2004 - 2005 Calendar

School of Human Kinetics and Recreation


dash PERSONNEL

1 SCHOOL DESCRIPTION 

2 DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS
2.1 General Degrees
2.2 Honours Degrees
2.3 Work Terms in Co-operative Programs

3 ADMISSION/READMISSION REGULATIONS FOR THE SCHOOL OF HUMAN KINETICS AND RECREATION
3.1 General Information
3.2 Deadlines and Application Forms
3.3 Admission Requirements to School Programs

dash 4 PROGRAM REGULATIONS  GENERAL AND HONOURS DEGREES
4.1 Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative)
4.2 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative)
4.3 Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative)
4.4 Bachelor of Kinesiology
4.5 Bachelor of Physical Education
4.6 Bachelor of Recreation
4.7 Honours Degrees

5 PROMOTION REGULATIONS
5.1 General Information
5.2 Promotion Status
dash 5.3 Other Information

6 WAIVER OF REGULATIONS
6.1 General Information

7 APPEAL OF REGULATIONS

8 HKR COURSES AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS NOT ENROLLED IN A PROGRAM OFFERED BY THE SCHOOL
8.1 Regulations for Students Not in a Program Offered by the School
8.2 HKR Courses

9 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

List of Tables

Table 1 Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative)
Table 2 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - Teaching Option
Table 3 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - General Option
Table 4 Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative)
Table 5 Bachelor of Kinesiology
Table 6 Bachelor of Physical Education - Teaching Option
Table 7 Bachelor of Physical Education - General Option
Table 8 Bachelor of Recreation


PERSONNEL

Director
Higgs, C., Dip.Phys.Ed. St. Luke's, B.Sc., M.Sc. Oregon, M.Ed. Memorial, Ph.D. Oregon; Professor

Associate Professors
Behm, D.G., B.P.E., B.Ed. Ottawa, M.S. McMaster, Ph.D. McGill
Butler, F.T., B.P.E. Memorial, M.Ed.(P.E.) Springfield
Kavanagh, B.G., B.P.E., B.Ed., M.P.E. Memorial, Ph.D. Iowa
Kuester, V., Dip.Phys.Ed. Durham, M.Ed. Bowling Green
Loeffler, T.A., B.A. Prescott College, M.S. Mankato State, Ph.D. Minnesota; CSU Teaching Award, 1998
Wheeler, R.E., B.P.E., B.Ed., M.P.E. Memorial, Ph.D. Alberta

Assistant Professors
Basset, F., B.P.E., M.Sc., Ph.D. Laval
Card, A., B.Ed.(Hons) DeMontfort, M.A.(Ed.) Southampton
MacKinnon, S., B.P.E. New Brunswick, M.Sc. Dalhousie, Ph.D. Cape Town
Sullivan, A.M., B.Rec. Dalhousie, M.A. Waterloo

Co-operative Programs
Downey, J.A., B.Sc. Memorial; Manager
Innes, G., B.A.(Hons.) York University, M.A.L.S. Wesleyan University; Coordinator

Academic Student Advisor
Saunders, J., B.Ed.(Post-Secondary) Memorial

1 SCHOOL DESCRIPTION

Students must meet all regulations of the School in addition to those stated in the general regulations. For information concerning fees and charges, admission/readmission to the University, and general academic regulations (undergraduate), refer to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS.

The School of Human Kinetics and Recreation offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in kinesiology, physical education, and recreation. The School’s programs prepare students to meet societal needs for professionals who are able to initiate and manage health and lifestyle-enhancing programs. The School encourages a close working relationship among students, faculty, and staff, and with local and national sport, health, and professional organizations. Co-operative education programs provide for the integration of academic and professional knowledge. A full-time academic student advisor within the School assists students with decisions related to their academic program. The School prides itself on the extent to which senior undergraduate and graduate students are engaged in teaching, research, and scholarly activity. Many graduates of the School are leaders in the fields of physical education, sport, kinesiology, health, and recreation.

2 DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS

dash 2.1 General Degrees
dash 2.2 Honours Degrees
dash 2.3 Work Terms in Co-operative Programs


2.1    General Degrees

The School of Human Kinetics and Recreation offers six general degrees in three program areas. For specific details on each degree refer to the appropriate Program Regulations - General and Honours Degrees. Courses of the School are designated by the abbreviation HKR.
 
2.1.1    Kinesiology Degrees
Kinesiology degrees are designed to prepare graduates for careers in ergonomics, fitness, health and wellness, and lifestyle professions. The kinesiology degree programs consist of School courses in addition to a flexible choice of electives. The two kinesiology degrees are:
•    Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative): is comprised of 120 credit hours and three work terms and is taken on a full-time basis.
•    Bachelor of Kinesiology: is comprised of 120 credit hours and can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

2.1.2    Physical Education Degrees
Physical Education degrees are designed to prepare graduates for careers in teaching and related areas. There are two physical education degrees with teaching and general options available within each degree.

The teaching option contains courses in the fundamentals of physical education as well as courses in curriculum planning, teaching methods, and pedagogy relevant to physical education curricula for various grade levels. Within the teaching option students will be placed in an educational setting for some of the course work. Following completion of a physical education degree - teaching option, a student wishing to teach in a school setting normally completes an intermediate/secondary degree program offered by the Faculty of Education. For information regarding admission requirements to the intermediate/secondary programs refer to the FACULTY OF EDUCATION section of this Calendar.

The general option is designed to provide basic professional preparation. The general option of the program consists of courses common to the teaching option plus a flexible choice of electives, without the requirement for curriculum and methods courses.
            
The two physical education degrees are:
•    Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative): is comprised of 120 credit hours and three work terms and is taken on a full-time basis. This program is offered in the teaching and general options.
•    Bachelor of Physical Education: is comprised of 120 credit hours and can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis. This program is offered in the teaching and general options.

2.1.3    Recreation Degrees
Recreation degrees are designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop professional competencies in recreation and leisure service management. The students will also gain an understanding of the social, physical, psychological, cultural, economic, and political issues that influence recreation and leisure participation, delivery, and management. The two recreation degrees are:
•    Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative): is comprised of 120 credit hours and three work terms and is taken on a full-time basis.
•    Bachelor of Recreation: is comprised of 120 credit hours and can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.


   
2.2    Honours Degrees

Honours degrees signify superior academic achievement in kinesiology and physical education programs and superior academic achievement with specific course work in recreation programs. To graduate with honours, application must be made on the prescribed form which is available from the School or the Office of the Registrar. For further information on honours degrees see Program Regulations - General and Honours Degrees.



2.3    Work Terms in Co-operative Programs

Students registered for work terms are also governed by the Co-operative Student Handbook. Prior to registering for the first work term, students must successfully complete the course Professional Development Seminars.

2.3.1    General Information
•    During work terms students are brought into direct contact with the kinesiology, physical education, and recreation professions, exposed to the work place setting, expected to assume ever-increasing responsibility in employment situations as their education advances, and introduced to experiences beyond the scope of those which could be provided in the classroom.
•    Students are responsible for finding suitable work placements. The Co-operative Education Office of the School provides resources to assist in this process.
•    In addition to a work term, students may register for up to 6 credit hours, although they are advised to consult the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
•    Students are not permitted to drop work terms without prior approval of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies and with the recommendation of the Co-operative Education Office of the School. Students who drop a work term without permission, or who fail to honour an agreement to work with an employer, will be assigned a grade of FAL (fail) for that work term.
•    Students who conduct themselves in such a manner as to cause their termination from the job, will be assigned a grade of FAL (fail) for that work term.
•    Students are expected to maintain professional ethics, including confidentiality.

2.3.2    Work Term Reports
•    A work term report, on a topic approved by the Co-operative Education Office of the School, must be submitted for each work term. The report must be approved by the employer and submitted by the student to the Co-operative Education Office of the School on or before the appropriate deadline specified in the University Diary.
•    Late work term reports will not be evaluated unless prior permission for a late work term report has been granted by the Co-operative Education Office of the School.

2.3.3    Evaluation of Work Terms
•    Two components are considered in work term evaluation: on-the-job performance and the work term report. Each component is evaluated separately and equally. The overall evaluation of work terms will result in the assignment of one of the following letter grades: PWD (pass with distinction), PAS (pass) or FAL (fail).


3 ADMISSION/READMISSION REGULATIONS FOR THE SCHOOL OF HUMAN KINETICS AND RECREATION

dash 3.1 General Information
dash 3.2 Deadlines and Application Forms
dash 3.3 Admission Requirements of School Programs
dash 3.4 Other Information


In addition to meeting the UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS  students must meet the admission/readmission regulations for the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation.

3.1 General Information

3.1.1 Entry to programs offered by the School is competitive for a limited number of placements. The final decision on admission rests with the Admissions Committee of the School.

3.1.2 Admission or readmission to the University does not necessarily constitute admission or readmission to any program.


3.2 Application Forms and Deadlines

3.2.1 All programs of the School commence in the Fall semester. The deadline for application for admission is March 1.

3.2.2 The deadline for application for readmission, for students who were previously admitted to a School program, is June 1 for the Fall semester, October 1 for Winter, and February 1 for Spring.

3.2.3 Application forms are available in person from the School’s General Office and the Office of the Registrar or through the School’s website at www.mun.ca/hkr. Applications forms may also be obtained by writing the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, A1C 5S7 or the Office of the Registrar, Admissions Office, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, A1C 5S7.

3.2.4 Applicants applying to more than one program must submit separate application forms and supporting documentation for each program.

3.2.5 All applications for admission or readmission must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. A complete application includes an application to the University (for those who have not attended Memorial University of Newfoundland in the two preceding semesters), an application to the School, an autobiographical statement, and any other required supporting documentation. Application fees must be paid when the application forms are submitted.

3.2.6 In addition to these requirements, students applying to the physical education programs must :

• submit a current first aid certificate, and

• complete the School’s swim test. Students applying from outside St. John's should call the School's General Office at (709) 737-8130 to contact the swim test coordinators to arrange for testing. In lieu of the School swim test, a level 8 Red Cross or other credential satisfactory to the School may be accepted. Students unable to complete the swim test requirement before beginning their program must successfully complete this requirement by the end of October of their first semester of admission to the program. Failure to do so will result in the student being required to withdraw from the program at the end of their first semester of admission.       


3.3 Admission Requirements to School Programs

Applicants may apply for admission to School programs under the CATEGORIES OF APPLICANTS, ADMISSION CRITERIA AND OTHER INFORMATION outlined under UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - ADMISSION/READMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY (UNDERGRADUATE). In addition to meeting these regulations, applicants in the following categories must meet the additional requirements as indicated below.

3.3.1 High School Applicants

•High school applicants to the kinesiology degree programs must have completed:

- Level III Laboratory Science with a grade of at least 70%, and either

- Level III Advanced Mathematics, or Level III Academic Mathematics with a grade of at least 70%, or Level III Academic Mathematics and a score on the Mathematics Placement Test acceptable to the Department of Mathematics and Statistics

3.3.2 Memorial University of Newfoundland Applicants

• Students who are attending or have previously attended this University must have achieved a minimum overall average of 60% to be considered for admission.

• Students who are attending or have previously attended this University are not required to submit a copy of their transcript with their application(s).

 3.3.3 Transfer Applicants

• Applicants seeking admission through transfer from accredited post-secondary institutions must have achieved a minimum overall average of 60% to be considered for admission.

• A student's placement within a program, and requirements needed to complete the program, will be determined on an individualo basis at the time of admission. No applicant will be granted placement beyond Academic Term 4.

• Transfer applicants must request that an official transcript showing any completed courses and current registrations be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar. Final transcripts must be submitted upon receipt of final grades.


3.4  Other Information

3.4.1 The School will notify applicants in writing regarding an admission decision to a School program.

3.4.2 Students admitted to a program at any level beyond Academic Term 1, without successfully completing all courses required up to that level, must successfully complete those courses prior to the end of their last academic term. Successful completion shall mean a minimum grade of 50% in every non-HKR course and a minimum grade of 60% in every HKR course.

3.4.3 Students who have been admitted to one program offered by the School and who wish to change to another program within the School must submit a new application for admission to the program. This application must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the March 1 deadline date and will be considered in competition with all other applications.

3.4.4 Students admitted full time to a program and who decline the offer of admission or who fail to register for courses during the Fall term of admission will be considered withdrawn from the program. Such students, if they subsequently wish to be considered for admission, must submit a new application for admission to the program. This application must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the March 1 deadline date and will be considered in competition with other applications.

3.4.5 Students admitted part-time to a program and who decline the offer of admission or who fail to register for courses and to successfully complete at least 6 credit hours applicable to the degree during each academic year will be considered withdrawn from the program. Such students, if they subsequently wish to be considered for admission, must submit a new application for admission to the program. This application must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the March 1 deadline date and will be considered in competition with other applications.


4 PROGRAM REGULATIONS - GENERAL AND HONOURS DEGREES


dash 4.1 Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative)
dash 4.2 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative)
dash 4.3 Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative)
dash 4.4 Bachelor of Kinesiology
dash 4.5 Bachelor of Physical Education
dash 4.6 Bachelor of Recreation
dash 4.7 Honours Degrees


4.1 Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative)

• The full-time 120 credit hour Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative) requires 69 HKR credit hours, 51 non-HKR credit hours, and three work terms.

• The 120 credit hours shall normally be taken in the academic terms in the sequence and course load as set out in Table 1 Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative). Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor.

• Work Terms shall be taken in the term and sequence as set out in Table 1 Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative).

Table 1

Bachelor of Kinesiology (Co-operative)

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Fall
Academic Term 1
Chemistry 1010 or Chemistry 1050
English 1080 or equivalent
HKR 2000
Mathematics 1000
Psychology 1000

Winter
Academic Term 2
Chemistry 1011 or Chemistry 1051
English 1110 or equivalent
HKR 2300
Psychology 1001
3 credit hours from non-HKR courses other than those listed under Required Courses
Spring
Open

Fall
Academic Term 3
Biology 2040
Computer Science 2650 (recommended) or Computer Science 1700
HKR 1123
HKR 2310
Statistics 2550
3 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above
3 credit hours from non-HKR courses other than those listed under Required Courses
Winter
Academic Term 4
HKR 2320
HKR 2600 or Biochemistry 2600
HKR 3320
HKR 3340
Physics 1020 or Physics 1050
3 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above
3 credit hours from non-HKR courses at the 2000 level or above other than those listed under Required Courses
Spring
Work Term 1
HKR 299W

Fall
Academic Term 5
HKR 3300
HKR 3310
HKR 3410
HKR 4320
3 credit hours from non-HKR courses at the 2000 level or above other than those listed under Required Courses
Winter
Work Term 2
HKR 399W

Spring
Academic Term 6
HKR 2703
HKR 4310
HKR 4330
HKR 4420
HKR 4600
3 credit hours from : HKR 2002, 2004, 2100, 3002, 3330, 3350, 3360, 3535, 3585, 4545, 4555, 4565, 4585, 4700, 4701, or 4720
Fall
Work Term 3
HKR 499W

Winter
Academic Term 7
HKR 4610
HKR 4702
HKR 4703
3 credit hours from : HKR 2002, 2004, 2100, 3002, 3330, 3350, 3360, 3535, 3585, 4545, 4555, 4565, 4585, 4700, 4701, or 4720

6 credit hours from non-HKR courses at the 2000 level or above other than those listed under Required Courses

4.2 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative)

4.2.1 Teaching Option

• The full-time 120 credit hour Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - Teaching Option requires 69 HKR credit hours, 51 non-HKR credit hours, three work terms, and a first aid certificate and a CPR certificate both of which must be current at the time of graduation.

• The 120 credit hours shall normally be taken in the academic terms in the sequence and course load as set out in Table 2 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - Teaching Option. Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor .

• The three work terms shall be taken in the term and sequence as set out in Table 2 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - Teaching Option.

• Students following the teaching option, and who plan to complete one of the intermediate/secondary degree programs offered by the Faculty of Education at this University, must choose a minor of at least 24 credit hours from one of the academic disciplines listed in the intermediate/secondary degree regulations. In completing the minor, students must follow the minor program regulations listed under the appropriate faculty or school.

Table 2

Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - Teaching Option

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Fall
Academic Term 1
English 1080 or equivalent
HKR 1123
HKR 2000
HKR 2100
3 credit hours in a laboratory science (either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics is recommended)
3 credit hours in Mathematics

Winter
Academic Term 2
English 1110 or equivalent
HKR 2300
3 credit hours in a laboratory science (either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics is recommended)
3 credit hours in Mathematics
Psychology 1000

Spring
Work Term 1
HKR 299W

Fall
Academic Term 3
HKR 2210
HKR 2310
Psychology 1001
6 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 4
HKR 2220
HKR 2320
HKR 3340
Statistics 2500 or equivalent
3 credit hours from minor subject
Spring
Work Term 2
HKR 399W

Fall
Academic Term 5

HKR 3110
HKR 3210 or HKR 3220
HKR 3300
HKR 3310

Winter
Academic Term 6
HKR 2004
HKR 3320
HKR 4310
6 credit hours from minor subject
Spring
Work Term 3
HKR 499W

Fall
Academic Term 7
HKR 3220 (if not previously completed) or HKR 4220
HKR 4320
HKR 4420
HKR 4600

First aid and CPR certification, both of which must be current at time of graduation, must be submitted to the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
3 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 8
HKR 4210
HKR 4610

First aid and CPR certification, both of which must be current at time of graduation, must be submitted to the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
6 credit hours from minor subject
3 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above

4.2.2 General Option

• The full-time 120 credit hour Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - General Option requires 69 HKR credit hours, 51 non-HKR credit hours, three work terms, and a first aid certificate and a CPR certificate both of which must be current at the time of graduation.

• The 120 credit hours shall normally be taken in the academic terms in the sequence and course load as set out in Table 3 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - General Option. Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor.

• The three work terms shall be taken in the term and sequence as set out in Table 3 Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - General Option.

• Students following the general option must choose a minor of at least 24 credit hours from the minor programs listed in the appropriate faculty or school regulations. In completing the minor, students must follow the minor program regulations listed under the appropriate faculty or school.

Table 3

Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) - General Option

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Fall
Academic Term 1
English 1080 or equivalent
HKR 1123
HKR 2000
HKR 2100
3 credit hours in a laboratory science (either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics is recommended)
3 credit hours in Mathematics

Winter
Academic Term 2

English 1110 or equivalent
HKR 2300
3 credit hours in a laboratory science (either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics is recommended)
3 credit hours in Mathematics
Psychology 1000

Spring
Work Term 1
HKR 299W

Fall
Academic Term 3

HKR 2210
HKR 2310
Psychology 1001
6 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 4

HKR 2220
HKR 2320
HKR 3340
Statistics 2500 or equivalent
3 credit hours from minor subject
Spring
Work Term 2
HKR 399W

Fall
Academic Term 5
HKR 3210 or HKR 3220
HKR 3300
HKR 3310
6 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 6
HKR 2004
HKR 3320
HKR 4310
3 credit hours from minor subject
3 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above
Spring
Work Term 3
HKR 499W

Fall
Academic Term 7

HKR 3220 (if not previously completed) or HKR 4220
HKR 4320
HKR 4420
HKR 4600

First aid and CPR certification, both of which must be current at time of graduation, must be submitted to the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
3 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 8
HKR 4210
HKR 4610

First aid and CPR certification, both of which must be current at time of graduation, must be submitted to the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
3 credit hours from minor subject
6 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above


4.3 Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative)

• The full-time Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative) requires 120 credit hours and three work terms.

• The 120 credit hours shall normally be taken in the academic terms in the sequence and course load as set out in Table 4 Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative). Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor.

• The three work terms shall be taken in the sequence as set out in Table 4 Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative).

• Students must choose a minor of at least 24 credit hours from the minor programs listed in the appropriate faculty or school regulations. In completing the minor, students must follow the minor program regulations listed under the appropriate faculty or school.

Table 4

Bachelor of Recreation (Co-operative)

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Fall
Academic Term 1
Business 1000
English 1080 or equivalent
HKR 2000
Mathematics 1000; or 6 credit hours chosen from Mathematics 1050/1051 or Mathematics 1090/1000
3 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Students who complete only Mathematics 1000 must include an additional 3 credit hours from non-HKR courses in their program.
Winter
Academic Term 2
Business 2000 or English 1110
HKR 2505
HKR 3525
Mathematics 1000; or 6 credit hours chosen from Mathematics 1050/1051 or Mathematics 1090/1000
3 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Students who complete only Mathematics 1000 must include an additional 3 credit hours from non-HKR courses in their program.
Spring
Open

Fall
Academic Term 3
HKR 1123
HKR 3535
HKR 4545
Sociology 1000 or Sociology 2000
Statistics 2500
3 credit hours from HKR courses
3 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Honours degree candidates must include HKR 4625 or HKR 4635 in their program. HKR 4625 may be substituted for the HKR course in this semester.
Winter
Academic Term 4
Business 1201
HKR 2515
HKR 3340
HKR 4600
3 credit hours from HKR courses
3 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Honours degree candidates must include HKR 4625 or HKR 4635 in their program. HKR 4635 may be substituted for the HKR course in this semester.
Spring
Work Term 1
HKR 299W

Fall
Academic Term 5
HKR 3575
HKR 4525
6 credit hours from HKR courses
6 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses
Winter
Work Term 2
HKR 399W

Spring
Academic Term 6
HKR 3555
HKR 3565
HKR 4555
3 credit hours from HKR courses
6 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses
Fall
Work Term 3
HKR 499W

Winter
Academic Term 7
HKR 4575
HKR 4585
6 credit hours from HKR courses
6 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Honours degree candidates must include HKR 4610 in their program. HKR 4610 must be substituted for 3 of the 6 HKR courses in this semester.

4.4 Bachelor of Kinesiology

• The full-time and part-time 120 credit hour Bachelor of Kinesiology requires 69 HKR credit hours and 51 non-HKR credit hours.

• Students admitted full time shall normally complete the 120 credit hours in the academic terms in the sequence and course load as set out in Table 5 Bachelor of Kinesiology. Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor.

• Students admitted part time should consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor regarding course sequence.

Table 5

Bachelor of Kinesiology

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Fall
Academic Term 1
Chemistry 1010 or Chemistry 1050
English 1080 or equivalent
HKR 2000
Mathematics 1000
Psychology 1000

Winter
Academic Term 2
Chemistry 1011 or Chemistry 1051
English 1110 or equivalent
HKR 2300
Psychology 1001
3 credit hours from non-HKR courses other than those listed under Required Courses
Spring
Open

Fall
Academic Term 3
Biology 2040
Computer Science 2650 (recommended) or Computer Science 1700
HKR 2310
Statistics 2550
3 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above
3 credit hours from non-HKR courses other than those listed under Required Courses
Winter
Academic Term 4
HKR 2320
HKR 2600 or Biochemistry 2600
HKR 3320
HKR 3340
Physics 1020 or Physics 1050
3 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above
3 credit hours from non-HKR courses other than those listed under Required Courses
Spring
Academic Term 5
HKR 2703
HKR 4330
HKR 4310
HKR 4420
HKR 4600
3 credit hours from non-HKR courses other than those listed under Required Courses
Fall
Academic Term 6
HKR 3300
HKR 3310
HKR 3410
HKR 4320
3 credit hours from : HKR 2002, 2004, 2100, 3002, 3330, 3350, 3360, 3535, 3585, 4545, 4555, 4565, 4585, 4700, 4701, or 4720
Winter
Academic Term 7
HKR 4610
HKR 4702
HKR 4703
3 credit hours from: HKR 2002, 2004, 2100, 3002, 3330, 3350, 3360, 3535, 3585, 4545, 4555, 4565, 4585, 4700, 4701, or 4720
6 credit hours from non-HKR courses other than those listed under Required Courses

4.5 Bachelor of Physical Education

4.5.1 Teaching Option

• The full-time and part-time 120 credit hour Bachelor of Physical Education - Teaching Option requires 69 HKR credit hours, 51 non-HKR credit hours, and a first aid certificate and a CPR certificate both of which must be current at the time of graduation

• Students admitted full time shall normally complete the 120 credit hours in the academic terms in the sequence and courses load as set out in Table 6 Bachelor of Physical Education - Teaching Option. Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor.

• Students admitted part time should consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor regarding course sequence.

• Students following the teaching option, and who plan to complete one of the intermediate/secondary degree programs offered by the Faculty of Education at this University, must choose a minor of at least 24 credit hours from one of the academic disciplines listed in the intermediate/secondary degree regulations. In completing the minor, students must follow the minor program regulations listed under the appropriate faculty or school.

Table 6

Bachelor of Physical Education - Teaching Option

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Fall
Academic Term 1
English 1080 or equivalent
3 credit hours in a laboratory science (either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics is recommended)
3 credit hours in Mathematics
HKR 2000
HKR 2100

Winter
Academic Term 2
English 1110 or equivalent
HKR 2300
3 credit hours in a laboratory science (either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics is recommended)
3 credit hours in Mathematics
Psychology 1000

Fall
Academic Term 3
HKR 2210
HKR 2310
Psychology 1001
6 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 4
HKR 2220
HKR 2320
HKR 3340
Statistics 2500 or Statistics equivalent
3 credit hours from minor subject
Fall
Academic Term 5
HKR 3110
HKR 3210 or HKR 3220
HKR 3300
HKR 3310

Winter
Academic Term 6
HKR 2004
HKR 3320
HKR 4310
6 credit hours from minor subject
Fall
Academic Term 7
HKR 3220 (if not previously completed) or HKR 4220
HKR 4320
HKR 4420
HKR 4600

First aid and CPR certification, both of which must be current at time of graduation, must be submitted to the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
3 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 8
HKR 4210
HKR 4610

First aid and CPR certification, both of which must be current at time of graduation, must be submitted to the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
6 credit hours from minor subject
3 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above

4.5.2 General Option

• The full-time and part-time 120 credit hour Bachelor of Physical Education - General Option requires 69 HKR credit hours, 51 non-HKR credit hours, and a first aid certificate and a CPR certificate both of which must be current at the time of graduation.

• Students admitted full time shall normally complete the 120 credit hours in the academic terms in the sequence and course load as set out in Table 7 Bachelor of Physical Education - General Option. Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor.

• Students admitted part time should consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor regarding course sequence.

• Students following the general option must choose a minor of at least 24 credit hours from the minor programs listed in the appropriate faculty or school regulations. In completing the minor, students must follow the minor program regulations listed under the appropriate faculty or school.

Table 7

Bachelor of Physical Education - General Option

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Fall
Academic Term 1
English 1080 or equivalent
HKR 2000
HKR 2100
3 credit hours in a laboratory science (either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics is recommended)
3 credit hours in Mathematics

Winter
Academic Term 2
English 1110 or equivalent
HKR 2300
3 credit hours in a laboratory science (either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics is recommended)
3 credit hours in Mathematics
Psychology 1000

Fall
Academic Term 3
HKR 2210
HKR 2310
Psychology 1001
6 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 4
HKR 2220
HKR 2320
HKR 3340
Statistics 2500 or Statistics equivalent
3 credit hours from minor subject
Fall
Academic Term 5
HKR 3210 or HKR 3220
HKR 3300
HKR 3310
6 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 6
HKR 2004
HKR 3320
HKR 4310
3 credit hours from minor subject
3 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above
Fall
Academic Term 7
HKR 3220 (if not previously completed) or HKR 4220
HKR 4320
HKR 4420
HKR 4600

First aid and CPR certification, both of which must be current at time of graduation, must be submitted to the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
3 credit hours from minor subject
Winter
Academic Term 8
HKR 4210
HKR 4610

First aid and CPR certification, both of which must be current at time of graduation, must be submitted to the School’s Academic Student Advisor.
3 credit hours from minor subject
6 credit hours from HKR courses at the 2000 level or above

4.6 Bachelor of Recreation

• The full-time and part-time Bachelor of Recreation is comprised of 120 credit hours.

• Students admitted full time shall normally complete the 120 credit hours in the academic terms in the sequence and course load as set out in Table 8 Bachelor of Recreation. Students wishing to change the sequence and/or reduce the course load required in the academic terms must first consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor.

• Students admitted part time should consult with the School’s Academic Student Advisor regarding course sequence.

• Students must choose a minor of at least 24 credit hours from the minor programs listed in the appropriate faculty or school regulations. In completing the minor, students must follow the minor program regulations listed under the appropriate faculty or school.         

Table 8

Bachelor of Recreation

Term
Required Courses
Elective Courses
Fall
Academic Term 1
Business 1000
English 1080 or equivalent
HKR 2000
Mathematics 1000; or 6 credit hours chosen from Mathematics 1050/1051 or Mathematics 1090/1000
3 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Students who complete only Mathematics 1000 must include an additional 3 credit hours from a non-HKR course in their program.
Winter
Academic Term 2
Business 2000 or English 1110
HKR 2505
HKR 3525
Mathematics 1000; or 6 credit hours chosen from Mathematics 1050/1051 or Mathematics 1090/1000
3 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Students who complete only Mathematics 1000 must include an additional 3 credit hours from a non-HKR course in their program.
Fall
Academic Term 3
HKR 3535
HKR 4545
Sociology 1000 or Sociology 2000
Statistics 2500

3 credit hours from HKR courses
3 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Honours degree candidates must include HKR 4625 or HKR 4635 in their program. HKR 4625 may be substituted for the HKR course in this semester.
Winter
Academic Term 4
Business 1201
HKR 2515
HKR 3340
HKR 4600
3 credit hours from HKR courses
3 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Honours degree candidates must include HKR 4625 or HKR 4635 in their program. HKR 4635 may be substituted for the HKR course in this semester.
Spring
Academic Term 5
HKR 3555
HKR 3565
HKR 4555
3 credit hours from HKR courses
6 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses
Fall
Academic Term 6
HKR 3575
HKR 4525
6 credit hours from HKR courses
6 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses
Winter
Academic Term 7
HKR 4575
HKR 4585
6 credit hours from HKR courses
6 credit hours from minor subject or non-HKR courses

Honours degree candidates must include HKR 4610 in their program. HKR 4610 must be substituted for 3 of the 6 HKR courses in this semester.


4.7 Honours Degrees

4.7.1 An honours degree signifies superior academic achievement.

4.7.2 An application for admission to any of the honours degrees is not required. Rather, students indicate on the prescribed application for graduation form that they wish to be considered for an honours degree.

4.7.3 To receive an honours degree, a candidate shall:

• meet the requirements of the general degree;

• obtain an overall average of 75% or better on all HKR courses for the degree; and

• obtain an overall average of 70% on the 120 credit hours required for the degree.

4.74 In addition to meeting the above-noted requirements, candidates for an honours degree in recreation shall include HKR 4610, and either HKR 4625 or HKR 4635 in their degree program.

4.7.5 A candidate for the honours degree who does not fulfill these conditions but fulfills the requirements for the general degree shall be awarded the general degree.

4.7.6 Candidates are not permitted to repeat or substitute courses or work terms for the purpose of meeting the academic requirements for honours degrees.

4.7.7 A candidate who, for academic reasons, has been required to withdraw from a program offered by the School will not be eligible for the honours degree.


5 PROMOTION REGULATIONS

dash 5.1 General Information
dash 5.2 Promotion Status
dash 5.3 Other Information



5.1 General Information

•  In addition to meeting the promotion regulations for the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation all students must meet the general academic regulations (undergraduate). For further information refer to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE).

•  Success in the programs depends on meeting the requirements of both academic terms and work terms.

•  To be promoted a student must, in addition to obtaining the requisite grades and average, complete and deliver all work term reports as required.


5.2 Promotion Status

•  A student's promotion status at the end of each term will be in one of the following four categories:

5.2.1 Clear Promotion: Clear Promotion means a student can proceed to the next term without restrictions.

•  Students completing an academic term will receive a Clear Promotion by obtaining an overall average of at least 60%, with a numeric grade of at least 60% in each HKR course, and a numeric grade of at least 50% in each non-HKR course.

•  Students completing a work term will receive a Clear Promotion by obtaining a PAS (pass) or a PWD (pass with distinction) in the work term.

•  Students completing courses in addition to a work term must obtain a PAS (pass) or a PWD (pass with distinction) in the work term and an overall average of at least 60%, with a grade of at least 60% in each HKR course, and at least 50% in each non-HKR course.

5.2.2 Probationary Promotion: Probationary Promotion designates less than a Clear Promotion but requires an overall average of at least 60%, with a numeric grade of at least 50% in each course, and not more than one HKR grade with a numeric grade below 60%.

•  A student with Probationary Promotion at the end of Academic Term 1 may be permitted to enter Academic Term 2 but must have Clear Promotion by the end of Academic Term 2.

•  A student with Probationary Promotion from any academic term may continue to the subsequent work term under the condition that entry into the next academic term is not allowed until the student's status is changed to Clear Promotion.

•  A student with Probationary Promotion at the end of the final academic term will not be recommended for graduation until the student's status is changed to Clear Promotion.

•  To change Probationary Promotion to Clear Promotion the student must satisfy the School that he or she is competent in the subject of the HKR course in which the student has failed to achieve 60%. This will normally entail re-examination, after which the student will be declared to have passed or failed a test of competency in the subject concerned. No numerical grade will be assigned in the re-examination, and the original grade submitted for the course will not be changed.

•  Re-examination may be written, oral, practical or a combination of formats and will be at a time determined by the School. Failure to submit to the re-examination or failure in the re-examination will result in denial of promotion.

•  The School may recommend that the student complete remedial studies before re-examination.

5.2.3 Probationary (A) Promotion: Probationary (A) Promotion designates failure to successfully complete the required components of HKR 2210, 2220, 3210, 3220, 4210 and 4220 in a given term.

•  Probationary (A) Promotion will be given upon the recommendation of the course instructor/coordinator and/or the Committee on Undergraduate Studies and only for extreme circumstances, duly authenticated.

•  A student with Probationary (A) Promotion in any term will be permitted to enter subsequent terms and will receive a letter grade of INC (incomplete) in the course. A final numeric grade will not be received until the required components of each course has been successfully completed. Academic Council will grant this status, taking into account the specific factors involved in each case. This status is not automatic, as failure to successfully complete all required components of each course would normally result in a failing grade.

•  A student with Probationary (A) Promotion at the end of the final academic term will not be recommended for graduation until the student has successfully completed all required components of all courses, and the student’s status is changed to Clear Promotion.

5.2.4 Promotion Denied: If Clear Promotion is not achieved each term or following probation, promotion is denied.

•  A student with Promotion Denied status will be required to withdraw from the School. Students with Promotion Denied status may apply for readmission to the program after two semesters. A student will normally be readmitted into the term from which promotion was denied.

•  A student who is denied promotion for failing a work term may be considered for readmission after the lapse of two semesters, at which time the student will be required to complete a further work term with satisfactory performance before being admitted to any further academic term in the School. A work term may be repeated only once, and not more than two work terms may be repeated in the entire program.

•  A student who has been denied promotion as a result of having failed a work term and who, in the opinion of the School, can benefit from a remedial program, may be permitted an extension of time not to exceed the end of the registration period of the subsequent semester to complete the requirements of the work term.

•  A student who is denied promotion as a result of grades received in HKR and non-HKR courses will be required to repeat all HKR courses in which they obtained a numeric grade of less than 60% in that term. A non-HKR course may be replaced by a course acceptable in the student's program.

•  A student with Promotion Denied status at the end of the final academic term will not be recommended for graduation until the student's status is changed to Clear Promotion.

5.3 Other Information

•  The Committee on Undergraduate Studies will determine each student’s promotion status at the end of each term and will make its recommendations to Academic Council.

•  Academic Council may promote a student notwithstanding the promotion regulations given above. A decision of this nature will be made only for reasons acceptable to Academic Council and in the case of a student thought likely to succeed in future terms.

•  A student shall be permitted only one readmission to the School.

•  Students may be required to withdraw from their program at any time, if, in the opinion of the School, they are unlikely to benefit from continued attendance.


6 WAIVER OF REGULATIONS

dash 6.1 General Information



6    Waiver of School Regulations

       Every student has the right to request waiver of School regulations. Students wishing waiver of University academic regulations should refer to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) -  Waiver of Regulations.

6.1    General Information
        •    The School reserves the right in special circumstances to modify, alter, or waive any School regulation in its application to individual students where merit and equity so warrant in the judgement of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.
        •    All requests, other than requests for waiver of a prerequisite or co-requisite of a School course, must be submitted to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School for consideration. Waiver of a School course prerequisite or co-requisite may be granted by the course instructor.
        •    Students requesting a waiver of a School regulation, other than requests for waiver of a prerequisite or co-requisite of a School course, must submit their request in writing to the Chair of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies on the prescribed form which is available from the School’s general office. Medical and/or other documentation to substantiate the request must be provided.
        •    Any waiver granted does not reduce the total number of credit hours required for the degree.
        •    In addition, regardless of any waiver granted, students enrolled in a co-operative program must successfully complete a minimum of two work terms.

7 APPEAL OF REGULATIONS

Any student whose request for waiver of School regulations has been denied has the right to appeal. For further information refer to UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS - GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS (UNDERGRADUATE) - Appeal of Regulations.


8 HKR COURSES AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS NOT ENROLLED IN A PROGRAM OFFERED BY THE SCHOOL

dash 8.1 Regulations for Students Not in a Program Offered by the School
dash 8.2 HKR Courses



8.1    Regulations for Students Not in a Program Offered by the School
 

• Students not in a program offered by the School may register for a maximum of 15 credit hours only from the following list if space is available.

• Students who have been required to withdraw from a program offered by the School may not register for any HKR course.

• Students not in a School program will be required to drop any HKR course(s) in excess of 15 credit hours and may be subject to academic and financial penalties.

8.2 HKR Courses

1000 Fitness and Wellness
1001 Resistance Training for Health and Activity
2000 Introduction to Kinesiology, Physical Education and Recreation
2002 Coaching
2300 Growth and Development
2310 Human Anatomy
2320 Primary Human Physiology
2410 Historical and Comparative Physical Education
2505 Recreation Programming and Evaluation
2515 Social Psychology of Leisure
2545 Introduction to Outdoor Recreation and Education
2600 Introduction to Human Nutrition
2601 Physical Activity, Obesity, and Weight Control
3002 Advanced Coaching
3310 Physiology of Exercise
3360 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
3410 Sociology of Sport
3490 Women in Sport and Physical Activity
3505 Adventure Programming
3515 Outdoor Recreation and Persons with Disabilities
3525 Canadian Recreation Delivery Systems
3535 Legal Aspects of Leisure and Recreation Services
3545 Outdoor Recreation Leadership
3585 Recreation and Persons with Disabilities
3595 Women and Leisure


9 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

In accordance with Senate’s Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, the course descriptions for courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Director of the School.

All courses of the School are designated by HKR. The abbreviations KIN, PHSD, and RECR indicate former Kinesiology, Physical Education, and Recreation courses.

AR = Attendance requirement; CH = Credit hours are 3 unless otherwise noted; CO = Co-requisite(s); CR = Credit can be retained for only one course from the set(s) consisting of the course being described and the course(s) listed; LC = Lecture hours per week are 3 unless otherwise noted; LH = Laboratory hours per week; OR = Other requirements of the course such as tutorials, practical sessions, or seminars; PR = Prerequisite(s); UL = Usage limitation(s).

1000 Fitness and Wellness (formerly PHSD 1000) is an introduction to the concepts of fitness and wellness, and the relationships among physical activity, fitness, wellness, quality of life, and longevity.
    CR: PHSD 1000
    UL: not applicable towards any of the degrees offered by the School

1001 Resistance Training for Health and Activity (formerly KIN and PHSD 1001) is an introduction to resistance training exercises, programs, and principles. This will necessitate both theoretical classes and practical laboratories that will involve testing and participation in resistance training activities. A portion of the assessment will also be based on regular attendance (at student convenience) for another hour of resistance training per week certified by the attending fitness consultant.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 1001; HKR 4320; the former KIN and PHSD 4320
    LH: 2
    UL: not applicable towards any of the kinesiology or physical education degrees offered by the School

1123 Professional Development Seminars are offered during the Fall semester prior to a student’s first work term. These seminars introduce the co-operative education process and prepare the student for work terms. These seminars are graded PAS or FAL based on attendance and participation.
    AR: attendance is required
    CH: 0
    LC: as scheduled

2000 Introduction to Kinesiology, Physical Education and Recreation (formerly KIN, PHSD, and RECR 2000) introduces the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural, historical concepts, and influences in kinesiology, physical education, and recreation.
    CR: KIN, PHSD, and RECR 2000; HKR 2001

2001 Introduction to Physical Education for Education Students provides students a general overview of the role that physical education and active living play in the overall development of primary and elementary students, and in the creation of positive learning environment in schools. This course is intended for students in the primary/elementary program offered by the Faculty of Education.
    CR: HKR, KIN, PHSD, and RECR 2000
    UL: not applicable towards any of the degrees offered by the School
    PR: admission to the Bachelor of Education (Primary/Elementary) offered by the Faculty of Education

2002 Coaching (formerly KIN and PHSD 2002) introduces the various methods, principles, and theories used to coach developing athletes in various sport settings. Factors such as the coach’s role, planning, analysing and developing skills, sport safety, and physical preparation will be presented with an emphasis on attaining competency in these areas.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 2002; the former PHSD 421A/B

2004 Enhancing Performance in Physical Activity (formerly PHSD 2004) gives an overview of the various models, principles, and theories used to explain and predict ways in which athletes and exercisers conduct themselves in various sport settings. Selected intervention techniques to enhance performance will be presented.
    CR: PHSD 2004

2005 Personal Stress Management is designed to provide students with an introduction to stress and to explore the relationship between exercise, fitness and physical activity and stress management. It describes how to reorganize one’s life by presenting a systematic analysis of stress and coping mechanisms appropriate to different stages of life. The stress coping mechanisms will be presented with an emphasis on application. Completion of this course does not qualify students as stress management counsellors. Students interested in this field are advised to contact the Department of Psychology for information on careers in counselling.
    CO: Psychology 1000 and 1001
    PR: Psychology 1000 and 1001

2100 Introduction to Organization and Administration (formerly KIN, PHSD, and RECR 2100) introduces the basic administrative functions in a work setting in physical education and/or recreation. The laboratory sessions will assist students to develop skill in the basic computer applications relevant to these functions.
    CR: KIN, PHSD, and RECR 2100
    LH: 2

2210 Physical Activities Course: Movement Concepts (formerly PHSD 2210) employs the conceptual approach to teaching physical activity and facilitated through various forms of dance (e.g., creative, folk). Concepts, skills, and strategies will be emphasized.
AR: attendance is required. Students who are absent more than 6 class hours may be required to withdraw from the course and will receive a letter grade of DRF and a numeric grade of 0%.
    CR: PHSD 2210
    LC: as scheduled
    LH: as scheduled

2220 Physical Activities Course: Gymnastics and Aquatics (formerly PHSD 2220) may employ a number of teaching methods. Emphasis will be placed on the language and practice of the conceptual approach. Concepts, skills, and strategies will be emphasized.
AR: attendance is required. Students who are absent more than 6 class hours may be required to withdraw from the course and will receive a letter grade of DRF and a numeric grade of 0%.
    CR: PHSD 2220
    LC: as scheduled
    LH: as scheduled

2300 Growth and Development (formerly PHSD 2120, and KIN and PHSD 2300) is an introductory study of human growth and developmental factors and their influence on the learning of motor skills.
    CR: PHSD 2120; KIN and PHSD 2300

2310 Human Anatomy (formerly KIN and PHSD 2310) is a study of the structure of the human body with emphasis on selected systems (endocrine, neural, muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory).
    CR: KIN and PHSD 2310
    LH: 2

2320 Primary Human Physiology (formerly KIN and PHSD 2320) is a study of bodily functions with emphasis of selected systems (endocrine, neural, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory).
    CR: KIN and PHSD 2320
    LH: 2

2410 Historical and Comparative Physical Education (formerly KIN and PHSD 2410) is a history of the development of physical education and sport from ancient societies to modern times.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 2410

2505 Recreation Programming and Evaluation (formerly RECR 2505) introduces the student to a variety of methodologies, skills, and materials for planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating professional recreation programs for diverse populations in a variety of settings.
    CR: RECR 2505

2515 Social Psychology of Leisure (formerly RECR 2515) introduces the personality and social factors that shape how people experience leisure. Course materials will focus on life cycle theory, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, perceived freedom, constraints theory, and other social psychological theory related to leisure.
    CR: RECR 2515

2545 Introduction to Outdoor Recreation and Education (formerly RECR 2545) gives an overview of the foundational principles of outdoor education and recreation as they pertain to philosophy, wilderness ethics, professional preparation, movement through wildlands, environmental hazards, navigation, and safety. Students will participate in a sampling of outdoor education and recreation activities during the course.
    CR: RECR 2545
    PR: HKR 2505

2600 Introduction to Human Nutrition (formerly KIN 2600; same as Biochemistry 2600) gives an overview of human nutrition with an emphasis on topics of current interest. Students will gain an understanding of nutrition in the context of health maintenance across the life span. Topics covered will include nutrition during pregnancy, nutrition for infants, Canadian Recommended Nutrient Intake/Dietary Reference Intake, weight loss and weight gain, nutriceuticals, and ergogenic aids.
    CR: KIN 2600; Biochemistry 2600

2601 Physical Activity, Obesity, and Weight Control explores the relationship between physical activity, obesity, and morbidity. Emphasis will be placed on the incidence and prevalence of obesity, environmental and genetic factors affecting obesity, and mechanisms of weight and body composition modification.
    UL: not applicable towards any of the kinesiology degrees offered by the School

2703 Introduction to Human Factors (formerly KIN 2703) is an introduction to the field of human factors, the field that studies aspects of human movement, health, safety, and performance in the workplace. This will include an introduction to the methods of detection, evaluation, and the physiological changes arising from hazards (e.g. inappropriate levels of noise, vibration, and illumination) in the workplace. The course will also examine overuse injuries in workplace studied in the context of basic biomechanics and function of the musculo-skeletal system.
    CO: HKR 2320 and Physics 1020
    CR: KIN 2703
    PR: HKR 2310, Chemistry 1010 and 1011 or Chemistry 1050 and 1051

299W Work Term 1 (formerly KIN, PHSD, and RECR 001W) offers an opportunity for students to learn, develop, and practice high standards of professional behavior and performance in the work environment. A student is required to submit a personal job diary and a work term report which should, at a minimum, reflect a clear understanding of job events and work place expectations and show reasonable competence in written communication skills.
    CR: KIN, PHSD, and RECR 001W
    CH: 0
    PR: HKR 1123

3002 Advanced Coaching (formerly KIN and PHSD 3002) is an advanced study of the various methods, principles, and theories used to coach athletes in various sport settings. Topics such as planning, the coach's role, analysing, and developing skills, mental training, physical preparation, and development of a personal coaching plan will be studied with an emphasis on attaining competency in these areas. Practical coaching experience is a required component of the course.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 3002; PHSD 421A/B
    LH: 3 Students will participate in practical coaching situations from which coaching journals will be developed for course evaluation.
    PR: HKR 2002

3110 Curriculum Development and Teaching Methods (formerly PHSD 2110, 3110, and 311A/B) gives an overview, through a blend of theory and practical experience, of curriculum development and teaching methods as they apply to primary/elementary level physical education
    CH: 6
    CO: HKR 3300
    CR: PHSD 2110, 3110, 311A/B
    LH: 9
    PR: HKR 2000, 2210, 2300, 2310, 2320 and 3340

3210 Physical Activities Course: Court Games (formerly PHSD 3210) covers volleyball, tennis, badminton, plus a selection of other court games. Individual activities include track and field, wrestling, and other combative activities. A number of teaching methods may be employed and emphasis will be placed on the language and practice of the conceptual approach. Concepts, skills, and strategies will be emphasized.
AR: attendance is required. Students who are absent more than 6 class hours may be required to withdraw from the course and will receive a letter grade of DRF and a numeric grade of 0%.
    CR: PHSD 3210
    LC: as scheduled
    LH: as scheduled
    PR: HKR 2210

3220 Physical Activities Course: Target and Field Games (formerly PHSD 3220) covers golf, archery, softball. Outdoor activities, including canoeing, navigational skills, lightweight camping, over-night canoe trip, and introduction to rock climbing, are offered only in the Fall. A number of teaching methods may be employed and emphasis will be placed on the language and practice of the conceptual approach. Concepts, skills, and strategies will be emphasized.
AR: attendance is required. Students who are absent more than 6 class hours may be required to withdraw from the course and will receive a letter grade of DRF and a numeric grade of 0%.
    CR: PHSD 3220
    LC: as scheduled
    LH: as scheduled
    PR: HKR 2210

3300 Motor Learning (formerly PHSD 2120, and KIN and PHSD 3300) gives an overview of motor learning and performance variables and their application to the teaching of physical skills, and will investigate motor control issues related to skill instruction.
CR: PHSD 2120; KIN and PHSD 3300
    LH: 2
    PR: HKR 2300

3310 Physiology of Exercise (formerly KIN and PHSD 3310) covers the physiological responses of the metabolic, neuromuscular, and cardiorespiratory systems at rest and during acute and chronic activity.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 3310
    LH: 3
    PR: HKR 2310 and 2320

3320 Introduction to Biomechanics (formerly KIN and PHSD 3320) is the analysis of human movement; the mechanics of motion and the general application of kinesiology.
    CO: HKR 2320
    CR: KIN and PHSD 3320
    LH: 2
    PR: HKR 2310 It is strongly recommended that students successfully complete Physics 1020 prior to enrolling in this course.
   
3330 Health Issues I (formerly KIN and PHSD 3330) covers issues in personal and community health related to infectious illness, degenerative illness, heredity, and nutrition.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 3330

3340 Adapted Physical Activity (formerly KIN, PHSD, and RECR 3340) presents an overview of current practices, philosophies, and issues related to physical activity and recreation for persons with disabilities. Knowledge and understanding of various disabling conditions and consequent needs of persons with disabilities, including health, safety and fitness, and how these needs may be met in terms of physical activity will be emphasized.
    CR: KIN, PHSD, and RECR 3340

3350 Health Issues II (formerly KIN and PHSD 3350) - inactive course.

3360 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (formerly KIN and PHSD 3360) is a basic introduction to the field of athletic therapy and sports medicine. The content focuses on the prevention and care of sports injuries and covers topics such as preventive screening, safe environments, on the spot assessment and First Aid, legal responsibility, and supportive taping/wrapping.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 3360
    PR: HKR 2310 and a Basic First Aid Course

3410 Sociology of Sport (formerly KIN 3410; same as Sociology 3410) is an analysis of functions of sport in Canadian and North American society. Areas include social organization of sport, sport and social processes, sport and social problems, socialization and stratification of sport, and violence in sport.
    CR: KIN 3410; Sociology 3410

3490 Women in Sport and Physical Activity (formerly PHSD 3490, and PHSD and RECR 3590) provides students with an opportunity to critically examine, understand and appreciate women’s involvement in and contributions to the areas of sport and physical activity. The student will be expected to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate a wide range of historical, cultural, philosophical, and socio-psychological issues that have shaped the nature and scope of women’s participation in sport and physical activity.
    CR: PHSD 3490; PHSD and RECR 3590

3505 Adventure Programming (formerly RECR 3505) introduces the theory and practice of adventure programing. Topics covered in the course will include briefing, activity selection, sequencing, group development, and risk management. The use of adventure programing with a variety of populations will be explored. Skill development in adventure activity facilitation and processing is stressed throughout the course.
    CR: RECR 3505
    PR: HKR 2505 or permission of the instructor

3515 Outdoor Recreation and Persons with Disabilities (formerly RECR 3515) - inactive course.

3525 Canadian Recreation Delivery Systems (formerly PHSD 3520, RECR 3525, and PHSD 4520) introduces recreation and sport delivery systems in Newfoundland and Canada. The course will examine the various agencies that administer recreation and sport at municipal, provincial, and national levels.
    CR: PHSD 3520; RECR 3525; PHSD 4520
    PR: HKR 2000

3535 Legal Aspects of Leisure and Recreation Services (formerly RECR 3535) provides students with an opportunity for in-depth study of legal issues related to the operation of leisure services and facilities. Issues of tort and contract liability, employment related legal aspects, human rights and freedoms, and administrative procedures involved in property acquisition, law enforcement, and risk management are the topics of this course.
    CR: RECR 3535
    PR: HKR 2100

3545 Outdoor Recreation Leadership (formerly 3545) acquaints students with the breadth, depth, and scope of outdoor recreation leadership including a detailed examination of theories, principles, and practices. The course provides opportunities for individual students to develop, practice, and receive feedback on their outdoor leadership skills. The course includes a required field experience in outdoor recreation leadership.
    CR: RECR 3545
    PR: HKR 2505 or HKR 3220

3555 Outdoor Recreation Management (formerly PHSD 3550 and RECR 3555) gives an overview of outdoor recreation practices in Newfoundland and Canada. This course will examine the management of resources, conservation education and practices, and development for public use or exclusion; legislation related to management of risk; viability of facilities; national and provincial agencies; private commercial ventures; and future trends in management. Management strategies will form a major part of the course.
    CR: PHSD 3550; RECR 3555

3565 Tourism/Commercial Recreation (formerly PHSD 3560 and RECR 3565) examines behavioral factors influencing tourism; promotion of commercial recreation attractions, provincial strategies in travel and tourism, problems of leisure travel, stability of entrepreneurial ventures in tourism, and research and planning strategies relevant to commercial ventures.
    CR: PHSD 3560; RECR 3565

3575 Community Development and Recreation (formerly RECR 3575) introduces various theoretical perspectives on community organization and development, as well as methods available to the recreation practitioner to facilitate the development of recreation services in communities. This course examines, in particular, recreation services delivery which involves community residents and groups in recreation program decision-making and implementation.
    CR: RECR 3575

3585 Recreation and Persons with Disabilities (formerly RECR 3585) provides students with an understanding of the theoretical perspectives that have guided the development of recreation services which are aimed at meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. It will introduce students to current recreation services, programs and supports for persons with disabilities in Canada.
    CR: RECR 3585
    PR: HKR 3340

3595 Women and Leisure (formerly PHSD and RECR 3590, and RECR 3595) provides students with an opportunity to critically examine, understand and appreciate women’s involvement in and contributions to leisure. The student will be expected to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate a wide range of historical, cultural, philosophical, and socio-psychological issues that have shaped the nature and scope of women’s participation in leisure.
    CR: PHSD and RECR 3590; RECR 3595
    PR: Sociology 1000 or Sociology 2000

399W Work Term 2 (formerly KIN, PHSD, and RECR 002W) offers an opportunity for students to further expand and develop professional knowledge and skills, while demonstrating the ability to accept increased responsibility and challenge in the work place. A student is expected to demonstrate competence in written communication skills through the maintenance of a personal job diary and the submission of a formal report demonstrating the student’s ability to effectively gather, analyse, organize, and present information regarding a specific aspect of the work term position.
    CR: KIN, PHSD, and RECR 002W
    CH: 0
    PR: HKR 1123 and successful completion of 299W

4210 Physical Activities Course: Territorial Games 1 (formerly PHSD 4210) includes ice hockey, water polo, team handball. Outdoor activities such as snow travel methods emphasizing cross-country skiing, navigational skills, winter survival/camping, and overnight camping are offered only during the Winter. A number of teaching methods may be employed and emphasis will be placed on the language and practice of the conceptual approach. Concepts, skills, and strategies will be emphasized.
AR: attendance is required. Students who are absent more than 6 class hours may be required to withdraw from the course and will receive a letter grade of DRF and a numeric grade of 0%.
    CR: PHSD 4210
    LC: as scheduled
    PR: HKR 2210

4220 Physical Activities Course: Territorial Games 2 (formerly PHSD 4220) includes soccer and rugby, basketball and other territorial games. A number of teaching methods may be employed and emphasis will be placed on the language and practice of the conceptual approach. Concepts, skills, and strategies will be emphasized.
AR: attendance is required. Students who are absent more than 6 class hours may be required to withdraw from the course and will receive a letter grade of DRF and a numeric grade of 0%.
    CR: PHSD 4220
    LC: as scheduled
    LH: as scheduled
    PR: HKR 2210

4310 Evaluation (formerly KIN and PHSD 4310) includes program evaluation and measurement of the components of physical performance in addition to statistical treatment and interpretation of data.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 4310
    LH: 2
    PR: Statistics 2500 or equivalent

4320 Fitness Leadership (formerly KIN and PHSD 4320) prepares professionals in the administrative, interpretive, instructional, interpersonal, and pedagogic competencies required for and associated with fitness testing, prescription, teaching, and leadership.
    CO: HKR 3310
    CR: HKR 1001, the former KIN and PHSD 1001; KIN and PHSD 4320

4330 Social Psychology of Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation (formerly KIN and PHSD 4330) introduces the psychological factors that influence participation in sport, exercise, physical activity and recreation and the psychological effects derived from participation.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 4330

4420 Issues (formerly KIN and PHSD 4420) explores, through research and discussion, trends and issues basic to the profession including areas in physical education, health, fitness, and lifestyle industries.
    CR: KIN and PHSD 4420
    PR: successful completion of a minimum of 78 credit hours

4515 Principles and Practices of Social Recreation (formerly PHSD 4510 and RECR 4515) - inactive course.

4525 Planning for Recreation (formerly RECR 4525) focuses on the strategic planning process and how it can be used within recreation organizations. The course is designed to introduce students to various planning theories and to provide students with opportunities to develop skills in strategic and other planning processes.
    CR: RECR 4525

4535 Camp Administration and Programming (formerly PHSD 4530 and RECR 4535) focuses on the organization of residence and mobile camps, camp ownership, site, property, buildings, health and safety, staff recruitment, budget, programming, operation, and evaluation.
    CR: PHSD 4530; RECR 4535

4545 Facility Planning, Design and Management (formerly PHSD 4540 and RECR 4545) focuses on the major considerations in selecting site, size, type and usage of the more popular facilities as well as the problems in design, layout and function, standards, and modifications.
    CR: PHSD 4540; RECR 4545

4555 Leadership and Supervision in Recreation (formerly PHSD 4550 and RECR 4555) focuses on need, selection, training, and supervision of leaders in recreation. Certification, standards and professional organizations. Evaluation of leadership materials and methods used. Practical exposure to roles of both leader and supervisor through seminar and related fieldwork.
    CR: PHSD 4550; RECR 4555

4565 Recreation Promotion and Marketing (same as PHSD 4560 and RECR 4565) examines the communication processes, marketing strategies, and evaluative methods that enable an agency to promote its products, programs, and services.
    CR: PHSD 4560; RECR 4565

4575 Recreation Ethics, Issues and Trends (formerly PHSD 4570 and RECR 4575) explores contemporary trends and issues identified by governments and recreation practitioners and the way in which these issues influence the delivery of leisure services.
    CR: PHSD 4570; RECR 4575

4585 Financing Recreation Services (formerly RECR 4585) provides opportunities for in-depth study of financing leisure services in a variety of settings. The primary learning objectives are to achieve an understanding of revenue sources, financial management, and budgeting, the concepts of equity from a justice, social, and economic perspective, and the ability to use various techniques in the allocation of resources, the pricing of services, and ascertaining the costs of providing services.
    CR: RECR 4585

4600 Introduction to Research (formerly KIN, PHSD, and RECR 4600) introduces research methodologies currently employed in kinesiology, physical education or recreation.
    CR: KIN, PHSD, and RECR 4600
    PR: Statistics 2550 or equivalent

4605 Research Methods in Recreation and Leisure II (formerly RECR 4605) - inactive course.

4610 Research Project (formerly KIN, PHSD, and RECR 4610) is a detailed study, directed by a faculty member of the School, of a selected topic in the field of kinesiology, physical education or recreation.
    CR: KIN, PHSD, and RECR 4610
    PR: HKR 4310 and 4600 and one of Statistics 2500 or Statistics 2550

4625 Theoretical Perspectives of Recreation and Leisure (formerly RECR 4625) is an in-depth overview and analysis of current theoretical perspectives/paradigms related to the leisure experience. A parallel purpose is to examine psychological, sociological, and social-psychological constructs that contribute to a contemporary, interdisciplinary understanding of recreation and leisure.
    CR: RECR 4625

4635 Multicultural Perspectives of Recreation and Leisure (formerly RECR 4635) is a cross-cultural analysis of recreation and leisure and their relationship to culture. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the interrelationships of the social, physical, psychological, economic, and political aspects of leisure and recreation in various cultures.
    CR: RECR 4635

4700 Advanced Fitness Training and Assessment (formerly KIN 4700) prepares students to assess, prescribe, demonstrate, supervise, educate, and counsel apparently healthy individuals across the lifespan on information related to physical activity/exercise, fitness and health. The successful completion of this course will allow students to apply for a certification as a Professional Fitness and Lifestyle Consultant from the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology.
    CR: KIN 4700
    LH: 2
    PR: HKR 4320

4701 Environmental Physiology (formerly KIN 4701) examines human behavioral, autonomic and metabolic responses to extreme environments. This will include the study of human responses seen during changes from normal ambient temperature and pressure, to those experienced in the environments encountered during undersea diving, space travel, altitude, and other similar environments.
    CR: KIN 4701
    PR: HKR 2320

4702 Advanced Exercise Physiology (formerly KIN 4702) prepares students to acquire the knowledge necessary to understand, analyse, and integrate information and experiences related to physiological adaptations occurring with acute and chronic activity and disuse.
    CR: KIN 4702
    LH: 2
    PR: HKR 3310

4703 Occupational Ergonomics and Sport Biomechanics (formerly KIN 4703) focuses on the contrast between biomechanical analyses of workplace tasks and athletic movement. Students will conduct a detailed biomechanical analysis of a given movement, in the workplace or for a given sport, with regard to both the probability of injury and optimization of performance.
    CR: KIN 4703
    LH: 2
    PR: HKR 2703, 3320, and Physics 1020

4720 Directed Study (formerly KIN 4720) requires approval of Director of the School and the course instructor. Permission to register must be obtained in the term preceding enrolment.   
    CR: KIN 4720

4910 Directed Study (formerly PHSD 4910) requires approval of Director of the School and the course instructor. Permission to register must be obtained in the term preceding enrolment.   
    CR: PHSD 4910

4915 Directed Study (formerly RECR 4915) requires approval of Director of the School and the course instructor. Permission to register must be obtained in the term preceding enrolment.   
    CR: RECR 4915

499W Work Term 3 (formerly KIN, PHSD, and RECR 003W) offers an opportunity for students, who have sufficient academic grounding and work experience, to exercise greater independence and responsibility in their assigned work. A student must demonstrate a high level of competency in communications skills through the submission of a formal report on a topic related to the work term or through a formal presentation on an aspect of the work term using the latest in computer technology and applications.
    CR: KIN, PHSD, and RECR 003W
    CH: 0
    PR: HKR 1123 and successful completion of 399W


Please direct inquiries to jsaunder@mun.ca.


Last modified on April 30, 2004 by R. Bruce

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