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Synergy Session: Employer investment in apprenticeships and work-based learning: Evidence from UK

With Dr. Lynn Gambin, Research Fellow at the Institute for Employment Research, University of Warwick, UK.

Friday, November 15, 2013, The Fluvarium, St. John's, NL

Dr. Gambin's presentation slides

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Session Description

With skilled labour shortages affecting many sectors in NL’s booming economy, apprenticeship programs are a hot topic. Join Dr. Lynn Gambin, Research Fellow at the Institute for Employment Research, University of Warwick, UK, as she leads a discussion of what we might learn from the a major study of UK-based apprenticeship programs.

This study (commissioned by the UK Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) aimed to identify the costs and benefits employers derive from Apprenticeships, and, more broadly, workplace learning (WPL), in England. The study considered both financial and 'in-kind' investments made by employers in different sectors and also estimated the period over which employers recoup their costs of training. In 80 in-depth case studies, employers were also asked about their reactions to planned funding changes, their rationale for investing in Apprenticeships and WPL, how the training decision was made, and what were the perceived benefits of having made the investment.

Dr. Lynn Gambin is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Employment Research, University of Warwick, UK, where she is involved in a programme of research on Apprenticeships, training and skills. She has a BSc and MA in Economics from Memorial University and a PhD in Economics from the University of York, UK. She has co-authored a number of Government-commissioned reports on Apprenticeship and training and collaborates with external research partners (throughout Europe) on research into vocational education and training. Her main research interests include: the returns to education, training and skills; employer investment in training; and applied microeconometrics.

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