Barrister and Solicitor: Ontario, Newfoundland and British Columbia; Notary Public, Newfoundland

Downer, P.A., B.Comm.(Co-op)(Hons.), M.B.A. Memorial, F.C.A. (Newfoundland); Winner of the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2003-2004

Foster, K.D., B.Sc. UNB, M.B.A., Ph.D. Dalhousie

Gallagher, K., B.A. McGill, M.B.A., Ph.D. British Columbia

Gupta, R.K., B.Sc., M.Sc. Agra, M.B.A. Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta, M.S., Ph.D. Rochester-Simon

Hart, S.M., B.A.(Hons.) Warwick, M.Sc. London, Ph.D. Warwick

Palasvirta, A., B.A., Ph.D. Utah

Pittman, J.A., B.Comm.(Co-op)(Hons.), M.B.A. Memorial, Ph.D. Waterloo, C.M.A., C.A. (Newfoundland)

Redlack, A.R., B.Sc., British Columbia, M.B.A. Queen's, M.Sc., Ph.D. Waterloo

Tulett, D.M., B.Sc., Ph.D. Queen's

Wong, S.L., M.Sc.(Management) Durham, F.C.M.A.(U.K.), Chartered Management Accountant, F.C.C.A.(U.K.), Chartered Certified Accountant, Cert.Ed.(Birmingham); Educational Director of the Certified Management Accounting Program

Wyse, J.E., B.Sc., M.B.A. Memorial, Ph.D. Western Ontario, C.D.P., I.S.P.

Assistant Professors

Arnold, K.A., B.A. Ottawa, M.B.A. McMaster, Ph.D. Queen’s

Bauer, L.L., B.Sc., Ph.D. Alberta

Coady, P.A., B.Comm.(Co-op) (Hons.), M.B.A. Memorial, C.A. (Newfoundland); Winner of the President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2004-2005

Cooke, G.B., B.Math., B.A. Waterloo, M.B.A. Wilfrid Laurier

Dearness, J.A., B.A. Alberta at Calgary, M.B.A. Toronto

Dupré, K.E., B.A.(Hons.) Queen’s, M.Sc., St. Mary’s, Ph.D. Queen’s

Guedhami, O., B.A. HEC, M.Sc.(finance) HEC Montreal, Ph.D.(finance) Laval

Hanlon, D.J., B.A., B.Ed. Windsor, M.B.A. Memorial, Ph.D. Stirling

Jaya, P.S., B.A.(Hons.), M.A. Delhi School of Economics, Ph.D. Rhode Island

King, W.F., B.Comm. Memorial, M.B.A. McMaster, C.A. (Newfoundland)

Komiak, S.X., B.Eng. Tsinghua (China), M.Ec. Fudan (China), Ph.D. British Columbia

Matchim, C.N., B.A., B.A.(Ed.), M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Ohio State

Mishra, D.R., B.B.A., M.Com. Tribhuvan, M.B.A. Indiana-Kelly, Ph.D. Connecticut

Stapleton, D., B.Sc., M.B.A. Memorial

Timur, S., B.Sc. Hacettepe (Turkey), M.B.A. Radford

Timur, T., B.Sc. Hacettepe (Turkey), M.B.A. Virginia Tech (USA)

Verma, M., B.A.(Hons.) Delhi, M.B.A. McGill

Wetsch, L.R., M.B.A. Massey (New Zealand), M.Sc. Queen’s

White, B., B.Sc. Dalhousie, B.A. Mount Saint Vincent, M.B.A. Saint Mary’s

Lecturers

Evans, D., B.A., M.B.A. Dalhousie

Furey, M., B.Sc., B.Ed., M.B.A. Memorial

Morrissey, L.M., B.Comm.(Co-op)(Hons.), M.B.A. Memorial

Business Co-operative Education

Crichton, A.G., B.Eng. Dalhousie, P.Eng.; Co-ordinator

Noseworthy, S., B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A. Memorial; Program Manager

Raheja, V., B.Comm. Madras, M.B.A. Memorial, A.C.A. (Institute of Chartered Accountants of India); Co-ordinator

Skanes, H., B.Comm. Memorial, M.B.A. York; Co-ordinator


PROGRAMS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The following undergraduate programs are available in the Faculty:

a) Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative)
b) Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) (Honours)
c) Bachelor of Commerce
d) Bachelor of Commerce (Honours)
e) Diploma in Business Administration
f) Bachelor of Business Administration
g) Bachelor of Business Administration (Honours)
h) Minor in Business Administration

GRADUATE STUDIES

A program leading to the M.B.A. degree is described in the Graduate Studies section of the University calendar.


PHILOSOPHY OF THE BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAMS

The Business Administration Programs are designed to provide students with a liberal business education and to prepare students for a creative role in business. The objectives of the program are to provide the graduate with:

-    a working knowledge of the functional areas of an organization,
-    a capacity for self development,
-    a high level of communication skills,
-    the ability to identify and analyze problems and opportunities and collect the relevant data pertinent to these,
-    a sensitivity to human interrelationships,
-    an awareness of subtle interplay of influence, persuasion and power in organizations,
-    an ability to recognize and respond to change,
-    an ability to apply skills to a variety of situations,
-    a sensitivity to the social, cultural and governmental environment.

The program leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) is set up to provide the student with a combination of academic terms or semesters and full-time work terms in the business environment. These work terms are arranged with the full co-operation of business firms and government enterprises and are supervised. They are designed to provide the student with the opportunity to weld theory and practice and to provide a broader preparation for a work career.

The business environment is becoming ever more complex. The program, therefore, recognizes that it is not enough to give the student theoretical and technical training only. By being exposed, as early as possible, to the environment in which he/she will eventually work, the student will be better able to appreciate that most work is accomplished and goals are achieved by working with and through people operating in a social and organizational setting. Such exposure will also aid the students in defining their own career interests and objectives.

The program leading to the Diploma in Business Administration and the Degree of Bachelor of Commerce is specifically designed to meet the needs of individuals who hold full- or part-time employment and who wish to complement their work experience with theoretical and practical training in business administration. The program provides such individuals with an opportunity to develop the abilities and to acquire the tools needed to deal with a changing work environment.

The program leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration permits students to combine core studies in the management area with interests in other fields. To that end, students who are enrolled in this program may complete a minor in the faculties of Arts or Science, the School of Music (or other areas with permission) or one of the minors offered at the Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.

REGULATIONS FOR BUSINESS MINOR

1) Students who are completing degrees in the Faculties of Arts and/or Science, or certain degrees in the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, may complete a minor in Business Administration.

2) Students who wish to undertake the Business minor program must have completed a minimum of ten courses. Application is made in the space provided on the Change of Academic Program Form, which must then be approved by the Dean of the Faculty of Business Administration, or delegate. Admission into the minor program is selective: at the time of application a student must have a cumulative average of at least 65%.

3) A minor in Business Administration shall consist of 24 credit hours comprising the following courses: Business 1000, 1101, 1201, 2301, 4000, 4500, and two courses chosen from Business 1600, 2101, 2201, 3101, 3320, 3700, and 4320.

4) Course prerequisites to all Business courses shall apply to a Business minor. Students should note, for example, that the prerequisites for Business 4500 are Business 1101, Statistics 2500 and Economics 2010. It should be noted that some courses are not offered every semester.


ADMISSION/READMISSION TO THE FACULTY

Applicants to the Faculty of Business Administration must fill out the "Application for Admission to the Faculty of Business Administration" form and return it by the appropriate deadline to the Office of the Registrar. Candidates for admission to the Diploma Program are also required to complete an "Employment Evaluation" form. Students who must apply for admission/readmission to the University, must also submit to the Office of the Registrar an "Application for Admission/Readmission" form.

GENERAL NOTES

1) The Office of the Registrar and the Faculty of Business Administration will assist students with any questions or problems which might arise concerning the interpretation of academic regulations. It is, however, the responsibility of students to see that their academic programs meet the University's regulations in all respects.

2) No student shall obtain more than one undergraduate degree from the Faculty of Business Administration.

3) The Committee on Undergraduate Studies, Faculty of Business Administration, may recommend that transfer credit for certain Business courses be awarded on the basis of successful completion of professional courses that lead to a professional designation (e.g. C.A., C.G.A., C.M.A.). Applications for transfer credit should be made through the Office of the Registrar.

4) The Faculty of Business Administration may approve that credit for certain Business courses successfully completed through Memorial University of Newfoundland's former Extension Services Division be granted upon application to the Registrar for transfer credit evaluation.


APPEALS PROCEDURES

All of the regulations above are subject to appeal. Appeals must be made in writing to the Chairperson, Committee on Undergraduate Studies, Faculty of Business Administration and must clearly outline the grounds for the appeal.


REGULATIONS FOR THE GENERAL DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE)

Admission Modes and Requirements

The Curriculum

Joint Degrees of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) and Bachelor of Arts

Joint Degrees of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) and Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

Minor or Cognate from Another Academic Unit

Examination and Advancement

Academic Course Program


ADMISSION MODES AND REQUIREMENTS

Direct Entry (for High School Students)

Students may apply for admission into first year of the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program (Terms A/B) directly from high school by indicating this in the appropriate place on their Undergraduate Application for Admission/Readmission to Memorial University of Newfoundland. Direct entry from high school is subject to the applicant’s final acceptance to the University and admissibility into either Mathematics 1000 or 1090. Terms A/B normally starts in September.

Advanced Standing (for Current Memorial Students)

1) Students may apply for admission with Advanced Standing into terms beyond Terms A/B up to and including Term 4. Students applying for admission to a term beyond Terms A/B must have completed all of the courses required in the program up to that term, including the courses required in Terms A/B, with grades high enough to have met promotion requirements. Students applying for admission with advanced standing must complete and submit to the Office of the Registrar the Application For Admission to the Faculty of Business Administration, normally on or before the deadlines specified in the University Diary for the semester in which they intend to begin their program.

2) Admission with Advanced Standing is competitive and selective. Prospective students are therefore encouraged to consider an alternate degree program in the event that they are not accepted into the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program.

3) The primary criterion used in reaching decisions on applications for admission with advanced standing is overall academic achievement. Selection, therefore, will be based on a student's overall academic performance. Students with weak overall academic records are unlikely to be admitted.

Transfers From Other Post-Secondary Institutions

1) Students who are transferring from other universities must apply for admission to the University on or before the deadlines specified in the University Diary for the semester in which they intend to begin their program, to allow sufficient time for the evaluation of transfer credits. Subject to items 2) and 3) under Advanced Standing (for Current Memorial Students) above, transfer students from other universities will be placed in that Term of the program judged by the Admissions Committee of the Faculty to be appropriate considering equivalent credits. Regardless of the Term into which they are admitted, transfer students must complete a minimum of two work terms.

2) Subject to items 2) and 3) under Advanced Standing (for Current Memorial Students) above, graduates of a three-year community college business diploma program may be considered for admission into Term 3. Space for Term 3 admissions is limited and competitive and admission decisions will be based on overall academic performance. Specific course requirements will be determined on an individual basis at the time of admission.

THE CURRICULUM

1) Every candidate shall complete nine academic terms in the Co-operative Program and shall normally be required to complete three work terms. The 141 academic credit hours are distributed as follows: 30 credit hours over the course of Terms A/B, 18 credit hours in each of Terms 1 and 2, and 15 credit hours in each of Terms 3 through 7.

2) Students who have been admitted to the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program must complete courses in academic terms or "blocks" in the sequence, order and course load as set out in Table I -Academic Course Program - The Co-operative Business Administration Program. Academic and Work Terms shall be taken in the sequence as set out in Table II - Plan of Operation - The Co-operative Business Administration Program. Exceptions to this prescribed program, including specified course load, must have the approval of the Admissions Committee or of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty.

3) By the end of the Winter semester of their first year, Terms A/B students must have successfully completed the following 30 credit hours:

a)    Six credit hours in English courses*;
b)    Mathematics 1000;
c)    Economics 2010 and 2020;
d)    Business 1000;
e)    Twelve additional credit hours in non-Business courses, at least 9 credit hours of which must be in courses chosen from the Faculties of Arts and/or Science** and/ or the School of Music.

* It is strongly recommended that students complete English 1110, Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style, as one of these English courses.

** Students who wish to complete the joint degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) [see entry immediately following THE CURRICULUM below] are strongly advised to include courses in a second language and courses in the subject of the intended Major program. Students who wish to complete the joint degrees of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) and Bachelor of Science in Computer Science [see entry immediately following JOINT DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE) AND BACHELOR OF ARTS below] must complete Computer Science 1710, 3 more credit hours in Mathematics and are strongly advised to complete 3 additional credit hours in Science electives.

4) The usual curriculum of courses and work terms beyond the 30 credit hours required in Terms A/B is as follows:

a)    Computer Science 2801
b)    Statistics 2500
c)    Economics 3150
d)    Fifty-one credit hours in core Business Administration courses
e)    Thirty credit hours in elective Business Administration courses, including non-Business courses prescribed for a concentration
f)    Twenty-one credit hours in non-Business courses, at least 15 of which must be in courses chosen from the Faculties of Arts and/or Science and/or the School of Music.
g)    Three work terms of four months duration each.

Unspecified credits may not be used to fulfil the requirements outlined in a), b), c), d), and g) above.

5) Notwithstanding clauses 2) and 4) and General Academic Regulation (Undergraduate) 1.1.3, students do not require special permission to register for courses while on work terms if the courses are in addition to the prescribed program.

6) The need for a specific course(s) or work term requirement may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty for students who apply for exemption from the course(s) or work term requirement in question.

NOTE: Students should also refer to the UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) of the University.

JOINT DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE) AND BACHELOR OF ARTS

Any student who is admitted into the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program may simultaneously complete the requirements for a Bachelor of Arts program. Under those circumstances, regulations for the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program will be relaxed as follows. Notwithstanding clauses 4) e) and 4) f) of “The Curriculum” above, students in the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program who are concurrently completing the Bachelor of Arts degree will be permitted to make the following adjustments to those clauses:

a) No fewer than 15 credit hours, but no more than 30 credit hours, in Business electives, including non-Business courses prescribed for a concentration.

b) No fewer than 21 credit hours, but no more than 36 credit hours, in elective courses chosen from the Faculty of Arts.

THESE ADJUSTMENTS TO THE NORMAL CURRICULUM WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE GRADUATING WITH THE BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE) DEGREE AND THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE AT THE SAME CONVOCATION. In order to meet all of the requirements of both degree Programs at the same time, students who are completing the joint degrees are strongly advised to follow the Table III, Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) Curriculum (Completed jointly with the Bachelor of Arts). 

JOINT DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE) AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Any student who is admitted into the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program may simultaneously complete the requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree. Under those circumstances, regulations for the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program will be relaxed as follows. Notwithstanding clauses 4) a), e) and f) of “The Curriculum” above, students in the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program who are concurrently completing the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree will be permitted to make the following adjustments to those clauses:

a) Computer Science 2801 will not be required.

b) No fewer than 15 credit hours, but no more than 30 credit hours, in Business electives, including non-Business courses prescribed for a concentration.

c) No fewer than 21 credit hours, but no more than 36 credit hours, in elective courses chosen from the Faculty of Science.

THESE ADJUSTMENTS TO THE NORMAL CURRICULUM WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE GRADUATING WITH THE BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE) DEGREE AND THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES AT THE SAME CONVOCATION. In order to meet all of the requirement of both degree Programs at the same time, students who are completing the joint degrees are strongly advised to follow the Table IV, Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) Curriculum (Completed jointly with the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science).

MINOR OR COGNATE FROM ANOTHER ACADEMIC UNIT

1) A student enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program may, using all of the non-Business electives required in the curriculum, complete a minor within the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Science, the School of Music, or offered at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College. Regulations for the minor are given under the Calendar entries for the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Science, and the School of Music, and under the Calendar entry for Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.

2) A student enrolled in the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) program may pursue a minor (or equivalent) in other non-business academic units (where minor program exist) with i) permission of that academic unit and ii) permission of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty of Business Administration.

EXAMINATION AND ADVANCEMENT

1) The Faculty Council of the Faculty of Business Administration constitutes the examining body for all examinations in Business courses. In addition, the standing of every student will be assessed by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies in accordance with the promotion requirements outlined in Clauses 2, 3, and 8 below.

2) Students in Terms A/B will be considered for promotion to Term 1 at the end of the Winter semester of their first year. At that time, for promotion from Terms A/B, students must have successfully completed the 30 credit hours prescribed in 3) of THE CURRICULUM above, with an overall average on those 30 credit hours of at least 65%. Students who do not satisfy these requirements will be required to withdraw from the program and will not be promoted to Term 1.

Students who have been required to withdraw following Terms A/B may be considered for readmission to the program in accordance with the entry under ADMISSION MODES AND REQUIREMENTS above, with the heading Advanced Standing (for Current Memorial Students).

A required withdrawal for failure to meet the promotion requirements from Terms A/B will not be reflected on a student’s transcript.

3) For promotion from each of Terms 1 through 7, the requirements are the achievement of a passing grade in at least 12 credit hours and an overall average of at least 60% in those courses required in each academic term.

Students in an academic term who do not maintain the appropriate course load as outlined in Clause 2 of "The Curriculum," with the approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies, will be required to withdraw from the program and will not be promoted.

Students completing Terms 1 through 7 who fail to achieve these standards will be required to withdraw from the program. A required withdrawal from any of Terms 1 through 7 will be reflected on a student’s transcript.

Students who have been required to withdraw following any one of Terms 1 through 7 may be considered for readmission after the lapse of two semesters, at which time they will normally be required to repeat the term which they failed, unless, in the opinion of the Admissions Committee, Faculty of Business Administration, a more meaningful course of study would be appropriate.

In order to be considered for readmission, students must formally apply for readmission to the program not later than the deadlines specified in the University Diary for the semester in which they wish to recommence their program.

4) The Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty of Business Administration may promote a student notwithstanding promotion requirements listed in Clause 3 above. A decision of this nature will be made only for reasons acceptable to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and in the case of a student thought likely to succeed in future terms.

5) Work terms are scheduled in the "Plan of Operation - The Co-operative Business Administration Program". The dates for starting and finishing each work term are shown in the University Diary.

Successful completion of the work term requirements is a prerequisite to graduation.

6) A competition for work term employment is organized by Business Co-operative Education.

Students may obtain their own work term jobs outside the competition. Such jobs must be confirmed by letter from the employer and approved by Business Co-operative Education on or before the first day of the work period.

By entering the competition, students give permission for Business Co-operative Education to supply their university transcripts to potential employers.

7) A work report on a topic approved by Business Co-operative Education must be submitted for each work term. This report must be approved by the employer and submitted to Business Co-operative Education on or before the deadline scheduled by Business Co-operative Education. Evidence of the student's ability to gather material relating to the report, analyze it effectively, and present it in a clear, logical and concise form, will be required in the report. Late reports will not be graded unless prior permission for a late report has been given by Business Co-operative Education.

8) The overall evaluation of the work term is the responsibility of Business Co-operative Education. The work term shall consist of two components:

Student performance as evaluated by a co-ordinator, given input from the employer, and a work report graded by a co-ordinator or a member of faculty.

Evaluation of the work term will result in the assignment of one of the following final grades:

a) Pass with Distinction: Indicates EXCELLENT PERFORMANCE in BOTH the work report and work performance. The student is commended for his/her outstanding performance in each of the required components; pass with distinction has been awarded to each of the work report and work performance.

b) Pass: Indicates that PERFORMANCE MEETS EXPECTATIONS in both the work report and work performance. The student fully meets the requirements of a passing work report and completely satisfactory work term performance.

c) Fail: Indicates FAILING PERFORMANCE in the work report and/or the work performance.

For promotion from the work term, a student must obtain PASS WITH DISTINCTION or PASS.

If a student fails to achieve the standards outlined above, the student will be required to withdraw from the program and may be considered for readmission after the lapse of two semesters, at which time the student will be required to complete a further work term with satisfactory performance before being admitted to any further academic term in the Faculty.

9) A student who has been required to withdraw from the program as a result of failing to meet the requirements of either two academic terms or two work terms will not be eligible for readmission to the program.

10) Students are not permitted to drop work terms without prior approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies upon the recommendation of Business Co-operative Education. Students who drop a work term without permission, or who fail to honour an agreement to work with an employer, or who conduct themselves in such a manner as to cause their discharge from the job, will normally be awarded a failed grade for that work term. Permission to drop a work term does not constitute a waiver of degree requirements, and students who have obtained such permission must complete an approved work term in lieu of the one dropped.

NOTE: Students should also refer to the UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) of the University.

ACADEMIC COURSE PROGRAM (following promotion from Terms A/B to Term 1)

The curriculum for academic terms following promotion from Terms A/B is as follows:

NOTE: Also refer to Table I.

Term 1
Business 1101. Principles of Accounting
Business 1201. Principles of Marketing
Statistics 2500. Statistics for Business and Arts Students I
   
Nine credit hours from List A below.

Term 2
Business 2101. Managerial Accounting
Business 2201. Marketing Applications
Business 2301. Organizational Behaviour

The 9 remaining credit hours from List A below not completed in Term I.

LIST A
∙    Business 1600. Introduction to Entrepreneurship
∙    Business 2000. Business Communications
∙    Business 2401. Quantitative Methods for Business
∙    Computer Science 2801. Introduction to Computing for Business
∙    Six credit hours in non-Business electives**.

Term 3
Business 3320. Introduction to Labour Relations
Business 3401. Operations Management
Business 3700. Information Systems
Six elective credit hours from List B below.

Term 4
Business 4000. Business Law I
Business 4320. Introduction to Personnel and Human Resource Management
Business 4401. Management Science
Business 4500. Financial Management I
Economics 3150. Money and Banking

Term 5
Business 5301. Organizational Theory
Twelve credit hours chosen from List B below, not completed in Term 3.

Term 6
Business 7000. Organizational Strategy
Twelve credit hours chosen from List B below, not completed in Term 3 or 5.

Term 7
The remaining 15 credit hours from List B below, not completed in Terms 3, 5, and 6.

LIST B
∙    Thirty credit hours in Business electives, including non-Business courses prescribed for a concentration.
∙    Fifteen credit hours in non-Business electives**.

**Of the 21 credit hours in non-Business electives required, at least 15 must be chosen from the Faculties of Arts and/or Science and/or the School of Music.


REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOURS DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE)

An Honours Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) signifies superior academic achievement.

1) To be considered for an Honours Degree, the candidates must so indicate on the prescribed application for graduation form.

2) Candidates for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) shall comply with all regulations governing the General Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative).

3) A candidate shall:

a) maintain at least a 75% average and an average of at least 3.5 points on the courses which comprise the 84 credit hours in Business (including non-Business concentration program courses) as specified in "THE CURRICULUM" , and

b) maintain an average of at least 3.25 points on the courses which comprise the total number of credit hours required for the degree, and

c) achieve a passing grade in each of the courses which comprise the 84 credit hours in Business.

4) A declared candidate for an Honours Degree who fails to fulfill the conditions of Clause 3 but fulfills the requirements for a General Co-operative Degree shall be awarded the General Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative).

5) A student who has been required to withdraw from the program as a result of failing to meet the requirements for promotion from academic Terms 1 through 7 or from Work Terms 1, 2, or 3 will not be eligible for an Honours Degree.

6) Candidates are not permitted to repeat or substitute courses for the purpose of meeting the academic standing specified in Clause 3.


BUSINESS CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION

General management of the work terms in the Co-operative Program is the responsibility of Business Co-operative Education. Through its co-ordinators, it is responsible for assisting potential employers to become involved in the program, for the continual development of employment opportunities, for arranging student-employer interviews, for counselling of students, for visiting students on their work assignments and for the evaluation of the work term.

Students and employers choose each other through the job competition process. Job advertisements are posted and students may apply for up to twelve positions. Employers interview students, and both the students and employers express their preferences for one another.

Students are then placed by Business Co-operative Education to reflect expressed preferences. Placement is not guaranteed but every effort is made to ensure that appropriate employment is made available. In the case of students who are required to withdraw from the program, Business Co-operative Education has no responsibility for placement until they have been readmitted to the program.

Salaries paid to co-operative students are determined by employers based upon their internal wage structures, and tend to increase as the student progresses through the program and assumes more responsibility. However, students should not expect the income from work terms to make them completely self-supporting.

Students in the Co-operative Program give permission to prospective employers, in the course of the placement process, to have access to their records, which contain their academic marks and their work term evaluations. After accepting a position, students may not withdraw from a specific job situation unless prior permission is obtained from the Dean or his delegate.

EMPLOYERS PARTICIPATING IN CO-OPERATIVE BUSINESS PROGRAM

2Market
Abitibi-Consolidated, Grand Falls-Windsor, NL
ACE Memorial
P. Acharya & Associates
Acta Herb Inc.
Addison Energy, Calgary, AB
Advanced Immuni T Canada
Advanced Tent Rentals, Concord, ON
Agnes Pratt
Agriculture and Agri-Foods, Dept. of
Air Cadets
Aker Kvaerner
Aliant Mobility
Allied Youth Program
AMEC
Anthony and Smith
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Moncton, NB and St. John’s, NL
Atlantic Lottery Corporation
Auntie Crae's
Auto Parts Network

Battery Hotel and Suites
Bennett's Restaurants
Bennington Gate
Big Brothers, Big Sisters
Blue Line Innovations
Brookfield Dairy Group
Browning Harvey
BYC Services Limited

Canada Revenue Agency
Canadian Hard of Hearing Association
Canadian National Institute for the Blind
Canadian Natural Resources Limited, Calgary, AB
Capital Coast Development Alliance
Cardinal Homes Ltd.
C-CORE
Central Dairies
CHC Scotia Limited, Aberdeen, Scotland
Chester Dawe
CIBC
CIBC Wood Gundy
Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Ottawa
City of St. John's
CNIB (CaterPlan Services)
Codroy Valley Credit Union
Colby Construction
Collins Barrow, Calgary, AB
Community Fundraising Inc.
Community Mediation Services
Cormack Mini Mart
Country Ribbon
Creative Canvas
Crosbie Salamis Limited
Cruise Ship Association of Newfoundland
Curves

Daley Brothers
Day Job Limited
Deloitte & Touche
Dennis Chevrolet Oldsmobile, Corner Brook, NL
Department of Finance
DF Barnes
Ducks Unlimited

East Coast Catering
East Coast Converters
East Coast Sample Services
Education, Department of
Eimskip
Elim Pentecostal Tabernacle Church
Emergency Alert Foundation
Energywise, The Netherlands
Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON
Ernst & Young, Montreal, QC
Ernst & Young, St. John’s, NL
Export Development Canada, Ottawa, ON
ExxonMobil

fga Consulting Engineers Limited
Fidelity National Financial Canada
Finance, Department of
First Atlantic Financial
Fisheries & Oceans, Dept. of
Fit For Work
Focus Atlantic
Foley's Atlantic Martial Arts
Forest Resources and Agri-Foods, Dept. of
Fortis Properties

Genesis Centre
GlaxoSmithKline, Harlow, U.K.
GMAC Financial, Halifax, NS
Grant Thornton

Harris Ryan
Health Bridges
Hibernia
Hickman Motors Ltd.
Home Hardware
Hostess Frito-Lay
HP Management
Human Resources Development Canada
Humber Valley Resort, Humber Valley

IDEA Factory
Industry Canada
Innovation, Trade and Rural Development, Dept. of
Institute of Chartered Accountants of NL
IRO, Hengelo, The Netherlands
Iron Ore Company of Canada, Labrador City, NL

J.D. Irving Paper, Saint John, NB
J. Pike and Company, Corner Brook, NL
Janes and Company, Placentia, NL
Johnsons Insurance
Junior Achievement

Kellogg, Brown and Root
Kenny Enterprises
Kids Eat Smart Foundation
Kruger

L & G Business Advisors Inc.
Labatt Brewery
Lakecrest
Lee, Pearl L.
Lighthouse Cafe
Lion Max Simms Camp, Bishop Falls, NL
Lloyd's Register
London Offshore Consultants, London, U.K.
LTQ Enterprises

MacKay Landau, Iquluit, NWT
Maersk Contractors
Marine Atlantic Inc., Port Aux Basques, NL
Metro General Insurance
Morrison Health Care
Mt. Pearl Sports Alliance
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Centre for International Business
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Centre for Management Development
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Computer Purchasing Centre
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Distance Education and Learning
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Faculty of Business Administration
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Finance and Administration
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Fisheries and Marine Institute Student Union
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Offshore Safety and Survival Centre
Memorial University of Newfoundland, PJ Gardiner Institute for Enterprise and Entrepreneurship
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Student Affairs and Services
Memorial University of Newfoundland, Student Recruitment
Memorial University of Newfoundland, University Relations

Newfoundland Association of Technical Industries
Natural Resources, Dept. of
NavSim
Newfound Developers Group of Companies
Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro
Newfoundland Design Associates
Newfoundland Liquor Corporation
Newfoundland Ocean Industries Association
NewLab Clinical Research Inc.
NKHK Chartered Accountants
NL Association of CBDC
North Atlantic Petroleum
North Atlantic Refining Limited
Nu Way

O'Brien's Whale and Bird Tours
Omega Investments
Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, ON
Ozark Electrial

Parkdale Pharmacy
Peninsula Health Care Corporation, Carbonear, NL
PennCon
Penny Energy
Penny Pincher, Pembroke, ON
Persona Communications
Petro-Canada
Pizza Experts
Pizza Your Way
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Primerica
Provincial Airlines
Public Policy Research Centre
Public Utilities Board

Quidi Vidi Brewery Ltd.

RBC Royal Bank
Reid Insurance, Grand Falls-Windsor, NL
Roebothan, McKay & Marshall
Royal St. John's Regatta Committee

Scotiabank
Specialty Homes
Spectrol
St. John's Nursing Home Board
St. John's Sport and Entertainment
Strategic Directions Inc.
Student Connections
Subway
Syncrude, Fort McMurray, AB

Technology Tutors Ltd.
The Rental Hutch
TLC Nursing and Home Care
Tom Woodford Ltd
Town of Gander
Town of WitlessBay
Traders Atlantic Inc.
Transportation and Works, Dept. of
Trapper John's
Treasury Board of Canada
Treasury Board Secretariat
Triple S Management

Universal Travel

Vector Aerospace

Wal-Mart Canada
Wes Power Technology
West Side Charlie's
Wood Gundy
Woody Island Resort

Y Enterprise Centre


REGULATIONS FOR THE DIPLOMA IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

1) To be considered for admission to the Diploma Program in Business Administration, applicants must normally have satisfied the following requirements:
a) Successful completion of 15 academic credit hours as follows:
    i.      Six credit hours in English;
    ii.     Mathematics 1000;
    ii      Business 1000;
    iv.    Three credit hours chosen from courses in the Faculties of Arts and/or Science and/or the School of Music.

Only students with an overall average of at least 60% in the courses comprising the 15 credit hours required will be considered for admission to the program.

Overall academic performance is an important criterion in reaching decisions on applications for admission, and will be considered, in addition to the average on the five courses required for admission, in the selection process. Students with weak overall academic records are unlikely to be admitted.

b) At least five years of full-time work experience, or equivalent, that is deemed acceptable by the Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Business Administration.

In the case where students have been required to withdraw from the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) Program, the Admissions Committee of the Faculty may consider this circumstance as grounds to deny admission.

2) To be eligible for the Diploma in Business Administration, a student must:
a) have been admitted to the Diploma Program;

b) successfully complete the following 45 credit hours in addition to the 15 credit hours required for admission (a total of 60 credit hours):
    -     Economics 2010 and 2020;
    -     Statistics 2500 or equivalent;
    -     Computer Science 2801;
    -     Business 1101, 1201, 1600, 2301, 2401, 4000, and 4500;
    -     Four of the following, one of which must either Business 3320 or 4320: Business 2000, 2101, 2201, 3320, 3401, 3700, 4320, and 4401.
c) Achieve an overall average of at least 60% in the courses which comprise the 45 credit hours specified in clause 2(b). A student failing to meet this requirement will be required to repeat a course(s) to raise the overall average to the minimum acceptable level.

d) Successfully complete a comprehensive case analysis with report (Business 450W).

e) Students planning to pursue their Bachelor of Business Administration or their Bachelor of Commerce (General) (see regulations for the general degrees of Bachelor of Business Administration and Bachelor of Commerce) are encouraged to note the prerequisites for 7000 (Organizational Strategy) and to plan their courses so that they have completed the prerequisites prior to the semester in which they plan to take 7000.

3)a) Every candidate for the Diploma in Business Administration will be required to complete at least 30 credit hours at this University. The courses comprising these credit hours must be applicable to the Diploma in Business Administration.

b) Every candidate for the Diploma in Business Administration, who has completed a Bachelor's degree at this University or another recognized university or university college, will be required to complete at least 30 credit hours at this University beyond those required for that degree. The courses comprising these credit hours must be applicable to the Diploma in Business Administration.

4) The requirement for a specific course(s) may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies for students who apply for exemption from the course(s) in question. However, such exemptions may not be used to reduce the number of credit hours required for the Diploma.

NOTE: Students should also refer to the UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) of the University.

CONTINUATION

1) The Faculty Council of the Faculty of Business Administration constitutes the examining body for all examinations in Business courses. In addition, the standing of every student will be assessed by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies in accordance with the continuation requirements outlined in paragraph (2) below.

2) Students must qualify for continuation after each term of study. For continuation, students must have an overall average of 60% over their last ten courses taken. In the event that a student has more courses than needed in the earliest term used, the courses with the highest grades in that term will be used.

3) Students who fail to achieve the standards outlined in paragraph (2) above normally will be required to withdraw from the program. They may be considered for readmission after a lapse of two semesters. In order to be considered for readmission, students must formally apply for readmission.

4) Students who are required to withdraw a second time are not eligible for readmission into their program.

5) The Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty of Business Administration may allow a student to continue who fails to achieve the standards outlined in paragraph (2) above. A decision of this nature will be made only for reasons acceptable to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies.


REGULATIONS FOR THE GENERAL DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE

ADMISSION

1. Students will be admitted to the Bachelor of Commerce degree program only after the successful completion of the requirements listed in Clauses 1 and 2 of the Regulations for the Diploma in Business Administration. Please refer to the Diploma Regulations which immediately precede these regulations.

2. Graduates of a three-year community college business diploma program may be considered for admission directly into the Bachelor of Commerce degree program. The admission requirements of the Diploma in Business Administration with respect to work experience outlined in clause 1)b will apply. Applicants should note that admission is competitive and limited and is based on overall academic performance. To be eligible for the General Degree of Bachelor of Commerce such students will be required to complete a minimum of 45 credit hours from diploma and degree courses beyond those used towards their college diploma. Specific course requirements will be determined on an individual basis at the time of admission.

3. Notwithstanding Clause 1 above, the Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Business Administration may admit students who fail to meet the admission requirements. A decision of this nature will be made for reasons acceptable to the Admissions Committee, and in the case of the student thought likely to succeed in future terms.

CURRICULUM

1) A candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Commerce shall successfully complete a minimum of 60 credit hours in addition to the 60 credit hours required for the Diploma in Business Administration. The 60 credit hours shall comprise:

-    The remaining four courses from the following list which were not completed for the Diploma in Business Administration: Business 2000, 2101, 2201, 3320, 3401, 3700, 4320, and 4401;
-    Business 5301, Business 7000*, and Economics 3150;
-    Thirty credit hours in Business electives, including non-Business courses prescribed for a concentration;
-    Nine credit hours in non-Business electives, at least 6 credit hours of which must be chosen from courses in the faculties of Arts and/or Science and/or the School of Music.

*Students are encouraged to note the prerequisites for 7000 (Organizational Strategy) and to plan their courses so that they have completed the prerequisites prior to the semester in which they plan to take 7000.

An overall average of at least 60% must be achieved in the twenty courses listed above. A student failing to meet this requirement will be required to repeat a course(s) to raise the overall average to the minimum acceptable level.

2) All candidates, as an academic requirement of the degree, must successfully complete an approved research paper or a comprehensive case analysis with report (Business 750W). This requirement is in addition to the comprehensive case analysis report (Business 450W) required for the Diploma in Business Administration.

3) The requirements for a specific course(s) may be waived by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies for students who apply for exemption from the course(s) in question. However, such exemptions may not be used to reduce the number of credit hours required for the Degree.

NOTE: Students should also refer to the UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) of the University.

CONTINUATION

1) The Faculty Council of the Faculty of Business Administration constitutes the examining body for all examinations in Business courses. In addition, the standing of every student will be assessed by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies in accordance with the continuation requirements outlined in paragraph (2) below.

2) Students must qualify for continuation after each term of study. For continuation, students must have an overall average of 60% over their last ten courses taken. In the event that a student has more courses than needed in the earliest term used, the courses with the highest grades in that term will be used.

3) Students who fail to achieve the standards outlined in paragraph (2) above normally will be required to withdraw from the program. They may be considered for readmission after a lapse of two semesters. In order to be considered for readmission, students must formally apply for readmission.

4) Students who are required to withdraw a second time are not eligible for readmission into their program.

5) The Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty of Business Administration may allow a student to continue who fails to achieve the standards outlined in paragraph (2) above. A decision of this nature will be made only for reasons acceptable to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies.


REGULATIONS FOR HONOURS DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF COMMERCE

An Honours Degree of Bachelor of Commerce signifies superior academic achievement.

1. To be considered for an Honours Degree, the candidates must so indicate on the University's prescribed application for graduation form.

2. Candidates for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Commerce shall
a) comply with all regulations governing the Diploma in Business Administration and the General Degree of Bachelor of Commerce, and
b) maintain at least a 75% average and an average of at least 3.5 points on the courses which comprise the 84 credit hours in Business (including non-Business option program courses but excluding Business 450W and Business 750W) required for the diploma and the degree, and
c) maintain an average of at least 3.25 points on the courses which comprise the total number of credit hours required for the diploma and the degree.

3. Candidates are not permitted to repeat or substitute courses for the purpose of meeting the academic standing specified in Clause 2.

4. A declared candidate for an Honours Degree who fails to fulfil the conditions of Clause 2 but fulfils the requirements for a General Degree shall be awarded the General Degree of Bachelor of Commerce.


COMMERCE CONCENTRATIONS

A student may choose to follow a general degree program, or to concentrate in one of the areas outlined below. In either case, students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in Business electives. A concentration provides the student with the opportunity of broadening knowledge and understanding of one of the following areas. Particular attention should be paid to necessary prerequisites when scheduling courses.

ACCOUNTING
MARKETING
HUMAN RESOURCES AND LABOUR RELATIONS
FINANCE
SMALL BUSINESS/ENTREPRENEURSHIP
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE


ACCOUNTING

Students electing an Accounting concentration should complete the following courses:

Business 3101. Accounting Applications
Business 5160. Cost Accounting
Business 6100. Intermediate Accounting I
Business 6110. Intermediate Accounting II

and any five of the following. Those students intending to pursue the C.A., C.M.A., or C.G.A. designations should consult the appropriate body to determine those courses which would be most beneficial to them.

Business 5000. Business Law II
Business 5500. Financial Management II
Business 6120. Taxation I
Business 6130. Auditing
Business 7110. Accounting Theory
Business 7120. Advanced Financial Accounting
Business 7150. Taxation II
Business 7160. Advanced Topics in Managerial Accounting

MARKETING

Students electing a Marketing concentration should complete the following courses:

Statistics 2501. Statistics for Business and Arts Students II
Business 5200. Consumer Behaviour
Business 6200. Marketing Research
Business 7230. Marketing Management

and any five of the following:

Business 6210. Advertising Management
Business 6220. Professional Selling and Sales Management
Business 6230. Services Marketing
Business 7210. Retailing Management
Business 7240. International Marketing
Business 7250. Business and Industrial Marketing

HUMAN RESOURCES AND LABOUR RELATIONS

Students electing the Human Resources and Labour Relations concentration should complete the following courses:

Business 6310. Advanced Personnel and Human Resource Management
Business 6320. Advanced Labour Relations
Business 7310. Seminar in Human Resource Management
Business 7322. Labour Law
Business 7330. Organizational Development
Economics 3360. Labour Market Economics

and any two of the following:

Business 6301. New Directions in Organizational Behaviour
Business 7320. Collective Agreement Administration and Arbitration
Business 7321. Dispute Settlement in Labour Relations

FINANCE

Students electing a Finance concentration should complete the following courses:

Business 5500. Financial Management II
Business 6120. Taxation I
Business 6510. Investments
Business 6550. International Finance
Business 7500. Advanced Finance
Business 7510. Options and Futures

and any three of the following courses:

Mathematics 2090. Mathematics of Finance
Economics 3000. Intermediate Micro Theory I
Economics 3010. Intermediate Macro Theory
Economics 3030. International Economics
Economics 4025. Public Expenditures
Economics 4026. Taxation
Business 5530. Public Finance
Business 6100. Intermediate Accounting I
Business 6110. Intermediate Accounting II
Business 7150. Taxation II

SMALL BUSINESS/ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Students electing a Small Business/Entrepreneurship concentration should complete the following courses:

Business 5600. New Venture Creation
Business 6200. Marketing Research
Business 6600. Managing Growth in the Small Firm
Business 6610. Small Enterprise and Regional Development
Business 7600. Current Topics in Entrepreneurship
Business 7610. Regulatory and Taxation Issues for Small Business
One of Philosophy 2800-2810. Contemporary Issues

and any two of the following:

Business 6120. Taxation I
Business 7210. Retailing Management
Business 7240. International Marketing

INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Students electing an Information Systems concentration should complete the following courses:

Business 5700. Information Systems Analysis and Design
Business 5701. Information Systems Development
Business 6700. Data Management
Business 6701. Information Technology Management
Business 7700. Strategic Information Systems
Business 7701. Current Topics in Information Systems

and any three of the following:

Business 5401. Linear Optimization and Extensions I: Applications
Business 7400. Simulation in Management
Computer Science 2710. Object-Oriented Programming II
Computer Science 2711. Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Computer Science 2752. Introduction to Business Data Processing
Computer Science 3710. Vocational Languages

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE

Students electing a Management Science concentration should complete the following five courses:

Business 5401. Linear Optimization and Extensions I: Applications
Business 5402. Linear Optimization and Extensions II: Algorithms
Business 6400. Advanced Management Science
Business 7400. Simulation in Management
Computer Science 2710. Object-Oriented Programming II


REGULATIONS FOR THE GENERAL DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

ADMISSION MODES AND REQUIREMENTS

THE CURRICULUM

MINOR OR COGNATE FROM ANOTHER ACADEMIC UNIT

CONTINUATION


ADMISSION MODES AND REQUIREMENTS

Direct Entry (for High School Students)

Students may apply for admission into first year of the BBA program (Terms A/B) directly from high school by indicating this in the appropriate place on their Undergraduate Application for Admission/Readmission to Memorial University of Newfoundland. Direct entry from high school is subject to the applicant’s final acceptance to the University and admissibility into either Mathematics 1000 or 1090. Terms A/B normally starts in September.

Advanced Standing (for Current Memorial Students)

1) Students may apply for admission with Advanced Standing into the BBA program beyond Terms A/B. Students applying for admission beyond Terms A/B must have completed all of the courses required in Terms A/B with grades high enough to have met continuation requirements. Students applying for admission with advanced standing must complete and submit to the Office of the Registrar the Application For Admission to the Faculty of Business Administration, normally on or before the deadlines specified in the University Diary for the semester in which they intend to begin their program.

2) Admission with Advanced Standing is competitive and selective. Prospective students are therefore encouraged to consider an alternate degree program in the event that they are not accepted into the BBA program.
 
3) The primary criterion used in reaching decisions on applications for admission with advanced standing is overall academic achievement. Selection, therefore, will be based on a student's overall academic performance. Students with weak overall academic records are unlikely to be admitted.

4) In the case where an applicant has been required to withdraw from the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) Program, the Admissions Committee of the Faculty may consider this circumstance as grounds to deny admission.

Transfers From Other Post-Secondary Institutions

1) Students who are transferring from other universities must apply for admission to the University on or before the deadlines specified in the University Diary for the semester in which they intend to begin their program, to allow sufficient time for the evaluation of transfer credits. The acceptance of transfer students into the BBA program is subject to the same conditions outlined under Advanced Standing (for Current Memorial Students) above.

2) Subject to items 2) and 3) under Advanced Standing (for Current Memorial Students) above, graduates of a three year community college business diploma program may also be considered for admission with advanced standing into the BBA program. To be eligible for the General Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration such students will be required to complete a minimum of 45 credit hours beyond those used towards their college diploma. Specific course requirements will be determined on an individual basis at the time of admission. 

THE CURRICULUM

1) The BBA program requires a total of 120 credit hours.

2) By the end of the Spring semester of their first year, Terms A/B students must have successfully completed the following 30 credit hours:

a) Six credit hours in English courses*;
b) Mathematics 1000;
c) Economics 2010 and 2020;
d) Business 1000;
e) Twelve additional credit hours in non-Business courses, at least 9 credit hours of which must be in courses chosen from the Faculties of Arts and/or Science and/ or the School of Music.

* It is strongly recommended that students complete English 1110, Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style, as one of these English courses.
 
3) In addition to the Terms A/B requirements, the curriculum shall consist of the successful completion of:

a) Sixty credit hours consisting of: Computer Science 2801, Statistics 2500, Economics 3150, Business courses 1101, 1201, 1600, 2000, 2101, 2201, 2301, 2401, 3320, 3401, 3700, 4000, 4320, 4401, 4500, 5301, and 7000.

b) Students are encouraged to note the prerequisites for 7000 (Organizational Strategy) and to plan their courses so that they have completed the prerequisites prior to the semester in which they plan to take 7000.

c) Thirty other credit hours, of which not more than 9 credit hours may be from courses in the Faculty of Business Administration.

4) For graduation, a student must be enrolled in the BBA program, and have obtained a minimum average of 60% on the program courses.

MINOR OR COGNATE FROM ANOTHER ACADEMIC UNIT

1) A student enrolled in the BBA program may complete a minor within the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Science, the School of Music, or from Sir Wilfred Grenfell College. Regulations for the minor are given under the Calendar entries for the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Science, the School of Music, and Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.

2) A student enrolled in the BBA program may pursue a minor (or equivalent) in other non-business academic units (where minor programs exist) with i) permission of that academic unit and ii) permission of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty of Business Administration. 

CONTINUATION

1) The Faculty Council of the Faculty of Business Administration constitutes the examining body for all examinations in Business courses. In addition, the standing of every student will be assessed by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies in accordance with the continuation requirements outlined in paragraphs (2) and (3) below.

2) Students in Terms A/B will be considered for continuation in the BBA program at the end of the Spring semester of their first year. At that time, for continuation after Terms A/B, students must have successfully completed the 30 credit hours prescribed in 2) of THE CURRICULUM above, with an overall average on those 30 credit hours of at least 65%. Students who do not satisfy these requirements will be required to withdraw from the program.

Students who have been required to withdraw following Terms A/B may be considered for readmission to the program in accordance with the entry under ADMISSION MODES AND REQUIREMENTS above, with the heading Advanced Standing (for Current Memorial Students).

A required withdrawal for failure to meet the continuation requirements from Terms A/B will not be reflected on a student’s transcript.

3) Following Terms A/B, BBA students must qualify for continuation after each term of study. For continuation, students must have an overall average of 60% over their last ten courses taken. In the event that a student has more courses than needed in the earliest term used, the courses with the highest grades in that term will be used.

Students who fail to achieve these standards will be required to withdraw from the program. They may be considered for readmission after a lapse of two semesters. In order to be considered for readmission, students must formally apply for readmission.

A required withdrawal for failure to meet continuation requirements in terms following Terms A/B will be reflected on a student’s transcript.

4) Students beyond Terms A/B who are required to withdraw a second time are not eligible for readmission into their program.

5) The Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the Faculty of Business Administration may allow a student to continue who fails to achieve the standards outlined in 3) above. A decision of this nature will be made only for reasons acceptable to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies.  


REGULATIONS FOR THE HONOURS DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

An Honours degree of Bachelor of Business Administration signifies superior academic achievement.

1) To be considered for an Honours degree, the candidates must so indicate on the University’s official “Application for Degree” form.

2) Candidates for the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration shall:

a) comply with all regulations governing the General Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration, and

b) achieve at least a 75% numerical average and a grade point average of 3.5.

3) Candidates are not permitted to repeat or substitute courses for the purpose of meeting the academic standing specified in Clause 2.

4) A declared candidate for an Honours degree who fails to fulfil the conditions of Clause 2 but fulfils the requirements for a General degree shall be awarded the General Degree of Bachelor of Business Administration.


COURSE LIST

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Dean of the Faculty.

Service Courses

Core Program Course Descriptions

Business Electives

Work Term Descriptions

Comprehensive Case Analysis Descriptions


SERVICE COURSES

NOTE: Courses listed as SERVICE COURSES may not be used to fulfil any of the requirements of any of the programs of the Faculty of Business Administration, including the minor, certificate, diploma and degrees.

2102. Introductory Accounting for Non-Business Students. This course will provide full introductory coverage of both financial and managerial accounting. The course focuses on the most widely used accounting theory and practice.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Business 2102 and either of Business 1101 or Business 2101.

CORE PROGRAM COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

NOTES: 1) Any prerequisite listed may be waived by permission of the instructor.
2) Enrolment in Business courses is limited and first priority will be given to students registered in the Faculty of Business Administration programs and secondarily to Business Minor Candidates who have obtained the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Business Administration or delegate.


1000. Introduction to Business. An overview of business in the Canadian environment is presented in the course with emphasis on the stakeholders involved and the issues confronting managers. The course examines the functional areas of the enterprise (finance, marketing, production, and human resources management) in addition to providing an overview of the business system. An analysis of actual business situations provides a framework of study.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 2001. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 2001 and Business 1000.

1101. Principles of Accounting. This course will emphasize the concepts and issues of introductory financial accounting as they relate to the Canadian conceptual framework, and will also address the strengths and weaknesses of financial reporting at an introductory level. The student will be introduced to the accounting process and analysis of the balance sheet, income statement, and the statement of changes in financial position.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Business 1101 and either of the former Business 3100 and the former Business 2100.

1201. Principles of Marketing. This course provides an overview of the marketing function, emphasizing customer satisfaction as the focal point of an organization's activities. The course examines customer characteristics and behaviours as a crucial element in the design of effective marketing strategies and programs. The course also deals in detail with the elements of the marketing mix: products and services; pricing; distribution channels; and promotion.
Prerequisite: Business 1000 or the former Business 2001.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 1201 and the former Business 3200.

1600. Introduction to Entrepreneurship. This introductory course is designed to give students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship and the role that entrepreneurship plays in society. Topics will include the nature and theories of entrepreneurship, the characteristics and behaviours of entrepreneurs, and the entrepreneurial process in small and large firms. Students will get to think and act in a creative manner, obtain exposure to local entrepreneurs, assess their potential for entrepreneurial careers and develop attitudes and skills that will be useful in any organization. The course is also useful for those who will be dealing with smaller firms in the context of larger organizations and for those who will be working for entrepreneurs.
Prerequisite: Business 1000.

2000. Business Communications. An emphasis on the understanding and use of various forms of communication in the business organization. From an examination of the communication process, study progresses to planning, and developing skills in written and oral communications including business reports and letter writing.

2101. Managerial Accounting. The course will provide an overview of the use of financial data for managerial decision making. The student will be introduced to basic budgeting and analysis techniques for both service-oriented and manufacturing businesses.
Prerequisite: Business 1101.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 2101 and the former Business 4100.

2201. Marketing Applications. This course applies the principles learned in Business 1201 in a variety of contexts and organizations. Students gain an appreciation for the application of marketing principles in specialist application areas such as: marketing for services, not-for-profit and public sector organizations, and in an international context. In addition, an overview and appraisal of the marketing function and of marketing performance is addressed through the marketing planning process.
Prerequisite: Business 1201.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 2201 and the former Business 3200.

2301. Organizational Behaviour. This course focuses on the study of individual and group processes in formal organizations. The student is introduced to the nature of work, the systematic approach to the study of behaviour, organizational roles and socialization, motivation, leadership, communication, and group dynamics.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 4300. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 2301 and Business 4300.

2401. Quantitative Methods for Business. Topics will include series, probability, linear algebra with applications, graphing (including two-variable linear optimization), and business applications of differential calculus; where applicable, spreadsheets will be used.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 or 1081
NOTE: A knowledge of the basic operations of spreadsheets is required.

3320. Introduction to Labour Relations. This course provides an introduction to the field of industrial and labour relations in Canada, with primary emphasis on the labour-management relationship. Students will be introduced to the basic elements of an industrial relations system, including the participants, their roles and relationships, the social, economic, legal and political environment in which the participants interact, and the process and outcomes of collective bargaining. Students may be exposed to various role playing exercises that are applicable to a career in industrial and labour relations.

3401. Operations Management. The objective of this course is to present and discuss the fundamental concepts necessary to understand the nature and management of the operations function in organizations. The course will focus on forecasting for operations, inventory management; capacity, aggregate and requirements planning; operations scheduling; quality management and continuous improvement; just-in-time systems; product and service design. Case studies will be used.
Prerequisites: Statistics 2500 and Business 2401.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 3401 and Business 5400.

3700. Information Systems. This course provides an introduction to information systems to support operations and management. Topics include: an overview of information systems technology; data management; systems development approaches; and managing the information systems function.
Prerequisites: Computer Science 2801 (or equivalent computer literacy course) and Term 3 standing.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 3700 and Business 6300.

399W. Work Term I. (See description in Work Term Descriptions and course title section below.)

4000. Business Law I. A course dealing with the law relating to certain aspects of business activity; includes introductory material on the nature of law and legal processes, together with a detailed study of certain aspects of the law of contract, examination of the general principles of the law of agency as they affect business operations; introduction to selected topics in company and partnership law.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 3000. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 4000 and Business 3000.

4320. Introduction to Personnel and Human Resource Management. This course introduces the student to the design, operation and management of P/HRM processes, their evaluation, and their contribution to employee and organization effectiveness. The principal processes considered are staffing, development, employment relations, and compensation. Consideration of the influence of relevant organizational and external conditions on P/HRM is included. The course views the management of human resources as the joint responsibility of line and P/HRM managers.
Prerequisite: Business 2301.

4401. Management Science. In this course the student is introduced to the analysis, structuring, and model formulation of quantitative business problems, and to the methods for solving these models. Topics include the management science paradigm, payoff matrices, sensitivity analysis of solutions, decision trees, imperfect information, utility theory, Markov chains, formulation of simple linear optimization models, and other topics at the discretion of the instructor; where applicable, available software will be used.
Prerequisite: Business 2401.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 4401 and the former Business 3400.

4500. Financial Management I. This course is designed to introduce the student to the role of financial management in business, financial analysis techniques, working capital management, and long-term and short-term financing.
Prerequisites: Business 1101, Statistics 2500, and Economics 2010.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 4500 and the former Business 4110.

450W. Business Methods in Practice I. (See description in Comprehensive Case Analysis Descriptions and course title section below.)

499W. Work Term 2. (See description in Work Term Descriptions and course title section below.)

5301. Organizational Theory. The scope of interest in this course is the organization, its environment, and its subsystems. From providing a basic appreciation of the role and practice of research in organizations, study extends to measures of organizational effectiveness, determinants of structure and design, power and politics, intergroup conflicts and conflict resolution, and organizational development and change.
Prerequisite: Business 2301.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 5300. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 5301 and Business 5300.

599W. Work Term 3. (See description in Work Term Descriptions and course title section below.)

7000. Organizational Strategy. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of business and organizational strategy, and the formulation and implementation of strategy. These will be discussed from a senior management perspective and as the result of senior management decision-making. The student is expected to develop a facility in the strategic analysis of business and other types of organizations, and in strategy formulation and implementation. Theoretical concepts will be discussed and will be explored through case analysis.
Prerequisite: Business 2101, 2201, 3320, 3401, 3700, 4000, 4320, 4500, and 5301.

750W. Business Methods in Practice II. (See description in Comprehensive Case Analysis Descriptions and course title section below). 

BUSINESS ELECTIVES

3101. Accounting Applications. The course continues the study of accounting on a more in-depth and detailed basis. Building on the theory and concepts of Business 1101 and Business 2101, Business 3101 will emphasize the procedures and techniques required for the preparation and presentation of accounting information and general purposes financial statements.
Prerequisites: Business 1101.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 3101 and either the former Business 3100 or the former Business 2100.

5000. Business Law II. This course is designed to show the student how principles of Law are applied to four areas of Business. The areas dealt with in this course are accounting/ finance, marketing, personnel and production.
Prerequisite: Business 4000.

5160. Cost Accounting. This course deals with the use of accounting data for decision making. Topics covered include: cost estimation, pricing, joint costs, advanced variance analysis, total quality management, just-in-time, decentralization, transfer pricing, performance evaluations, activity based accounting, and backflush costing.
Prerequisite: EITHER the former Business 3100 and Business 4100, OR Business 2101.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 7100. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 7100 and Business 5160.

5200. Consumer Behaviour. This course deals with concepts related to factors which influence the purchase and consumption behaviour of individuals including culture, social class, reference groups, perception, learning, motivation, personality and lifestyle. The unique aspects of groups and organizational buyers will also be examined.
Prerequisite: Business 2201 or the former Business 3200.

5401. Linear Optimization and Extensions I: Applications. The ideas of formulation begun in Business 4401 are extended to more complex linear optimization models, and models which are extensions of this. Emphasis will be on formulation and computer-based sensitivity analysis, applications to other fields of business, cases in linear optimization and related fields.
Prerequisite: Business 4401.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 5401 and the former Business 4400.

5402. Linear Optimization and Extensions II: Algorithms. Topics include the simplex and revised simplex algorithms, sensitivity analysis and duality, goal optimization, advanced formulation of 0/1 models, branch and bound algorithm, network models: assignment, transportation, transshipment, shortest path, critical path, minimal spanning tree, and maximal flow.
Prerequisite: Business 4401.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 5402 and the former Business 4400.

5500. Financial Management II. Extension of Business 4500. Capital investment decision-making using discounted cash flow methodology; investments under certainty; financial structure and leverage; analysis of money and capital markets; further examination of long-term external financing.
Prerequisite: Either the former Business 4110 or Business 4500.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 7140 and Business 5140. Credit may be obtained for only one of Business 5500, the former Business 7140, and the former Business 5140.

5530. Public Finance. This course recognizes the large role played by government in our society. Sources and uses of government funds at the federal, provincial and local levels will be covered. Intergovernmental fiscal problems will be examined with special emphasis on various incentive programs available to business from the three levels of government.
Prerequisites: Economics 2010 and 2020.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 5100. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 5530 and Business 5100.

5600. New Venture Creation. This course covers the business creation process from the idea conception stage to the launch stage. Students learn how to search for, screen and evaluate opportunities, and to plan and assemble the required resources, including the preparation of an actual business plan. Alternatives to new venture creation, such as purchasing an existing business and purchasing a franchise, are also explored. Extensive group work is required.
Prerequisites: Business 1101, Business 1600, and Business 2201.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 5030 and Business 7030. Credit may be obtained for only one of Business 5600, the former Business 7030 and the former Business 5030.

5700. Information Systems Analysis and Design. This course provides students with the skills to identify business problems which may be solved using information technology, determine requirements for information systems (IS) solutions, and develop detailed designs which form the basis for implementing systems. Topics may include: role of the user in systems development, systems development life cycle, requirements analysis and conceptual modelling, structured analysis and design, and trends in systems development methodologies. The importance of CASE tools in modern systems development will be emphasized through hands-on exercises.
Prerequisite: Business 3700.   

5701. Information Systems Development. This course focuses on issues related to the implementation of information systems. Particular attention will be paid to the requirements of transaction processing and management reporting systems. Topics may include: transition from design to implementation, software construction, testing, documentation, training, conversion, and evaluation.
Prerequisites: Business 3700 and Computer Science 2710.

6000-6029 (excluding 6001, 6008, 6009, and 6010). Special Topics.

6010. Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation. This course is designed to explore the strategic management of technology and innovation for improving competitiveness and for business development. This will include market-strategy-technology connections, and technical innovation/new product development processes. Technology and technical innovation are viewed as fundamental to strategic competitiveness and business development as important elements of the management of strategic change in the business firm. In approaching technical innovation as strategic implementation, business environmental, organizational capability, human resources and management factors will be discussed.
Prerequisite: Business 2101, 2201, 3320, 3401, 3700, 4320, 4500, and 5301.

6100. Intermediate Accounting I. This course continues the study of financial accounting by focusing on specific topics such as current assets, long-term investments, capital assets, intangibles, current liabilities, and long-term liabilities. Emerging issues in accounting will also be covered.
Prerequisite: Either the former Business 3100 or Business 3101.

6110. Intermediate Accounting II. This course is designed to integrate the principles, concepts and skills acquired in previous accounting courses and to enhance the student's analytical and decision-making capabilities. The course will focus on specific topics related to deferred taxes, pension liabilities, shareholders' equity, and financial statement presentation. The skills acquired in earlier courses will be integrated for purposes of interpreting and analyzing financial information.
Prerequisite: Either the former Business 3100 or Business 3101.

6120. Taxation I. Determination of income tax liability of individuals and corporations, and a survey of sales taxes.
Prerequisite: Business 1101 or the former Business 3100, and Business 4000.

6130. Auditing. The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to the practice of auditing and to stress the auditor's decision-making process when determining the nature and amount of evidence the auditor should accumulate. Specific topics to be covered include the auditor's legal liability, materiality, internal control, transaction cycles, and audit of information processed through electronic data processing systems.
Prerequisites: Business 6100 and Computer Science 2801.

6200. Marketing Research. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the use of marketing research as an aid to management. This is a comprehensive survey of the scope and methods of marketing research.
Prerequisites: Business 2201 or the former Business 3200, and Statistics 2501 or equivalent.

6210. Advertising Management. The objectives of the course are to provide a theoretical background on the nature, role and principles of advertising; and to develop analytical and decision-making skills in planning, executing, evaluating and controlling advertising campaigns. Areas to be examined include: social, ethical, legal, and economic considerations; market and customer analysis; advertising objectives; advertising budgets; creative strategy; media strategy; sales promotion and advertising; campaign management and retail advertising.
Prerequisite: Business 2201 or the former Business 3200.

6220. Professional Selling and Sales Management. The professional selling component of this course will focus on professional selling skills and the selling process, as it is important to understand them to manage a sales force effectively. The sales management component will focus on sales forecasting; planning and budgeting; sales force organization; recruiting, selecting, training, motivating, and compensating salespeople; and evaluating and controlling the sales force and individual salespeople.
Prerequisite: Business 2201 or the former Business 3200.

6230. Services Marketing. This course is intended to examine the marketing of services and the role of services in supporting the marketing of tangible products. The distinction between the marketing of tangibles and intangibles will be stressed. The course will identify and examine the distinct issues which are encountered in the marketing of services and will explore appropriate strategies for implementing services marketing programs, primarily in services organizations, including health care, transportation, telecommunications, education, etc. Specifically, the course will examine in detail the role of people in delivering services, the importance of service quality as a strategic differentiating tool, and the importance of collaboration between marketing and human resources management in the delivery of services.
Prerequisite: Business 2201 or the former Business 3200.

6301. New Directions in Organizational Behaviour. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore and to develop their interests in topics in a dynamic field. Topics will be selected according to current emphases in the organizational behaviour literature.
Prerequisites: Business 2301 and Business 5301.

6310. Advanced Personnel and Human Resource Management. The aim of this course is to reinforce the applied aspects of theory covered in the introduction to Human Resource Management (B4320) by examining approaches to (a) the avoidance of lawsuits, arbitration and performance-related problems which could result from the lack of both due process and effective policies and procedures, and (b) processes for the management of contemporary issues in Human Resource Management. Topics include problem solving in the areas of promotion policy, performance appraisal, test validation, training and development, compensation, job evaluation and pay equity, wrongful dismissal, occupational health and safety, absenteeism, substance abuse and AIDS. Students will examine cases and other material involving worker-management conflict in the above areas and seek to relate these to the legal, ethical and behaviourial foundations of Human Resource Management in both unionized and non-unionized settings.
Prerequisites: Business 4320.

6320. Advanced Labour Relations. This course provides advanced level treatment of the field of industrial and labour relations in Canada, with primary emphasis on the labour-management relationship. Emphasis is placed on understanding recent problems/issues in industrial and labour relations and the range of options available for resolving these same problems. Topics examined may include: industrial relations theory; labour law reform; union growth and structure; management strategy; the role of third parties; workplace innovations; alternative dispute resolution mechanisms; union impact; public sector labour relations; comparative industrial relations; etc. Students may be exposed to various role playing exercises that are applicable to a career in industrial and labour relations.
Prerequisite: Business 3320.

6400. Advanced Management Science - inactive course. 

6510. Investments. A study of investment securities, risks, markets and mechanics; an appraisal of the economy, the industry and the firm; and portfolio management for personal and institutional investments.
Prerequisite: Either the former Business 4110 or Business 4500
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 6140. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 6510 and Business 6140.

6550. International Finance. This course examines the additional risks and profitable opportunities that arise for the firm when it extends its operations into international markets. Specific topics will include the determination of exchange rates, the international monetary system, balance of payments, the foreign exchange market, international money and capital markets, the parity conditions, accounting exposure, economic exposure, transactions exposure, political risk, and global financing. Knowledge of these topic areas will give further understanding with respect to operating within the constraints of the international marketplace.
Prerequisite: Either the former Business 4110 or Business 4500.
NOTE: This course has been offered as the special topics course Business 6008. Consequently, credit may not be obtained for both Business 6008 and Business 6500.

6600. Managing Growth in the Small Firm. This course is designed to introduce the student to the challenges and opportunities of managing small growing businesses. The focus will be on functional issues and solutions within the context of growth oriented small firms. In addition, the course will explore strategic planning in the owner-managed business and strategies for growth and expansion. Extensive use will be made of cases and examples from Atlantic Canada.
Prerequisite: Business 5600.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 6030. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 6600 and Business 6030.

6610. Small Enterprise and Regional Development. This course explores the potential and constraints on efforts to foster small enterprise formation and expansion as a means to promote regional economic development. It critically examines government initiatives to promote small business as the panacea for depressed regional economies, and reviews changes in the global economy and the organization of production which may enhance small business competitiveness. Both Canadian and international cases are studied, with theoretical and empirical findings related to the Newfoundland context.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 7031 and Business 6009. Credit may be obtained for only one of Business 6610, the former Business 6009 and the former Business 7031.

6700. Data Management. This course is based on the premise that data is a valuable resource which needs to be managed effectively to provide accurate, complete, timely, relevant, and accessible information to support decision making. Topics may include: enterprise data modelling, logical database design, database management systems, query languages, transaction management and concurrent access, and security.
Prerequisite: Business 3700 or Business 6300.

6701. Information Technology Management. This course examines issues of managing information systems and technology. Topics may include: success and failure in IS implementation, IS planning, economics of IS, telecommunications and network management, and legal and ethical issues.
Prerequisite: Business 3700 or Business 6300.

7010. Business and Society. The course will examine the inter-relationships among business, government, society and the environment. Topics include: the social-economic business system, business ideologies, social responsibilities of business, business ethics, stakehold and issues management, and selected current issues in business.
Prerequisite: Term 7 standing.

7110. Accounting Theory. This course deals with the theoretical issues of specific topics such as the accounting standard setting process, the Canadian conceptual framework, assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses, not-for-profit organizations, related party transactions, and financial statement presentation and disclosure. Considerable emphasis will be given to emerging issues.
Prerequisites: Business 6100, Business 6110, Business 6120, and Business 6130.

7120. Advanced Financial Accounting. The course will cover specific topics such as long-term investments, consolidated financial statements, joint ventures, segmented financial information, foreign exchange transactions, and fund accounting.
Prerequisite: Business 6100 and Business 6110.

7150. Taxation II. This course is designed to provide a detailed and comprehensive analysis of income taxation as well as sales taxation and customs duties and excise taxes. Information relating to the use of trusts, partnerships, and joint ventures will be included, as well as the use of various tax shelters and international tax implications in business planning. The concentration will be on how tax planning for both individuals and corporations can be a significant element in the regular decision-making process, especially for the private corporation.
Prerequisite: Business 6120.

7160. Advanced Topics in Managerial Accounting. This course will introduce the student to an indepth study of advanced qualitative and quantitative methodology available to the managerial accountant. The application of mathematical models and behavioural theories to realistic challenges faced by various fiscal entities will be stressed. Class instruction will include the use of cases and rely heavily on a multidisciplinary approach towards solving the unstructured problem.
Prerequisite: Business 5160.

7210. Retailing Management. This course provides an integrative examination of the activities involved in marketing goods and services directly to the ultimate consumer. Specifically, the following areas will be examined within a managerial framework: the evolution of retailing; retailing within the marketing channel; market analysis and planning; shopping behaviour; image and retail advertising; trading area and site analysis; store layout; shelf space utilization; merchandising; and the future prospects for retailing.
Prerequisite: Business 2201 or the former Business 3200.

7230. Marketing Management. This course is designed to integrate the principles, concepts and skills acquired in previous marketing courses and to enhance the student's analytical and decision-making capabilities with regard to developing marketing strategies. The course will focus on: market analysis, marketing planning, the strategic decisions to be made within the framework of the marketing mix (product, price, promotion, and distribution); and the control systems related to the marketing program. The use of market research and knowledge from other functional areas of the organization (accounting, finance, economics, etc.) will be considered throughout the course.
Prerequisites: Business 5200 and Business 6200.

7240. International Marketing. This course provides an understanding of the effects that the international dimension has upon the strategies and management of the marketing efforts of the firm. In particular, the student is introduced to the analysis techniques of the various environments that constitute a country analysis. Entry strategies are discussed with an emphasis upon the export process. Finally, the standardization/adaptation question is discussed in the context of each element of the marketing mix.
Prerequisite: Business 2201 or the former Business 3200.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 7240 and the former Business 6001.

7250. Business and Industrial Marketing. This course presents a comprehensive view of business markets, including industrial, institutional, and government markets. There is a balanced focus on strategy development and implementation. Particular attention is given to organizational buying behaviour, relationship management, global competitiveness, and the marketing of new high technology products and services.
Prerequisite: Business 2201 or the former Business 3200.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both Business 7250 and the former Business 7220.

7302. International Business. The course is designed to introduce students to the issues of international business: these are the processes of cultural confrontation and compromise; the problems of competitive sovereignty involving multinational corporations and the governments of host societies; the organization, structure, operation and control of diverse international businesses; and, finally, the role of multinational enterprise as a catalyst in economic development and resource employment, in particular, the North- South context. The relevance of international business as an area of study to the Canadian economy is discussed. The course is both conceptual and empirical in content.

7310. Seminar in Human Resource Management. This seminar course seeks to integrate policies, procedures and methods covered in B6310 with other functional areas which impact upon the management of Human Resource Systems. Stakeholder assumptions about: work-force characteristics; management philosophy; business strategy; labour markets; laws and society; task technology and unions will be examined via a combination of cases, readings, research, peer discussion and dialogue with guest speakers.
Prerequisite: Business 6310.

7320. Collective Agreement Administration and Arbitration. This course provides advanced coverage of the substantive and procedural rights of employers, unions and employees under collective agreements, and the means by which disputes over these rights are resolved through the grievance arbitration process. Topics examined include: the legal framework and place of grievance arbitration in the industrial relations system; the nature and scope of the arbitrator's role; preparation for and conduct of arbitration hearings; arbitral jurisprudence; alternative dispute resolution processes; and the development of a sound labour relations climate. Students will undertake extensive reviews of labour arbitration cases and will examine the impact of jurisprudence on the philosophy and practice of management in the private and public sectors. Students may be exposed to various role playing exercises that are applicable to a career in industrial and labour relations.
Prerequisite: Business 6320.

7321. Dispute Settlement in Labour Relations. This course provides advanced level study of conflict in industrial relations, its determinants, the various institutional procedures used to deal with it, and the effectiveness of these same procedures. Topics examined include: theories of industrial conflict; the legal framework; union and employer strategies; interest dispute resolution; the right to strike and alternatives to same; the role and effectiveness of alternative forms of voluntary and compulsory third party assistance; etc. Students may be exposed to various role playing exercises that are applicable to a career in industrial and labour relations.
Prerequisite: Business 6320.

7322. Labour Law. This course provides an overview of laws regulating the employment relationship in Canada, including the common law, general employment and collective bargaining laws, and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Emphasis is placed on the law of collective bargaining in the private sector, including the acquisition and termination of bargaining rights, unfair labour practices, the duty to bargain, industrial conflict and the administration of the collective agreement.
Prerequisite: Business 6320.

7330. Organizational Development. - inactive course.

7400. Simulation in Management - inactive course.

7500. Advanced Finance. This course examines advanced devel-opments in finance. Several topics will be selected, researched and discussed. These topics shall vary as financial practices change.
Prerequisites: Business 5500 or the former Business 5140, and Business 6510 or the former Business 6140.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 7130. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 7500 and Business 7130.

7510. Options and Futures. This course is an extension of B6510 Investments which will introduce the student to the workings of the options and futures markets. Specific topics will include the institutional structure of the markets, option pricing, strategies such as straddles and spreads, hedging, spot/forward/futures markets, speculation, risk transference and market efficiency considerations.
Prerequisites: Business 6510 or the former Business 6140.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 7170. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 7510 and Business 7170.

7600. Current Topics in Entrepreneurship. This course endeavours to address recent research findings in various aspects of entrepreneurship. Students will have the opportunity to pursue issues in entrepreneurship development covering a wide range of topics using publications, journals and conference proceedings.
Prerequisite: Business 5600.
NOTE: This course was formerly Business 7032. Credit may not be obtained for both Business 7600 and Business 7032.

7610. Regulatory and Taxation Issues for Small Business. This course is designed to provide students with a general knowledge base of the various tax and other regulatory issues that should be considered in starting a business. The role that tax plays in decision making will be examined as well as the types of corporate funding to establish a new business through government grants, conventional loans and tax credits as provided under the Income Tax Act. Alternative corporate structures will be examined as well as aspects of employee compensation and business valuations. Practical aspects of starting your own business, such as registration requirements, will also be examined.
Prerequisite: Business 1101 or the former Business 3100.

7700. Strategic Information Systems. This course examines the growing importance of information systems in helping organizations to achieve and sustain a competitive advantage. Topics covered may include: frameworks for identifying strategic applications, the role of information systems in redesigning business processes, interorganizational systems, identifying and managing risks associated with SIS, supporting globalization, and strategic implications of emerging technologies.
Prerequisite: Business 6701.

7701. Current Topics in Information Systems. This course examines new developments and trends in information systems. The scope of the course includes: implications of emerging hardware and software technologies, emerging systems applications, and the state-of-the-art in IS management practice. Specific topics will change each year. Readings assigned from professional and academic journals will form the basis of class discussion.
Prerequisites: Business 5700, Business 6700, and Business 6701.

WORK TERM DESCRIPTIONS

The following work terms are a requirement of the Bachelor of Commerce Co-operative program only.

The objectives of the Work Term component of the Business Administration Co-operative Program are embodied in the Work Term descriptions below. The descriptions serve to guide the student and employer toward achieving these objectives and to guide Business Co-operative Education and the Faculty of Business Administration in monitoring and evaluating each student's progress.

399W. Work Term I. This Work Term follows the successful completion of Academic Term 3. For most students, it represents their first professional work experience in a business environment and as such represents their first opportunity to evaluate their choice of pursuing a career in business administration. Students are expected to learn, develop and practice the high standards of behaviour and performance normally expected in the work environment. (A detailed description of each job is normally posted during the job competition.)

As one component of the work term, the student is required to complete a work report. The work report, as a minimum requirement should

a)    analyze an issue/problem related to the student's work environment,
b)    demonstrate an understanding of the structure of a professional report, and
c)    show reasonable competence in written communication and presentation skills. (Students should consult the evaluation form provided in the placement package.)

NOTE: Seminars on professional development, conducted by Business Co-operative Education, are presented during Academic Term 3 to introduce and prepare the student for participation in the subsequent work terms. Topics may include, among others, work term evaluation, work report writing, career planning, employment seeking skills, resume preparation, self-employment, ethics and professional concepts, behavioural requirements in the work place, assertiveness in the work place and industrial safety.

499W. Work Term 2. This Work Term follows the successful completion of Academic Term 4. Students are expected to further develop and expand their knowledge and work-related skills and should be able to accept increased responsibility and challenge. In addition, students are expected to demonstrate an ability to deal with increasingly complex work- related concepts and problems. Students should conscientiously assess the various business opportunities relative to their individual interests.

The Work Report, as a minimum requirement should

a)    analyze an issue/problem related to the student's work environment and demonstrate an understanding of business concepts relative to the student's academic background,
b)    demonstrate competence in creating a professional report, and
c)    show competence in written communication and presentation skills. 

599W. Work Term 3. This Work Term follows the successful completion of Academic Term 5. Students should have sufficient academic grounding and work experience to contribute in a positive manner to the management and problem-solving processes needed and practiced in the work environment. Students should become better acquainted with their discipline of study, should observe and appreciate the attitudes, responsibilities, and ethics normally expected of business managers and should exercise greater independence and responsibility in their assigned work functions.

The Work Report should reflect the growing professional development of the student and, as a minimum requirement, will

a)    demonstrate an ability to analyze a significant business issue/problem related to the student's experience in the work environment,
b)    demonstrate a high level of competence in producing a professional report, and
c)    show a high level of competence in written communication and presentation skills.

COMPREHENSIVE CASE ANALYSIS DESCRIPTIONS

The following courses of study are academic requirements of the Diploma in Business Administration and Bachelor of Commerce Programs only and do not carry academic credit.

Business 450W. Business Methods in Practice I. A non-credit course in which each student will undertake an analysis of an assigned case. A written report is mandatory. Evidence of the student's understanding of various business methods and the ability to gather material relating to the report, analyze it effectively, and present it in a clear, logical and concise form, will be required in the report. (NO CREDIT AWARDED).

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean, or delegate.

Business 750W. Business Methods in Practice II. A non-credit course in which each student will undertake an analysis of an assigned case or complete a research project. A student wishing to undertake a research project must have prior Faculty approval. A written report is mandatory. (NO CREDIT AWARDED).

Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean, or delegate.


TABLE I

BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE) CURRICULUM



Terms A/B (Fall and Winter)
●Six credit hours in English courses*
●Mathematics 1000
●Economics 2010 and 2020
●Business 1000
●Twelve additional credit hours in non-Business electives, at least
   9 credit hours of which must be in courses chosen from the
   Faculties of Arts and/or Science and/or the School of Music




Term One (Fall)
●Business 1101. Principles of Accounting
●Business 1201. Principles of Marketing
●Statistics 2500. Statistics for Business and Arts Students
●Nine credit hours chosen from:
  Business 1600. Introduction to Entrepreneurship
  Business 2000. Business Communications
  Business 2401. Quantitative Methods for Business
  Computer Science 2801. Introduction to Computing for Business
  Six credit hours in non-Business electives**



Term Two (Winter)
●Business 2101. Managerial Accounting
●Business 2201. Marketing Applications
●Business 2301. Organizational Behaviour
●Remaining 9 credit hours chosen from:
  Business 1600. Introduction to Entrepreneurship
  Business 2000. Business Communications
  Business 2401. Quantitative Methods for Business
  Computer Science 2801. Introduction to Computing for Business
  Six credit hours in non-Business electives**
Spring

Term Three (Fall)
●Business 3320. Introduction to Labour Relations
●Business 3401. Operations Management
●Business 3700. Information Systems
●Six credit hours in elective courses**
Work Term I (Winter)

Business 399W



Term Four (Spring)
●Business 4000. Business Law I
●Business 4320. Introduction to Personnel and Human Resource Management
●Business 4401. Management Science
●Business 4500. Financial Management I
●Economics 3150. Money and Banking
Work Term II (Fall)

Business 499W

Term Five (Winter) ●Business 5301. Organizational Theory
●Twelve credit hours in elective courses**
Work Term III (Spring)

Business 599W

Term Six (Fall) ●Business 7000. Organizational Strategy
●Twelve credit hours in elective courses**
Term Seven (Winter) ●Fifteen credit hours in elective courses**
* It is strongly recommended that students complete English 1110, Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style, as one of these English courses.

** Of the 51 credit hours in elective courses required in the program from Terms 1 through 7, 30 must be chosen from Business courses (including non-Business courses prescribed for a concentration) and 21 must be non-Business courses. Of the 21 credit hours in non-Business electives, at least 15 must be chosen from the Faculties of Arts and/or Science and/or the School of Music.


TABLE II

PLAN OF OPERATION

THE BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAM

YEAR OF
entry
into the
program
YEAR OF
graduation
from the
program
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Sept-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sept-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sept-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sept-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sept-Dec Jan-Apr May-Aug Sept-Dec
2001
2005 Work
Term
2
Term
5
Work
Term
3
Term
6
Term
7











2002 2006 Term
3
Work
Term
1
Term
4
Work
Term
2
Term
5
Work
Term
3
Term
6
Term
7








2003
(for AS* students)
2007 Term
1
Term
2
Free
Semes.
Term
3
Work
Term
1
Term
4
Work
Term
2
Term
5
Work
Term
3
Term
6
Term
7





2003
(for DE** students)
2008 Term
A
Term
B
Free
Semes.
Term
1
Term
2
Free
Semes.
Term
3
Work
Term
1
Term
4
Work
Term
2
Term
5
Work
Term
3
Term
6
Term
7


2004
(for DE** students)
2009


Term
A
Term
B
Free
Semes.
Term
1
Term
2
Free
Semes.
Term
3
Work
Term
1
Term
4
Work
Term
2
Term
5
Work
Term
3
Term
6

* AS stands for students admitted with Advanced Standing to a Term other than Terms A/B
** DE stands for students admitted directly from High School to Terms A/B


TABLE III

BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (CO-OPERATIVE) CURRICULUM

(COMPLETED JOINTLY WITH THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS)

Please refer to the calendar entry for the Faculty of Arts for complete course descriptions and regulations for the Bachelor of Arts degree.

Terms A/B (Fall and Winter)
∙Six credit hours in English courses*;
∙Mathematics 1000;
∙Economics 2010 and 2020;
∙Business 1000;
∙Twelve additional credit hours in non-Business electives, at least 9 credit hours of which must be in courses chosen from the Faculties of Arts and/or Science and/ or the School of Music.






Term One (Fall)
∙Business 1101. Principles of Accounting
∙Business 1201. Principles of Marketing
∙Statistics 2500. Statistics for Business and Arts Students
∙Nine credit hours chosen from:
 Six credit hours in Major, Core or elective courses [See NOTE 1 below]
 Business 1600. Introduction to Entrepreneurship
 Business 2000. Business Communications
 Business 2401. Quantitative Methods for Business
 Computer Science 2801. Introduction to Computing for Business






Term Two (Winter)
∙Business 2101. Managerial Accounting
∙Business 2201. Marketing Applications
∙Business 2301. Organizational Behaviour
∙Remaining 9 credit hours chosen from:
 Business 1600. Introduction to Entrepreneurship
 Business 2000. Business Communications
 Business 2401. Quantitative Methods for Business
 Computer Science 2801. Introduction to Computing for Business
 Six credit hours in Major, Core or elective courses [See NOTE 1 below]
Spring [See NOTE 2 below]


Term Three (Fall)
∙Business 3320. Introduction to Labour Relations
∙Business 3401. Operations Management
∙Business 3700. Information Systems
∙At least 6 credit hours in Major, Core or elective courses [See NOTE 3 below]
Work Term 1 (Winter) Business 399W [See NOTE 2 below]


Term Four (Spring)
∙Business 4000. Business Law I
∙Business 4320. Introduction to Personnel and Human Resource Management
∙Business 4401. Management Science
∙Business 4500. Financial Management I
∙Economics 3150. Money and Banking
Work Term II (Fall) Business 499W [See NOTE 2 below]
Term Five (Winter) ∙Business 5301. Organizational Theory
∙At least 12 credit hours in Major, Core or elective courses [See NOTE 3 below]
Work Term III (Spring) Business 599W [See NOTE 2 below]
Term Six (Fall) ∙Business 7000. Organizational Strategy
∙At least 12 credit hours in Major, Core or elective courses [See NOTE 3 below]
Term Seven (Winter) ∙At least 15 credit hours in Major, Core or elective courses [See NOTE 3 below]

* It is strongly recommended that students complete English 1110, Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style, as one of these English courses.

NOTES: 1)The degree of Bachelor of Arts requires completion of a Major program, a Minor program, a set of Core Requirements, and elective courses, totalling at least 78 credit hours in courses offered by departments within the Faculty of Arts (or Computer Science, Mathematics and Statistics, and Psychology). When the degree of Bachelor of Arts is completed jointly with the degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative):
a) Minor program requirements are satisfied by Business courses specified in Table 1 above.
b) Core requirements for English and Numeracy/Science are satisfied by courses completed in Terms A/B or during Terms 1 or 2 of the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) degree.
c) It is recommended that the Core Requirement for 6 credit hours in courses in a second language be completed in Terms A/B of the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) degree program.
d) Core requirements for 6 credit hours in research/writing courses may be satisfied by including two such courses within the 78 credit hours in courses offered by departments within the Faculty of Arts. Please consult the Undergraduate Registration Procedures booklet to determine research/writing course offerings in any given semester.
e) Major requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts may be satisfied in 36 to 45 credit hours, depending on the department or program chosen. Students are strongly recommended to seek advice from the department or program of their Major to ensure that their proposed degree program is possible within the constraints of course scheduling and prerequisites.

2)Students are advised that, in order to complete the joint degrees within the minimum 150 credit hours, they should be prepared to complete at least three of the courses required for the degree of Bachelor of Arts as opportunities arise and as courses are offered. Following Term 2 of the program for the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) degree, these courses may be completed during the Spring semester between Terms 2 and 3, or during any of the three Work Terms (for example, in the evening or by distance), or as sixth courses during any of Terms 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7 (following submission of a course load waiver).

3)To meet the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative), not fewer than 15 and not more than 30 credit hours in elective courses must be chosen from Business courses (including non-Business courses prescribed for a concentration). Students intending to complete the joint degrees in the minimum number of 150 credit hours should ensure that at least 78 of these credit hours are completed in courses offered by departments within the Faculty of Arts (or Psychology, Mathematics and Statistics, and Computer Science). Careful planning, particularly in the selection of elective courses as well as in the sequence of Major program courses, is therefore recommended to ensure timely completion of the joint degrees.


TABLE IV

BACHELOR OF COMMERCE DEGREE (CO-OPERATIVE) CURRICULUM

COMPLETED JOINTLY WITH THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Please refer to the calendar entry for the Faculty of Science for complete course descriptions and regulations for the Bachelor of Science degree.
Terms A/B (Fall and Winter)
∙Six credit hours in English courses*;
∙Six credit hours in Mathematics courses, which must include Mathematics 1000;
∙Economics 2010 and 2020;
∙Business 1000;
∙Computer Science 1710;
∙Six additional credit hours in Science electives.
Term One (Fall) ∙Business 1101. Principles of Accounting
∙Business 1201. Principles of Marketing
∙Statistics 2500. Statistics for Business and Arts Students I OR Statistics 2510. Statistics for Physical Science
∙Computer Science 2710.Object-oriented Programming II
∙Computer Science 2742. Logic for Computer Science
∙Business 1600. Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Term Two (Winter) ∙Business 2000. Business Communications
∙Business 2101. Managerial Accounting
∙Business 2201. Marketing Applications
∙Business 2301. Organizational Behaviour
∙Business 2401. Quantitative Methods for Business
∙Pure Mathematics 2320. Discrete Mathematics
Spring [See NOTES 1 and 2 below]
Term Three (Fall) ∙Business 3320. Introduction to Labour Relations
∙Business 3401. Operations Management
∙Business 3700. Information Systems
∙Computer Science 2711. Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
∙Computer Science 2760. Encountering the Computer: Society and the Individual
Work Term I (Winter) Business 399W [See NOTE 1 below]
Term Four (Spring) ∙Business 4000. Business Law I
∙Business 4320. Introduction to Personnel and Human Resource Management
∙Business 4401. Management Science
∙Business 4500. Financial Management I
∙Economics 3150. Money and Banking
Work Term II (Fall) Business 499W [See NOTE 1 below]
Term Five (Winter) ∙Business 5301. Organizational Theory
∙Computer Science 3719. Algorithms and Complexity
∙Computer Science 3724. Computer Organization
∙Six credit hours of electives [See NOTE 3 below]
Work Term III (Spring) Business 599W [See NOTE 1 below]
Term Six (Fall) ∙Business 7000. Organizational Strategy
∙Computer Science 3715. Network Computing with WEB Applications
∙Computer Science 3716. Software Methodology
∙Computer Science 3725. Computer Architecture
∙Three credit hours of electives [See NOTE 3 below]
Term Seven (Winter) ∙Computer Science 3754. Introduction to Information and Intelligent Systems
∙Computer Science 4770. Team Project
∙1 Computer Science elective
∙Six credit hours of electives [See NOTE 3 below]

* It is recommended that students complete English 1110, Comprehension, Writing and Prose, as one of these English courses.

NOTES: 1) Students are advised that, in order to complete the joint degrees within the minimum150 credit hours, they should be prepared to complete at least three of the courses required for the degree of Bachelor of Science as opportunities arise and as courses are offered. Following Term Two of the program for the Bachelor of Commerce (Co-operative) degree, these courses may be completed during the Spring semester between Terms 2 and 3, or during any of the three Work Terms (for example, in the evening or by distance), or during Terms 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7 (following submission of a course-load waiver).

2) To meet the requirements for the Joint Degree in the minimum number of 150 credit hours, careful planning, particularly in the selection of elective courses as well as in the sequence of Major program courses, is recommended to ensure timely completion. Also note that, in order to meet the Science general regulations, students must have completed courses in at least four areas of Science.

3) Six credit hours must be Business electives and 6 credit hours must be Science electives.



Please direct inquiries to llong@mun.ca.


Last modified on July 25, 2005 by R. Bruce

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