John Kenneth Galbraith Lecture in Public Policy

The John Kenneth Galbraith Lectureship in Public Policy is intended to bring to outstanding figures to Memorial University, whose work reflects their commitment to excellence in scholarship and public affairs. The Lectureship is an initiative of Memorial Uni­versity and is one of the major events open to the general public during the academic year.

It is named in honour of John Kenneth Galbraith, the internationally-renowned economist who was awarded an honourary doctorate of letters at Memorial’s 1999 fall convocation. Dr. Galbraith is known for his development of Keynesian and post-Keynesian economics, the economics of the modern large firm, as well as for his writing and his active involvement in American politics.

Normally, the John Kenneth Galbraith Lecturer will spend three to five working days at Memo­rial. The purpose of the lectureship is to expose faculty, students, public servants and the general public to timely and significant public issues. The lectureship is a window to the larger world of public policy, and is meant to put important and complex issues in context. The lectureship con­sists of three separate components:

A public lecture aimed at the educated citizen. This is the main event of the Lectureship and is typically held on a weekday evening. To encourage public participation, admission is free, and a reception is held afterwards where the audience can meet the lecturer.

Formal and informal discussions with faculty and students of Memorial. These are coordinated by the Faculty of Arts and are open to the public by invitation only.

Formal and informal discussions with public servants and community representatives on public policy issues. These events will normally be open to faculty and students, however, some costs may need to be incurred by faculty members and the students.

The lectureship is held under the auspices the President , and is coordinated jointly by the Dean of Arts and by the Director of the Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development, or their representatives.

View a list of previous lectures and a video