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Peter Mezo

B.Sc. (Hons.) Toronto; M.A., Ph.D. Hawaii

Psychology Residency St. Joseph's Healthcare, McMaster

Assistant Professor, R.Psych.

Cross-Appointments Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Education

Office: SN1072
Phone: (709) 864-4345
Email: mezo@mun.ca
Lab: http://www.mun.ca/psychology/miriam/home/
Affiliations: Clinical

Education and Training

I received my Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and completed my psychology residency (internship) at St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton, McMaster University. My professional positions have included serving as a research associate with the Virtual Reality Behavioral Health program at Tripler Army Medical Center, and serving as associate director and lecturer at the Yale Anxiety and Mood Services, Department of Psychology, Yale University. My education and training has consistently fostered a clinical science orientation, in which my research and practice have been mutually complementary.

Training of Students

Undergraduate:

I am frequently open to training energetic, organized students who are interested in gaining research experience in psychology. This training may include supervision of an undergraduate honours thesis. Research activities include working with data to make it suitable for analyses, conducting literature reviews, and becoming familiar with the development and conduct of psychological research.

Graduate:

Please refer here to see whether I am currently considering new students.

In collaboration, Dr. Peter Mezo and Dr. Sarah Francis in the Department of Psychology and participating faculty from the Faculty of Education are pleased to provide a specialized course of study in clinical science. This course of study is subsumed under the experimental psychology program and there is no official recognition of this program of study in clinical psychology by the Department of Psychology. Indeed, the position of many clinical psychology training programs is that these programs are not recognized as separate from other areas in psychology (e.g., cognitive, developmental, or behavioural neuroscience) by their host departments; rather, program designation occurs in relation to external accreditation bodies (e.g., the Canadian Psychological Association or the Academy of Psychological Clinical Science). This program of study is not currently accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association.

The clinical science/scientist-practitioner model defines clinical psychology as a branch of experimental psychology. As such, training as a clinical scientist is appropriate in a science-based experimental psychology degree and, therefore, is not offered in the context of a practice-specific clinical psychology degree. In the clinical science model, training in clinical psychology is first and foremost training as a psychological scientist, in which the application of clinical science is equivalent to ethical clinical practice. Understanding the scientific bases of various forms of clinical practice, particularly as they change over time, optimizes efforts to improve the lives of individuals and organizations affected by clinical practice. More specifically, the optimal applications of clinical psychology may occur in the context of evolving, adaptive, and responsive clinical scientific inquiry. Students in the clinical science program of study obtain generalist and specialized training in clinical psychology and develop clinical research programs that will keep them at the forefront of their chosen specialties for the duration of their professional careers. As with other areas of experimental psychology, we do not train students for specific careers. The emphasis of the clinical science program of study is to train clinical scientists who will foster a lifelong commitment to critical skepticism and empirical evaluation in a variety of professional psychology settings.

Successful matriculation from the M.Sc./Ph.D. in the clinical science program of study involves ongoing engagement in mentored clinical research and completion of the course curriculum. The course curriculum is offered through collaboration with the Faculty of Education, and students have the opportunity to work with faculty participating in the clinical science program of study, as well as faculty within the Department of Psychology as a whole and faculty in the Faculty of Education. Completion of the M.Sc./Ph.D. in the clinical science program of study requires that mentorship be offered by a participating faculty in this program of study as a primary supervisor or as a co-supervisor.

The clinical science program of study is designed to establish and promote the development of professional psychologists. This does not ensure eligibility to become a registered psychologist. Currently, this program of study is intended to satisfy four of the five competencies outlined by the Mutual Recognition Agreement of the Regulatory Bodies for Professional Psychologists in Canada. Plans to establish a practicum course are underway, so that all competency areas may be addressed. Although the M.Sc. is awarded en route to the Ph.D., this program of study is not designed to be a terminal Master’s program. For students interested in direct service as a professional psychologist, we would recommend inquiring about the M.Ed. in Counselling Psychology offered through the Faculty of Education.

In addition to Department of Psychology graduate degree courses and requirements in experimental psychology, the following courses are required for the clinical science program of study:

PSY6107 Introduction to Clinical Science
E6700 Ethical and Legal Issues in Counselling
PSY6810 Psychometrics
E67XX One Faculty of Education Assessment Course
PSY6111 A Clinical Science Approach to Child and Adolescent Psychopathology and Psychological Treatments
PSY6110 A Clinical Science Approach to Adult Psychopathology and Psychological Treatments

As with all courses within the experimental psychology program, these courses may only be offered with faculty and other resources permitting. For further information, please contact either Dr. Sarah Francis (sfrancis@mun.ca) or Dr. Peter Mezo (mezo@mun.ca).

Research Interests

My research interests focus on examining mechanisms of maintenance and change in the affective disorders of anxiety and depression. The advent of psychological clinical science in the past several decades has resulted in the proliferation of numerous empirically sound cognitive and behavioural mechanisms for promoting and sustaining mental health. More recent research in the anxiety and mood disorders has begun to investigate how these mechanisms may overlap, and the extent to which they represent common mechanisms of vulnerability. My program of research is designed to participate in the empirical movement to distill and operationalize common mechanisms in anxiety and mood disorders, including associated symptom processes, such as negative affect, rumination, and irrational beliefs. Currently, I am investigating and comparing three classes of mechanisms that have been shown to have promise among the affective disorders: (1) Self-Management, Self-Control, and Self-Regulation, (2) Mindfulness, and (3) Monitoring and Blunting.

Representative Refereed Publications

(*Indicates student co-authors)

Francis, S. E., Mezo, P. G., & Fung, S. L.* (in press). Self-control training in children: A review of interventions for anxiety and depression and the role of parental involvement. Psychotherapy Research.

Mezo, P. G., & Baker, R. M.* (in press). The moderating effects of stress and rumination on depressive symptoms in women and men. Stress and Health.

Mezo, P. G., & Francis, S. E. (in press). Modeling the interrelationship of learned resourcefulness, self-management, and affective symptomatology. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment.

Mackenzie, M. B.*, Mezo, P. G., & Francis, S. E. (2012). A conceptual framework for understanding self-regulation in adults. New Ideas in Psychology, 30, 155-165.

Mezo, P. G., & Short, M. M.* (2012). Construct validity and confirmatory factor analysis of the self-control and self-management scale. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 44, 1-8.

Mezo, P. G., Hall, J.*, Duggan, C. M.*, & Noel, V. A.* (2011). An initial comparison of live instruction and immersive video modes of progressive muscle relaxation. Journal of Technology in Human Services, 29, 212-223.

Mezo, P. G., & Heiby, E. M. (2011). Proposed cut-off scores for self-management questionnaires. Clinical Psychologist, 15, 78-84.

Mezo, P. G., (2009). The Self-Control and Self-Management Scale (SCMS): Development of an adaptive self-regulatory coping skills instrument. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 31, 83-93.

Mezo, P. G., McCabe, R. E., Antony, M. M., & Burns, K. (2005). Developing a monitoring-blunting measure for social anxiety disorder: The Coping Styles Questionnaire for Social Situations (CSQSS). Depression and Anxiety, 22, 20-27.

Refereed Abstracts and Presentations (2010 - present)

(*Indicates student co-authors)

Bojman, K. M.*, Noel, V. A.*, & Mezo, P. G. (2011, November). Mindfulness for depression: An examination of the relative importance of rumination, irrational beliefs, and worry. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, ON.

Broderick, E. M.*, Mezo, P. G., & Stapleton, J. (2011, November). Initial development and validation of the Coping Styles Questionnaire for Traumatic Events (CSQTE). Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, ON.

Short, M. M.*, Mezo, P. G., Callanan, T. S., Radu, G. M., MacLaughlin, D. A., & Vassar, E. V.*, (2011, November). Investigating the theoretical link between self-management skills and mindfulness across clinical and nonclinical populations. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, ON.

Short, M. M.*, Mezo, P. G., Callanan, T. S., Radu, G. M., Vassar, E. V.*, & MacLaughlin, D. A. (2011, November). Examining mindfulness and self-management skills in relation to negative repetitive thought in a clinical sample. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, ON.

Vassar, E. V.*, Radu, G. M., Bojman, K. M.*, Callanan, T. S., MacLaughlin, D. A., & Mezo, P. G. (2011, November). Differential relationships between mindfulness, self-management, and affective symptomatology. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, ON.

Bojman, K. M.*, Duggan, C. M.*, & Mezo, P. G. (2011, June). Gender differences in irrational beliefs. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Psychological Association, Toronto, ON.

Duggan, C. M.*, Mezo, P. G., & Hall, J.* (2011, June). The efficacy of immersive media for the delivery of a progressive muscle relaxation intervention. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Psychological Association, Toronto, ON.

Short, M. M.*, & Mezo, P. G. (2011, June). Gender differences in anxiety sensitivity and worry. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Psychological Association, Toronto, ON.

MacKenzie, M. B.*, Mezo, P. G., Short, M. M.*, & Wiseman, F. E.* (2010, November). Social anxiety, positive emotions, and self-management. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, San Francisco, CA.

Short, M. M.*, & Mezo, P. G. (2010, November). Independent contributions of mindfulness and self-management skills to negative repetitive thought. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, San Francisco, CA.

Wiseman, F. E.*, Mezo, P. G., & MacKenzie, M. B.* (2010, November). The roles of specific irrational beliefs in anxiety and depression. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, San Francisco, CA.

Short, M. M.*, & Mezo, P. G. (June, 2010). Examining the relationships between mindfulness, rumination, and depression in men and women. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Psychological Association, Winnipeg, MB.

Short, M. M.*, Mezo, P. G., & Duggan, C. M.* (June, 2010). Brooding and reflection: Empirically testing the valence of rumination subtypes. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Psychological Association, Winnipeg, MB.

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