FACULTY OF ARTS

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE COURSE LIST

In accordance with Senate's Policy Regarding Inactive Courses, courses which have not been offered in the previous three academic years and which are not scheduled to be offered in the current academic year have been removed from the following listing. For information about any of these inactive courses, please contact the Head of the Department.

Some sections of English 2000, 2001, 2002, 2010, 2020, 2211 and 2214, may qualify as Research/Writing courses for the B.A. Core requirements. Consult each semester's Registration Booklet for the R/W designation.

NOTES: 1) Lists of texts and readings for courses may be obtained from the Secretary of the Department of English.

2) Courses for which there is insufficient demand will not be given.

3) English 1000, 1050, 1080, and the former 1100 are courses for students who have attained a standard in Level III English acceptable to the Department.

4) English 1050 and 1051 are courses for students who have completed Level III English at a level of attainment acceptable to the Department.

5) English 1020 is a course for students whose first language is not English and who have passed 102F or have attained a standard acceptable to the Department on the English Placement Test.

6) English 1001, 1051, 1101, 1102, 1103, 1110 are courses which may be taken by students who have successfully completed 1000, 1050, 1080 or the former 1100. English 1000, 1001, 1050, 1051, 1080, 1101, 1102, 1103, or the former 1100 are courses which may be taken by students who have successfully completed 1020 or 1030.

7) Students cannot receive credit for more than one of English 1000, 1050, 1080, 1100 or for more than one of 1001, 1051, 1101, 1102, 1103, 1110.

8) Students cannot receive credit for both English 1020 or 1030 and English 1110, nor can they receive credit for both English 1110 and English 2010.

9) A student may not receive credit for more than six credit hours in first-year courses in English (this includes unspecified first-year transfer credits).

100C. Survey of the English Language I. This course is intended for students accepted for the Teacher Education Program Labrador (TEPL) and the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) program. An introduction to the reading and writing of paragraphs and short compositions in English. Special attention will be paid to specific rhetorical modes, organizational strategies and sentence structure.

101C. Survey of the English Language II. This course is intended for students accepted for the Teacher Education Program Labrador (TEPL) and the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) program. A further development of the English language skills introduced in English 100C. Emphasis is placed on the writing of short descriptive and narrative pieces and the use of lexical cohesion.

102C. Survey of the English Language III. This course is intended for students accepted for the Teacher Education Program Labrador (TEPL) and the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) program. An introduction to more formal styles of writing academic English. Emphasis placed on whole discourse and strategies of analysis, generalizing and synthesizing as well as lexical cohesion.

103C. Survey of the English Language IV. This course is intended for students accepted for the Teacher Education Program Labrador (TEPL) and the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) program. A further development of the modes-of-discourse approach introduced in English 102C. Emphasis is on the rhetorical conventions used in academic writing.

NOTE: 100C, 101C, 102C, AND 103C MAY NOT BE USED FOR CREDIT TOWARDS ANY DEGREE

102F. A non-credit course designed for students whose first language is other than English and whose knowledge and use of English do not meet the standards for entry into the regular first-year English courses.
Lectures: Four hours per week plus one hour conversation class.
Laboratory: One hour per week.

1020. Writing for Second Language Students. An introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for non-native English-speaking students.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Admission to English 1020 will be determined on the basis of the departmental English Placement Test or successful completion of English 102F.

1030. Writing. This course is intended for students registered in the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) degree program. An introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for students who, in addition to English, speak and plan to teach the languages spoken by the Inuit and Innu peoples.
NOTE: Admission to English 1030 will be determined on the basis of a departmental English Placement Test or successful completion of English 102C and 103C or equivalent.

1031. Prose Literature. An introduction to the novel and short prose forms. This course is intended for students registered in the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) degree program. Emphasis will be placed on writing.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 1001, 1051, 1101, 1102, 1103 or 1110.

1080. Critical Reading and Writing I. An introduction to such literary forms as poetry, short fiction, drama, and the essay. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit will not be given for both 1080, and 1000, 1050 or the former 1100.

1101. Critical Reading and Writing II (Fiction). A study of such forms as the novel, the novella, the story sequence. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.

1102. Critical Reading and Writing II (Drama). A study of drama. Emphasis is place on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.
NOTE: English 1102 may not be used instead of English 2002 as a prerequisite for entry into the Theatre-Drama specialization within the Major.

1103. Critical Reading and Writing II (Poetry). A study of poetry. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.

1110. Critical Reading and Writing II (Context, Substance, Style). An examination of prose texts such as essays, articles and reviews. Students write for different purposes and audiences. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1050 or 1080 or the former 1100.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTES: 1) Students cannot receive credit for both 1110 and 2010.
2) Students cannot receive credit for both English 1020 and 1110, nor for both 1030 and 1110.

2000. Major Writers to 1800. An introduction to the work of major authors by detailed study of selected texts. There is an emphasis on the various skills of essay writing.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2000, 2005, and 2110*.

* Inactive Course

2001. Major Writers from 1800. An introduction to the work of major authors by detailed study of selected texts. There is an emphasis on the various skills of essay writing.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2001, 2007, and 2111*.

* Inactive Course

2002. Drama. A survey of drama from the Greeks to the present day.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2002 and 2350.

2003. Poetry. A study of poetry, which aims to increase the student's critical understanding and appreciation of poetry, conducted through an examination of a wide variety of kinds and techniques.

2004. Short Fiction. A study of short fiction which aims to give the student an appreciation of the short story as a literary form. The course will deal with the nature, history and development of short fiction by considering a variety of authors and stories.

2010. Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style (I). The chief emphasis will be on the development of (a) the capacity to understand and appreciate the varieties of prose through close analysis of a wide range of examples, and (b) the ability to write expository and other kinds of prose.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 1110.

2020. Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style (II). A continuation of the work begun in 1110 and 2010.
Prerequisite: English 1110 or English 2010.

2030. Comprehension, Writing and Prose Style. This course is intended for students registered in the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) degree programme. An introduction to the analysis of prose and to writing for various purposes. The chief emphasis will be on the development of (a) the capacity to understand and appreciate the varieties of prose through close examination of a wide range of examples, and (b) the ability to write expository and other kinds of prose.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 1110 or English 2010.

2031. Modern Canadian Fiction. A study of Canadian fiction including texts with a northern native emphasis. This course is intended for students registered in the Bachelor of Education (Native and Northern) degree programme.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 2150.

2120. Introduction to Tragedy. This course introduces students to the theory, forms and strategies of tragedy through a selection of works in English. The course emphasizes the teaching of various skills of research and essay writing, including the principles of documentation. This course qualifies as a Research/Writing course.

2121. Introduction to Comedy. This course introduces students to the theory, forms, and strategies of comedy through a selection of works in English. The course emphasizes the teaching of various skills of research and essay writing, including principles of documentation. This course qualifies as a Research/Writing course.

2122. Introduction to World Literature in English. This course introduces students to the significant body of literature written in English that stands outside the dominant British/North American canon. The course emphasizes the teaching of various skills of research and essay writing including principles of documentation. Students will be required to complete a major research project and to write several shorter essays. This course qualifies as a Research/Writing course.

2150. Modern Canadian Fiction. A study of representative Canadian fiction since 1930, including such authors as Ross, Buckler, Davies, Laurence, Atwood, Ondaatje and Findley.

2151. New Canadian Fiction. A study of fiction of Canadian writers since the 1970s.

2160. North American Aboriginal Literature. This course will introduce aboriginal literature in a social, political and historical context. Beginning with the oral tradition (songs, narratives, legends, and orations), it will focus on different works by North American aboriginal writers: poetry, drama, short stories and novels.

2210. The English Novel to 1800. A study of representative eighteenth-century English novels including such authors as Aphra Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne and Smollett.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 2200.

2211. The English Novel from 1800-1900. A study of representative English novels of the nineteenth century including works by such authors as Austen, the Brontës, Dickens, Thackeray, Gaskell, Eliot, Trollope and Hardy.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 2200.

2212. The Twentieth-Century British Novel. A study of representative British novels of the twentieth century, including works by such authors as Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Waugh, Lessing and Murdoch.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 2201.

2213. The Twentieth-Century American Novel. A study of representative American novels of the twentieth century, including such authors as James, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Morrison, Pynchon, DeLillo and Silko.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 2201.

2214. Nineteenth-Century American Fiction. A study of representative American fiction of the nineteenth century including works by such authors as Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain and Chopin.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2214 and 2215.

2390. Introduction to Modern English Structures. A practical introduction to the descriptive study of the English language with emphasis on syntax.

2400*. History of the English Language to 1500. (Same as Linguistics 2400*). A study of the early stages of the English Language: the Indo-European background; pronunciation and spelling, grammar, vocabulary and meaning in Old and Middle English.
Prerequisite: English 2390 or Linguistics 2103.

* Inactive Course

2401*. History of the English Language from 1500 to Modern Times. (Same as Linguistics 2401*). The English language since the Great Vowel Shift: sounds and grammar; standardization and varieties; eighteenth-century attitudes and nineteenth-century scholarship; semantic and lexical change.
Prerequisite: English 2390 or Linguistics 2103.
NOTES: 1) Students can receive credit for only one of English 2401 and 3395.
2) Students are urged to take 2400 before registering for English 2401.

* Inactive Course

2600. Introduction to Middle English. A study of the language and literature of the later medieval period, excluding Chaucer.

2601. Introduction to Early Middle English. A study of the language and literature of the earlier medieval period.

2811. Science Fiction and Fantasy. This course introduces the literary sub-genres of science fiction and fantasy. It examines the traditional canonical backgrounds from which popular literatures derive, studies the formulaic patterns and explores the place of science fiction and fantasy in popular culture.

2812-2820. Special Topics.

3001. Satire. A study of satire from classical times, examining major forms of satiric expression such as the monologue, the parody and the long narrative.

3002. Medieval Books. (Same as Medieval Studies 3000, History 3000, Religious Studies 3000). Examination of the development and role of the manuscript book during the Middle Ages. Topics covered will include book production and dissemination; authors, scribes and audiences; and various kinds of books (e.g. glossed Bibles, anthologies, books of hours, etc.) and their uses.
Prerequisite: Medieval Studies 2000, 2001 or 2002 or permission of the instructor.

3003. English Studies. A seminar course involving discussions of the history and practice of English studies, with emphasis on current methods and changing approaches.

3006. Women Writers in the Middle Ages. (Same as Medieval Studies 3006 and Women's Studies 3001). The course will study selections from the considerable corpus of women's writings in the Medieval period, as well as issues which affected women's writing. All selections will be read in English translation.

3021. English Drama to 1580. A study of the development of English drama from the Middle Ages to 1580. The course may also consider the popular arts, such as folk plays and mumming.

3022. Drama 1580-1642. A study of the development of English drama (excluding Shakespeare) from 1580 to 1642.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 3022 and 4317.

3100. Practical Criticism. A study of poetry through close reading and analysis to reveal meaning, methods, tone and technique.

3105. Issues in the Acquisition of English and the Adult Learner. (Same as Linguistics 3105). This course focuses on selected issues in the grammatical, lexical, and pragmatic components of adult-learner English. Techniques of contrastive analysis, error analysis, performance analysis, and discourse analysis of corpora from adult English learners are presented and practised.
Prerequisites: English 2390, 3650; Linguistics 2104; Education 2222; English 2010 is recommended.

3120. Tragedy. The course explores the idea of tragedy through a number of works from Classical to recent times.

3121. Comedy. The course explores the idea of comedy through a number of representative works.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3000.

3152. Canadian Literature to 1918. A study of the development of Canadian literature from its beginnings to the end of World War I.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3145, 3147, or 3150.

3153. Canadian Literature, 1918-1945. A study of the development of modern Canadian literature, covering the period from the end of World War I to 1945.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3145, 3147, or 3150.

3155. Newfoundland Literature. A study of Newfoundland literature with emphasis on representative writers since 1900.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2155 and 3155.

3156. Modern Canadian Drama. A study of a number of representative plays which illustrate the development of modern drama and theatre in Canada.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 3156 and 4307.

3157. Canadian Literature 1945-1970. A study of the development of Canadian literature from 1945 to 1970.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3146, 3148, 3151, or 3154.

3158. Canadian Literature 1970 to the Present. A study of recent developments in Canadian literature.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3146, 3148, 3151, or 3154.

3160. Post-Colonial Literature I. A study of selected authors of Australia and New Zealand.

3161. Post-Colonial Literature II. A study of selected authors of the West Indies, Africa and the Indian sub-continent.

3171. Anglo-Irish Drama. A study of representative Anglo-Irish drama by such authors as Wilde, Shaw, Yeats, Synge, Lady Gregory, O'Casey, Behan, Friel and Molloy.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3170 or 3180.

3172. Anglo-Irish Poetry. A study of representative Anglo-Irish poetry by such authors as Ferguson, Allingham, Joyce, Yeats, Stephens, Clarke, Kavanagh, Kinsella, Montague and Heaney.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3170 or 4185.

3173. Anglo-Irish Prose. A study of representative Anglo-Irish prose by such authors as Swift, Edgeworth, Stephens, Yeats, O'Casey, Joyce, Behan, Lavin, O'Connor, O'Flaherty and Moore.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3170 or 4190.

3181. Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. A study of major dramatic texts from 1660 to the end of the eighteenth century.

3190. Scottish Literature. A study of representative Scottish poetry and prose from the mid-eighteenth to the twentieth century including selected works by such writers as Boswell, Burns, Hogg, Scott, Galt, Stevenson, Conan Doyle, Buchan, MacDiarmid, Garioch and Muriel Spark.

3200. Shakespeare. A study of six tragedies and romances such as Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, Macbeth, The Winter's Tale, The Tempest.

3201. Shakespeare. A study of six comedies and histories such as Love's Labour's Lost, The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, 1 Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Henry V.

3260. American Drama. A study of works by dramatists such as O'Neill, Rice, Maxwell Anderson, Sherwood, Williams, Hellman, Odets, Saroyan, Inge, Miller, Albee, Wilder and Kopit.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 3260 and 4308.

3302. Nineteenth-Century Drama. A study of both literary and theatrical dimensions of nineteenth-century drama, such as melodrama, comedy, farce, pantomime, burlesque, extravaganza, spectacular entertainment, naturalism and the well-made play.

3350. Theatre. An introduction to principles of directing and acting, through lectures, discussion and stage production.
Three hours of lectures.
Three hours of workshops.

3351. The Physical Stage. An introduction to the fundamentals and vocabulary of design, lighting and stagecraft, including sound, properties, etc. The history and development of staging techniques from the Greek Theatre to the present day will be studied.
Three hours of lectures.
Three hours of workshops.

3460. Folklore and Literature. (Same as Folklore 3460).

3500. Old English Language and Poetry. This course introduces students to the basic elements of Old English grammar and vocabulary through the practice of translating one or more poems from Old English into modern English and the study of the Old English poetic corpus in modern translations.
NOTES: 1) It is strongly recommended that students complete English 2390 prior to taking this course.
2) Students who have completed English 250A/B cannot receive credit for either English 3500 or English 3501.

3501. Old English Language and Prose. This course introduces students to the basic elements of Old English grammar and vocabulary through the practice of translating one or more prose texts from Old English into modern English and the study of selected Old English prose texts in modern English translations.
NOTES: 1) It is strongly recommended that students complete English 2390 prior to taking this course.
2) Students who have completed English 250 A/B cannot receive credit for either English 3500 or English 3501.

3600. Chaucer. A study of representative poems.

3650. Structure of Modern English: Phonology and Morphology. A study of standard English pronunciation and regional variations; stress intonation, terminal junctures; inflectional and derivational morphology. Informal speech and written English are compared.

3651. Structure of Modern English: Syntax. A study of the syntax of modern English, including classes of words, the structure of phrases, clauses and sentences, variation in clauses and sentences and the principles of discourse analysis.

Prerequisite: English 2390 or Linguistics 2103.

3710-3729. Special Topics in English (available only as part of the Harlow Campus Semester).

3811-3820 (excluding 3813 and 3817). Special Topics.

3813. Film Studies. An introduction to the study of narrative feature film with an emphasis on the history of the industry, the evolution of different genres, the influence of national cinemas and the role of major directors in the development of the medium.

3817. Writing and Gender. Differences related to gender are explored in a wide variety of writing, not only in texts, but also in their production, reception and functions. All students are required to keep a journal, to share some of their writing with the class, and to participate in class discussions.

3830. Women Writers. A course setting women writers in the context of literary history.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 2805, 3810, and 3830.

3840 - 3870. Special Topics.

3900. Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction. The course is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary writing and the students' own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.
NOTES: 1) Students can receive credit for only two of English 3900, 3901, and 3905.
2) Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor's evaluation of the student's writing. Class size will be limited.

3901. Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry. The course is conducted as a seminar using models of contemporary writing and the students' own work. Each student will be required to submit work regularly.
NOTES: 1) Students can receive credit for only two of English 3900, 3901, and 3905.
2) Normally, admission to this course will be based on the instructor's evaluation of the student's writing. Class size will be limited.

4000. English Literature and History of Ideas I. A study of European thought and culture as they affect the history and development of English literature from the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 400A and B.

4010. Literature, 1485-1600: Prose and Poetry. A study of the literature of the English Renaissance, including Tudor humanism, Elizabethan prose fiction, and such writers as Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney and Spenser.

4030. British Literature, 1600-1660. A study of selected works by such authors as Bacon, Donne, Jonson, Overbury, Browne, Herbert, Burton, Walton, Vaughan and the Cavalier poets.

4031. British Literature 1660-1700. A study of selected works by such authors as Milton, Marvell, Clarendon, Bunyan, Evelyn, Pepys, Behn and Dryden.

4040. British Literature, 1700-1750. A study of selected works by such representative authors as Addison, Steele, Defoe, Swift, Shaftesbury, Pope, Thomson and Young.

4041. British Literature, 1750-1790. A study of selected works by such representative authors as Burke, Johnson, Boswell, Walpole, Gray, Collins, Cowper, Smart, Chatterton, Goldsmith and Sheridan.
NOTE: Neither English 4040 nor 4041 may be taken for credit by students who completed English 404A and B.

4050. British Literature, 1790-1830. A study of selected works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge and Hazlitt.

4051. British Literature, 1790-1830. A study of selected works of Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb and De Quincey.
NOTE: Neither English 4050 nor 4051 may be taken for credit by students who completed English 405A and B.

4060. Victorian Literature I. A study of selected works by such writers as Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Brontës, Arnold, and Morris.

4061. Victorian Literature II. A study of selected works by such writers as Dickens, Thackeray, Gaskell, George Eliot, Meredith, Trollope, and the Rossettis.

4070. British Literature, 1890-1920. A study of representative writers such as Hardy, Wilde, Conrad, Housman, Forster, Edward Thomas, Owen, D. H. Lawrence, Mansfield, Virginia Woolf.

4071. British Literature, 1920-1945. A study of representative writers such as Virginia Woolf, Eliot, Bowen, Orwell, Graham Greene, Auden, Empson, Waugh and Dylan Thomas.

4080. British Literature since 1945. A study of representative writers of the period, such as Larkin, Murdoch, Hughes, Jennings, Geoffrey Hill, Powell, Pinter, Kingsley Amis and Ishiguro.

4100. Critical Theory I. A survey of critical approaches to literature, from Plato to the end of the nineteenth century.
NOTE: Students are advised to take this course towards the end of their program.

4101. Critical Theory II. A survey of critical approaches to literature in the twentieth century.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 4101 and 4105. Students are advised to take this course towards the end of their program.

4210. Shakespeare's English History Plays. A course for students who have completed English 3200 or 3201. Plays studied: King John, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VI, Richard III, Henry VIII.
Prerequisite: English 3200 or 3201.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only two of English 4210, 4211, and 4316.

4211. Shakespeare's Roman and Greek Plays. A course for students who have completed English 3200 or 3201. Plays studied: Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Troilus and Cressida, Coriolanus, Timon of Athens, Pericles, Cymbeline.
Prerequisite: English 3200 or 3201.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only two of English 4210, 4211, and 4316.

4251. American Literature to 1880. Representative fiction, prose and poetry, including works by such authors as Edwards, Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Whitman and Dickinson.

4260. American Literature from 1880 to 1928. The course traces the development of American literature from the closing of the frontier to the beginning of the Depression through the study of such writers as Adams, James, Crane, Dreiser, Cather, Robinson and Frost.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only three of English 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270.

4261. American Literature from 1928 to 1945. The course concentrates on the study of American fiction, drama and poetry in the period between the two World Wars. The course includes such writers as Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, O'Neill, Stevens, Cummings and Hart Crane.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only three of English 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270.

4270. American Literature Since 1945. A study of representative writers of the period, such as Stevens, Lowell, Wilbur, Plath, McCullers, Bellow, Malamud.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only three of English 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270.

4300. Modern Drama I. Drama from Ibsen to the present day, principally of the realistic tradition, studied through representative plays.
Prerequisite: English 2002 or permission of the Head of Department.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 3275 and 4300.

4301. Modern Drama II. Twentieth-century developments: expressionism, surrealism, theatre of the absurd, studied through representative plays.
Prerequisite: English 2002 or 4300 or permission of the Head of Department.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 4301 and 4305.

4302. Contemporary British Drama. A study of representative dramatic works of contemporary British drama.

4400. Directing the Play. Analysis and production plans for selected plays, and the problems of genre and style.
Prerequisites: English 3350 and 3351 or permission of the instructor, in consultation with the Head of the Department.

4401. Producing the Play. A full semester working with a selected play, to culminate in public performance. Students will be required to participate fully in all aspects of the production, except direction, which will be the responsibility of the instructor.
Prerequisites: English 3350 and 3351 or permission of the instructor, in consultation with the Head of the Department.

4420. English Dialectology I. (Same as Linguistics 4420.) Scope and applications of dialect study; history of English dialects; standard versus non-standard varieties; development of dialect study, especially linguistic geography; non-standard dialect and literature.

4421*. English Dialectology II. (Same as Linguistics 4421*.) Field-work and transcription; modern linguistic geography; structuralist dialectology; occupational dialects; other recent approaches.
Prerequisite: English 4420.



* Inactive Course

4500. Old English Language and Literature I. A study of representative Old English prose in its cultural and linguistic contexts.

4600. Middle English Language and Literature I. A study of such representative writers as Chaucer, Gower, Langland and the Gawain/Pearl poet.

4800. Spenser and Milton. A study of the major works of Spenser and Milton.

4805. Blake. A study of a selection of Blake's major writings.

4810-4819. Special Topics.

4821. Canadian Literature in Context I. A study of some of the main concepts in Canadian culture up to World War II as they affect the history and development of Canadian literature.
Prerequisite: Completion of three credit hours chosen from courses at the 2000 or 3000 level in Canadian literature, or permission of the instructor.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 4820.

4822. Canadian Literature in Context II. A study of some of the main concepts in Canadian culture since World War II as they affect the history and development of Canadian literature.
Prerequisite: Completion of three credit hours chosen from courses at the 2000 or 3000 level in Canadian literature, or permission of the instructor.
NOTE: This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 4820.

4900. Bibliography I. An introduction to methods needed for advanced study of English: aspects of literary detection; studies in the material form of the book, from sheep or tree to finished product; a guide to the editing of books.

4990. Comprehensive Examination for Honours Candidates.
NOTE: Students can receive credit for only one of English 4950 and 4990.

4999. Essay for Honours Candidates.

5100 ESL. Instructional Field Placement. (Practicum). (6 cr. hrs.) The practicum will consist of classroom observation, group discussion of observations, one-to-one tutoring and classroom teaching practice. Participation in a weekly discussion group and submission of preliminary and final reports are required.
Prerequisite: Eng/Ling. 3105.


Last modified on May 21, 2002 by MaryJane Puxley

Up to Calendar Table of Contents

Back to Registrar's Office Home Page