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Harlow

HARLOW CAMPUS, FALL 2009


HARLOW CAMPUS, FALL 2007

FACULTY OF ARTS, ENGLISH LANDSCAPE AND LITERATURE


English Literature and the evolving English Cultural Landscape
In the fall semester 2007, the 6th running of the English Landscape and Literature programme was taught at Old Harlow, England by Dr. Michael Staveley of Memorial’s Department of Geography and Dr. Annette Staveley of the Department of English Language and Literature. The programme focused on selected works from some of England’s seminal writers, and set them in the context of a rich and changing cultural landscape.

The programme consisted of five courses (fifteen credit hours): two courses in English dealt with major writers in the English literary tradition, from early medieval to twentieth century works; two courses in Geography examined the evolution of the English landscape over two thousand years through studies in historical and cultural geography. A fifth course was chosen by each student as a seminar/research paper in either English or Geography.

The whole of the fall semester was spent in England. The programme commenced in Harlow at the end of the first week in September, and concluded at term end in the second week in December. Regular lectures and seminars were held in Harlow on two or three days each week, and these were interspersed with regular field trips (by bus, train and on foot) - these trips were usually of one day’s duration, but others were of two or three or five days away from Harlow in the more distant parts of England - such as the West Country or the North. The field trips and classroom activities were supplemented by a regularly scheduled programme of videos and current educational television.

Field trips in earlier programmes have visited the loci of amongst others, Shakespeare, Dickens, Wordsworth, Austen, the Brontës, Ruskin, Hardy, Johnson and many other literary figures. This group also had numerous site visits to places of cultural and architectural significance such as Stonehenge, Avebury, Sutton Hoo, Cambridge, Canterbury, Hatfield, St. Alban’s, York, Fountains Abbey, Cressing Temple and Lavenham. There were frequent museum, gallery and theatre trips to London. Some field trips were more local and involved old town and rural walks in the vicinity of Old Harlow and Epping Forest.

The English Landscape and Literature programme was open to all students from all faculties, and from all North American universities. There were no prerequisites.


Practical Information

The timing of the programme will be similar to the dates of the St. John’s campus fall semester - first week in September to the second week of December. This fully satisfies the semester abroad requirement of some universities. There will be a mid-term break (no classes or field trips) of at least a week in late October to coincide with English school mid-term holidays. This period is frequently used by our students for extended European trips.

Admission: all students are welcome to register for the programme. In the past, we have had students from all disciplines in Arts, as well as in business, earth sciences, nursing, psychology, computer science and biology. No prior experience of English Literature, Geography, History or Archaeology or the Arts generally is assumed, as the small numbers, and close regular teaching enables us to bring all students to appropriate levels of attainment.

Application: the programme needs a minimum of 20 students, but we cannot accommodate more than 28. Application may be made on a form available on the web site, or from the instructors. Spaces will be allocated in order of reception of application.

Costs: Tuition fees will be paid to Memorial University at regular rates, during the first week of September. Residence fees, which are approximately the same as Memorial residence fees, are paid to the Harlow Campus shortly after arrival. A Programme fee covers return airfare to London, plus transfer fees between Heathrow and Harlow, plus all travel and admission fees for the field trips. This Programme fee is payable before travel to Harlow is undertaken.

Further information about the programme may be obtained from either of the instructors at

Professors:
Dr. Michael Staveley
Professor of Geography
Department of Geography
Memorial University
St. John’s, NL Canada
A1B 3X9
(709) 737-8999 (office)
(709) 726-9198 (home)
staveley@mun.ca

Dr. Annette Staveley
Professor of English

Department of English Language and Literature
Memorial University
St. John’s, NL Canada
A1C 5S7
(709) 737-8279 (office
(709) 726-9198 (home)
astaveley@mun.ca


FACULTY OF ARTS, ENGLISH LANDSCAPE AND LITERATURE


HARLOW CAMPUS, FALL 2007

English 3710: The Place of Writing and the Writing of Place (I)
Through a close reading of selected English literary texts prior to 1840, and related critical material, students will consider the creation, appeal and function of interior and exterior landscapes through an exploration of some of the following topics: journeys and pilgrimages, utopian and fantastical communities, allegorical landscapes, pastoral and anti-pastoral worlds, the power of the picturesque, the creation and use of memory, the shaping and reflection of desires, the romance and the perception of place. The selected readings will be studied against the background of the landscape of their creation through a series of field trips to relevant sites in England. Specific texts vary, but the course may include the writings of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Wordsworth and Austen.
English 3711: The Place of Writing and the Writing of Place (II)
Through a close reading of selected English literary texts published after 1840 and related critical material, students will consider the creation, appeal and function of interior and exterior landscapes through an exploration of some of the following topics: cultural and class responses to landscape, the gendering of landscape, the deracination of the countryside, the emotional contours and rhythms of landscape, the opposition between rural and urban aesthetics, the quest for connection and community. Specific texts vary, but the course may include the writings of the Brontës, Gaskell, Dickens, Hardy and Forster.
English 3712: The Place of Writing and the Writing of Place (III)
Through a close reading of English literary texts published after 1925 and related critical material, students will select an essay topic that refers to these texts. Students may refer to other texts studied this semester. Specific texts vary, but the course may include the writings of Woolf, Gibbons, Lodge and Lively. Students will also complete a journal of their time in Harlow from September until December, 2005.
Readings from the above texts will be extensively supplemented by materials from the Harlow library and by books taken for the semester from the Queen Elizabeth II library in St. John’s.


Geography 3710: Historical Geography and Evolution of the English Landscape to 1600
A systematic examination of the evolution of the landscape of England prior to the 17th century covering: prehistoric settlement systems and agriculture; Celtic and Roman systems; the Anglo-Saxon settlement – farms and fields, villages and nascent towns; Norman England and the manorial system; open field agriculture; ancient woodland and forest; medieval houses, halls and barns; institutional settlement (Cistercians) and landscape effects; ‘vernacular’ and ‘polite’ architecture; effects on economy and landscape of major dislocations such as the Black Death and the Dissolution of the Monasteries. This course involves field visits to sites relevant to many of the foregoing topics.
Geography 3711: Historical Geography and Evolution of the English Landscape from 1600
A systematic examination of the evolution of the landscape of England from the 17th century incorporating: early improvements in agricultural systems; village form and function; growth of commerce and towns; emparkment and the growth of the landscaped estate; Georgian influence in architecture and the built landscape; early enclosure and the later Parliamentary Enclosure movement; developing communication systems and industrialization; the emerging dominance of urban forms; garden cities and new towns. This course involves field visits to sites relevant to many of the foregoing topics.
Geography 3712: Special Studies in English Landscape Form and Evolution (optional)
Individual research and field projects derived from the foregoing subject matter, determined following advice and consultation with the instructor. These studies will incorporate, where appropriate, library, archival, and/or field work in England.
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