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(March 8, 2001, Gazette)

Steam, Water, and Hydrothermal Systems:
Physics and Chemistry Meeting the Needs of Industry
Edited by Drs. Peter R. Tremaine, P. G. Hill, D. E. Irish and P. V. Balakrishnan

Advocating Change: Contemporary Issues in Subject English
Edited by Drs. Roberta Hammett and Barrie Barrell

Putting the Hum on the Humber ...
the first 75 years

The Quest for Christian Unity, Peace, and Purity in Thomas Campbell’s Declaration and Address: Text and Studies
Edited by Dr. Hans Rollmann (with Thomas H. Olbricht)

Star Trek and Sacred Ground
Edited by Dr. Jennifer Porter

Finding Our Sea Legs: Linking Fishery People and Their Knowledge with Science and Management
Edited by Drs. Barbara Neis and Lawrence Felt

Perspectives in Web Course Management
Dr. Bruce L. Mann, contributing editor

Place Names of the Northern Peninsula
By E.R. Seary
Edited by Robert Hollett and Dr. William J. Kirwin

Steam, Water, and Hydrothermal Systems:
Physics and Chemistry Meeting the Needs of Industry
Edited by Drs. Peter R. Tremaine, P. G. Hill, D. E. Irish and P. V. Balakrishnan

Dr. Peter R. TremaineDr. Peter R. Tremaine

In September 1999 over 160 scientists and engineers from 17 countries met in Toronto to attend the 13th International Conference on the Properties of Water and Steam, where they presented more than 140 papers on pure and applied research related to the physics and chemistry of hydrothermal systems.

The conference continued the series begun in 1929. These meetings have traditionally provided the scientific foundation for very accurate representations of the thermophysical properties of water and steam. In recent years, the conference has expanded to include pure and applied research on aqueous solutions at high temperature and pressure for applications to electric power cycle chemistry and other industrial technologies that involve the use of high-temperature water and supercritical steam.

Steam, Water and Hydrothermal SystemsThe 13th conference continued a trend of covering an increasingly wide range of topics associated with water, steam and high-temperature aqueous systems. In addition to the traditional subjects related to the thermophysical properties of water and new formulations for scientific and industrial use, this volume includes papers on such topics as metastable states, nucleation, super-cooled water, near-critical behaviour, molecular modelling of aqueous systems, and new developments in the physical chemistry of aqueous solutions.

The proceedings of the 1999 conference were published by the National Research Council Research Press and edited in part by Memorial’s Dr. Peter Tremaine, who also served as conference chair.

Advocating Change: Contemporary Issues in Subject English
Edited by Drs. Roberta Hammett and Barrie Barrell

Dr. Roberta HammettDr. Roberta Hammett

There was a time when being an English teacher meant that you taught reading and writing, but contemporary English learning involves a multitude of forms and representations. Since 1996, English language curricula has been standardized in Canada, with jurisdictional amalgamations in the Western provinces, Ontario, Quebec and the Atlantic region. Under this framework secondary English language arts have de-emphasized the reading of canonical works and has increased the types of texts to be read, included media education and technology, and broadened the variety of ways students were to compose and represent knowledge.

Drs. Roberta Hammett and Barrie Barrell from the Faculty of Education have brought together the work of over 20 leading researchers in a comprehensive critique of the changing face of subject English in Advocating Change: Contemporary Issues in Subject English. The book looks at similarities in standardized English Advocating Change: Contemporary Issues in Subject Englishcurricula and the contemporary challenges and transformations taking place within English language arts education. “This book is about re-thinking, not only the subject but also what and how it is taught,” said Dr. Hammett, associate dean for graduate programs.

The book looks at six strands of teaching English: reading and writing, speaking, and listening, viewing, and representing in other ways. The collection aims to assist pre-service and in-service teachers understand and implement the new curricula and adjust to a different conception of English teaching. “The idea of this book arose out of the new vision for secondary English language arts and an evolving view of literacy. It also came into being because of a lack of Canadian texts that specifically addressed contemporary issues in Canadian secondary English education,” said Dr. Hammett.

A new edition of the book will be published in the United States by the Teacher’s College Press.

Putting the Hum on the Humber ...
the first 75 years

(L-R) Pamela Gill, Ed Andrews, Joseph Kruger, Dr. Olaf Janzen, Susan Kruger, Dr. Don Downer, Lori Lee Hollett and Ed HollettThe team that published Putting the Hum on the Humber are pictured here: (L-R) Pamela Gill, SWGC information officer, Ed Andrews, professor of environmental science, Joseph Kruger, chairperson and chief executive officer of Kruger Inc., Dr. Olaf Janzen, professor of historical studies, Susan Kruger, Dr. Don Downer, manager, Applied Research Unit, and Lori Lee Hollett and Ed Hollett, owners, Hollet Visual Communications.

Printed in August 2000, Putting the Hum on the Humber... The First 75 years, was a project of the Applied Research Unit at Sir Wilfred Grenfell College and Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Inc. The text, printed by Robinson-Blackmore, is an illustrated 75-year history of the paper mill in Corner Brook, and was published as part of the Corner Brook Pulp and Paper 75th anniversary celebrations.

Putting the Hum on the Humber... The First 75 yearsThe writing/design team consisted of Ed Andrews, professor of environmental science, Pamela Gill, SWGC information officer, Dr. Olaf Janzen, professor of historical studies, and Lori Lee Hollett and Ed Hollett of Hollet Visual Communications, a Corner Brook design firm.

The Applied Research Unit is a single point of contact for businesses, organizations and individuals interested in using the expertise, services and resources at Grenfell College.

The Quest for Christian Unity, Peace, and Purity in Thomas Campbell’s Declaration and Address: Text and Studies
Edited by Dr. Hans Rollmann (with Thomas H. Olbricht)

Dr. Hans RollmannDr. Hans Rollmann

The Declaration and Address of 1809 is a unity proposal for Christianity based on restitutionist thinking — that is, the notion that if you go back to biblical or early Christian beginning you can recover an ideal age.

Dr. Hans Rollmann, Religious Studies, is interested in North American church history of the 18th and early 19th centuries, especially restitutionist thought. Because of this research interest, he and Dr. Thomas Olbricht, Maine, organized an international on-line seminar in 1997-98. This required Web-based materials, a list for discussion, Web-based logs and papers as well as an electronic mailbox for additional input.

“Almost all of the administration was carried out by me from MUN,” said Dr. Rollmann. “Scholars were willing to co-operate and the seminar participants came from all over North America, from Alaska to Texas and from California to Newfoundland.”

The Quest for Christian Unity Composed in 1809 in order to organize and direct a loosely assembled network of Scots-Irish Presbyterians on the western Pennsylvania frontier, Thomas Campbell’s Declaration never quite achieved the immediate objectives that compelled its composition. “Yet the document’s lofty vision of a unified Christian Church, restored to the peace and purity that the New Testament had preached and promised, has for generations fuelled the imagination and fired the commitment of millions of Christians worldwide — with, often, quite contradictory results,” said Dr. Rollmann.

Emerging from the on-line seminar, this book includes both the first critical edition of the text of the Declaration, and 18 studies of the document’s historical provenance, its theological and ecclesiastical significance, and its continuing influence.

Dr. Rollmann’s own contribution is an article on the Eschatology of the Declaration which shows how much the crisis and end-time expectations of the European upheavals shaped the thought and motivation of the author in America. He also co-wrote the introduction and gave advice on the critical edition and bibliography in the book.

Dr. Rollmann said one surprise arising from the Web-based seminar was that an authentic community of scholars was established on the Internet. “The human dimension was amplified by the tragic death of two seminar participants, one by stroke, the other by heart attack. We had never experienced death on the Internet, but the experience heightened our sense of community. The volume was dedicated to the two members who died, and the widows were given copies of the book at our book launch in Nashville, Tennessee, in November of last year.”

Dr. Rollman said the audience for this book includes students, scholars and people interested in church history, theology and ecumenism. It is published in soft and hardcover by the American Theological Library Association Monograph Series, No. 46 (Lanham, Maryland & London: Scarecrow Press, 2000).

Star Trek and Sacred Ground
Edited by Dr. Jennifer Porter

Dr. Jennifer PorterDr. Jennifer Porter

Dr. Jennifer Porter, Religious Studies, went where no (wo)man had gone before and co-edited a book on the representation of religion in the many volumes of the Star Trek epic.

For many, trekking to the TV for their daily dose of Captain Kirk and the crew is something of a religious experience. In Star Trek and Sacred Ground: Explorations of Star Trek, Religion, and American Culture, Dr. Porter and the other contributors looked at religion itself in Star Trek.

Dr. Porter has had a long, but somewhat mixed, relationship with Star Trek. “I’m a fan of the show, but I’m not a fan generally of the way Star Trek portrayed religion. I would often get annoyed at the way religion was treated in the show,” she said. “The combination of those two things really inspired the desire to look at just what the show says about religion and whether that has changed.”

And changes there have been.

“God got thoroughly trounced repeatedly in the original series,” she remarked; “there is a very clear sense that religion is bad for humanity.”
The situation with Star Trek: The Next Generation was not much improved, but Deep Space Nine “was the first to present religion in a somewhat positive light.”

Star Trek and Sacred GroundNonetheless, the improvement was slight: “it’s a positive change, but at the same time it’s a bit problematic because religion is apparently only OK for aliens –— humans aren’t religious ... there’s always a scientific explanation for the same set of data. (The creators) always juxtapose the religious interpretation to the scientific.”

Voyager is the first Star Trek series where a human being is shown to be religious. That is again one step up from Deep Space Nine,” Dr. Porter noted about the most recent addition to the Star Trek family.

Even here, broader cultural dynamics are at play, as the creators of the show seemed to still exclude non-aboriginal peoples from the right to be religious. One of Porter’s articles in the book – (Re)Covering Sacred Ground: New Age Spirituality in Star Trek: Voyager – examines these issues in greater detail.

The book itself consists of three main parts. In the first part, the contributors examine how religion has been presented in Star Trek. The second is dedicated to an examination of themes derived from religion that have permeated the various series. Finally, the articles in the third section take a look at religious attitudes and characteristics amongst “Star Trek fandom.”

Finding Our Sea Legs: Linking Fishery People and Their Knowledge with Science and Management
Edited by Drs. Barbara Neis and Lawrence Felt

Drs. Barbara Neis and Lawrence FeltDrs. Barbara Neis and Lawrence Felt

The product of a 1998 workshop, Finding Our Sea Legs documents efforts in the North Atlantic Ocean to find a common ground between the natural sciences and the knowledge and lore of people who work in the fishery. Bringing Fishers' Knowledge into Fisheries Science and Management saw fishery workers, natural scientists and social scientists from several different countries congregate at Memorial.

The presentations from that workshop comprise the bulk of Finding Our Sea Legs; the editors also added “one or two papers we knew about that helped to flesh it out.”

Drs. Neis and Felt have been exploring this area for several years — Dr. Felt since the 1970s and Dr. Neis since 1990. In the past decade and a half, there has been what Dr. Neis describes as “a crisis in managed fisheries” all over the world. The northern cod crisis we face in Newfoundland is reflected in countries in both hemispheres.

Finding our SEA LEGSScientific knowledge leaves some gaps when managing a fishery. For example, catch rates are used as a measure of abundance, but factors such as technological innovation can give the impression of a continuous resource level when in fact more efficient gear is simply catching more of the available fish.

Fish harvesters often have very fine scale knowledge of a particular area, a fine scale that isn't possible with the large areas survived by scientists. People working in a fishery can also provide oral history of the abundance in that area. While this can't provide precise information for any particular point in time, it gives a very good idea of trends in an area.

Each of the book's five sections is prefaced by quotes from Bill Broderick, other fish harvesters, and scientists. Mr. Broderick sums up the spirit of the ongoing collaborative efforts when he says, “The relationship among fish harvesters, scientists, and managers has become critical to the future fishery, and like any relationship it must be based on trust and respect.”

Finding Our Sea Legs was published by ISER Books.

Perspectives in Web Course Management
Dr. Bruce L. Mann, contributing editor

Dr. Bruce L. MannDr. Bruce L. Mann

Perspectives in Web Course Management tackles the ever-changing internet as a pedagogical tool. The wide variety of perspectives from Canadian, American and Australian teachers and experts make this the essential guide to Web course management.

The book moves beyond 1980s technology (e-mail, listservs and newsgroups) that have been incorporated into more sophisticated systems; it also suggests that Web-supported systems that incorporate VR, IRC and ICQ are not yet feasible for today’s use.

Perspectives focuses specifically on managing courses using comprehensive Web course management systems such as WebCT, TopClass and Lotus LearningSpace. Web course development tools and development efforts at particular institutions are covered. Other chapters are theoretical, offering models or commenting on the current state of the art.

Perspectives in Web Course Management“I think it is fair to say that none of the authors of this book believe in a ‘total solution’ to learning over the Internet,” explained Dr. Mann in the preface. “We all know that the provision of Web management software in no way guarantees critical thinking; that the current status of online collaborative social learning in no way matches the variety of interactions in seminars and tutorials.

“That said, most of us believe that Web course management systems have the potential to offer some of us in higher education a new means of self-expression and new opportunities for student engagement with our course material.”

Bruce Mann, an associate professor in the Faculty of Education, contributed the opening chapter, titled Phase Theory: A Teleological Taxonomy of Web Course Management, and another chapter titled Adding Digitized Speech to Web Courses.

Dr. Marc Glassman, Education, also contributed a chapter titled Creating a Nexus Between Tele-Teaching and Tele-Learning.

Perspectives is published by Canadian Scholars’ Press in Toronto.

Place Names of the Northern Peninsula
By E.R. Seary
Edited by Robert Hollett and Dr. William J. Kirwin

Robert Hollett and Dr. William J. KirwinRobert Hollett and Dr. William J. Kirwin

This material, first published in 1960, will be of interest to geographers, historians, folklorists and the just plain curious who want to know how Ha Ha Bay got its name.

Hollett and Kirwin have written in the foreword a careful explanation of the changes they have made, and why. The book contains a version of Seary’s 1960 preface and his 1959 and 1960 introductions, which meticulously detail the cartographical history of the area and include tidbits that might be included in a Newfoundland trivia game. For example, the earliest recorded names on the Great Northern Peninsula are credited to Jacques Cartier during his first voyage to Canada in 1534: Already known was Karpont (now Quirpon), and named by Cartier was cap Pointu (now Cow Head).

The book explains the structures of names: single or multiple elements with modifiers and specifics of colour, size, direction, vegetation, etc. It also has a phonetic key, a glossary of foreign terms, and a wealth of other reference material. Each community name is accompanied by latitude and longitude, reference points, maps and a bit of history that shows its chronological development.
Here’s a sample:
Rocky Harbour 49-35 57-56
(Gros Morne 12H/12W)
? Small bay (Cook 1767), ? Little Bay (Cook 1770), G of St Julien (Lane 1790), Roche harbout (NLP 1887), Roche (Rocky) Harbour (Adm 1209 1897).


Place Names of the Northern Peninsula“The shores nearly all round are bordered by rocky ledges” (NLP I, 353).

Okay, so it’s not scintillating prose. But by searching the book we find the coves that make up Rocky Harbour: Lobster Cove Head (known to Cook as North Point in 1770) and The Bottom (Cove) were noted by Admiralty cartographers in 1887; Bear Cove (once Anse à l’Ours) and Woody Cove were known in 1882. Oh, well, maybe you have to be from there ….

Robert Hollett and William Kirwin are preparing two other place name monographs on Placentia Bay and Trinity Bay. Hm. How did Tickle Harbour get its name?

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