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April 10, 2003, Gazette

To help introduce new members of the university's faculty to the Memorial community, the Gazette continues its series of faculty profiles. Our latest faculty members come to us from Egypt, China, Sweden and even one returning home. The featured faculty in this issue bring their diverse research expertise in the areas of gambling, environmentally-friendly technology in the offshore oil and gas industry, drug delivery in cancer treatment and radio communication engineering.

Cheng Li Anne-Marie Sullivan
Dr. Vlastimil Masek Dr. Husam Younes

 

Cheng Li
Cheng Li
Cheng Li
Assistant professor, electrical and computer engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science


Research interests
“Personal communication is only going to get bigger and better as technology advances – it was just starting to get noticed when I began my studies and it has really taken off since,” said Cheng Li. Since he began the study of radio communications engineering, Mr. Li has been researching mobile and wireless communications systems.
The focus of his doctoral work has been on designing the architecture for a multicast packet switching system for broadband communications. He plans to continue work on this switch architecture and on applications for wireless communication networks after his doctoral work wraps up.

Experience
While studying in China, Mr. Li worked as a research assistant in the Communication Research Centre at Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). Following graduation he was employed as a communications and electronics engineer with Baosteel in Shanghai, and a network system group manager with Nokia China Investment Co. Working in various aspects of the communications industry has given him a unique insight into new technology and its potential applications. Since coming to Memorial in 1999, Mr. Li has worked in the Faculty’s Centre for Digital Hardware Application Research (CDHAR).

Background
Prior to starting his doctoral studies here at Memorial, Mr. Li received a bachelor’s degree in communication engineering from HIT in China. He then went on to complete a master’s degree in telecommunication engineering at the same institution, focusing on trunked mobile communications systems and switching technologies.
 
Dr. Vlastimil Masek
Dr. Vlastimil Masek
Dr. Vlastimil Masek
Assistant professor, electrical engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

Research interests

Dr. Masek’s research focuses on data logging for more accurate and precise sensing techniques that could ultimately bring environmentally-friendly technology to the offshore oil and gas industry. Since he began the study of engineering, Dr. Masek has long been interested in process control and robotics and finds the interdisciplinary nature of the research appealing. His graduate research focused on fuzzy controlled mobile robots (their reasoning being neither hot nor cold, but somewhere in between) and later on the ultrasonic sensors of mobile robots.

Experience
Looking for some industrial experience, Dr. Masek accepted an opportunity to work with ABB Corporate Research in Sweden. He worked for almost three years as a research scientist working in the mechatronics group and then moving into sensors and robotics. Dr. Masek plans to take his experience working with process control and apply it to aspects of the oil and gas industry while here at Memorial. The relevance to the oil and gas industry would mean optimization which could lead to cost-effectiveness and more environmentally-friendly processes.

Background
Dr. Masek received his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of West Bohemia in the Czech Republic. Pursuing an interest in electrical engineering and armed with a scholarship from the Japanese government, he went on to complete a master’s, then a doctorate degree at the University of Electro-Communications in Tokyo, Japan. After completing his studies he remained for one year as a post-doctoral research associate in the Satellite Venture Business Laboratory.
 
Anne-Marie Sullivan
Anne-Marie Sullivan
Anne-Marie Sullivan
Assistant professor, recreation
Human Kinetics

Research interests

Recreation, and its potential to bring balance to one’s life, has always been of interest to Ms. Sullivan. She has studied the impact of recreation on the lives of various societal factions, and is currently focusing her PhD research efforts on the gambling habits of young people. Recognizing how deeply entrenched gambling is in post-secondary culture, her research strives to locate the point on the continuum where youth shift from leisure gambling to addiction. Ms. Sullivan is studying identity challenges associated with such high-risk behavior, aiming to capture the perspective of her subjects on their recreational habits.

Experience
Ms. Sullivan has dedicated much of her research to understanding the role of recreation in people’s lives. During her MA, she conducted action research with a group of Alzheimer’s patients and their families, examining the impact of recreation on their quality of life, as they viewed it to be. A grant from the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Center during her PhD also enabled her to study the effects of gambling on identity formation in young adults. In addition, she has worked in both the United States and Canada as a recreation therapist, teaching for a period of three years at Brock University.

Background
A native of Newfoundland and Labrador, Ms. Sullivan worked in Jasper National Park as a young adult, eventually heading to Dalhousie University in Halifax to pursue her interest in therapeutic recreation. She completed her undergraduate work, going on to work as a recreation therapist in New Mexico and British Columbia for a few years. While in BC, she became increasingly aware of the misconceptions surrounding her field of interest, and felt compelled to pursue graduate work in the hopes of changing such attitudes at the educational level.
“Recreation is about providing balance in one’s life,” she said. “I want students to value their work, and all that they can contribute to people’s lives.” Ms. Sullivan earned an MA in recreation from the University of Waterloo, followed by the start of her PhD at Guelph in family relations and human development. She has taught courses at Brock University, and, this past winter, accepted a position as assistant professor of recreation in human kinetics at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

 
Dr. Husam Younes
Dr. Husam Younes
Dr. Husam Younes
Assistant professor
School of Pharmacy

Research interests

Dr. Younes’ research is on polymeric drug delivery systems for cancer treatment. He is looking for an approach that will deliver treatment in an efficient localized and sustained manner. His work utilizes cytokines, which are soluble glycoproteins released by cells of the immune system that act through specific receptors to regulate immune responses. Dr. Younes is looking at ways to deliver cytokines through a system that is biodegradable but which will maintain the stability of these proteins and achieve localized action. He is also looking at ways of using biodegradable polymers to deliver genes. This field of research is aimed at directing specific genes to areas of the body where their presence has been demolished or reduced as a result of a certain diseased state. Dr. Younes said if this study is successful, it will be a new approach for enhancing cancer therapy.

Experience
Dr. Younes joined the School of Pharmacy in November, following education and work experience in the field of pharmaceutics and drug delivery. He earned his pharmacy degree in Egypt in 1992 and worked for a year as a community pharmacist before pursuing a master’s degree in pharmaceutical technology and industry at the Jordan University of Science and Technology. He worked for two years in the pharmaceutical industry in Jerusalem before moving to Alberta to do a PhD at the University of Alberta in pharmaceutical science. He brings a new research expertise to Memorial’s School of Pharmacy, and is involved in teaching new graduate and undergraduate courses in pharmaceutics and physical pharmacy as well as setting up a laboratory for his research and taking on graduate students.

Note to all deans and directors: If you have new faculty members and would like them featured in this series, please contact Deborah Inkpen, communications co-ordinator (research), at inkpend@mun.ca.