MacEdward Leach and the Songs of Atlantic Canada
The Fellow That Looked Like Me
Cyril O'Brien NFLD 2 Tape 10A Track 4
Trepassey Audio:
Comic Song

LEACH: All right
O’Brien: (Sings)

In sad despair l wander my heart is filled wit’ woe
Though in my grief l ponder what to do l do not know
My cruel fate does on me frown and the trouble seems to be
That there’s a feller in this town and he just looks like me

Chorus:
Oh wouldn't l like to catch him whoever he may be
Wouldn't l give him particular fits
That fellow that looked like me

The other day l went to see a girl was about to take her out
When a lady tapped me on the back saying how is your wife old Brown
In vain l said I’m a single man but tis married l wish to be
She called me a swindler and kicked me out for a fellow that looked like me

Chorus:
Oh wouldn't l like to catch him whoever he may be
Wouldn't l give him particular fits
That fellow that looked like me

The other night l went up to a dance was just enjoying the sport
When a p'liceman caught me by the arm sayin' you’re wantin' down in court
You escaped us twice but this here time we'll take care you don't get free
They dragged me off locked me up in a jail for a fella that looked like me

Chorus:
Oh wouldn't l like to catch him whoever he may be
Wouldn't l give him particular fits
That fellow that looked like me

Next day l was tried found guilty was about to be taken down
When a second p'liceman he, brought in the right criminal Willie Brown
They locked him up and set me free wasn't he a sight to see
For the ugliest wretch that ever you saw was the fella that looked like me

Chorus:
Oh wouldn't l like to catch him whoever he may be
Wouldn't l give him particular fits
That fellow that looked like me


Notes


Sources: Laws H21; Roud 2187; Randolph 463.
From the Memorial University Folklore and Language Archive (MUNFLA) Song Index and Song Annotation Collection: Sutton, Edward MUNFLA 73-266

History: According to the Traditional Ballad Index (http://www.csufresno.edu/folklore/BalladSearch.html), the earliest copyright for this song in 1867 and attributed to J.F.Poole.

Text: This is a similar text to “The Twins.” An innocent man is tried for a crime he didn’t commit. In this version the guilty look-a-like is apprehended and convicted.

Tune: The text alternates between verse and chorus but the melody is repeated throughout. The last word is spoken. Speaking, instead of singing a final word or phrase is generally thought to indicate Irish influence on the singer or song. The meter is 4/4 and the key is A-flat major with a range of a perfect 11th from A-flat to D-flat. There are large regular vocal leaps.

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