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Mathematics & Statistics Programs

Programs
Declaring a Major in Mathematics
Declaring a Major in Statistics


Programs

The following undergraduate programs are available in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics:

  • Major in Pure Mathematics
  • Major in Applied Mathematics (B.Sc. only)
  • Major in Statistics
  • Applied Mathematics/Computer Science Joint Major (B.Sc. only)
  • Applied Mathematics/Economics Joint Major (B.Sc. only)
  • Applied Mathematics/Physics Joint Major (B.Sc. only)
  • Pure Mathematics/Computer Science Joint Major (B.Sc. only)
  • Pure Mathematics/Economics Joint Major (B.Sc. only)
  • Statistics/Computer Science Joint Major (B.Sc. only)
  • Statistics/Economics Joint Major (B.Sc. only)
  • Statistics/Economics (Co-operative) Joint Major (B.Sc. only)
  • Honours in Applied Mathematics (B.Sc. only)
  • Honours in Pure Mathematics
  • Honours in Statistics
  • Pure Mathematics/Statistics Joint Honours
  • Pure Mathematics/Computer Science Joint Honours (B.Sc. only)
  • Applied Mathematics/Chemistry Joint Honours (B.Sc. only)
  • Applied Mathematics/Physics Joint Honours (B.Sc. only)
  • Statistics/Computer Science Joint Honours (B.Sc. only)
  • Statistics/Biology Joint Honours (B.Sc. only)
  • Statistics and Economics, Joint Honours (B.Sc. only)
  • Minor in Mathematics
  • Minor in Statistics

Please note that from the point of view of degree regulations, APPLIED MATHEMATICS, PURE MATHEMATICS, and STATISTICS are considered to be one subject area.

Keep Your Options Open: The three principal degree programs offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics are in pure mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics. Before students commit themselves to any of these subject areas, we strongly recommend the following selection of courses for second year.

If you took MATH 1000 and 1001 in first year, then take these courses in second year:

Fall Winter
MATH 2000 MATH 2051
MATH 2050 PMAT 2320
COMP 1510 AMAT 2130

If you took MATH 1090 and MATH 1000 in first year, then take these courses in second year:

Fall Winter
MATH 1001 MATH 2000
MATH 2050 MATH 2051
COMP 1510 PMAT 2320
  AMAT 2130
 

Declaring a Major in Mathematics

Most people who major in mathematics do so within the Faculty of Science (and graduate with a bachelor of science degree). We recommend that students declare their major during the second semester of their first year, although official admission to the Faculty of Science requires satisfactory completion of 10 first-year courses that include:

two courses in English,
two courses in mathematics, and
two courses in each of two sciences (other than mathematics)

We strongly recommend that students contemplating a science degree take chemistry and physics in their first year since these courses open the door to the widest variety of subsequent programs.

It is also possible to obtain the bachelor of arts degree with a major in mathematics To begin such a program, you should complete 10 first-year courses including:

two courses in English,
two courses in a second language,
two courses in numeracy/science.
To declare a major in mathematics, a student obtains from the Office of the Registrar a Declaration/Change of Academic Program form on which the degree being sought -- B.Sc. or BA -- and the major subject of study are specific. Many different programs involving mathematics are possible. See Programs for a complete list of the possibilities. In our department, the Declaration/Change of Academic Program form requires the signature of the undergraduate officer, who is considered the student's faculty adviser. He or she will review the courses a student has taken already and then map out a program for the completion of the degree. We urge all our majors and honours students to consult their faculty adviser at least once a year. Note, however, that the final and entire responsibility for taking the correct courses for a degree program rests with the student.

Declaring a Major in Statistics

Most people who major in statistics do so within the Faculty of Science (and graduate with a bachelor of science degree). We recommend that students declare their major during the second semester of their first year, although official admission to the Faculty of Science requires satisfactory completion of 10 first-year courses that include:

two courses in English,
two courses in mathematics, and
two courses in each of two sciences (other than mathematics)

Many students will find it helpful to take STATS 1510 in the first year and STATS 2560 in the second year before declaring statistics as their major. This provides a nice introduction to the subject and gives students an idea of the importance of understanding statistics, irrespective of the subject matter. Interested students can speak with the deputy head (statistics) for more details on majoring in statistics and career opportunities in statistics.

We strongly recommend that students contemplating a science degree take chemistry and physics in their first year since these courses open the door to the widest variety of subsequent programs.

It is also possible to obtain the bachelor of arts degree with a major in statistics To begin such a program, you should complete 10 first-year courses including:

two courses in English,
two courses in a second language,
two courses in numeracy/science.
To declare a major in statistics, a student obtains from the Office of the Registrar a Declaration/Change of Academic Program form on which the degree being sought -- B.Sc. or BA -- and the major subject of study are specific. Many different programs involving statistics are possible. See Programs for a complete list of the possibilities. In our department, the Declaration/Change of Academic Program form requires the signature of the deputy head (statistics), who is considered the student's faculty adviser. He or she will review the courses a student has taken already and then map out a program for the completion of the degree. We urge all our majors and honours students to consult their faculty adviser at least once a year. Note, however, that the final and entire responsibility for taking the correct courses for a degree program rests with the student.
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