MacEdward Leach and the Songs of Atlantic Canada
I’m A Man You Don’t Meet Every Day
Cyril O'Brien NFLD 2 Tape 4 Track 4
Trepassey Audio:
Ballad


Cyril O'Brien, Trepassey

Leach: All right there
Female voice: Is that all right? Leach: Yes
Female voice: Okay go ahead
O'Brien:(sings)

I’ve a neat little cabin thats built out of mud
Not far from the county Kildare
I’ve an acre of land and l grow my own spuds
With enough and a little to spare

Don't you think l came over here seeking your jobs
It's just for a visit to pay
So be easy and free while you're drinking with me
I’m a man you don’t meet every day

Chorus:
Come fill up your glasses and drink what you please
Whatever's the damage I’ll pay
Be easy and free while you're drinking with me
I’m a man you don’t meet every day

When l landed in Liverpool the other day
What a sight met my eyes to be sure
There was Mike there was and Kate, Mary Ann,
Mac McGuffer and 2 or 3 more

They all started laughing when they saw me walk
I had but few words for to say
Says l ye _____ teens do ye think I’m a ghost
I’m a man you don't meet every day

Chorus: Come fill up your glasses...etc.

There's a neat little colleen that lives around here
And it's her l came over to see
We're going to be married next Saturday night
And she's coming to old Ireland with me

And if you come over 12 months from today
I’ll have a smart lad and he'll say to his Dad
I'm a man you don't meet any day

Chorus: So fill up your glasses... etc.


Notes


Sources: From the Memorial University Folklore and Language Archive (MUNFLA) Song Index and Song Annotation Collection: West, Eric MUNFLA 78-236

History: Irish moniker song.

Text : A man with money goes to Liverpool from Ireland to find his bride.   While he is visiting Ireland he frequents the pubs and buys the local people alcoholic beverages.

Tune: Lively tune in 6/8 time.   Verses and chorus are ABAC form.   The third degree of the scale is ambiguous on the final cadence of each stanza; sounds flattened.   The key is otherwise a major one.

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