MacEdward Leach and the Songs of Atlantic Canada
Young Flora
Alphonse Sutton NFLD 2 Tape 6A Track 8
Trepassey Audio:
Ballad

LEACH: Okay
SUT'TON (sings):

Come all ye lovers bold, attend for a while
To a tale that l am going to unfold
Young Flora was a maid, oh, that never was afraid
And young James was her gallant sailor bold.

"Adieu, my lovely Flora," one morning he did say
"I’m called and I’m forced for to go
Unto some foreign shore where the loud cannons roar
And to battle when the stormy winds do blow."

Young Flora in despair she tore her yellow hair
When young James told her that they should part
She broke her ring in two, saying, "Here is one half for you
And the other she pressed it to her heart.

"None shall be dismayed," lovely Flora did say
"It's with you I’m intended for to go
Unto some foreign shore where the loud cannons roar
And to battle when the stormy winds do blow."

Three years upon the ocean she sailed with her love
And was never expected as a maid
In battle she did run as she stood by her gun
Like a Britainer she never was afraid.

Three years upon the ocean she sailed with her love
And was never expected as a maid
It never could be said that young Flora was a maid
In her jacket and trousers so blue.

Oh now they at large, young James got his discharge
And straight to the captain he did go
He cried, "Behold a maid, oh, that never was afraid
Went aloft when the stormy winds did blow."

The Captain in his might, he looked on her so bright
He was suddenly overwhelmed with surprise
He gazed on her so bright as she spoke so polite
And the tears flowed in torments from his eyes.

He said, "My lovers bold, here's fifty pounds in gold
And it's with you to get married I will go
May you with joy be blessed and upon your pillows rest
And at home when the stormy winds do blow."

Young James and young Flora got married, so we're told,
By their friends they're respected also
They talk in accents soft about the times they went aloft
And they listen when the stormy winds do blow.


Notes

 

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