REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

MEDICINE

Professor of Medicine and Dean
M. Ian Bowmer

Professor and Assistant Dean
F. Moody-Corbett

There are seven program areas in the Faculty of Medicine: Cancer, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Neurosciences. Each program area has a coordinator who is responsible to communicate the interests of the program to the Faculty of Medicine Graduate Studies Committee and participate in the admission of graduate students into the graduate program in Medicine.

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy (in one of the seven programs listed above) is offered in the Faculty of Medicine by full-time and part-time study. The Faculty of Medicine also offers the opportunity for students registered in the M.D. program to obtain a Ph.D. in a combined and integrated M.D.-Ph.D. program.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

Admission Requirements

The admission requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Medicine are as given under the GENERAL REGULATIONS governing Ph.D. degrees.

Degree Requirements

1. The program of study for a Ph.D. degree is the responsibility of the supervisory committee composed of a supervisor and at least two other faculty members.

2. It is the responsibility of the supervisory committee to meet regularly (at least annually) with the student and to provide guidance at all stages of the candidate’s program. An annual report prepared by the supervisor and signed by the student and all members of the committee is required to be submitted to the Assistant Dean of Research and Graduate Studies (Medicine).

3. Graduate students are expected to participate in Faculty of Medicine seminars and journal clubs.

4. Graduate students in the Ph.D. degree normally take the comprehensive examination before the end of the seventh semester. The comprehensive examination consists of both a written and oral component and is in accordance with the GENERAL REGULATIONS governing Ph.D. degrees.

M.D.-Ph.D PROGRAM

The M.D.-Ph.D. program is available to highly motivated students with an excellent academic record who are interested in a research career in academic medicine and wish to receive both of these degrees from the Faculty of Medicine.

The purpose of the M.D.-Ph.D. program is to provide medical education, including clinical skills, and training in health research. The integrated program is designed to increase the efficiency of obtaining both degrees, and the student is required to fulfill the complete requirements of both the M.D. and Ph.D. degrees.

Admission Requirements

To be admitted into the M.D.-Ph.D. program, students must meet the admission requirements of both the M.D. and Ph.D. programs.

Degree Requirements

1. Students are jointly enrolled in the M.D. program and the Ph.D. program that will be overseen by the Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Medical Education and the Assistant Dean of Research and Graduate Studies.

2. Normally, students successfully complete the pre-clerkship phase of the M.D. program and then enter the M.D.-Ph.D. program full-time.

3. Normally, students will complete the requirements for the Ph.D. degree before resuming full-time M.D. studies.

4. The program of study for the Ph.D. is described in the preceding section and follows the GENERAL REGULATIONS governing the Ph.D. degree.

5. The program of study for the M.D. follows the GENERAL REGULATIONS governing the M.D. degree.

6. During the Ph.D. training students are expected to maintain clinical skills by arrangement with the Assistant Dean Undergraduate Medical Education and Assistant Dean of Research and Graduate Studies. Before resuming full-time studies in the clerkship phase of the M.D. program, students will be required to demonstrate competency in clinical skills.

7. During the M.D.-Ph.D. program (including the clerkship phase) students are expected to participate in Faculty of Medicine seminars and journal clubs in their area of research specialization.
                                   
COURSES

In accordance with Senate’s Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Dean of the Faculty.

6070. Seminars in Physiological Instrumentation
6110-19. Special Topics
6127. Immunology I
6128. Immunology II (Prerequisite Medicine 6127)
6130. Advanced Immunological Methods
6140. Basic Cardiovascular and Renal Physiology
6141. Cardiovascular/Renal Techniques
6142. Selected Topics in Cardiovascular and Renal Physiology
6143. Cardiovascular Anatomy
6144. Current Concepts in Cardiovascular and Renal Pathophysiology
6190. General Pharmacology
6192. Pharmacology of Receptors and Receptor Effector-Coupling Processes
6193. Advanced Topics in Neuroscience
6194. Advanced Topics in Physiology
6195. Neurobiology of Nervous System Diseases
6196. Systems Neuroscience
6197. Cellular Neuroscience
6200. Biostatistics I
6220. Introduction to Community Health
6250. Basic Clinical Epidemiology
6255. Clinical Research Design
6260. Applied Data Analysis for Clinical Epidemiology
6270. Epidemiology I
6280. Community Health Research Methods
6282. Canadian Health Care System
6284. Research and Evaluation Design and Methods
6286. Ethical Foundations of Applied Health Research
6288. Policy and Decision Making
6290. Determinants of Health: Healthy Public Policy
6292. Qualitative & Quantitative Methods for Health Services Research
6340. Research Topics in Cancer I
6341. Research Topics in Cancer II
6342. Basic Principles of the Pathology of Cancer
6390. Human Population Genetics
6391. Selected Topics in Human Genetics
6392. Applied Human Genetics
6393. Human Molecular Genetics
6400* Research Seminars for M.Sc. Students I
6401* Research Seminars for M.Sc. Students II
6402* Research Seminars for M.Sc. Students III
6403* Research Seminars for M.Sc. Students IV
6410* Research Seminars for Ph.D. Students I
6411* Research Seminars for Ph.D. Students II
6412* Research Seminars for Ph.D. Students III
6413* Research Seminars for Ph.D. Students IV
6420. Medical Science/Social Responsibility in Health Care: Aspects of Medical History (Same as History 6125)
6580. Molecular Biology of Cancer (Prerequisites: Biology 4241, Biochemistry 4100 [or equivalent])
6590. Molecular Biology I - Cross listed as Biology 6590 and Biochemistry 6590 (Prerequisites: Biology 4241, Biochemistry 4100 [or equivalent])
6591. Molecular Biology II - Cross listed as Biology 6591 and Biochemistry 6591 (Prerequisites: Biology 4241, Biochemistry 4100 [or equivalent])

*A one-credit hour course.


Last modified on June 4, 2003 by R. Bruce

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