FACULTY OF SCIENCE

CHEMISTRY COURSE LIST

COURSE RESTRICTIONS

Credit will be given for no more than one of Chemistry 1000, 1010, 1050, 1200, 150A/B, no more than one of Chemistry 1001, 1031, 1051, 150A/B, and no more than one of Chemistry 1001, 1011, 1051, 150A/B.

COURSE LIST

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

NOTE: Attendance for ALL Chemistry Laboratory sessions is mandatory. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.

1010 (F) and 1011 (W). Introductory Chemistry I and II. Descriptive chemistry; atomic structure; chemical bonding; periodicity illustrated by the chemistry of selected elements; mole concept and stoichiometry; physical properties of matter; energetics; rates of reaction; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1010 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 1011.
Lectures: Four hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

1031. Introductory Chemistry III (F/S). This course prepares students who have completed Chemistry 1010 and 1011 for Chemistry 2210, 2300 and 2400. It augments the topics covered in Chemistry 1010 and 1011 with the greater depth and problem solving emphasis of Chemistry 1050 and 1051.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1011 and Mathematics 1000.
Lectures: Four hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

1050 (F) and 1051 (W). General Chemistry I and II. The topics will be similar to 1010/1011 but will be treated in greater depth with an emphasis on problem solving.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 1000. Mathematics 1000 may be taken concurrently with Chemistry 1050. Chemistry 1050 and Mathematics 1000 are prerequisites for Chemistry 1051.
Lectures: Four hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
NOTES: 1): For entry to Chemistry 1050 students must have
i) achieved at least 80% in high school Chemistry 3202 and
ii) successfully completed high school Advanced Mathematics 3201.
2) Other students, including those with no high school chemistry background, will take Chemistry 1010. It is recommended that students have at least 70% in high school Academic Mathematics 3203, or a pass in any university level mathematics course.
3) Only six science credit hours will be awarded for a major or honours in Chemistry from the following course groups: Chemistry 1010/1011/1031, or Chemistry 1800/1200/1001 (Sir Wilfred Grenfell College).

2210. Introductory Inorganic Chemistry (F) and (W). Chemistry of selected s, p, and d block elements. Introduction to crystal and molecular structures and to molecular orbital and crystal field theories.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1051 (or 1001 or 1031), Mathematics 1000.
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

2300. Introductory Physical Chemistry (F) and (W). Introductory chemical thermodynamics and equilibria. Complementary laboratory work with an emphasis on quantitative analysis.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1051 (or 1001 or 1031), Mathematics 1001, Physics 1054 or 1021.
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

2400. Introductory Organic Chemistry I (F). Bonding involving carbon; conformations and sterochemistry; introduction to functional groups and nomenclature; properties, syntheses and reactions of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides and alcohols.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1051 or 1031; or Chemistry 1010 and 1011 with a grade of at least 80% in each; or Chemistry 1011 with a grade of at least 85%; or Chemistry 1001 with a grade of at least 65%.
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit will not be given for more than one of Chemistry 2400, 2420, 2440 and 240A/B.

2401. Introductory Organic Chemistry II (W). An introduction to the interpretation of infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectra; properties, syntheses and reactions of ethers, simple aromatic compounds, ketones, aldehydes, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives; aldol and related reactions.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 2400.
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit will not be given for more than one of Chemistry 2401, 2420, 2440, and 240A/B.

2440. Organic Chemistry for Biologists (F) & (W). An introduction to the principles of organic chemistry with an emphasis on material relevant to biological molecules. The laboratory will introduce techniques and illustrate concepts covered in the course.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1011 (or 1001 or 1051).
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
NOTE: This course is designed primarily for Biology Majors. It may not be used for credit by Chemistry or Biochemistry Majors and may not serve as a prerequisite for any other Chemistry course. Credit may be obtained for only one of Chemistry 2400, 2420, 2440, 240A/B.

3100. Analytical Chemistry I (F) and (W). Treatment of data, gravimetric analysis, volumetric analysis including oxidation-reduction titrations using electrochemical techniques, the use of specific ion electrodes, and titrations in non-aqueous systems. Spectrophotometric trace analysis and titration.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 2300.
Lectures and Laboratories: Not more than seven hours per week.

3211. Inorganic Chemistry (W). A detailed examination of the structure, bonding, and chemistry of the d block elements.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2210 and 2300.
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

3300. Physical Chemistry I (F). The laws of thermodynamics, calorimetry, thermochemistry, equilibrium constants. Introduction to thermodynamics of non-ideal gases. Topics will include partial molal quantities, phase equilibria, thermodynamics of solutions, activity coefficients of non-electrolytes, the Gibbs-Duhem equation.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2300, Mathematics 2000, Physics 1054 and 2054. Physics 2054 may be taken concurrently with Chemistry 3300.
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

3301. Physical Chemistry II (W). Electrical conductivity of solutions, electrochemical cells, equilibrium constants of weak electrolytes, activity coefficients of electrolytes. Elementary theoretical chemistry, introduction to quantum mechanics, statistical interpretation of thermodynamic functions of ideal gases, and kinetic theory of gases. Chemical kinetics including relaxation techniques and mass transport phenomena.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3300 and Applied Mathematics 3260.
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

3410. Bio-organic Chemistry (F). A study of the major classes of biomolecules, their structure, function, and in vitro chemistry. An introduction to natural products. Synthetic polymers compared to biopolymers. Heteroaromatic molecules and derived biomolecules.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 2401. It is recommended that Chemistry 3500 be taken concurrently.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Students may obtain credit for only one of Chemistry 3410 and the former Chemistry 3401.

3411. Synthetic Organic Chemistry I (W). A survey of some important reactions used in organic synthesis, including pericyclic reactions and those based on carbocation, carbene, nitrene and carbanion intermediates. Emphasis is placed on multifunctional compounds.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 3410, or all of Chemistry 2401, Biochemistry 2100 and Biochemistry 2101.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Students may obtain credit for only one of Chemistry 3411 and the former Chemistry 3400.

3500. Spectroscopic Analysis: Spectroscopy and Structure (F). Application of spectroscopic methods to the determination of molecular structure. Emphasis will be placed on electronic, vibrational and rotational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2210, 2300, 2401. Physics 2056 is strongly recommended.
Lectures and Laboratory: Not more than six hours per week.

4110. Analytical Chemistry II (F). Error treatment, atomic emission and absorption spectroscopy, chromatographic and other separation techniques, electroanalytical chemistry, mass spectrometry, x-ray spectroscopy, ion and electron spectroscopy.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3100 and 3300. Chemistry 3300 may be taken concurrently with Chemistry 4110.
Lectures and Laboratories: Not more than six hours per week.
NOTE: Students may obtain credit for only one of Chemistry 4110 and the former Chemistry 4100 and for only one of Chemistry 4110 and the former Chemistry 4101.

4151. Analytical Separations and Organic Mass Spectrometry. Advances in the traditional chromatographic techniques, the development of new analytical tools in separation science, the interfacing of mass spectrometers to chromatographic instruments, and other mass spectrometric techniques.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 4110, which may be taken concurrently (or Chemistry 4100 or Chemistry 4101)
Lectures and Laboratories: Not more than six hours per week.

4152. Electroanalytical Techniques. The principles and theory of dynamic electrochemistry, voltammetry, stripping analysis, electro-chemical sensors and detectors.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 4110, which may be taken concurrently (or Chemistry 4100 or Chemistry 4101).
Lectures and Laboratories: Not more than six hours per week.

4201. Coordination Chemistry in Biological Molecules - Structural, Mechanistic and Magnetic Studies. The role of certain transition elements e.g. iron, copper, cobalt, and zinc, in proteins and enzymes will be discussed in terms of structural features, the natural ligands, magnetic properties, mechanisms, etc., and reinforced with examples of 'model compounds'. Magnetic theory, in particular for polynuclear transition metal complexes, will also be developed.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 3211.
Lectures: Three per week.



4204. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and Catalysis. A survey of inorganic and organometallic reactions, their mechanisms and kinetic characteristics. In addition, stereochemical non-rigidity, reactions of coordinated ligands and homogeneous catalysis are discussed.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 3211.
Lectures: Three per week.

4205. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Complexes. An introduction to the thory of electronic excited states in transition metal complexes. Applications to artificial photosynthesis, photodynamic therapy, molecular photovoltaics and molecular electronics.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3211 and 3301 (which may be taken concurrently).
Lectures: 3 hours per week.

4300. Advanced Physical Chemistry I: Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy (F).Solutions of the Schrodinger wave equation by means of second order differential equations and operator and matrix methods. Electronic spectra of atoms, and the rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra of diatomic and triatomic molecules. Chemical bonding.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 3301.
Lectures: Three per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.

4302. Statistical Thermodynamic (W). Probability theory, ensembles, quantum statistical thermodynamics of ideal gases, perfect crystals, metals and radiation. Semiclassical statistical thermodynamics, distribution functions, dense gases and liquids.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 4300.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week
NOTE: Students may obtain credit for only one of the former Chemistry 4301 and Chemistry 4302.

4411. Topics in Medicinal Chemistry. Synthesis, stereochemistry, chemical properties and mode of action of selected drug types including antibacterial, antiviral and anticancer drugs. Emphasis will be placed on organic chemical considerations of drug design.
Prerequisite: EITHER Chemistry 3401; OR Chemistry 3400 and Biochemistry 2101.
Lectures: Three per week.

4420. Physical Organic Chemistry (F). An introduction to the quantitative and qualitative theories of reactions and reactivity and their application to organic reaction mechanisms and to mechanism elucidation.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 3301, and 3401 or 3411. Chemistry 3500 is strongly recommended.
NOTE: Students may obtain credit for only one of Chemistry 4420 and the former Chemistry 4400 and for only one of Chemistry 4420 and the former Chemistry 4401.

4430. Synthetic Organic Chemistry II (W). Modern synthetic methods with particular attention placed on the synthesis of enantiomerically enriched compounds and newer methods for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. Designing syntheses of complex organic molecules.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 3401 or 3411. Chemistry 4420 is strongly recommended.
NOTE: Students may obtain credit for only one of Chemistry 4430 and the former Chemistry 4410.

490A/B. Honours Thesis.


Last modified on May 21, 2002 by MaryJane Puxley

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