School of Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Kinesiology (KIN) Courses

Physical Education (PHSD) Courses

Activity Courses

Recreation (RECR) Courses

Kinesiology Work Terms

Physical Education Work Terms

Recreation Work Terms


KINESIOLOGY (KIN) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

2000. Introduction to Kinesiology, Physical Education and Recreation. An introduction to the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural and historical concepts and influences in Kinesiology, Physical Education and Recreation.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 2000 or RECR 2000.

2002. Coaching. An introduction of the various methods, principles and theories used to coach developing athletes in various sport settings. Factors such as the coach's role, planning, analysing and developing skills, sport safety, and, physical preparation will be presented with an emphasis on attaining competency in these areas.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 2002 and the former PHSD 421A/B.

2300. Growth and Development. Introductory study of human growth and development factors and their influence on the learning of motor skills.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 2300 and the former PHSD 2120.

2310. Human Anatomy. A study of the structure of the human body with emphasis on selected systems (neural, muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory).
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 2310.

2320. Primary Human Physiology. A study of bodily functions with emphasis of selected systems (neural, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory).
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 2320.

2600. Introduction to Human Nutrition. This course gives an overview of human nutrition with an emphasis on topics of current interest. Students will gain an understanding of nutrition in the context of health maintenance across the life span. Topics covered will include nutrition during pregnancy, nutrition for infants, Canadian Recommended Nutrient Intake/Dietary Reference Intake, weight loss and weight gain, nutriceuticals and ergogenic aids.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Same as BIOC 2600.

3002. Advanced Coaching. An advanced study of the various methods, principles and theories used to coach athletes in various sport settings. Topics such as planning, the coach's role, analysing and developing skills, mental training, physical preparation and development of a personal coaching plan will be studied with an emphasis on attaining competency in these areas. Practical coaching experience is a required component of the course.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week. Students will participate in practical coaching situations from which coaching journals will be developed for course evaluation.
Prerequisite: KIN 2002 or PHSD 2002.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 3002 and the former PHSD 421A/B.

3300. Motor Learning. This course will present an overview of motor learning and performance variables and their application to the teaching of physical skills, and will investigate motor control issues related to skill instruction.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
Prerequisite: KIN 2300 or PHSD 2300.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 3300 and the former PHSD 2120.

3310. Physiology of Exercise. Physiological effects of and body adaptations to muscular exercise, physical conditioning and training.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: KIN 2320 or PHSD 2320.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 3310.

3320. Introduction to Biomechanics. The analysis of human movement; the mechanics of motion and the general application of kinesiology.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
Prerequisites: KIN 2310 and KIN 2320 or PHSD 2310 and PHSD 2320 or permission of the instructor. In addition, it is strongly recommended that students successfully complete Physics 1020 prior to enrolling in this course.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 3320.

3340. Adapted Physical Activity. The course presents an overview of current practices, philosophies and issues related to physical activity and recreation for persons with disabilities. Knowledge and understanding of various disabling conditions and consequent needs of persons with disabilities, including health, safety and fitness, and how these needs may be met in terms of physical activity will be emphasized.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 3340 or RECR 3340.

3360. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. A basic introduction to the field of athletic therapy and sports medicine. The content focuses on the prevention and care of sports injuries and covers topics such as: preventive screening; safe environments; on the spot assessment and First Aid; legal responsibility; supportive taping/wrapping.
Prerequisites: KIN 2310 or PHSD 2310; and a Basic First Aid Course.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 3360.

3410. Sociology of Sport. Analysis of functions of sport in Canadian and North American society. Areas include social organization of sport, sport and social processes, sport and social problems, socialization and stratification of sport, and violence in sport.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 3410, KIN 3410 or SOCI 3410.

4310. Evaluation. Programme evaluation and measurement of the components of physical performance. Statistical treatment and interpretation of data.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 4310.

4320. Fitness Leadership. A course designed to prepare professionals in the administrative, interpretive, instructional, interpersonal and pedagogic competencies required for, and associated with fitness testing, teaching and leadership.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: KIN 3310 or PHSD 3310.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 4320.

4330. Social Psychology of Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation. An introduction to the psychological factors that influence participation in sport, exercise, physical activity, recreation and the psychological effects derived from participation.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 4330.

4420. Issues. In this course students will explore through research and discussion, trends and issues basic to the profession including areas in physical education, health, fitness, and lifestyle industries.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 4420.

4600. Introduction to Research. An introduction to research methodologies currently employed in Kinesiology.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTES: 1) Same as PHSD 4600 or RECR 4600.
2) This course will not be accepted for credit towards any of the Recreation degree programmes.

4610. Kinesiology Research Project. A detailed study, directed by a Faculty member of the School, of a selected topic in the field of Kinesiology. The topic must be approved by the Director of the School.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisites: KIN 4310 and KIN 4600 or PHSD 4310 and PHSD 4600, and one of Statistics 2500 or Statistics 2550.
NOTE: Same as PHSD 4610 or RECR 4610.

4700. Advanced Fitness Training and Assessment. This course will prepare students to assess, prescribe, demonstrate, supervise, educate, and counsel apparently healthy individuals across the lifespan on information related to physical activity/exercise, fitness and health. The successful completion of this course will allow students to apply for a certification as a Professional Fitness and Lifestyle Consultant from the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
Prerequisite: KIN 4320 or PHSD 4320.

4701. Environmental Physiology. This course will examine human behavioral, autonomic and metabolic responses to extreme environments. This will include the study of human responses seen during changes from normal ambient temperature and pressure, to those experienced in the environments encountered during undersea diving, space travel, altitude and other similar environments.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: KIN 2320 or PHSD 2320 or permission of the instructor.

4702. Advanced Exercise Physiology. This course will prepare students to acquire the knowledge necessary to understand, analyse and integrate information and experiences related to physiological adaptations occurring with acute and chronic activity and disuse.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
Prerequisite: KIN 3310 or PHSD 3310.

4703. Occupational Ergonomics and Sport Biomechanics. This course will focus on the contrast between biomechanical analyses of workplace tasks and athletic movement. Students will conduct a detailed biomechanical analysis of a given movement, in the workplace or for a given sport, with regard to both the probability of injury and optimization of performance.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
Prerequisite: KIN 3320 or PHSD 3320, and Physics 1020.

4720. Directed Study. Approval of Committee on Undergraduate Studies and the instructor. (Permission to enroll to be obtained in the term preceding enrolment).
Lectures: Three hours per week.



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PHSD) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

1000. Fitness and Wellness. Introduction to the concepts of fitness and wellness, and the relationships among physical activity, fitness, wellness, quality of life, and longevity.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Note: Credit for this course may not be used to meet the requirements of the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) or the Bachelor of Physical Education Honours (Co-operative) degrees.

1001. Resistance Training for Health and Activity. Course will introduce students to resistance training exercises, programmes and principles. This will necessitate both theoretical classes and practical laboratories that will involve testing and participation in resistance training activities. A portion of the assessment will also be based on regular attendance (at student convenience) for another hour of resistance training per week certified by the attending fitness consultant.
Lectures: 3 hours per week.
Laboratory: 2 hours per week.
NOTE: This course is not available for credit for Bachelor of Physical Education students. Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 1001 and PHSD 4320 (Fitness Leadership).

2000. Introduction to Kinesiology, Physical Education and Recreation. An introduction to the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural and historical concepts and influences in Kinesiology, Physical Education and Recreation.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of KIN 2000, PHSD 2000 or RECR 2000.

2002. Coaching. An introduction of the various methods, principles and theories used to coach developing athletes in various sport settings. Factors such as the coach's role, planning, analysing and developing skills, sport safety, and, physical preparation will be presented with an emphasis on attaining competency in these areas.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 2002 and the former PHSD 421A/B.

2004. Enhancing Sport Performance. An overview of the various models, principles and theories used to explain and predict ways in which athletes and exercisers conduct themselves in various sport settings. Selected intervention techniques to enhance performance will be presented.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

2100. Introduction to Organization and Administration. The course will introduce students to basic administrative functions in a work setting in Physical Education/Recreation. The laboratory sessions will assist students to develop skill in the basic computer applications relevant to these functions.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for PHSD 2100 and RECR 2100.

2300. Growth and Development. Introductory study of human growth and developmental factors and their influence on the learning of motor skills.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 2300 and the former 2120, or KIN 2300.

2310. Human Anatomy. A study of the structure of the human body with emphasis on selected systems (muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory).
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 2310 or KIN 2310.

2320. Primary Human Physiology. A study of bodily functions with emphasis on selected systems (muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory).
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 2320 or KIN 2320.

2410. Historical and Comparative Physical Education. A history of the development of Physical Education and Sport from ancient societies to modern times.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

3002. Advanced Coaching. An advanced study of the various methods, principles and theories used to coach athletes in various sport settings. Topics such as planning, the coach's role, analysing and developing skills, mental training, physical preparation and development of a personal coaching plan will be studied with an emphasis on attaining competency in these areas. Practical coaching experience is a required component of the course.
Lectures: 3 hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week. Students will participate in practical coaching situations from which coaching journals will be developed for course evaluation.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2002.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 3002 and the former PHSD 421/AB.

3110. Curriculum Development and Teaching Methods in Primary and Elementary School Physical Education. This course will provide an overview, through a blend of theory and practical experience, of curriculum development and teaching methods as they apply to primary/elementary level Physical Education.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Physical Education 3300.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for both PHSD 3110 and the former PHSD 311A/B or PHSD 2110.

3300. Motor Learning. This course will present an overview of motor learning and performance variables and their application to the teaching of physical skills, and will investigate motor control issues related to skill instruction.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2300 or KIN 2300.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 3300 and the former PHSD 2120, or KIN 3300.

3310. Physiology of Exercise. Physiological effects of and body adaptations to muscular exercise, physical conditioning and training.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2320 or KIN 2320.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 3310 or KIN 3310.

3320. Introduction to Biomechanics. The analysis of human movement; the mechanics of motion and the general application of kinesiology.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
Prerequisites: PHSD 2310 and PHSD 2320 or KIN 2310 and KIN 2320, or permission of the instructor. In addition, it is strongly recommended that students successfully complete Physics 1020 prior to enrolling in this course.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 3320 or KIN 3320.

3330. Health Issues I. Issues in personal and community health related to infectious illness, degenerative illness, heredity and nutrition.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

3340. Adapted Physical Activity. The course presents an overview of current practices, philosophies and issues related to physical activity and recreation for persons with disabilities. Knowledge and understanding of various disabling conditions and consequent needs of persons with disabilities, including health, safety and fitness, and how these needs may be met in terms of physical activity will be emphasized.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 3340, RECR 3340 or KIN 3340.

3350. Health Issues II. Issues in personal and community health related to environmental pollution, mental health, ageing, death and dying and holistic healing.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

3360. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. A basic introduction to the field of athletic therapy and sports medicine. The content focuses on the prevention and care of sports injuries and covers topics such as: preventive screening; safe environments; on the spot assessment and First Aid; legal responsibility; supportive taping/wrapping.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2310 or KIN 2310; and a Basic First Aid Course.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 3360 and KIN 3360.

3410. Sociology of Sport. Analysis of functions of sport in Canadian and North American society. Areas include social organization of sport, sport and social processes, sport and social problems, socialization and stratification of sport, and violence in sport.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 3410, KIN 3410 or SOCI 3410.

3490. Women in Sport and Physical Activity. This course pro-vides students with an opportunity to critically examine, understand and appreciate women's involvement in and contributions to the areas of sport and physical activity. The student will be expected to analyze, synthesize and evaluate a wide range of historical, cultural, philosophical, and socio-psychological issues that have shaped the nature and scope of women's participation in sport, and physical activity.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only 1 of PHSD 3490, the former PHSD 3590 or the former RECR 3590.

4310. Evaluation. Programme evaluation and measurement of the components of physical performance. Statistical treatment and interpretation of data.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 4310 or KIN 4310.

4320. Fitness Leadership. A course designed to prepare physical education professionals in the administrative, interpretive, instructional, interpersonal and pedagogic competencies required for, and associated with fitness testing, teaching and leadership.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHSD 3310 or KIN 3310.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 4320 or KIN 4320.

4330. Social Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. An introduction to the psychological factors that influence participation in sport, exercise and physical acitivity and the psychological effects derived from participation.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD 4330, RECR 4330 or KIN 4330.

4420. Issues. In this course students will explore through research and discussion, trends and issues basic to the profession including areas in physical education, health, fitness, and lifestyle industries.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of KIN 4420 or PHSD 4420.

4600. Introduction to Research. An introduction to research methodologies currently employed in Kinesiology.
Lectures: Three hours per week
NOTES: 1) Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD, RECR or KIN 4600.
2) This course will not be accepted for credit towards any of the Recreation degree programmes.

4610. Physical Education Research Project. A detailed study, directed by a Faculty member of the School, of a selected topic in the field of Physical Education or Recreation. The topic must be approved by the Director of the School.
Lectures: Three hours per week .
Prerequisites: PHSD 4310 and PHSD 4600 or KIN 4310 and KIN 4600; and Statistics 2500 or Statistics 2550.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of PHSD, RECR or KIN 4610.

4910. Directed Study. Approval of Committee on Undergraduate Studies and the instructor. (Permission to enrol to be obtained in the term preceding enrolment).
Lectures: Three hours per week.

Education 2194. Physical Education in the Primary and Elementary Grades (P,E). The curriculum organization in physical education for the Primary and Elementary grades; instructional material and teaching techniques for these grades; creative, aesthetic and health-developing aspects of Physical Education.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for Education 2194 and the former Education 3070, or the former Education 2192 taken during the 1984-85 or 1985-86 academic year.

Education 4190. The Teaching of Physical Education in the Secondary School (S). This course applies the principles of effective teaching to the teaching and learning of physical education. Topics include the nature and purpose of physical education, an examination of the physical education curriculum, an analysis of quality daily physical education, approaches to teaching physical education, and evaluation of progress in physical education.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week supervised practice teaching on-campus and in a school setting.
NOTE: Education 2194 and 4190 are courses offered to students in the Faculty of Education only.



ACTIVITY COURSES

Attendance is required in PHSD 2210, 2220, 3210, 3220, 4210, 4220. Students completing the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) programme are required to take the activity courses in the sequence as outlined in Table 1.

Students who are absent for more than six class hours in any of these courses may be required to withdraw from the remainder of the course. Students required to withdraw from a course for failure to comply with attendance regulations will receive a grade of 0 F.

2210. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Movement concepts: the conceptual approach to teaching physical activity. Application through various forms of dance (e.g., creative, folk).
Attendance: Six hours per week.

Throughout the following fifteen credit hours a number of teaching methods may be employed; emphasis will be placed on the language and practice of the conceptual approach.

2220. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Gymnastics and Aquatics.
Attendance: Six hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2210.

3210. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Court Games: volleyball, tennis, badminton, plus a selection of other court games. Individual Activities: track and field, wrestling, and other combative activities.
Attendance: Six hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2210.

3220. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Target and Field Games: golf, archery, softball. Outdoor Activities (Summer): canoeing, navigational skills, lightweight camping, over-night canoe trip, introduction to rock climbing.
Attendance: Six hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2210.

4210. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Territorial Games 1: ice hockey, water polo, team handball. Outdoor Activities (Winter): snow travel methods emphasizing cross-country skiing, navigational skills, winter survival/camping, overnight camping.
Attendance: Six hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2210.

4220. Concepts, Skills and Strategies of Selected Physical Activities. Territorial Games 2: (Outdoor) soccer, rugby. (Indoor) basketball, lacrosse.
Attendance: Six hours per week.
Prerequisite: PHSD 2210.



RECREATION (RECR) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

2000. Introduction to Kinesiology, Physical Education and Recreation. An introduction to the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural and historical concepts and influences in Kinesiology, Physical Education and Recreation. An orientation to the profession is provided as well.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of RECR 2000, KIN 2000 or PHSD 2000.

2100. Introduction to Organization and Administration. The course will introduce students to basic administrative functions in a work setting in Physical Education/Recreation. The laboratory sessions will assist students to develop skill in the basic computer applications relevant to these functions.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Two hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 2100 and PHSD 2100.

2505. Recreation Programming and Evaluation. This course is designed to introduce the student to a variety of methodologies, skills, and materials for planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating professional recreation programmes for diverse populations in a variety of settings.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

2515. Social Psychology of Leisure. In this course students will be introduced to the personality and social factors that shape how people experience leisure. Course materials will focus on life cycle theory, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, perceived freedom, constraints theory and other social psychological theory related to leisure.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

2545. Introduction to Outdoor Recreation and Education. An overview of the foundational principles of outdoor education and recreation as they pertain to philosophy, wilderness ethics, professional preparation, movement through wildlands, environmental hazards, navigation and safety. Students will participate in a sampling of outdoor education and recreation activities during the course.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Recreation 2505.

3340. Adapted Physical Activity and Recreation. The course presents an overview of current practices, philosophies and issues related to physical activity and recreation for persons with disabilities. Knowledge and understanding of various disabling conditions and consequent needs of persons with disabilities, including health, safety and fitness, and how these needs may be met in terms of physical activity will be emphasized.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of RECR 3340, PHSD 3340 or KIN 3340.

3505. Adventure Programming. This course introduces the theory and practice of adventure programming. Topics covered in the course will include briefing, activity selection, sequencing, group development, and risk management. The use of adventure programming with a variety of populations will be explored. Skill development in adventure activity facilitation and processing is stressed throughout the course.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Recreation 2505 or Permission of the Instructor.

3515. Outdoor Recreation and Persons with Disabilities. An introduction to current philosophy, issues and practices relating to outdoor recreation opportunities for persons with disabilities. This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to integrate persons with disabilities into outdoor recreation activities and programmes.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Recreation 2505, 2545 & 3340 or permission of the instructor.

3525. Canadian Recreation Delivery Systems. This course will provide an introduction to recreation and sport delivery systems in Newfoundland and Canada. The course will examine the various agencies that administer recreation and sport at municipal, provincial and national levels.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: RECR 2000.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 3525 and the former PHSD 3520 or PHSD 4520.

3535. Legal Aspects of Leisure and Recreation Services. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity for in-depth study of legal issues related to the operation of leisure services and facilities. Issues of tort and contract liability, employment related legal aspects, human rights and freedoms, and administrative procedures involved in property acquisition, law enforcement and risk management are the topics of this course.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: RECR 2100 or PHSD 2100.

3545. Outdoor Recreation Leadership. This course acquaints students with the breadth, depth, and scope of outdoor recreation leadership including a detailed examination of theories, principles and practices. The course provides opportunities for individual students to develop, practice, and receive feedback on their outdoor leadership skills. The course includes a required field experience in outdoor recreation leadership.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Recreation 2505 or Physical Education 3220 or Permission of Instructor.

3555. Outdoor Recreation Management. An overview of outdoor recreation practices in Newfoundland and Canada. This course will examine the management of resources, conservation education and practices, development for public use or exclusion; legislation related to management of risk; viability of facilities; national and provincial agencies; private commercial ventures; and future trends in management. Management strategies will form a major part of the course.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 3555 and the former PHSD 3550.

3565. Tourism/Commercial Recreation. The course will examine behavioral factors influencing tourism; promotion of commercial recreation attractions; provincial strategies in travel and tourism; problems of leisure travel; stability of entrepreneurial ventures in tourism; and research and planning strategies relevant to commercial ventures.
Lectures: Three hours per week
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 3565 and the former PHSD 3560.

3575. Community Development and Recreation. This course introduces various theoretical perspectives on community organization and development, as well as methods available to the recreation practitioner to facilitate the development of recreation services in communities. This course examines, in particular, recreation services delivery which involves community residents and groups in recreation programme decision-making and implementation.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

3585. Recreation and Persons with Disabilities. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the theoretical perspectives that have guided the development of recreation services which are aimed at meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. It will introduce students to current recreation services, Programmes and supports for persons with disabilities in Canada.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Recreation 3340 or Physical Education 3340 or Kinesiology 3340.

3595. Women and Leisure. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to critically examine, understand and appreciate women's involvement in and contributions to leisure. The student will be expected to analyze, synthesize and evaluate a wide range of historical, cultural, philosophical, and socio-psychological issues that have shaped the nature and scope of women's participation in leisure.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Sociology 1000 or 2000 or Permission of Instructor.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of RECR 3595, the former RECR 3590 or the former PHSD 3590.

4330. Social Psychology of Sport, Physical Activity, and Rec-reation. An introduction to the psychological factors that influence participation in sport, exercise, and recreation and the psychological effects derived from participation.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of RECR 4330, PHSD 4330 or KIN 4330.

4515. Principles and Practices of Social Recreation. This course focuses on the variety of settings where social interaction is of primary importance rather than an incidental by-product. The major categories of art, crafts, dance, drama, social games are examined in detail. Strong emphasis is placed upon the development of skills for leading social recreation activities.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4515 and the former PHSD 4510.

4525. Planning for Recreation. This course focuses on the strategic planning process and how it can be used within recreation organizations. The course is designed to introduce students to various planning theories and to provide students with opportunities to develop skills in strategic and other planning processes.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

4535. Camp Administration and Programming. Organization of residence and mobile camps, camp ownership, site, property, buildings, health and safety, staff recruitment, budget, programming, operation and evaluation.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4535 and the former PHSD 4530.

4545. Facility Planning, Design and Management. Major considerations in selecting site, size, type and usage of the more popular facilities. Problems in design, layout and function, standards and modifications.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4545 and the former PHSD 4540.

4555. Leadership and Supervision in Recreation. Need, selection, training and supervision of leaders in recreation. Certification, standards and professional organizations. Evaluation of leadership - materials and methods used. Practical exposure to roles of both leader and supervisor through seminar and related fieldwork.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4555 and the former PHSD 4550.

4565. Recreation Promotion and Marketing. The course will examine the communication processes, marketing strategies and evaluative methods that enable an agency to promote its products, programmes and services.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4565 and the former PHSD 4560.

4575. Recreation Ethics, Issues and Trends. The course will explore contemporary trends and issues identified by governments and recreation practitioners and the way in which these issues influence the delivery of leisure services.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
NOTE: Credit may not be obtained for RECR 4575 and the former PHSD 4570.

4585. Financing Recreation Services. The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for in-depth study of financing leisure services in a variety of settings. The primary learning objectives are to achieve an understanding of revenue sources, financial management and budgeting, the concepts of equity from a justice, social and economic perspective, and the ability to use various techniques in the allocation of resources, the pricing of services, and ascertaining the costs of providing services.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

4600. Research Methods in Recreation and Leisure I. An introduction to research methodologies currently employed in Recreation.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisites: Statistics 2500 or permission of the instructor.
NOTES: 1) Credit may be obtained for only 1 of RECR 4600, PHSD 4600 or KIN 4600.
2) This course will not be accepted for credit towards the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) or any of the Kinesiology degree programmes.

4605. Research Methods in Recreation and Leisure II. Students will work through the development of a research proposal suitable for the study or investigation of a topic relevant to the recreation and leisure studies field. Students will prepare a research proposal and present it for discussion in the class. Students who proceed on to the honours programme will implement the study they have proposed during Recreation 4610.
Lectures: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Recreation 4600 and Statistics 2500 or permission of the instructor.
NOTE: This course will not be accepted for credit towards the Bachelor of Physical Education (Co-operative) or any of the Kinesiology degree programmes.

4610. Recreation Research Project. A detailed study, directed by a Faculty member of the School, of a selected topic in the field of Recreation. The topic must be approved by the Committee on Undergraduate Studies of the School.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: RECR 4505, RECR 4600, KIN 4600 or PHSD 4600 and one of STATS 2500 or STATS 2550.
NOTE: Credit may be obtained for only one of RECR 4610, PHSD 4610 or KIN 4610.

4625. Theoretical Perspectives of Recreation and Leisure. The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth overview and analysis of current theoretical perspectives/paradigms related to the leisure experience. A parallel purpose is to examine psychological, sociological and social-psychological constructs that contribute to a contemporary, interdisciplinary understanding of recreation and leisure.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

4635. Multicultural Perspectives of Recreation and Leisure. A cross-cultural analysis of recreation and leisure and their relationship to culture. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the interrelationships of the social, physical, psychological, economic, and political aspects of leisure and recreation in various cultures.
Lectures: Three hours per week.

4915. Directed Study. Approval of Committee on Undergraduate Studies and the instructor. (Permission to enroll to be obtained in the term preceding enrolment).
Lectures: Three hours per week.



KINESIOLOGY WORK TERMS

001W. Work Term I (KIN)(Spring Semester). This Work Term follows successful completion of Academic Term 4. Students are expected to learn, develop and practice high standards of professional behavior and performance in the work environment. A student is required to submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report should, at a minimum:

a) reflect a clear understanding of job events and work place expectations;

b) demonstrate an understanding of a formal report format, personal job diary, work term journal or portfolio (depending on the choice of submission); and

c) show reasonable competence in written communication skills.

NOTE: Seminars on professional development and/or computer skills are conducted by the School in conjunction with the Office of Co-operative Education. The seminars are presented during Academic Term 2 with the intent to introduce and prepare the student for participation in subsequent Work Terms. Topics will include technical report writing, written and oral communication skills, resume preparation, employment seeking skills, career planning, ethics and professional concepts, work place expectations and employment standards.

002W. Work Term 2 (KIN)(Winter Semester). This work term follows successful completion of Academic Term 5. Students are expected to further expand and develop their professional knowledge and skills, while demonstrating the ability to accept increased responsibility and challenge in the work place. A Work Term student is required to submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report should, at a minimum:

a) demonstrate an advanced understanding of the industry in general, knowledge of the organization they are employed by, and the student's role within the company;

b) indicate a clear understanding of a personal job diary and its contents; and

c) show competencies in written communication skills.

003W. Work Term 3 (KIN)(Fall Semester). This work term follows successful completion of Academic Term 6. Students should have sufficient academic grounding and work experience to exercise greater independence and responsibility in their assigned work. A Work Term student must submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report is based on a significant project developed by the student with input from the employer. The Work Report will consist of either:

a) a formal work report demonstrating technical content, structure and communications skills; or

b) a presentation using the latest in computer technology and applications.



PHYSICAL EDUCATION WORK TERMS

001W. Work Term I (PHSD)(Spring Semester). This Work Term follows successful completion of Academic Term 4. Students are expected to learn, develop and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance in the work environment. A student is required to submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report should, at a minimum:

a) reflect a clear understanding of job events and work place expectations;

b) demonstrate an understanding of a formal report format, personal job diary, work term journal or portfolio (depending on the choice of submission); and

c) show reasonable competence in written communication skills.

NOTE: Seminars on professional development and/or computer skills are conducted by the School in conjunction with the Office of Co-operative Education. The seminars are presented during Academic Term 2 with the intent to introduce and prepare the student for participation in subsequent Work Terms. Topics will include technical report writing, written and oral communication skills, resume preparation, employment seeking skills, career planning, ethics and professional concepts, work place expectations and employment standards.

002W. Work Term 2 (PHSD)(Winter Semester). This work term follows successful completion of Academic Term 5. Students are expected to further expand and develop their professional knowledge and skills while demonstrating the ability to accept increased responsibility and challenge in the work place. A Work Term student is required to submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report should, at a minimum:

a) demonstrate an advanced understanding of the industry in general, knowledge of the organization they are employed by, and the student's role within the company;

b) indicate a clear understanding of a personal job diary and its contents; and

c) show competencies in written communication skills.

003W. Work Term 3 (PHSD)(Fall Semester). This work term follows successful completion of Academic Term 6. Students should have sufficient academic grounding and work experience to exercise greater independence and responsibility in their assigned work. A Work Term student is required to submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report is expected to be based on a significant project developed by the student with input from the employer. The Work Report will consist of either:

a) a formal report demonstrating technical content, structure and communication skills; or

b) a presentation using the latest in computer technology and applications.



RECREATION WORK TERMS

001W. Work Term I (RECR)(Spring Semester). This Work Term follows successful completion of Academic Term 4. Students are expected to learn, develop and practice high standards of professional behaviour and performance in the work environment. A student is required to submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report should, at a minimum:

a) reflect a clear understanding of job events and work place expectations;

b) demonstrate an understanding of a formal report format, personal job diary, work term journal or portfolio (depending on the choice of submission); and

c) show reasonable competence in written communication skills.

NOTE: Seminars on professional development and/or computer skills are conducted by the School in conjunction with the Office of Co-operative Education. The Seminars are presented during Academic Term 2 with the intent to introduce and prepare the student for participation in subsequent Work Terms. Topics will include technical report writing, written and oral communication skills, resume preparations, employment seeking skills, career planning, ethics and professional concepts, work place expectations and employment standards.

002W. Work Term 2 (RECR)(Winter Semester). This work term follows successful completion of Academic Term 5. Students are expected to further expand and develop their professional knowledge and skills while demonstrating the ability to accept increased responsibility and challenge in the work place. A Work Term student is required to submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report should, at a minimum:

a) demonstrate an advanced understanding of the industry in general, knowledge of the organization they are employed by, and the student's role within the company;

b) indicate a clear understanding of a personal job diary and its contents; and

c) show competencies in written communication skills.

003W. Work Term 3 (RECR)(Fall Semester). This work term follows successful completion of Academic Term 6. Students should have sufficient academic grounding and work experience to exercise greater independence and responsibility in their assigned work. A Work Term student is required to submit a Work Report. (See FEES AND CHARGES, C. TUITION AND RELATED FEES, 1.c), for Co-operative Education Work Term fees).

The Work Report is expected to be based on a significant project developed by the student with input from the employer. The Work Report will consist of either:

a) a formal report demonstrating technical content, structure and communication skills; or

b) a presentation using the latest in computer technology and applications.



WORK REPORTS

A Work Report, on a topic approved by the Programme Manager or delegate, must be submitted for each work term. The report must be approved by the employer and submitted to the School on or before the deadline scheduled by the School. Evidence of the student's ability to gather material relevant to the report, analyze it effectively and present it in a clear, logical and concise form, will be required in the report.


Last modified on May 17, 2000 by MaryJane Puxley

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