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REF NO.: 122

SUBJECT: Double treat for fans of Newfoundland history
DATE: March 25, 2003

Fans of Newfoundland history are in for a treat next week as Memorial University presents the David Alexander Lecture and the Newfoundland Historical Society presents a three-day history symposium on Newfoundland identity.

The Alexander lecture will feature Dr. Margaret Conrad who will give a lecture titled A Case of Mistaken Identities: Newfoundland and Labrador in Atlantic Canada since Confederation. The lecture will be held on Thursday, March 27, at 8 p.m. in Hampton Hall, located in the Marine Institute. The lecture is free of charge and open to the public.

The symposium - titled The Idea of Newfoundland: Nationalism, Identity and Culture from the 19th Century to the Present - also takes place at Hampton Hall, and runs from March 27-29. The symposium is free of charge and open to the public and features Memorial University researchers Dr. Jerry Bannister, Dr. Jeff Webb, Dr. Peter Pope, Prof. Shane O'Dea, Dr. Helen Peters and honorary graduate Dr. Bernice Morgan. Registration is not necessary. For full program details, see www.infonet.st-johns.nf.ca/providers/nfldhist/.

Dr. Margaret Conrad was a member of the history department of Acadia University from 1969 to 2002, and was awarded a Canada Research Chair in Atlantic Canada Studies at the University of New Brunswick in 2002. She also served as an adjunct professor of history at Dalhousie from 1992 to 2002. In 1995 she was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and, from 1996 to 1998, held Nancy's Chair in Women's Studies at Mount Saint Vincent University.

Dr. Conrad has published widely in the fields of Atlantic Canada and Women's History. Her many works include (with Dr. James K. Hiller of Memorial) Atlantic Canada: A Region in the Making, which in 2002 won the Canadian Historical Association's Clio Prize for the best book in the history of the Atlantic Canada.

In her capacity as Canada Research Chair in Atlantic Canada Studies, Dr. Conrad is exploring co-operation and conflict in and among the Atlantic provinces since 1939 as a means of refocusing the current discussion on how individuals, groups, and governments in Atlantic Canada should position themselves to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century.

The David Alexander Lecture was established by Memorial University in 1981 to commemorate the life and work of one of its most distinguished scholars. Dr. Alexander joined Memorial's history department in 1967 and remained here until his untimely death in 1980. Trained in British economic history at the London School of Economics, his best known work is Decay of Trade: An Economic History of the Newfoundland Saltfish Trade, 1935-1965.

The first chair of the Alexander lecture was then vice-president Ward Neale, appointed by President Leslie Harris. The current chair is Dr. Shannon Ryan who serves on the committee with Terry Bishop-Stirling and Gordon Inglis.

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