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REF NO.: 204

SUBJECT: Aldrich Interdisciplinary Lecture reflects on Memorial University’s past, present and future
DATE: Feb. 18, 2005

Note to editors:

On Feb. 21-22, the Graduate Students' Union and the School of Graduate Studies at Memorial University will present the 2005 Aldrich Interdisciplinary Lecture and Conference. During the course of the day, graduate students will present 20-minute long papers on their research.

The conference will be held in the in the Business Administration building. The presentation of papers begins at 9 a.m. in rooms B1008, B1009 and B1010. There is no conference fee and all members of the university community and members of the general public are encouraged to attend. A schedule of presentations, along with abstracts, can be found at www.mun.ca/gsu.

A highlight of the day is the Aldrich Lecture, which will be delivered by Dr. H.E.A. (Eddy) Campbell, vice-president (academic), Memorial University. Dr. Campbell will present the lecture, Where Once They Stood – Reflections on Returning to Memorial After 30 Years: Where We've Been, Where We Are, and Where We Might Go. In the past thirty years Memorial has grown into being one of the best comprehensive universities in Canada. The institution has been actively evolving, but yet it has managed to retain its special character. Newfoundland and Labrador is now at a crossroads in its development. As evidenced in the White Paper on Post-secondary Education and in the recent government discussion paper on Economic Growth through Innovation, the province will place increasing reliance on the University's responsibility and role in developing the necessary "knowledge capital.” The public is invited to attend this lecture, which begins at 7 p.m. in room AA-1043 Arts and Administration Building, on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2005. Free parking is available in lot 15. Gate operated parking ($2) is available in lot 15B.

Dr. Campbell was appointed vice-president (academic) in May 2004. Prior to joining Memorial, he was an associate dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, and a professor in Queen’s department of Mathematics and Statistics. He holds a B.Sc. and M.Sc. from Memorial University of Newfoundland, and a PhD from the University of Toronto. He completed postdoctoral studies at the University of Western Ontario before joining Queen's department of Mathematics and Statistics in 1983.

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