FACULTY OF ARTS

CLASSICS COURSE LIST

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

Greek

Latin

Greek and Roman Studies


Medieval Studies 3000 may be substituted for a Greek and Roman Studies course in both the Classics degree programs (Honours, Joint Honours and general degree) and the Greek and Roman Studies degree programs (Honours, Joint Honours and general degree).

COURSES IN GREEK

1130. Elementary Ancient Greek I. Introduction to the grammar and syntax of ancient Greek, with particular attention paid to the acquisition of basic skills in reading, composition, and aural comprehension.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 1130 and the former Classics.

1131. Elementary Ancient Greek II. A continuation of the work begun in Elementary Ancient Greek I.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 1131 and the former Classics 130B.
Prerequisite: Classics 1130 or its equivalent.

2300. Intermediate Ancient Greek. A continuation of the grammar, syntax, reading, and composition completed in the elementary program.
Prerequisite: Classics 1131.

2305. Selected Attic Authors.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 2305 and the former Classics 2301.

3310. Greek Tragedy I.

3315. Attic Orators.

3320. Greek Historians.

4300. Greek Tragedy II.

4310. Greek Epic Poetry.

4320. Greek Lyric Poetry.

4340. Greek Philosophical Authors.

4370. Hellenistic Poetry.

4395. Greek Prose Composition.
This course is open to Honours students in Greek, and to others with the permission of the Department.

4998. Honours Comprehensive Examination.

4999. Honours Essay.

COURSES IN LATIN

1120. Elementary Latin I. Introduction to the grammar and syntax of Latin, with particular attention paid to the acquisition of basic skills in reading, composition, and aural comprehension.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 1120 and the former Classics 120A.

1121. Elementary Latin II. A continuation of the work begun in Elementary Latin I.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 1121 and the former Classics 120B.
Prerequisite: Classics 1120 or its equivalent.

2200. Intermediate Latin. A continuation of the grammar, syntax, reading, and composition completed in the elementary program.
Prerequisite: Classics 1121.

2202. Medieval Latin. (Same as Medieval Studies 3005). An introduction to Medieval Latin through the reading of selections by a variety of authors.
Prerequisite: Classics 1121.

2205. Selected Latin Authors.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 2205 and the former Classics 2201.

3210. Latin Lyric Poetry.

3230. Latin Elegiac Poetry.

4210. Latin Historians.

4220. Latin Hexameter Poetry.

4240. Latin Drama.

4250. Latin Satire.

4291. Special Authors.

4295. Latin Prose Composition. This course is open to Honours students in Latin, and to others with the permission of the Department.

4998. Honours Comprehensive Examination.

4999. Honours Essay.

* Inactive Course

GREEK AND ROMAN STUDIES

NOTE: For the following courses, no knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

1050. Introduction to Greek and Roman Mythology. A survey of the principal myths and legends of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Attention will be paid to the literary and artistic representations of these myths, as well as to modern methods of interpretation.

1100. Introduction to Greek Civilization. A general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of Ancient Greek Civilization. The course introduces the student to Greek social and political institutions, religion and myth, and achievements in art, philosophy, science and literature, as well as the influence of Ancient Greece on the modern world.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 1100 and either of the former Classics 1000 or 2000. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1200. Introduction to Roman Civilization. A general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of Ancient Rome. The course introduces the student to social, political, and legal institutions, the growth of the Roman Empire, Roman art, literature, and religions, as well as Rome's pervasive influence in the modern world.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 1200 and any of Classics 1000, 1101, or 2001. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

2010. Greek Art and Architecture. An introduction, through illustrated lectures, to the study of the art and architecture of Ancient Greece.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 2010 and either of the former Classics 3100 or 3101.

2015. Roman Art and Architecture. An introduction, through illustrated lectures, to the study of the art and architecture of Ancient Rome.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 2015 and either of the former Classics 3100 or 3102.

2020. Hellenistic Civilization. An illustrated survey of the political, social, intellectual and artistic developments in the Mediterranean world and the Near East from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. until the incorporation of the Kingdom of Egypt in the Roman Empire in 30 B.C. Particular attention is given to the fusion of eastern and western thought-patterns and ideologies under the influence of Greek culture.

2025. Introduction to Ancient History. (Same as History 2020). An introduction to the history of ancient city-states, kingdoms and empires, including economic, social, political and cultural developments.

2035. History of Classical Greece. (Same as History 2035). A survey of Greek History from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great, with special reference to the social and political institutions of the fifth century B.C.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics/History 2035 and either of the former Classics/History 3910 or Classics/History 2030.

2040. History of Rome. (Same as History 2040). A survey of Roman History from the early monarchy to the reign of Constantine with special reference to society and politics in the late Republic and early Empire.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics/History 2040 and the former Classics/History 3920.

2055. Women in Greece and Rome. An examination of the role of women in ancient Greece and Rome from the perspectives of religion, literature, art, society, and politics. Critical assessments of relevant scholarship and methodologies (including feminist methodologies) will be included.

2060. The Heroic Epic in Greece and Rome. A survey of epic poetry from the archaic period to late antiquity, with emphasis on the works of Homer and Vergil.

2701. History of Ancient Philosophy. (Same as Philosophy 2701). A survey of the origin and development of Western philosophy among the Greeks and Romans.

2805. Greek Tragedy and Society. A survey of the development of Greek tragedy in its social, literary, and theatrical contexts, with comprehensive analyses of selected plays by the major tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Students may not receive credit for both Classics 2805 and Classics 2800.

2810. Ancient Comedy and Society. A survey of the development of Greek and Roman comedy in their social, literary, and theatrical contexts, with comprehensive analyses of selected plays by major comedic playwrights such as Aristophanes, Menander, and Plautus. Students may not receive credit for both Classics 2810 and Classics 2801.

3010. Greek Religion. (Same as Religious Studies 3010). A study of the role of religion in the private and public life of the Greek world.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics/Religious Studies 3010 and the former Classics/Religious Studies 3121.

3020. Roman Religion. (Same as Religious Studies 3020). A study of the role of religion in the private and public life of the Roman world.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics/Religious Studies 3020 and the former Classics/Religious Studies 3121.

3030. Greece and Persia. A study of relations between Greece and Persia from the foundation of the Persian Empire to the death of Alexander the Great.

3040. Socrates and Athens. An introduction to and examination of Socrates within the context of Athenian political, social, cultural, intellectual, and religious life, and against the background of the fifth-century enlightenment and the sophistic movement.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 3040 and the former Classics 2050.

3050. Augustus and Rome. The Age of Augustus (27 B.C. to A.D. 14) witnessed not only Rome's greatest achievements in literature and art but also the replacement of republican government by a monarchy; this course, based on original sources, examines the period through its most powerful and influential figure.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 3050 and the former Classics 2051.

3060. Sport and Athletics in Ancient Society. This course will trace the evolution of athletics and other forms of recreation in Greece and Rome, with the emphasis on their religious, cultural, and social importance. Topics will include sports in Homer, the concept of arete, the Olympic 'ideal', gladiatorial contests, Greek athletics and the Roman Empire.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for Classics 3060 and the former Classics 2160.

3080. Themes and Genres in Greek and Roman Prose. A detailed study of individual works in prose designed to illustrate themes or genres in the prose literature of Greece and Rome, such as the novel, biography, oratory, and historiography.

3130. Greek and Roman Mythology. (Same as Folklore 3130). A comparative study of specific myths and folktales of Greece and Rome as embodied in the literary and artistic remains of the ancient world with reference to their origins and their influence on later art and literature.

3150. Early Christian Thought. (Same as Religious Studies 3150). An advanced study of selected themes and personalities in Christian thought and literature from the second to the sixth centuries. Particular attention will be given to the controversies centering on the doctrines of the Trinity and the Person of Christ.

3270. Christianity and the Roman Empire. (Same as History 3270 and Religious Studies 3270). A study of the relationship between Christianity and the Roman Empire from the first to the fourth century.

3580. Bronze Age Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean. (Same as Anthropology 3580). This course examines the archaeoeogical (material) evidence that underlies the current reconstruction of the Bronze Age in the eastern Mediterranean. In particular, the Bronze Age of the Aegean and the island of Cyprus is essentially prehistoric and inaccessible except through the methods of archaeology. These methods are as diverse as physical dating techniques, geoarchaeology, residue studies, palaeoethnobotany, zooarchaeology, forensic anthropology, underwater archaeology and cultural resource management. Emphasis is placed on the role of Cyprus as a physical and cultural link between peoples of the Aegean and the Near East during the Middle and Late Bronze Age.

3710-3729. Special Topics in Classics. (Available only as part of the Harlow campus semester).

4000. Seminar in Greek History and Society.

4010. Seminar in Roman History and Society.

4020. Seminar in Greek Literature and Culture.

4030. Seminar in Roman Literature and Culture.

4100-4109. Special Topics in Greek and Roman Studies. Topics to be offered will be announced by the Department and may include field studies in topography, Greek and Roman art and architecture, archaeology, and related areas, to be held in the Mediterranean and other regions of Graeco-Roman influence.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Head of the Department.

4998. Honours Comprehensive Examination.

4999. Honours Essay.


Last modified on June 4, 2003 by R. Bruce

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