FACULTY OF ARTS

HISTORY COURSE LIST

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

1010. The North Atlantic in the Age of Expansion, 1492-1776. A thematic examination of European imperial expansion into the North Atlantic and the Americas, starting with the discoveries of Columbus and concluding with American Independence. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1011. Europe and the Wider World, 1750-1914. A thematic examination of the political, economic, social and cultural developments in Europe and the wider world from the French Revolution to World War I. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1012. The World in the Twentieth Century. This course will examine some of the major themes in world history since 1914. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1013. Issues in Canadian History. This course will examine the historical context for various contemporary problems being experienced by Canadians. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1014. Issues in United States History. This course will examine several historical themes or problems in the history of the United States. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1015. Ideas and Society in the West. This course introduces students to early modern western history (1500 - 1800) through the study of original texts. It will combine lectures on the historical background to the texts, discussion of them and analysis of their meanings in assigned essays. This course qualifies as a research/writing course.

1070. A History of Canada's Native Peoples. An examination of the history of Canadian native peoples from the arrival of Europeans to the present. This course is designed for students in the T.E.P.L. Certificate Program and the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) Program.

1200. The History of Modern Issues. An examination of issues confronting the modern world from the perspective of their evolution over centuries and across national boundaries. This course qualifies as a humanities/social science course.

2020. Introduction to Ancient History. (Same as Classics 2025). An introduction to the history of ancient city-states, kingdoms and empires, including economic, social, political and cultural developments.

2031. Ancient Asian History. A study of the history of ancient India, China, and Japan with emphasis on the way of life of the people, their customs, traditions, art and heritage.

2035. History of Classical Greece. (Same as Classics 2035). A survey of Greek history from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great, with special reference to the social and political institutions of the fifth century B.C.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for History/Classics 2035 and either of the former History/Classics 3910 or History/Classics 2030.

2040. History of Rome. (Same as Classics 2040). A survey of Roman history from the early monarchy to the reign of Constantine, with special reference to society and politics in the late Republic and early Empire.
NOTE: Students may not receive credit for History/Classics 2040 and the former History/Classics 3920.

2110. North Atlantic History Since 1820. A survey of the relations among the regions of the North Atlantic since 1820. Emphasis will be placed on Social and Economic History.

2200. Canadian History: 1497-1867. A survey of Canadian History from the era of discovery to Confederation.

2210. Canada Since 1867. A survey of Canadian History since Confederation.

2300. Introduction to Modern European History: 1500-1789. An introduction to the main issues and problems in early modern European History with an emphasis on the political, social, economic and cultural developments from the sixteenth through the eighteenth century.

2310. Europe in the Nineteenth Century: 1789-1914. A survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe from 1789-1914.

2320. Medieval Europe to 1050. (Same as MST 2001) A survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of the early Middle Ages.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 2320 and the former History 2030.

2330. Medieval Europe, 1050 to the Reformation. (Same as MST 2002) A survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe in the high and late Middle Ages.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 2330 and the former History 2030.

2350. Europe in the 20th Century. (Same as European Studies 2000 and Political Science 2350). Social, economic, and political changes from 1918 to the present including the collapse of monarchies, the emergence of mass politics, fascism and totalitarianism, World War II, postwar reconstruction and the welfare state, European integration, and Europe in the postwar economic and political order. The course will examine Britain, France, Germany, and Italy, and particularly the European Union. Special attention will be paid to the demise of class politics and the impact of postwar affluence.

2500. The Twentieth Century, I. A study of the world-wide impact of the main events and developments in the age of global interdependence.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 2500 and the former History 3700.

2510. The Twentieth Century, II. An historical analysis of the main issues in the contemporary world since 1945.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 2510 and the former History 3710.

2700. Art History Survey I. (Same as Visual Arts 2700) The history of art from pre-historic times to the Renaissance.

2701. Art History Survey II. (Same as Visual Arts 2701) The history of art from the Renaissance to the 20th century.

3000. Medieval Books. (Same as Medieval Studies 3000, English 3002, Religious Studies 3000). Examination of the development and role of the manuscript book during the Middle Ages. Topics covered will include book production and dissemination; authors, scribes and audiences; and various kinds of books (e.g. glossed Bibles, anthologies, books of hours, etc.) and their uses.
Prerequisite: Medieval Studies 2000, 2001 or 2002 or permission of the instructor.

3011-3019. Special Topics in Ancient and Medieval History. Specialized studies in Ancient and Medieval History. Topics to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3803 and History 3016.

3020. Art, Architecture and Medieval Life. (Same as Medieval Studies 3001, Anthropology 3589, Folklore 3001). An examination of the development of medieval art and architecture and of the ways in which they mirror various aspects of life in the Middle Ages. This course will include a discussion of art and architecture in the countryside, in the town, in the castle, in the cathedral and in the cloister.
NOTE: It is recommended, but not obligatory, that students should have successfully completed one of the following courses: Anthropology 2480, Folklore 1000 or 2000*, History 2320/MST 2001, History 2330/MST 2002, MST 2000.

* Inactive Course

3050. History of Warfare to 1789. A survey of major developments in the history of warfare from the earliest times to 1789 with particular emphasis on changes in the nature and conduct of warfare, the evolution of military thinking, the organization of military and naval forces, the impact of technological change, the emergence of professionalism and the relationship between societies and armed forces.

3060. History of Modern Warfare since 1789. An examination of those major developments which have affected the nature and conduct of warfare in the period since 1789, with particular emphasis on the evolution of military thinking, the impact of technology on organization and planning, the role of air power, the civil-military relationship, professionalism in the armed forces, and the changing nature of warfare: the emergence of total war, global war, guerilla warfare, and limited warfare.

3100. History of the Maritime Provinces of Canada Since 1600. The evolution of the varied societies in the Maritime provinces from the beginning of permanent European settlement.

3110. History of Newfoundland to 1815. The growth of settlement and the manner in which a 'migratory' fishery carried on from England and Ireland changed into a 'sedentary' fishery carried on by residents of Newfoundland.

3120. Modern Newfoundland Since 1815. The establishment and development of political institutions, changes in economic structure and the growth of populations.

3150. Social History of the Canadian Worker since 1896. The development of the Canadian working-class movement from 1896 to the present is the theme of this course. Topics include changes in the organization of work, immigration, problems in trade union organization, industrial conflict, labour in politics, women and trade unions, the role of the state in industrial relations, the growth of white collar and public sector unionism, and working-class culture in mass society.

3230. History of the United States of America: 1763-1865. A survey of the History of the United States of America from the origins of the independence movement through the Civil War.

3240. History of the United States of America Since 1865. A survey of the History of the United States of America since the Civil War.

3270. Christianity and the Roman Empire. (Same as Classics 3270 and Religious Studies 3270). A study of the relationship between Christianity and the Roman Empire from the first to the fourth century.

3330. France: 1750-1852. France from the decline of the Old Regime to the end of the Second Republic.

3340. France Since 1852. France from the beginning of the Second Empire to the present.

3350. Imperial Russia. Russian History from the rise of Moscow and the Petrine Empire to World War I.

3360. Revolutionary and Soviet Russia. Russian History from the 1917 Revolutions to the emergence of the USSR as a super power.

3370. German History I, to the Mid-Nineteenth Century. The History of the peoples and states of the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation and the Germanic Confederation with emphasis on the origins of modern Germany.

3380. German History II, Since the Mid-Nineteenth Century. The History of German-speaking central Europe with special reference to the evolution of modern Germany since the mid-nineteenth century.

3440. History of the British Empire and Commonwealth since 1815. The transition from British Empire to Commonwealth of Nations.

3450. Tudor and Stuart Britain. 1485-1714. The emergence of Britain under the Tudors and early Stuart monarchs.

3460. British History Since 1714. British History from the accession of the Hanoverians to the welfare state.

3480. History of Ireland, 1603 to the Great Famine. A survey of Irish history from Hugh O'Neill's submission to the English in 1603 to the mid-nineteenth century disaster of the Great Famine.

3490. History of Ireland Since the Great Famine. A survey of Irish history from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3490 and the former History 3470.

3515. Prehistory of Mesoamerica. (Same as Anthropology 3515). When the Spanish explorers arrived in Mesoamerica (i.e., Mexico and Guatemala of today) they discovered rich and complex civilizations that had developed independently of European or Asian influence. This course traces the development of Mesoamerican civilizations from their known origins to the point at which growth was terminated by Spanish intervention.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2480.

3520. The Early Ethnohistory of North America's Native People. (Same as Anthropology 3520). The North American native response to early European contact and initial settlement. Particular attention will be paid to cultural change resulting from the adoption of European goods, participation in the fur trade, the introduction of European disease, and the adaptation to a permanent European presence.

3525. The Later Ethnohistory of North America's Native People. (Same as Anthropology 3525). Indian and Inuit cultural history of the 18th and 19th centuries, including the fur trade, resistance and accommodation to European expansion, the emergence of revitalization movements, demographic changes, and population shifts. Special emphasis will be placed on the ethnohistory of the native peoples of what is now Canada and northern United States.

3545. History of Modern Japan. An examination of the history of Japan during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on the period following the Second World War. This course will also trace the cultural heritage of the Japanese people.

3555. Methods and Materials in Historical Archaeology. (Same as Anthropology 3555). This is a combination lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint students with the analysis of artifacts and other evidence from historical archaeological sites. It is ordinarily intended to follow Anthropology 3480, Field and Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology.

3560. A History of Human Rights. A history of the origins, development and implementation of human rights with reference to the period following the Second World War. This course will emphasize the historic contribution of the West to human rights and the response of African, Asian and Latin American nations. International human rights instruments such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights will be studied. The course will also include a study of the historic role of the United Nations in urging global acceptance and implementation of human rights.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3560 and the former History 3743.

3570. The Modern Middle East. An examination of the peoples and states of the Middle East and their interaction with each other and with the great powers since the mid-nineteenth century.

3580. South Africa Since 1815. A history of South Africa from the British acquisition of the Cape to the present.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3580 and the former History 3809.

3585. Tropical Africa Since 1800. A history of subSaharan black Africa from the slave trade era to postcolonial times.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3585 and the former History 3814.

3600. Industrial Revolutions of the 18th and 19th Centuries. (Same as Economics 3600.) The first industrial revolution in England from its origins, and industrialization in selected parts of the world during the 19th century.

3610. International Economic History of the 19th and 20th Centuries. (Same as Economics 3610.) The economic relationships between Europe and the rest of the world in the 19th and 20th centuries; the shift in the centre of economic power from Europe to North America in the 20th century.

3620. Canadian Economic History to the End of the 19th Century. (Same as Economics 3620*.) Economic development from European contact to the establishment of a national economy.

* Inactive Course

3630. Canadian Economic History in the 20th Century. (Same as Economics 3630.) The economic development of Canada from the wheat economy through the `new industrialization' to the present.

3675. Navies and Societies Since 1650. An examination of the rise of modern navies since 1650 that places navies and naval decisions within broader national and international political, economic and social contexts.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3675 and the former History 3822.

3700. Art History: The Italian Renaissance. (Same as Visual Arts 3700). An overview of the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy with an emphasis upon the historical context in which art was produced.

3701. Art History: The Renaissance Outside Italy. (Same as Visual Arts 3701) The Renaissance outside Italy from the late 14th century and the international style through the 16th century.

3710-3729. Special Topics in British History (available only as part of the Harlow Campus Semester).

3740-3750. Studies in Modern Social and Intellectual History. Selected studies in the history of modern ideas and society. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

3760. Women in Western Society and Culture, (I). A survey of major developments in the history of women from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries. The major themes addressed are: cultural and religious assumptions about women; demographic changes; women's work roles; women's participation in religious and political movements.

3770. Women in Western Society and Culture, (II). Selected themes in the history of women in the modern period with a focus on cultural attitudes toward women, demographic trends affecting women, the impact of changing economic roles, and the development of feminism.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3770 and the former History 3761.

3800-3830 (excluding 3822). Contemporary Problems in Historical Perspective. An analysis of developments leading to a contemporary issue or problem selected each year or semester. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3803 and History 3016.

3840. Historical Methods. An introduction to the methods and practices of history in the modern era. This course is compulsory for Honours students and recommended for Majors, including those intending to apply for graduate studies.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 3840 and the former History 4801.

3860. Vernacular Architecture. (Same as Folklore 3860 and Anthropology 3860.) An historical survey of vernacular architectural forms in various regions of North America, with attention to Newfoundland materials. Issues discussed include the relationship of house form and culture, the concepts of antecedents, diffusion, innovation, and evolution of building forms and technologies, and the siting of buildings in the landscape. Dwelling houses, outbuildings, churches and industrial vernacular architecture will be included.

3870. An Introduction to the History of Western Architecture Since the Renaissance. The object of this course is to introduce students to the history of architecture in the western world, beginning with the revival of classical forms in Renaissance Italy.

4000-4010. Special Topics in Ancient and Medieval History. Specialized studies in Ancient and Medieval History. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4110-4130. Special Topics in North Atlantic History. Specialized studies in the History of the North Atlantic. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4210-4229 (excluding 4214). Special Topics in North American History. Specialized studies in the History of North America. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4230. Special Topics in Newfoundland History I. Specialized studies in the History of Newfoundland to the mid-nineteenth century.

4231. Special Topics in Newfoundland History II. Specialized studies in the History of Newfoundland since the mid-nineteenth century.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 4231 and Political Science 4731.

4232. Special Topics in Newfoundland History III. (Same as Law and Society 4900) Specialized studies in the development of law in Newfoundland.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for History 4232 and either Law and Society 4900 or the former History 4214.

4240-4260. Special Topics in Canadian History. Specialized studies in Canadian history. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4310-4330. Special Topics in European History. Specialized studies in the History of Europe. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4410-4430. Historical Problems. Specialized studies in historical problems. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4480. Folklore and Oral History. (Same as Folklore 4480.) This seminar deals with the uses of oral (and aural) sources, particularly those which have a traditional dimension, for the study of History. It will discuss the methods developed by Vansina, Dorson and others for evaluating the historical meaning of oral traditions in literate and non-literate cultures. The use of oral traditions in the study of traditional modes of life and work such as fishing and farming will be considered. The use of oral traditions in the study of social and political history will also be discussed.

4520-4529. Special Topics in Economic and Mercantile History. Specialized studies in Economic and Mercantile History. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4560-4570. Special Topics in Social and Intellectual History. Specialized studies in Social and Intellectual History. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4670-4690. Special Topics in Maritime History. Specialized studies in Maritime History. Aspects to be studied will be announced in the History Department brochure.

4730. Art History: Modern Art I. (Same as Visual Arts 4730) A comprehensive survey of Western art from 1750 to 1885 with an emphasis on painting and sculpture.

4731. Art History: Modern Art II. (Same as Visual Arts 4731) A comprehensive survey of Western art from 1885 to the present day.

4800. Historiography. An introduction to the major historians and historiographical traditions of the West. This course is for Honours students and other selected students, including those intending to apply for graduate studies.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Head of Department

4810. Documents Management. Introduction to the management of records and documents, both official and private.

4821. (F) & (W) Reading Course. Directed reading course for Honours and selected students including those intending to apply for graduate studies. Readings will be taken from a list of works by historians, or social theorists whose works are related to history or the historical process.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Head of Department.

4822. Reading Course. Directed reading course for Honours and selected students. The readings will be chosen in such a way as to supplement a student's knowledge of his/her area of specialization and, where appropriate, to prepare the student for the honours essay. If a student intends to complete History 4999, a proposal for the honours essay will be a requirement of the course.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Head of Department
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both History 4822 and the former History 4820.

4830-4850. Reading Courses. Directed reading courses for selected B.A. students. Students MUST receive approval of Department Head or delegate BEFORE registering for these courses.

4999. Honours Essay.
Prerequisite: History 4822.


Last modified on May 21, 2002 by MaryJane Puxley

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