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Memorial University College Report
1926-1927.

By President J.L. Paton

There were four students in the first batch that went out from the College to the Universities in October 1926. Miss Nora Wood passed the Intermediate in Arts in Arts at London and went to University College, London.

Miss Helena McGrath entered Toronto University, being accepted for the Honours Course in English and History. In the examination May 1927 she came out second in her class.

Miss Muriel Butler entered third year course for Bachelor of Science at Dalhousie in May 1927.

Mr. Ralph Anderson entered the 1st year of Medical Course at Dalhousie.

In September 1926 the number of new entries was 37.

The number remaining to enter 2nd Year [was] 30. Total 67.

Of these, 65 completed the full year's course of studies. 18 passed the Senior Matriculation, 4 in the First Division, 14 in the 2nd Division.

Of the first year students, 24 passed the Senior Matriculation, 4 in the first Division.

In the 2nd Year the following earned the following Diplomas:--

Brackets denote that the subject was taken in 1st year grade. All other subjects were taken in 2nd year grade.

In addition 4 students passed on to the University.

L. May R. Blanford,
Mildred W. Samson,
Anna J. Taylor
H.G. Puddester.

Mr. C.B. Crummey was awarded the Senior Jubilee Scholarship, valued $1000. Miss Nancy Frost was awarded the College Scholarship, valued $600. She was also awarded a Scholarship, covering all tuition fees, at Acadia University, N.S.

New Equipment

A new laboratory has been equipped for Biology with microscopes, electric lamps for use with the same, tanks for aquariums, dissecting apparatus, charts, etc.

A new Laboratory has been equipped in the basement for Physics. There is a work room attached for repairs of apparatus and making of new apparatus. The chemical laboratory has been completely reorganized with new tables and fume cupboards. A new room has been fitted for balance work.

Further, a complete equipment for a meteorological station has been put in. Mr. R. J. Stevenson, B. Sc., Lecturer in Physics, has been put in charge of this and the record of measurements is cabled morning and evening to the Weather Bureau at Toronto and communicated to the Ministry of Marine and Fisheries.

Staff

The following additions have been made to the staff:--

For Chemistry and Physics -- J.H. Mennie, M.Sc., Ph.D. (McGill)

For Biology -- G.F. Sleggs, M.Sc., (Liverpool) seconded to the Ministry of Marine.

For History and Economics -- David H. Travers, M.A. (Dublin and London School of Economics).

For Physics and Meteorology -- R.J. Stevenson, B.Sc., (London and Reading).

Professor Sleggs spent four weeks in Halifax at Christmas and studied specially the question of the preservation of fish which has been for some time under investigation at the station for Marine Biology. Mr. Stevenson spent his summer holiday at Hazel Hill, Canso, N.S., where he made special study of cable work at the station of the Commercial Cable Company.

Curriculum

The following new subjects have been added to the Curriculum:-- Greek, Economics, the History of Civilization, Biology, Botany, Comparative Anatomy, Chemistry 2nd year (advanced Inorganic and Quantitative Analysis), Physics (2nd year course).

Scholarships

A beginning has been made with the foundation of a Scholarship Fund. The total amount collected is $6111.81. Securities have been purchased for $5,500. The first award was made July on the strength of 2nd year examination. $300 per annum for two years were awarded to Miss Nancy Frost.

Benefactions

The Rev. George J. Bond, LL.D., has presented to the College the library of his brother, the late Sir Robert Bond, Prime Minister of the Dominion. The Trustees have set apart a special room adjoining the Library for the reception of these books and have decided that the Library shall bear the name of Sir Robert Bond. The Rev. Dr. Bond has very kindly promised a portrait of the late Sir Robert Bond, and he has promised to add to his gift books from his own library.

The Rylands Library of Manchester have sent us a complete set of their publications and put us on the mailing list to supply us regularly with their Bulletin.

Sir A.V. Paton has added to his previous gifts. These form the nucleus of a historical collection.

The following centenaries of the following have been celebrated:

Isaac Newton
Beethoven
The Lucifer Match
Pestalozzi
Lecture by Prof. A.G. Hatcher
Music Arranged by Mr. R.T. Bevan
Lecture by Prof. J.H. Mennie
Lecture by the President

In the College itself the most striking feature of the year has been the strong development of Corporate Life. We have put in the field teams for Football (both Rugby and Association), Ice Hockey (men and women), Field Hockey (women) Basket Ball (men and women). We had a social re-union at Christmas and after graduation ceremony the whole college sallied out to the barrens and had a picnic, winding up with a singsong in the big Hall.

Two Needs Are Urgent

1st. A residence. Our outports students are scattered in lodgings. They have none of the advantages of the Collegiate life, the closer intercourse in which angles are rubbed down, mind is whetted by contact of mind, and soul grows in contact with soul. There was a good deal of illness this winter and the poor accommodation of some of the outport students brought this home to me. A corporate life needs a recognized habitation.

2nd. A playing field which we can call our own. The United Church College and Bishop Feild College have helped us out most generously. But we shall never get games played properly until we have a ground and gymnasium of our own.

Extra-mural Work

The total Registration last year was 591. Classes were held in 24 subjects, 9 were new.

English Literature
Women Novelists

French
 (a) Elementary
*(b) Advanced (senior Matriculation)

*Spanish
*German

Mathematics
(a) Workshop
*(b)Junior Matriculation

 Economics
*History of Civilization

Mechanical Drawing, Beginners advanced

Building Construction
*Astronomy

*Chemistry
(a) Organic
(b) Beginners

*Physics
*Oceanography
*Nature Study
Pharmacy
*Preservation of Fish
Domestic Science

* New Subjects

Classes were offered also in Navigation, Marine Engineering, Geology, but the number of students coming forward did not justify the expense of running classes in these subjects.

At Easter Examinations were held and Diplomas were awarded to the following, whose names appear in order of merit.

Pharmacy


Mechanical Drawing and Workshop Mathematics-Passed with distinction

Passed





Mechanical Drawing only

Building Construction


Organic Chemistry
Charles Byrne
Edward Johnson

W. Oliver
A. Goosney
C. Fry

A. Lush
C. Winsor
F. Samuelson
E. Stowe
T. Longworth

Peter Kirby

Harry B. Summers
William B. Titford

A.H. Edgecombe
I.J. Samson
J. Horwood
J.B. Butler

Report of D.J. Davies, Esq., Government Analyst, to the Hon. R.B. Job, Chairman of Trustees for Job's Bequest to the Teaching of Chemistry.

The paper in Advanced Chemistry was set by Mr. D.J. Davies, B.Sc., C.B.E., and the papers written were submitted to him. His report was as follows:

    "I should like to report that a very good start has been made in the teaching of Organic Chemistry, a teaching which may, later on, have an important influence on our Oils and Fats Industries and the recovery of our potential fishery by-products. I should like to recommend that one year's interest on the Job's Bequest for the teaching of Chemistry be paid to the Authorities responsible for the running of the Evening Technical School to help defray the expenditures incurred in connection with the Organic Chemistry Classes during the session 1926-1927."

The great need is now a Technical School where practical work can be done and demonstrations given with steam engine and internal combustion engines, etc. Provision should be made for a room for Art and Draughtmanship.

Summer School

Though the liberality of the Carnegie Institute which made a grant of $4000, it was possible to hold a Summer School. It opened July 5th, and closed August 2nd. 126 teachers attended, coming from all parts of the Dominion, two of them from Labrador. These were whole-time students taking for the most part five or six courses. In addition, there were 28 students taking one or two elective courses, chiefly Nature Study. Three scholarship were offered, value $50 apiece, two were the gift of Dr. F.A. Bruton, and one of Lady Cashin, in memory of her late husband.

Staff

Nature Study


Science of Education

Art


Mathematics and Navigation

French


Chemistry
and Physics

English


Latin and Greek

Music

Registrar

Lodgings
and Transportation Secretary

Dr. F.A. Bruton, late of Manchester Grammar School.

Prof. J.A. Dale, of Toronto University, formerly, Professor of Education at McGill.

Miss M.F. Tozer, Vice-Principal of the Nova Scotia School of Art, Halifax, N.S.

Prof. A.G. Hatcher, Mr. G. House.



Prof. A.C. Hunter, Mrs. Hunter, Mr. Leo English, Miss Olive Field

Prof. J.H. Mennie


Mrs. Alan Fraser, Miss H. Lodge, B.A., Miss R. Carmichael, M.A., S.S. Horsley, M.A.

President J.L. Paton, Miss H. McGrath


R.T. Bevan, F.R.C.O., L.R.A.M.

Miss M. O'Connor, R.N.


    Mr. R.H. Richards

Every room in the building was used every day throughout the four weeks.

Diplomas

A new class was offered this year in the Theory of Navigation. The purpose of the class was to qualify teachers to give instruction in the Outports during the winter months to sea-going men. The work was intensive and the examination was very thorough. There were 11 in the class. On the strength of the Examination, four College Diplomas of Proficiency were awarded to:-- Harry Bourne, Allan Dwyer, Mary Foley, Horatio Guy.

Similarly, an Examination was held at the conclusion of the Course of Nature Study. The examination included practical work in rocks and minerals, flowering plants, ferns and marine algae.

Diplomas of Proficiency were awarded to:-- Edith M. Edgar, Dorothy Gilbert, Vera Gilbert, Annie Gillard, Joan McGrath, Edith M. Manuel, Mildred Moore, Elizabeth Rose.

Additions were made to the Herbarium and the collection of Marine Algae and a systematic record of the finds was begun. The labels are a copy of those used in the collections at Kew.

The public were invited to the Summer School Concert, organized by Mr. R.T. Bevan, and to the Special Lecture.

Vitamins -- by Mr. D.J. Davies, B.Sc., C.B.E.,

Isaac Newton -- Prof. A.G. Hatcher.

The Friction Match, or How Man Made Fire -- Prof. J.H. Mennie.

J.H. Pestalozzi -- The President.

The whole Summer School were invited to Luncheon at the Newfoundland Hotel by Sir John and Lady Crosbie. The Prime Minister, Mr. Monroe, Mrs. Pilkington and other guests were present. Again on the last Saturday the School was invited to Luncheon by the Superintendents.

The social life of the School was helped by the perfect summer weather. Miss V. Macpherson was good enough to arrange for a number of picnics on the first two Thursday afternoons. Various friends brought their motor cars and took off parties to their country houses, where picnic tea was provided. The tea was followed by games and the feeling of strangeness soon disappeared. It was remarkable how soon the sense of "altogetherness" and friendship grew up; it was perhaps the most striking feature of this year's Summer School. Our thanks are due to the friends who made it possible for us not only to see the country in this jolly way but to meet each other and new friends; Mrs. Alderdice, Mrs. David Baird, Mrs. J.B. Baird, Mrs. Bruce, Mrs. J.S. Currie, Mrs. Leslie Curtis, Mrs. Chatwood, Mrs. Fred Emerson, Mrs. Cyril Fox, Mrs. C. Hunt, Mrs. C.H. Hutchings, Mrs. George Horwood, Miss Pearl Hiscock, Mrs. R.B. Job, Mr. H. Macpherson, Mrs. Harold Mitchell, Mrs. W.S. Monroe, Miss V. Macpherson, Mrs. Andrew Murray, Mrs. L.C. Outerbridge, Mr. W.H. Peters, Mr. George Peters, Miss N. Reid, Mrs. J.A. Robinson, Mrs. Rogerson, Mrs. Harry Winter, Mrs. Herbert Winter, Mr. H. Wyatt.

The taste for picnics grew upon us. We went out on Saturday afternoons. And we had starlight picnics and moonlight swims in Long Pond and Cuckhold's Cove.

In the social life of the Summer School Mr. S.S. Horsley was invaluable. He was the organiser and the life of it all.

There were also many friends who helped with the Nature Study in many different ways:

Mr. H.M.K. Whiteway (boxes of seedlings and etc., presented a handsome pair of Caribou Antlers).

Mr. A.E. Canning (Timber and Specimens from Bowring Park).

Mrs. Tessier, Dr. Blackall, Dr. Burke, Dr. and Mrs. Hunter, Prof. Sleggs, Mrs. Philip Knowling, Rev. Gordon Elliot, the Misses Calver, Miss Steed, Mrs. Blandford, Rev. R.J. Power, Mrs. L.C. Outerbridge, Mr. Rendell, Mr. Harold Oxley.

Above all we are indebted to Lady Allardyce, who spoke to us words of kindly greeting and encouragement at our opening meeting, sent us flowers, came to the concert and finally gave us a Garden Party at Government House and made us all feel that Government House was one with all that is best in the life of our country.

In the last week, for four days, we held an "At Home" in the afternoon. We had all our Nature specimens on view. There was a collection of paintings of Newfoundland by Mrs. R.J. Power, kindly lent by herself. There was an exhibition showing the whole curriculum of Art work in the Nova Scotia Schools, kindly lent by Miss Brodie of the Education Department, N.S. Miss Tozer had an exhibition of the work done by her pupils in the Art Class. Dr. Mennie demonstrated Crookes tubes and X-rays in the laboratory. The students gave short concerts in the Big Hall, and teas were served in the Women's Common Room.

Travelling Library

The Carnegie Corporation made a grant of $5000 towards the starting of a library for the outports. And several parcels of books have been sent by friends in England to help build up the library.

Counsel has been sought from McGill University and Edmonton University, from the Seafarers Association in New York and above all the World's Adult Education Society in London. The pattern of the boxes has been decided on after careful consideration and 50 boxes have been ordered. A room has been set apart in the Militia Building and shelves have been erected. Over 400 books are already on the shelves and catalogued. Other orders have been given. Arrangements have been decided on as to local communities and rules of procedure. A start will be made in the Autumn.

The library will place a box of books for the crew on each Government Coastal Steamers where a responsible officer undertakes to take charge of it.


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