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Description of Courses Offered in First Year - Cont'd.


GERMAN

German is the first language of over 100 million people in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and other countries.  In recent years, and especially since the reunification of East and West Germany, German is used increasingly as a second and third language, because of its major significance as a language of business, science and technology. Next to Japanese, it is the most frequently studied language in the world.  In past centuries three major bodies of modern Western literature and art have developed:  in English (a Germanic language), French and German.  The influence of German thought on Western civilization and culture, particularly in subjects such as philosophy, psychology, theology, history and music, has been considerable.  Students in many fields of learning, therefore, find a knowledge of German not only useful but essential.

GERMAN 1000/1001
Elementary German I/II

These courses, designed for the beginner, emphasize spoken as well as written German.  At the end of these courses students should be able to
 
hold simple conversations on everyday topics and to read and write basic German.

Lectures:  Four hours per week
Laboratory:  One hour per week
Prerequisite:  German 1000 is a prerequisite for German 1001.

Notes: 

1. German 1000/1001 are prerequisites for all other German language courses.

2. A number of courses may be of interest to incoming students.  They require no prerequisites, the language of instruction is English throughout and they cover German culture and literature:  German 2900, 2901, 3000 and 3001.  These courses may not be used as part of the bachelor of arts requirement of two courses in a second language.

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HISTORY

“To know yourself, know history” (Auguste Comte).  Everything we see around us of human construction, from constitutions to popular culture, is a product of our history.  Our first-year courses are designed to introduce students to their past.

HISTORY 1010
The North Atlantic in the Age of Expansion, 1492-1776

The spread of European peoples across the North Atlantic Ocean during the centuries that followed Columbus’s voyage to the New World in 1492 is one of the transforming events of world history.  The conquest of the Americas, the rise of Western Europe, the growth of capitalism, and the horrors of slavery were Atlantic experiences, and the world as we know it would be inconceivable without them.  Newfoundland is a product of this history as well, and it is important to be informed about the connections between our past and that of the other regions within the North Atlantic basin.  This course follows the history of the North Atlantic from 1492 to 1776, tracing the origins and development of all of these themes across national boundaries and on both sides of the ocean.

Note: This course qualifies as a research/writing course for the Faculty of Arts.

Lectures/Discussion Groups:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

HISTORY 1011
Europe and the Wider World, 1750-1914

In 1750 most of the world lived in a manner that few of us would recognize; by 1914 our modern world had begun to take shape.  History 1011 will provide a thematic introduction to the history of Europe and the wider world, and may include such topics as industrialization, revolution, nationalism, imperialism and international relations.Note: This course qualifies as a research/writing course for the Faculty of Arts.

Lectures/Discussion Groups:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

HISTORY 1012
The World in the Twentieth Century

The 20th century has brought about dramatic change on a global scale.  This course looks back over the century, examining selected issues and events that have shaped the world we live in today.  These may include the First and Second World Wars, Nazi Germany and Communist Russia, the United Nations, independence movements in India, Africa, and Southeast Asia, the Holocaust, international terrorism, the revolution of rising expectations, and global politics during and after the Cold War.

Note: This course qualifies as a research/writing course for the Faculty of Arts.

Lectures/Discussion Groups:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

HISTORY 1013
Issues in Canadian History

In History 1013 students will time-travel through Canada’s past to explore the historical roots of selected currently relevant themes.  In this way they will gain an appreciation for the principal developments shaping our country’s society, economy and culture and an understanding of its dynamic complexity.

Note: This course qualifies as a research/writing course for the Faculty of Arts.

Lectures/Discussion Groups:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None


HISTORY 1014
Issues in United States History

It is arguable that no nation in history has had as great an impact on the recent history of the world as the United States.  On the one hand, no nation has elevated materialism to so high a status; on the  other hand, few people have been as overtly idealistic as Americans.  History 1014 examines this and other themes in the history of the United States over the past four centuries.

Note: This course qualifies as a research/writing course for the Faculty of Arts.

Lectures/Discussion Groups:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

HISTORY 1015
Ideas and Society in the West, 1500-1800

History 1015 introduces students to early modern European history through consideration of significant original materials.  The texts will vary from semester to semester, but will be chosen from among the works of authors whose influence on their time was deep and lasting.  These may include Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince; Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography; and Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women.  Students will be encouraged to grapple with the arguments of these writers and to understand the historical context from which they emerge.

Note: This course qualifies as a research/writing course for the Faculty of Arts.
 
Lectures/Discussion Groups:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

In all of the above courses a significant amount of class time will be spent in developing communication skills.  The instructors will guide students in historical research and the preparation of written work, using library and other resources.  In the process, participants will be introduced to the concepts, methods, and procedures used by professional historians.
 
Notes:

1. The History Department plans to offer at least one section of each of these courses in the fall and winter semesters.  Some of these courses will also be offered in spring semester. 

2. Students may take up to two of the research/writing courses (History 1010, 1011, 1012, 1013, 1014, 1015) to help meet the core requirements of the BA degree.

3. Students may receive credit for no more than two first-year history courses.

4. Students planning to major or minor in history are required to take one of the first-year history research/writing courses.

HISTORY 1100
Introduction to History
(Available only at Grenfell)

An introduction to the study and writing of history which will emphasize the concepts of history through a thematic approach to the history of western civilization from ca. 1300 to the 18th century. 

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

HISTORY 1101
Introduction to History
(Available only at Grenfell)

An introduction to the study and writing of history which will emphasize the concepts of history through a combination of research and writing within a thematic approach to the history of western civilization from the 18th century to the 20th century. 

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

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HUMAN KINETICS AND RECREATION

HKR 1000
Fitness and Wellness

Introduction to the concepts of fitness and wellness, and the relationships among physical activity, fitness, wellness, quality of life, and longevity.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

Note: Credit for this course may not be used to meet the requirements of any of the degree programs offered by the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation.

HKR 1001
Resistance Training for Health and Activity

This course will introduce students to resistance training exercises, programs and principles.  This will necessitate both theoretical classes and practical laboratories that will involve testing and participation in resistance training activities.  A portion of the assessment will also be based on regular attendance (at the student’s convenience) for another hour of resistance training per week certified by the attending fitness consultant.
  
Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

Note: This course is not available for credit for bachelor of physical education or bachelor of kinesiology students.  Credit may not be obtained for both HKR 1001 and HKR 4320 (Fitness Leadership).

HKR 1123
Professional Development Seminar

Professional development seminars are offered for BPE (Co-op) students during the fall semester prior to the first work term.  These seminars introduce the co-operative education process and prepare the student for work terms.  These seminars are graded PAS or FAL based on attendance and participation.

Lectures:  Two hours per week
Prerequisite:  None
Credit Hours: 0

HKR 2000
Introduction to Physical Education, Recreation and Kinesiology

An introduction to the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural and historical concepts and influences in kinesiology, physical education and recreation.  An orientation to the profession is provided as well.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

HKR 2100
Introduction to Organization and Administration

The course will introduce students to basic administrative functions in a work setting in physical education/recreation.  The laboratory session will assist students to develop skill in the basic computer applications relevant to these functions.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

HKR 2300
Growth and Development

Introductory study of human growth and development factors and their influence on the learning of motor skills.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

HKR 2505
Recreation Programming and Evaluation

This course is designed to introduce the student to a variety of methodologies, skills, and materials for planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating professional recreation programs for diverse populations in a variety of settings.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

HKR 3525
Canadian Recreation Delivery Systems

This course will provide an introduction to recreation and sport delivery systems in Newfoundland and Canada.  The course examines the agencies that administer recreation and sport at municipal, provincial and national levels.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: HKR 2000

Note:  The above courses may have credit restrictions with former courses offered by the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation.  Please refer to the university Calendar or the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation (709) 737-8129 for further information.


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ITALIAN

ITALIAN 1000
Elementary Italian I

This course is designed for the beginner in Italian and introduces the student to the fundamentals of Italian grammar, with particular attention to the acquisition of basic skills in oral and written communication.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory:  One hour per week
Prerequisite:  None

ITALIAN 1001
Elementary Italian II

A continuation of Elementary Italian I.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory:  One hour per week
Prerequisite:  Italian 1000

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LINGUISTICS

Linguistics examines the nature of language and communication.  Since language is so basic to human beings, the questions that linguists find worthwhile are related to almost all fields of study.  By investigating how language is organized at the level of sounds, words, phrases, sentences and meaning, linguists hope to come to a better understanding of the special mental and physical endowment that humans possess which enables them to learn and use language as a medium of communication.  Seen in this way, the study of the human language is, in the end, the study of the human mind.

Speech therapists, language teachers, educators, lawyers, psychologists, social scientists, mathematicians, engineers and students of literature are among those who find different aspects of linguistics useful in their professions.
 
LINGUISTICS 1100
Language and Communication

A general and non-technical introduction to linguistic topics which are important for an understanding of the nature of language and its function for communication.  It will be shown that linguistics takes an objective view of the phenomena of language; consequently it does not aim to impose "correct" language.  Nor is it reserved for those who speak many languages.  Discussion will centre around readings selected from the following areas:  language as structured systems; meaning in language; language, the brain and language disorders; the acquisition of language; and human vs. animal communication.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

Note:  A student may not receive credit for both Linguistics 1100 and 2100.

LINGUISTICS 1103/2103
Introduction to Linguistics: Morphology and Syntax

An introduction to the study of meaningful components of words and sentences.  This course will demonstrate the principles by which parts of words are organized into larger units (inflectional morphology and word-formation), and by which words pattern into phrases and sentences (syntax).  Synchronic and diachronic data from English and several other languages will be analysed to illustrate how language is structured.  Credit is not given for both Linguistics 1103 and 2103.
 
Lectures: Three hours per week and one hour tutorial.
Prerequisite: None

LINGUISTICS 1104/2104
Introduction to Linguistics: Phonetics and Phonology

An introduction to the sounds of speech, their description (phonetics), organization (phonology), and interactions with morphology (morphophonology).  The synchronic and diachronic patterns and regularities of language will be demonstrated through analysis of data selected from English and other languages.  Credit is not given for both Linguistics 1104 and 2104.
 
Lectures: Three hours per week and one hour tutorial
Prerequisite: None

Note:  First-year students may also do the following introductory courses without any prerequisites:

Ling. 2060 Aboriginal Languages of Eastern Canada

Ling. 2210 Language in Newfoundland and Labrador: An Introduction to Linguistic Variation

Ling. 2105 The Wonder of Words. 

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MATHEMATICS

Mathematics plays an increasingly greater variety of roles in modern society.  At the university level, mathematics provides technical know-how in diverse areas, e.g., economics, engineering, physics, biology, chemistry, psychology and computer science.  It is also a desirable prerequisite for almost any area of learning since it can serve as an extremely effective tool for training in logical reasoning.  First-year courses attempt to prepare students for study in these areas as well as for further study in mathematics and statistics.  First-year mathematics courses fall into two streams:  Mathematics 1050/1051, a non-calculus stream for students who neither require nor wish to study calculus, and for prospective teachers in primary and elementary education; and Mathematics 1090, 1000 and 1001, courses in a calculus stream designed to prepare students for the study of sciences and further mathematics. 

The mathematics placement test (MPT) will be administered for all students attending the St. John’s campus (with some exceptions) entering 1000-level courses to ensure that the pupils’ choice of courses is consistent with their level of mathematical preparation. 

At Grenfell a placement test in Mathematics will be administered for all students entering Mathematics 1000.  Students who are not eligible to register for Mathematics 1000 may select Mathematics 1090 or 1050 or 1051. 

The items on the placement test are a subset of the items tested on the diagnostic mathematics assessment (DMA), which was developed by the Department of Education after consultation with the Department of Mathematics to give high school students an opportunity to assess their likely performance on the MPT.  They are given a test that is similar in nature and difficulty, and is to be taken without using a calculator.

If you have not already taken the DMA and you wish to attend Memorial, you should do so.  If you have already taken it, your score should be similar to the one you would  obtain on the placement test.

If the score you obtained on the DMA is less than the score shown in the table at the end of this section, you may find that you will not obtain an MPT score that would grant you direct access to the course of your choice.  However, in consultation with your teacher, you can use the results on the DMA to upgrade your skills so that when you take the MPT, you achieve the required entry score for the course of your choice.  Also, completion of Mathematics 3103 should improve your MPT score.

Students with a score of 3, 4 or 5 on the standardized Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination may receive transfer credit for Mathematics 1000 and enter Mathematics 1001 directly.  On the St. John’s campus there are also Mathematics 102/3/4F for students with deficiencies in their knowledge of mathematics (see Mathematics Learning Centre, under Academic Services section of this Guide).

The table below lists the requirements for entry into each first-year mathematics course for the St. John’s campus.

MUN Course Newfoundland and Labrador HS Course Completed Acceptable MPT Score
1001

Advanced Placement Calculus with grade of 3 or better

N/A
1000 International Baccalaureate N/A
  3201 N/A
  3204 85 or higher
  3205 75 or higer
1090 3204 or 3205 55 or higher
1050 or 1051 3204 or 3205 50 or higher



MATHEMATICS 1000
Calculus I

An introduction to differential calculus including exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.

Lectures:  Four hours per week (At Grenfell, three hours of lectures and a one and one-half hour laboratory per week.)
Prerequisite: Math 1090, or high school Advanced Mathematics 3201 or Standard Level Mathematics from the International Baccalaureate program, or a combination of placement test scores and grades in high school mathematics acceptable to the department (St. John’s campus).  At Grenfell, successful completion of Advanced Mathematics 3205 and a grade on the placement test acceptable to the department.

MATHEMATICS 1001
Calculus II

An introduction to integral calculus with applications.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory:  1 ½ hours per week
Prerequisite:  Mathematics 1000 or a combination of placement test scores (e.g. Standardized Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam) and grades in high school mathematics acceptable to the department.

MATHEMATICS 1050
Finite Mathematics I

Topics include sets, logic, permutations, combinations and elementary probability.

Lectures:  Four hours per week
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test (MPT) scores and grades in high school mathematics acceptable to the department
(St. John’s campus).  At Grenfell, successful completion of Level III academic mathematics or advanced mathematics.

MATHEMATICS 1051
Finite Mathematics II

Topics include elementary matrices, linear programming, elementary number theory, mathematical systems and geometry.

Lectures:  Four hours per week
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test (MPT) scores and grades in high school mathematics acceptable to the department
(St. John’s campus).  At Grenfell, successful completion of Level III academic mathematics or advanced mathematics.

MATHEMATICS 1090
Algebra and Trigonometry

This course provides students with the essential prerequisite elements for the study of an introductory course in calculus.  Topics include algebra, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, polynomials, and rational functions.

Lectures:  Four hours per week  (At Grenfell, three hours of lectures and a three-hour laboratory per week.)
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test (MPT) scores and grades in high school mathematics acceptable to the department (St. John’s campus).  At Grenfell, successful completion of Level III academic mathematics or advanced mathematics.

MATHEMATICS 102F/103F/104F
Mathematics Skills Program

Non-credit courses on the St. John’s campus intended for those students who either have a weak background in mathematics or are returning to the subject after some years.  The program leads students through a review of the basic properties
of numbers to mastery of those algebraic skills which are essential for a study of calculus.

Tutorial Sessions: Three hours per week
Testing Sessions: Approximately every other week
Prerequisite:  None

Notes:

1. Mathematics 1000 is available for direct entry to students who have taken Advanced Mathematics 3201, or IB Standard Math in high school.  Students from high school Mathematics 3205 who obtain an acceptable score on the MPT may take Mathematics 1000.  All other students requiring calculus should take Mathematics 1090.  If a student does not meet the requirements for entry to Mathematics 1090, the appropriate preparatory course is Mathematics 102F. Mathematics 1000 will satisfy the admission requirement for the  bachelor of education (primary/elementary) program.

2. Mathematics 1050 and 1051 can be done in either order.  Mathematics 1050 is not a prerequisite for Mathematics 1051.

3.  Mathematics 1050/1051 can lead to a minor in mathematics.

4. Students who have successfully completed Advanced Placement Calculus and obtain a score of 3, 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus AB exam will be given credit for Mathematics 1000 automatically on receipt of AP grades by the Registrar’s Office.  These students are advised to register for Mathematics 1001 at Memorial.  For information on credit for Mathematics 1000, students should contact the Admissions Office at Memorial.

5. Transfer students who have queries regarding the prerequisite for Mathematics 1090 or 1000 are strongly advised to contact the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at (709) 737-8914 or Division of Science at Grenfell at (709) 637-6247.

6. Harold Johnson of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics is available to answer questions about math courses during regular business hours in office number HH-3004.The e-mail address is hjohnson@math.mun.ca and the telephone number is (709) 737-8914.

7. For a Synopsis and Examples Representative of   the Math Placement Test, please see Appendix D of this Guide.
 

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MEDIEVAL STUDIES

MEDIEVAL STUDIES 2000
The Cultural Legacy of the Middle Ages

The course will survey the formative cultures of the Middle Ages - Latin, Celtic, Arabic - as well as the rise of the new vernacular cultures, Germanic and Romance.  Literary trends such as
the reliance on authority, the emergence of national epic and the development of court literature will be studied.  The course examines the interplay of all the arts - literature, music, art and architecture.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None    




MUSIC

Music is one of the most important components of modern life, entering our lives in many ways: through radio and television, movies, recordings, computer games, even elevators and restaurants.  The study of music can be approached in several ways.  University courses in music tend to be grouped into three categories: music theory (including composition), music history, and applied music (performance).  Courses in applied music are available only to students in the bachelor of music program, while courses in music theory and music history may be taken by students in any program.

Courses in music history develop an understanding of music from cultural, social and historical perspectives.  These courses introduce you to many kinds of music, and help you recognize the features that distinguish different musical styles and periods.

Courses in music theory develop an understanding of the language of music, through its notation and structure.  In music theory courses you learn how to read and write music, and discover how musical elements such as timbre, melody, rhythm and harmony are put together to make musical compositions.  Courses in aural skills also develop critical listening and sightsinging skills.

Courses in applied music develop the individual student’s potential for musical expression and performance.  These courses develop your
technical competence, musical understanding,
and creativity so that you can prepare your own interpretations of music in a variety of styles.

The following music courses are available to students who have not been admitted to the School of Music, and are appropriate for students with little or no musical background:

MUSIC 1116
Basic Musicianship

An introduction to sightsinging and dictation.  Credit for this course is not applicable to the bachelor of music degree.

Lectures:  Two hours per week
Prerequisite:  None
Credit Hours: One

MUSIC 1120
Rudiments I

An introductory course in music rudiments and theory.  Credit for this course is not applicable to the bachelor of music degree.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None
Credit Hours:  Three

MUSIC 2011
North American Popular Music

A survey of popular music from the beginning of the century to the present.  This course has a strong listening component.  The ability to read music is not required.  Credit for this course is not applicable to the bachelor of music degree.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Credit Hours:  Three

MUSIC 2012
Understanding Classical Music: Introduction Through Guided Listening

Form and style in Western classical music will be explored within a cultural and historical context.  This course has a strong listening component.  The ability to read music is not required.  Credit for this course is not applicable to the bachelor of music degree.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Credit Hours:  Three

MUSIC 2013
Twentieth-Century Musicals

A survey on 20th-century musical theatre.  Selected works, presenting different styles and periods, will be examined in detail.  There will be a strong, required listening/viewing component to this course.  The ability to read music is not required.  Music 2013 cannot be taken for credit by students enrolled in the bachelor of music program.  Credit cannot be received for both Music 3007 and Music 2013.  Music 2013 is cross-listed with English 2013.
 
Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None
Credit Hours:  Three

Note: Credit may not be obtained for both Music 2013 and English 2013.

The following large ensemble courses are available to non-music majors with appropriate background, subject to the approval of the instructor:

MUSIC 2611
Festival Choir

Prerequisite:  Audition for ensemble director.  Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours:  One

MUSIC 2612
Chamber Choir

Prerequisite:  Audition for ensemble director.  Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours:  One

MUSIC 2613
Chamber Orchestra

Prerequisite:  Audition for ensemble director.  Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours:  One

MUSIC 2614
Concert Band

Prerequisite:  Audition for ensemble director.  Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours:  One

MUSIC 2615
Jazz Ensemble

Prerequisite:  Audition for ensemble director.  Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours:  One

MUSIC 2616
Opera Workshop

Prerequisite:  Audition for ensemble director.  Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours:  One

The following courses are available to students at all levels in the university without prerequisite, but with permission of the Director of the School of Music:

MUSIC 2021
Newfoundland and Labrador Folksinging

An introduction to the sociocultural contexts, functions and meanings of folksong in Newfoundland and Labrador.  Proceeding from this contextual base drawn from oral and scholarly histories, the course offers practical instruction by a tradition-bearer in the singing of traditional Newfoundland and Labrador tunes and texts, using the techniques of aural transmission and assisted by the written medium where appropriate.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Credit Hours: Three

MUSIC 2022
Newfoundland and Labrador Fiddling

An introduction to the sociocultural contexts, functions and meanings of fiddling in Newfoundland and Labrador.  Proceeding from this contextual base drawn from oral histories, the course offers practical instruction by a tradition-bearer on the fiddle, using the techniques of aural transmission and assisted by the written medium  where appropriate.
     
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Permission of the director
Credit Hours: Three

MUSIC 2023
Newfoundland and Labrador Accordion

An introduction to the sociocultural contexts, function and meanings of accordion music in Newfoundland and Labrador.  Proceeding from this contextual base drawn from oral histories, the course offers practical instruction by a tradition-
bearer on the button accordion, using the techniques of aural transmission and assisted by the written medium where appropriate.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Permission of the director
Credit Hours: Three


Some courses in music history and music theory are available to non-music majors who have fulfilled the prerequisites.  Please note that spaces in these classes are made available to non-B.Mus. students only after all B.Mus. students have registered.  These may include:

MUSIC 1002
Music History I

The first in a series of four survey courses in music history.  Music 1002 deals with the development of musical styles in Europe from ancient times to the end of the medieval period.  Ability to read music is essential.  Students with little or no background should register for Music 2011 or 2012.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Music 1120 OR successful completion of the theory placement test OR admission to the B.Mus. degree program.
Credit Hours:  Three

MUSIC 1003
Music History II

A continuation of Music 1002.  Music of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. 

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Music 1002
Credit Hours:  Three

MUSIC 1107
Materials & Techniques of Music I
 
An introduction to melodic writing, harmony and voice-leading, with emphasis on four-part chorale style.  Analysis and composition of smaller formal elements.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of the theory placement test OR Music 1120.
Corequisite: Music 1117
Credit Hours:  Three

MUSIC 1108
Materials & Techniques of Music II

A continuation of Music 1107. 

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  Music 1107
Credit Hours:  Three


The following courses are restricted to students admitted to a program in the School of Music:

MUSIC 1127
Keyboard Harmony I

Introduction to practical keyboard harmony skills for students whose principal applied study is not a keyboard instrument.
 
Lectures:  One hour per week
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of the piano proficiency test.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:  Music 1107
Credit Hours: 0

MUSIC 1128
Keyboard Harmony II

A continuation of Music 1127.

Lectures:  One hour per week
Prerequisite:  Music 1107, Music 1127
Credit Hours:  One

MUSIC 1137
Advanced Keyboard Harmony I

Introduction to practical keyboard harmony skills for students whose principal applied study is a keyboard instrument.

Lectures:  One hour per week
Prerequisite/Corequisite:  Music 1107
Credit Hours:  0

MUSIC 1138
Advanced Keyboard Harmony II

A continuation of Music 1137.

Lectures:  One hour per week
Prerequisite:  Music 1107, Music 1137
Credit Hours:  One

MUSIC 140 A/B
Applied Study

Private lessons in the principal instrument.  Available to music degree students only.

Lectures: One-hour private lesson per week
Prerequisite: Music 140A is a prerequisite for Music 140B.
Credit Hours:  Four over two semesters

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NURSING

NURSING 1002
Anatomy and Physiology I

Presents a survey of human anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan.  It includes aspects of cytology and histology that form a foundation for the practice of nursing.  Special emphasis is given to the skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory:  Two hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

NURSING 1003
Developing Therapeutic Relationships

Focuses on the application of caring theory to interpersonal communications.  It emphasizes the development of the role of communicator in individual and group experiences and in professional relationships.  Using an experiential model, laboratory experiences focus on self-awareness and group dynamics.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory:  Two hours per week
Corequisite:  Nursing 1004

NURSING 1004

Introduction to Nursing  introduces  the major concepts and theories related to the paradigm of person, health, society, nursing environment and nursing education in relation to the philosophy, conceptual framework and objectives of the program. Emphasis is placed on the concept of caring as the essence of nursing practice.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite:  None

NURSING 1012
Anatomy and Physiology II

Presents a survey of anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan.  It includes aspects of cytology, histology and embryology that form a foundation for the practice of nursing.  Special emphasis is given to the circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems, including pregnancy and delivery.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory:  Two hours per week
Prerequisite:  Nursing 1002

NURSING 1014
Health Assessment

Focuses on the development of competencies needed to assess the health status of individuals throughout the lifespan using a systematic approach.  Content includes the nurse’s responsibilities for health history, physical examination, interpretation of findings, and documentation.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory:  Two hours per week
Corequisite:  Nursing 1012

NURSING 1015
Health Promotion throughout the Lifespan

Explores nursing concepts and theories pertaining to health promotion/protection throughout the lifespan. Content includes principles of teaching and learning, introduction to community health and primary health care concepts and the determinants of health.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Laboratory: Twenty four hours during the course
Prerequisite or Corequisite: Psychology 1000,  Nursing 1003, Nursing 1004

NURSING 1016
Healthy Aging

Will explore, in-depth, concepts and issues applicable to the well older adult (65+). Selected theories, physical changes, and psychosocial, ethical, and legal issues associated with aging will be presented.

Lectures:  Three hours per week
Prerequisite: 1002, 1003 and 1004
Corequisite: 1012, 1014 and 1015

NURSING 1017
Fundamental Psychomotor Competencies

Will provide the student an opportunity to acquire beginning psychomotor competencies that are related to the provision of client comfort and safety in a variety of settings.  As well, this course provides the opportunity for the student to integrate the conceptual framework of the program into the development of psychomotor competencies.

Lectures: None
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite or Corequisite: 1003 and 1004

NURSING 1520
Extended Practice I

Provides the student with the opportunity to integrate the knowledge and practise the competencies acquired to date.  The focus is the promotion, protection and maintenance of health for well individuals within the context of the family.  This course is taught at the end of the winter semester, usually beginning during the final week of the examination period.

Clinical: 96 hours over three weeks
Prerequisite or Corequisite:  Nursing 1012, 1014, 1015, 1016, 1017

BIOCHEMISTRY 1430
Biochemistry for Nurses

An introduction to the chemistry and structure-function relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.  Basic metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, with emphasis on the biochemical fluctuations that occur in human health and disease.  A brief introduction to molecular genetics.  This course may not be used for credit to fulfill the requirements for a major in the Department of Biochemistry.  Entry into this course is restricted to students in the School of Nursing.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite:  Level III chemistry or a first-year chemistry course

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