The SEMAT Initiative: Reconstituting Software Engineering based on Sound Theoretical Foundations

Dr. Paul Ralph
(The Management School Lancaster University)

The SEMAT Initiative: Reconstituting Software Engineering
based on Sound Theoretical Foundations


Department of Computer Science
Thursday, January 3, 2013, 1:00 pm., Room EN-2022

 

 



Abstract

Many academic disciplines have general theories, which apply across the discipline and underlie much of its research. Examples include the Big Bang theory (cosmology), Maxwell’s equations (electrodynamics), the theories of the cell and evolution (biology), the theory of supply and demand (economics), and the general theory of crime (criminology). In contrast, few general theories of software engineering (SE) have been proposed, and none have yet achieved significant recognition. This harms practice, research and education by inhibiting a cumulative research tradition, reducing SE to trial and error, increasing SE's vulnerability to fads, and facilitating proliferation of untested, empirically-dubious SE concepts and practices. Consequently, this talk reviews possible theoretical foundations for software engineering including Complex Adaptive Systems Theory, Transactive Memory Systems Theory, The Theories of Boundary Objects and Boundary Spanners, The Theory of Cognitive Biases and Sensemaking-Coevolution-Implementation Theory.

Contact

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