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Description of Courses Offered in First Year

Anthropology

In cartoons and movies, anthropologists are often shown wearing pith helmets and shorts in a tropical jungle or digging up mummies in the desert with a pyramid in the background.

These images are not entirely wrong: some anthropologists actually do that sort of thing. However, anthropology is much more diverse than these stereotypes indicate. It is a broad-based comparative study of human biology, society and culture, past and present. Because of the emphasis on comparison, anthropology has paid special attention to small-scale societies outside the Western European cultural tradition, but nowadays anthropologists can be found doing their research in cities and factories as well as in villages and hunting camps.

Within the discipline of anthropology there are several broad areas of specialization:

Physical anthropology concentrates on how human beings acquired their present form and behaviour by tracing human evolution and physical diversity.

Archaeology is the study of human societies by means of the material traces they have left behind: tools, bones, house remains, and so on.

Social and cultural anthropology is the comparative study of the ideas, beliefs, and ways of life of human groups.

Applied anthropology is the application of anthropological knowledge to practical problems such as economic development, social conflict and environmental pollution.

Courses in anthropology provide a valuable background for students who intend to specialize in any of the social sciences or humanities, or in medicine, nursing, social work, education, law, business, government, communications and many other fields.

Students who want to specialize by doing a major or a minor program may choose
between a concentration in archaeology/physical anthropology or social/cultural anthropology.

ANTHROPOLOGY 1030
Introduction to Archaeology and Physical Anthropology

This course offers students a broad overview of archaeology and physical anthropology. It introduces students to the concepts of human biological and cultural evolution and to the methods and techniques by which these are investigated. The course is designed to give students an appreciation of the scope of archaeology and physical anthropology and to provide the basis for further study in the disciplines.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

ANTHROPOLOGY 1031
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

This course offers a broad overview of social and cultural anthropology, introducing students to major concepts, methods and theories. It is intended to give students an appreciation of the diversity of human societies and cultures through the comparative examination of examples from a wide range of societies around the world.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

1. Anthropology 1030/1031 courses need not be taken in numerical order. Students who major or minor in anthropology are expected to take both.

2. Anthropology 1030 is a prerequisite for most other archaeology/physical anthropology courses.

3. Anthropology 1031 is a prerequisite for most other social/cultural anthropology courses.





ART HISTORY

Art history is a special branch of general history that focuses on the development of different forms of art and material culture. It examines the political, social and historical circumstances that helped to produce these works. Students are taught to recognize the many and varied artistic expressions that have developed from ancient times to the present. Such study requires no artistic ability in the student, only interest in the subject itself. Lectures are normally accompanied by illustrations in the form of slides, videos or objects of art. The purpose of art history is to teach the student how to understand and critically consider the dynamic and various cultural manifestations to which the arts give expression, and the role the arts play in larger society.

VISUAL ART 2700
Art History Survey I
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

The history of art from pre-historic times to the Renaissance.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

VISUAL ART 2701
Art History Survey II
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

The history of art from the Renaissance to the 20th century.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

1. Credit may not be obtained for both Visual Arts 2700 and History 2700.

2. Credit may not be obtained for both Visual Arts 2701 and History 2701.





BIOLOGY

Biology is the study of living organisms and their attributes, and includes such topics as molecular biology, cell biology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, systematics and ecology. Of all the sciences, biology is perhaps the most closely related to everyday life. We are exposed daily to news and documentary reports on biological topics such as genetic engineering, environmental conservation, pollution, disease and immunology, social and behavioural interactions and population growth.

Biology, therefore, is not only a specific and rigorous science, but also may be approached in a broader sense as a general interest science relevant to many aspects of daily life.

The first-year courses provide an insight into biology as a scientific discipline of direct relevance to all, while at the same time allowing more detailed exploration of certain branches of the subject.

BIOLOGY 1001
Principles of Biology

Biology 1001 introduces biology as a scientific discipline, outlines the unifying ideas in modern biology, and then illustrates these ideas by examining selected aspects of the form, function and diversity of some major groups of living organisms.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None


BIOLOGY 1002
Principles of Biology

Biology 1002 is a continuation and extension of the principles embodied in Biology 1001.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Biology 1001

Note: Students who have written the College Board Advanced Biology exam should consult Appendix B for possible awarding of credit.






BUSINESS

BUSINESS 1000
Introduction to Business

An overview of business in the Canadian environment is presented. The course examines the functional areas of the enterprise (finance, marketing, production, and human resources management) in addition to providing an overview of the business system. An analysis of actual business situations provides a framework for study.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

BUSINESS 2000
Business Communications

This course focuses on the development of written and oral communication skills critical in the workplace. The common communications media are reviewed with emphasis on electronic and written correspondence. Students learn how to prepare comprehensive analytical reports including proposal writing. Attention is also given to building confidence in delivering oral presentations and preparing appropriate employment packages. A highly interactive design encourages student practice and participation.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None


CHEMISTRY

Chemistry is a science whose theories, principles and laws are based on many experimentally observed facts. Chemistry is concerned with the composition, structure and properties of substances, the reactions of substances with each other and the energy changes that occur in these reactions. The first-year chemistry program consists of a two-course option for those who are well prepared from high school (Chemistry 1050/1051 (St. John's) or Chemistry 1200/1001 (Grenfell) or a three course stream for those less prepared (Chemistry 1010/1011/1031 (St. John's) or Chemistry 1810/1200/1001(Grenfell )). Students who commence a sequence on one campus (e.g., 1200/1001 at Grenfell Campus) must complete the full sequence before transferring to the other campus. See notes below for entrance criteria.

CHEMISTRY 1010 and 1011
Introductory Chemistry I and II

Descriptive chemistry; atomic structure; chemical bonding; periodicity illustrated by the chemistry of selected elements; mole concept and stoichiometry; physical properties of matter; energetics; rates of reaction; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory/Tutorial: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1010 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 1011.

CHEMISTRY 1031
Introductory Chemistry III

This course prepares students who have completed Chemistry 1010 and 1011 for Chemistry 2210, 2300 and 2400. It augments the topics covered in Chemistry 1010 and 1011 with the greater depth and problem solving emphasis of Chemistry 1050 and 1051.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1011 and Mathematics 1000

CHEMISTRY 1050 and 1051
General Chemistry I and II

The majority of topics will be similar to Chemistry 1010/1011 but will be treated in greater depth with an emphasis on problem solving.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000 is a prerequisite for Chemistry 1050, but may be taken concurrently. Students who are required to drop from Mathematics 1000 to Mathematics 1090 as a result of their Math Placement Test score should not drop Chemistry 1050 before contacting the Chemistry department. Chemistry 1050 and Mathematics 1000 are prerequisites for Chemistry 1051.

CHEMISTRY 1810
Elements of Chemistry
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

This is a one-semester course intended to introduce the subject to those who have little or no background in chemistry. The course starts with a study of matter and energy, and moves on to consider ideas of atoms, molecules, formulas and equations for simple reactions. There is an emphasis on the development of the skills needed for the chemical calculations necessary in all higher chemistry courses. Practical experience of some of the reactions of simple substances is introduced, both in the laboratory and in the classroom.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

CHEMISTRY 1900
Chemistry in Everyday Life
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

A course that shows the relevance of chemistry in our daily lives. Following an introduction to atomic structure and chemical bonding, the course will focus on some of the following topics: organic chemistry and fuels; redox processes and batteries; acids, bases, and household cleaners; phases and detergents; the chemical components of foods; polymers and plastics; toiletries, and pharmaceuticals.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Note: Chemistry 1900 may not be used as one of the required courses towards a minor, major, or honours in any science degree program.

CHEMISTRY 1200
General Chemistry I
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

Course content includes those topics covered in Chemistry 1050, with the additional time being spent on relevant topics that are normally studied in Chemistry 1010 or in Chemistry 1810.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Students should have Chemistry 3202, or at least 75 per cent in Chemistry 2202, or have successfully completed Chemistry 1810.

CHEMISTRY 1001
Introductory General Chemistry II
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

This course commences with a brief introduction to some of the basic ideas of organic chemistry. A study of the factors that can affect the rate of
chemical reactions follows, and then students consider the topics of gas-phase equilibrium, solubility, acid-base equilibrium and thermodynamics. Finally, oxidation-reduction reactions, electro-chemical and electrolytic cells are considered in detail.

Lectures/Tutorials: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1200

Notes:

1. For entry to Chemistry 1050 students must have achieved at least 75 per cent in high school Chemistry 3202 and successfully completed Level III advanced math in high school. They must also be registered in Mathematics 1000 (not 1090). Students who are required to drop from Mathematics 1000 to Mathematics 1090 as a result of their Math Placement Test score should not drop Chemistry 1050 before contacting the Chemistry department.

2. Other students, including those with no high school chemistry background, will take Chemistry 1010 (or Chemistry 1810 at Grenfell). It is recommended that students have at least 70 per cent in Level III academic math in high school, or a pass in any non-foundation university level mathematics course.

3. Students who have done well in Chemistry 3202 and who register for Mathematics 1000 are strongly advised to do Chemistry 1050 at Memorial and not Chemistry 1010. Chemistry 1050 and 1051 provide an excellent preparation for all subsequent programs at Memorial and at other Canadian universities.

4. Students completing Chemistry 1010 and 1011 must also complete Chemistry 1031 for some programs at Memorial. Students who plan to transfer to a program at another university are advised that they may not receive transfer credit for Chemistry 1010 and 1011 unless they also complete Chemistry 1031.

5. Students who obtain a score of 5 on the AP Chemistry exam will be given credit for Chemistry 1050 and 1051 (or 1200 and 1001 at Grenfell) and may register for second-year chemistry courses. Students who obtain a score of 3 or 4 on the AP Chemistry exam will be given credit for Chemistry 1010 and 1011 and are advised to register for Chemistry 1031. At Grenfell credit will be given for 1810 and 1200. Students are advised to register for Chemistry 1001.

6. Only six science credit hours will be awarded for a major or honours in chemistry from the following course groups: Chemistry 1010/1011/1031, or Chemistry 1810/ 1200/1001 (Grenfell).


CLASSICS

Classics is the study of the ancient Greek and Roman cultures from which our own modern civilization has developed and by which our society continues to be conditioned. There is hardly any field of human thought or activity in the Western world that is not still influenced by the concepts and practices of the ancient Greeks and Romans, and there are many areas in which ancient achievements have never been equalled or surpassed. The study of classics enables us to see our own culture and traditions within a perspective which extends back almost 4,000 years.

CLASSICS 1120/1121
Introduction to the Latin Language

These courses introduce absolute beginners to Latin, with emphasis on acquiring a reading knowledge. The study of Latin is beneficial to students of the romance languages (French, Italian, Spanish) that are derived from it and to speakers of English, who are better able to understand the structure and syntax of their own language after studying the structure and syntax of Latin. In addition, the study of Latin vocabulary reveals how generously English has borrowed words from Latin in many areas, including scientific terminology.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Classics 1120 is a prerequisite for Classics 1121.

CLASSICS 1130/1131
Introduction to Ancient Greek

These courses introduce absolute beginners to the ancient Greek language, and to prepare them for the reading of works by such authors as Homer, Plato, Sophocles, Aristophanes, and Herodotus; they will also prepare students to read the New Testament in its original language. Classics 1130 begins with simple lessons in basic grammatical concepts and with the learning of the Greek alphabet, then gradually introduces all the essential forms, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Students begin to read Greek from the very outset of the course; these readings become increasingly sophisticated as knowledge of grammar and vocabulary broadens.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Classics 1130 is a prerequisite for Classics 1131.

CLASSICS 1050
Introduction to Greek and Roman Mythology

A survey of the principal myths and legends of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Attention will be paid to the literary and artistic representations of these myths, as well as to modern methods of interpretation.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

CLASSICS 1100
Introduction to Greek Civilization

A general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of ancient Greek civilization. The course introduces the student to Greek social and political institutions, religion and myth, and achievements in art, philosophy, science and literature, as well as the influence of Ancient Greece on the modern world.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

CLASSICS 1200
Introduction to Roman Civilization

A general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of Ancient Rome. The course introduces the student to social, political, and legal institutions, the growth of the Roman Empire, Roman art, literature, and religions, as well as Rome's pervasive influence in the modern world.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

1. Classics 1120/1121 and Classics 1130/1131 may be used as part of the bachelor of arts requirement of two courses in a second language.

2. Classics 1100 and Classics 1200 may qualify as research/writing courses for the Faculty of Arts.

3. Classics 1050, Classics 1100 and Classics 1200 may not be used as part of the bachelor of arts requirement of two courses in a second language.

4. Credit may not be obtained for Classics 1200 and the former 1101.




COMPUTER SCIENCE

Virtually every discipline - practical, theoretical or creative - is experiencing the influence of computers. The ever-increasing dependence on computer technology in our daily lives presents rich opportunities for those interested in the design of new applications and systems. Computer science, the science of computing, provides a solid and rigorous foundation on which such systems and applications can be built.

The basis for virtually all of computer science is abstraction - creating a model for a problem, and finding appropriate algorithms which can be automatically applied to the solution of the model problem. This makes computer science fundamentally different from most other sciences, in that other sciences attempt to explain the world as it is. Computer scientists normally must abstract relevant properties from a problem to construct a model of the problem which can be solved using a computer.

Computer Science Program Offerings and Admission Requirements

The Department of Computer Science, at the St. John’s campus only, offers a wide range of programs, all of which are intended to be challenging, are dedicated to the evolution of computer science, and attempt to strike a balance between the study of hardware, software, theory and practice.

A student, either on entrance to Memorial University or after successful completion of the first year of studies, may declare his/her intent to enter one of our computer science programs. For a majority of our program offerings, a student has the option of entering either the Faculty of Science or the Faculty of Arts, working towards a B.Sc. or BA degree, respectively. The computer science and mathematics course requirements are the same for students in either faculty, with the main differences being in the core requirements for each degree and the student’s choice of electives at the more advanced level. Computer science general or honours degrees are offered in either faculty. A general degree provides the student with exposure to the theoretical and applied concepts of computer science which are standard in any computer science program. Students who continue on to the honours program have the opportunity to broaden and deepen their knowledge in computer science, and are exposed to research activity in the discipline, under the supervision of a faculty member. A minor in computer science is also available in either faculty.

Two specialized programs are also available to computer science majors. These programs are a B.Sc. (hon.) in computer science, software engineering option, and the computer industry internship option available for the major or honours (B.Sc. only).

Further information on programs offered by the department can be found at web.cs.mun.ca/.

COMPUTER SCIENCE 1600
Basic Computing and Information Technology

This course offers an overview of computers and information technology. It provides students with the knowledge necessary to answer questions, such as: What is a computer system? How does it work? How is it used? This is done through the use of popular spreadsheet, word processing and database software packages and the Internet. Social issues and implications will also be included.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Level III advanced mathematics or Mathematics 1090, which can be taken concurrently.

Notes:

1. Students can receive credit for only one of Computer Science 1600, Computer Science 2650 or Computer Science 2801.

2. Computer Science 1600 can be used as a science elective, and is open to any student at the university.

3. Computer Science 1600 cannot be used as part of the 12 credit hours in non-business electives required for admission, promotion or continuance in the B.Comm. (Co-op), BBA or iBBA programs.

COMPUTER SCIENCE 1700
Introduction to Computer Science

This course lays the foundation for the art and the science of computing. The course contains fundamental and topical issues in computers, languages, programming and applications. This course is designed for potential computer science majors without a background in programming, but is also available for non-majors, and can be used as a science elective.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite/Corequisite: Mathematics 1090 (or equivalent), or Mathematics 1000, either of which may be taken concurrently.

COMPUTER SCIENCE 1710
Object-Oriented Programming I

An introduction to fundamental programming techniques, primitive data types and operations, program control structures and the use of objects, classes and methods.

This is now the first required course for all computer science majors.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1090 (or equivalent), or Mathematics 1000. Mathematics 1000 can be taken concurrently.

COMPUTER SCIENCE 2650
Introduction to Computing and Information Technology

This course provides a broad overview of hardware and software components of computer systems, their structure, and principles of operation. The topics include algorithmic problem solving, visual programming, operating system services, computer networks, elements of artificial intelligence and societal issues. Internet and microcomputer software tools in the Windows environment are introduced.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Level III advanced mathematics or Mathematics 1090, or Mathematics 1000. Mathematics 1000 can be taken concurrently.

Note: Students can receive credit for only one of Computer Science 1600, Computer Science 2650 or Computer Science 2801.

COMPUTER SCIENCE 2710
Object-Oriented Programming II

Continuing from Object-Oriented Programming I, this course studies object-oriented and event-driven programming. Additional topics include: recursion, basic analysis of algorithms, fundamental data structures such as simple linked structures and stacks, and fundamental computing algorithms such as binary search and quadratic time sorting. A brief overview of programming languages, virtual machines and language translations is also provided.

Lectures: Three hours per week.
Laboratory: Three hours per week.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 1710

COMPUTER SCIENCE 2742
Logic for Computer Science

This course is an introduction to propositional and predicate logic with applications. The use of the system of boolean logic in reasoning and circuit design, as well as basic proof techniques and the resolution principle, for both prepositional and predicate logic, will be covered. Concepts involving sets will be used to illustrate different types of proof techniques. The probable intractability of boolean logic and Goedel’s incompleteness theorem will be presented.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Computer Science 1710


EARTH SCIENCES

Earth Sciences is the study of the Earth and its neighbours in space - it deals with the origin, composition and history of our planet as well as the physical, chemical and biological processes that have changed and shaped it over the past 4.5 billion years. Throughout history humankind has viewed the planet we live on from many perspectives. Ancient cultures were fascinated by our world and the role it played in their lives, but were limited by their terrestrial vantage point. Today, we routinely view images of the planet from space. Studies of the Earth's continents, oceans and atmosphere reveal a complex and yet fragile world. This view has propelled us into an extraordinary age of geoscientific research. Earth scientists commonly explore the formation of mountains, drift of the continents, sources of mineral and fossil fuel deposits and environmental hazards of an expanding human population. New discoveries and theories in our understanding of planetary structure and function affect not only how we live but also how we relate to one another.

The goal of the introductory program at Memorial is to share the excitement of discovery by providing an overview of Planet Earth, its structure, its history and the role of earth sciences in resource and environment studies. Earth Sciences 1000/1002 provide a basic knowledge of the subject for the beginner and a foundation for those students intending to major in earth sciences. In addition, joint honours programs are offered in earth sciences/biology, earth sciences/chemistry, earth sciences/ geography, earth sciences/physics and geophysics/physical oceanography.

EARTH SCIENCES 1000
Earth Systems

A survey of the structure, function and interrelations of Earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Topics include an exploration of the physical and chemical
properties of planetary materials, forces driving
and sustaining Earth systems and biological modifiers (including humankind) on Earth today.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

EARTH SCIENCES 1002
Concepts and Methods in Earth Sciences

Introduction to a broad range of concepts concerning the development of the geological record and the Earth; practical methods for collection of field-based data; topics in map interpretation and geometric analysis, statigraphy, paleontology, structure and petrology. The course is presented with an emphasis on the development of practical skills needed to pursue a career in earth sciences.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 1000

Note: This course is required for earth sciences majors, minors and all joint programs.




ECONOMICS

Economics is the study of how limited resources can be allocated to the production of goods and services, and how these goods and services can be distributed to satisfy the unlimited desires of individuals. The introductory courses in economics are designed to familiarize students with the basic definitions and fundamental relationships which form the basis of economic analysis. For the student with a casual interest in economics, the introductory courses provide a simple yet insightful framework for understanding many of the economic phenomena we hear and read about each day. For the serious student of economics these courses provide the conceptual foundation of the more complex economic models developed in subsequent work.

Economics gives us the analytical tools to understand questions such as how prices are determined, why some people are unemployed, why interest rates rise and fall, and why products are traded between nations. Economic analysis can be focussed on an enormous variety of questions: the fishery, petroleum production, forestry, unemployment, taxation, and economic growth are examples of particular relevance to our province. Graduates in economics can frequently find employment in governments, financial institutions and large corporations. In these capacities, economists are able to apply their unique analytical skills to understand the critical determinants of our material well-being.

Economics is usually divided into two general categories: microeconomics and macroeconomics. The former examines the markets for specific goods to determine how much will be produced and at what price they will be sold. The latter deals with total production in the economy, the overall price level, and the role of money. This division forms the basis of the two introductory courses.

ECONOMICS 2010
Introduction to Microeconomics

After defining such basic ideas as scarcity and opportunity cost, this course focuses on one of the fundamental components of economic analysis: the market. By examining consumer (household) preferences and behaviour, the demand for a particular commodity can be discovered. By examining production functions, the amount of a good that producers (firms) are willing to supply can be determined. The interaction of supply and demand establishes the price and quantity for the product to be traded in the market. Market equilibrium and adjustments are examined under a variety of structures including perfect competition (many sellers and buyers) and monopoly (only one seller).

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Preferably the same prerequisite as Mathematics 1090

ECONOMICS 2020
Introduction to Macroeconomics

This course begins with the definitions and measurements of aggregate economic activity required for national income accounting, which is the calculation of such measures as gross national product (GNP). Most of the course focuses on the major components of aggregate expenditure in an economy: household consumption, investment, government spending, and international trade. These are used in the construction of a simple model to determine national income and the price level. This model is used to investigate topics such as inflation, unemployment, the role of money, government fiscal and monetary policy, and the balance of payments.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Preferably the same prerequisite as Mathematics 1090

Notes:

1. Economics 2010 and 2020 need not be taken in any specific order and may be taken concurrently.

2. Economics 2010 and 2020 are prerequisites to all further courses in economics.




ENGLISH

The first-year English program offers students the opportunity to enrich their experience of literature through the close study of selected texts from the genres of poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction.

The program also emphasizes essay-writing. Students are made familiar with the principles of analytical essays and with strategies for writing them. Written assignments are set frequently, and students are expected to pay close attention to their teachers' suggestions for improving content, organization and expression.

ENGLISH 1000
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An introduction to English literature and to the use of the English language with a particular emphasis upon composition. The course guides students in an exploration of texts representing the genres of the essay, short fiction and the novel. Substantial emphasis is placed on developing the students' abilities to write analytical essays.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

ENGLISH 1080
Critical Reading and Writing I

An introduction to such literary forms as poetry, short fiction, drama, and the essay. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

English 1080 is a required course for most students at the St. John’s campus except for those whose first language is not English, for whom it is an option. (See Note 1 at the end of this section.)

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Students who pass English 1080 or 1000 will proceed to one of the following courses:

ENGLISH 1001
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

A continuation of the studies begun in English 1000. The course guides students in an exploration of texts representing the genres of poetry and dramatic literature. Substantial emphasis is placed on developing the students' abilities to write analytical essays.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1080

ENGLISH 1101
Critical Reading and Writing II (Fiction)

A study of such forms as the novel, the novella, the story sequence. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1080

ENGLISH 1102
Critical Reading and Writing II (Drama)

A study of drama with emphasis on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1080

Note: English 1102 may not be used instead of English 2002 as a prerequisite for entry into the theatre-drama specialization within the major.

ENGLISH 1103
Critical Reading and Writing II (Poetry)

A study of poetry with emphasis on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1030 or 1080

ENGLISH 1110
Critical Reading and Writing II
(Context, Substance, Style)

An examination of prose texts such as essays, articles and reviews. Students write for different purposes and audiences. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analysing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1080

Notes:

1. Students cannot receive credit for both 1110 and 2010.

2. Students cannot receive credit for both English 1020 and 1110, nor for both 1030 and 1110.

Courses for students whose first language is not English:

Non-native speakers entering Memorial will be tested by the Department of English and placed in one of the following courses: English 1080, English 1000 (see description above), English 1020, English 102F.

ENGLISH 1020
Writing for Second Language Students I

This is a credit course in academic writing for students whose first language is not English and who are still in the process of acquiring the written and oral codes of English. Students write and revise a minimum of eight assignments.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 102F or departmental English placement test

Students who successfully complete English 1020 may enter English 1021, 1080, 1101, 1102 or 1103. They may not enter English 1110.

ENGLISH 1021
Writing for Second Language Students II

This course develops skills in critical reading and writing of academic English, with emphasis on research and writing syntheses from sources, for non-native-English-speaking students.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1020

ENGLISH 102F
Foundation English for Non-Native Speakers

English 102F is a non-credit, one-semester course for students whose first language is not English and who, while otherwise meeting university entrance requirements, would have difficulty coping with spoken and/or written English. The course diagnoses and addresses the specific problems of individual students. Frequent written assignments are set to help students develop the competence necessary for regular university work.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: None

ENGLISH 1030
Writing

This course is intended for students registered in the bachelor of education (Native and Northern) degree program. An introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for students who, in addition to English, speak and plan to teach Inuit and/or Innu languages.

This course may not be offered every year.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Departmental English placement test

Notes:

1. English 1080 is a prerequisite for English 1101, 1102, 1103 or 1110. For non-native speakers, English 1020 is a prerequisite for 1021, 1080, 1101, 1102 or 1103.

2. One of the following combinations is a prerequisite for all other English courses: 1080 (or 1020 or 1030)/1101; 1080 (or 1020 or 1030)/1102; 1080 (or 1020 or 1030)/ 1103; 1080/ 1110; 1020/1080, 1080 (or 1020 or 1030)/1021.

3. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of English 1101, 1102, 1103 and 1110 or for both English 1020 or 1030 and 1110 or for 1110 and 2010.

4. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of English 1000/1080 or for more than one of 1001/1101/1102/ 1103/1110. Nor may students receive credit for more than two first-year English courses. (This includes unspecified first-year transfer credits.)



ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 1000
An Introduction to Environmental Science (Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An introduction to the study of the environment. Environmental principles, issues and problems will be described and placed in a historical and societal context.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None




ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 1000
An Introduction to Environmental Studies (Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An introduction to a variety of major issues in environmental studies through an examination of a range of case studies including both local
problems, such as the impact of outdoor recreation activities on the environment, and global threats, such as stratospheric ozone depletion.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None


FOLKLORE

The field of folklore is concerned with the study of traditional artistic communication. A degree in folklore may lead to a career in areas such as heritage resources, research or journalism. Folklore is also a useful minor for majors in many disciplines, including English, anthropology, sociology, history and Canadian studies. Folklore majors can participate in the Canadian studies major program or in the Newfoundland studies minor program. Another useful option is the choice of folklore as a focus area for bachelor of education (primary/elementary) degree candidates.

Topics and genres of folklore include traditional forms of narrative, customs and beliefs, music and song, childlore, drama, religion, medicine, foodways, arts and crafts, occupational lore and architecture. Introductory courses are designed to acquaint the student with the content, performance and functions of tradition in its cultural context. Teaching methods include lectures, sound recordings, visual presentations, fieldwork and collection projects.

FOLKLORE 1000
Introduction to Folklore

The role of tradition in communication, art and society will be discussed through an examination of folklore materials from Newfoundland and the English-speaking world. Readings and "listenings" will emphasize the use of folklore in context, e.g., the proverb in speech and the folksong in child-rearing. Students will be urged to analyze the traditions in their own lives through special assignments.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

FOLKLORE 1050
Folklore Studies

An examination of specific folklore studies illustrating important themes and approaches in folkloristics. These will include antiquarian, nationalistic, diffusionist, historic-contextual, functional, structural and performance analyses as typified in selected readings from the works of leading folklorists.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None (but see note below)

FOLKLORE 1060
Folklore and Culture

An introduction to traditional expressive behaviour as cultural experience. Readings and lectures will explore the various meanings of “culture” from interdisciplinary perspectives and link the development of theoretical approaches to culture (evolutionary, materialist, particularist, psychological, semiotic, dramaturgic) to specific folklore phenomena. Illustrations will derive primarily from children’s folklore, material culture, and occupational folklife.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None (but see note below)

Note: Folklore 1000 (or the equivalent course, 2000) must be completed before advancing to folklore courses other than 1050 and 1060.





FORESTRY

To study forestry is to delve into the complex world of trees and forested ecosystems. While trees can be fascinating and inspiring organisms in their own right, forests offer a whole new level of complexity and interaction that can be explored and investigated by people who have the curiosity and the desire to do so. Since forests are more than just collections of trees growing in isolation, foresters need to be aware of the interactions and exchanges that occur between and among individual trees and plants, animals, soil and air, which are all part of the make-up and essential ingredients of functioning ecosystems.

Using a problem-based learning methodology, the forestry program is intended to be a demanding and challenging course of study which will equip students to think critically about issues of forest resource management and how society’s desires and needs relative to the issues can best be addressed by informed decision-making processes and clear communication.

For further information, please contact the Division of Science at (709) 637-6204.

FORESTRY 1010/1011
Introduction to Forestry
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

To introduce the many aspects of the professional practice of forestry including the multi- dimensionality of forest values and forest management as a design challenge. A problem-based approach to learning is used to create learning objectives for the remainder of the program; to begin development of quantitative and qualitative skills; to instill the habit of inquiry and
to begin development of understanding of social/ethical issues in forestry.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Forestry 1010 is a prerequisite to Forestry 1011.

Note: Forestry 1010/1011 are desirable electives for students interested in the environment and resource use, in particular those completing programs in environmental studies and environmental science. As well, both courses fulfill Grenfell’s quantitative reasoning and analysis (QRA) requirement.

FORESTRY 1900
Developing Proficiency in Communications
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

The main objective of this course is the improvement of the communication competency of beginning forestry students. The course will focus on both written and oral communication, with emphasis on the former. Forestry 1900 will be linked with the content of Forestry 1010 and 1011.

Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: None


FRENCH

A program of three first-year French courses is offered. The courses are designed to progress quickly from basic French to readiness for more advanced work at the second-year level. All three courses provide a balance of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, and all three stress accuracy in written French.

Selection of a French course depends on a student’s background and ability in French. Most new students may choose either French 1500 or 1501. Those with a limited background in French, and those wishing to review the basics, should begin with French 1500. Students with a stronger background, especially those wishing to progress more quickly to second year French, should begin with 1501. Students who are unsure of where to begin their study of French at the university level should consult the head of the French Department at (709) 737-7636 or french@mun.ca.

Students may not register concurrently for more than one of French 1500, 1501 and 1502 except with the permission of the head of the department.

French 1502 is reserved for students who have successfully completed French 1501 with a final grade of at least 60 per cent or who have a very strong background in French. Those who have not completed French 1501 will be required to obtain the permission of the head of the department to register for French 1502.

The Department of French and Spanish permits students to challenge for credit a maximum of two of the following courses: French 1500, 1501, 1502. Students who challenge these courses for credit will be evaluated in all four language skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening).

Note: Students whose native language is French may not challenge 1500, 1501 or 1502 for credit.

Students who have completed French immersion in high school with high marks and students with an outstanding academic record in extended or accelerated French should register for French 2100.

Note: Students who attain a grade of less than 4 on the Advanced Placement examination in French language, and students who need to review material studied at the secondary level, should obtain permission from the head of the department to register for French 1502.

FRENCH 1500
Introductory University French 1

A course for beginners and for students whose background in French is very weak. French 1500 uses only the present tense and a 500-word vocabulary, and covers the most common situations of daily life. Permission to register for this course will not be given to students who have completed Français 3202 or 3212 (high school French immersion).

Notes:

1. For students completing French 1500 at the St. John’s campus, grading of students’ performance in this course will NOT INCLUDE THE AWARD OF A SPECIFIC NUMERIC OR LETTER GRADE. Instead, students will be awarded either a PASS or a FAIL in the course. For this reason, performance in this course will not affect the calculation of the students’ average.

2. This course is not appropriate for students who received a final grade of 80% or higher in High School French 3200. Such students should complete French 1501 as their first university-level French course.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Language Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: None

FRENCH 1501
Introductory University French II

French 1501 teaches the use of past tenses and more advanced structures. Students begin to read short texts which are faithful to the original, to write longer compositions and to explore more complex situations.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Language Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: High School French 3200 or permission of the head of the department. This course is not normally appropriate for graduates of French immersion programs.

FRENCH 1502
Introductory University French III

French 1502 introduces ways of dealing with future and hypothetical (“What if...?”) situations and cases where emotion and personal feelings colour the issue. The work of composition and intensive vocabulary building continues, and students are expected to engage in more advanced oral practice. This course prepares students to participate in the Frecker Program, which is offered each fall semester in Saint-Pierre.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Language Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: French 1501 with a final grade of at least 60 per cent or permission of the head of the department

Note: Students may use only TWO of these three courses towards the minimum requirements for a major or minor in French. They are encouraged to consult their adviser or instructor about possibilities for further study in French-speaking areas.

FRENCH 2100
Intermediate French I

French 2100 is the appropriate first university-level French language course for students who have achieved very good grades in French immersion, as well as being the next French language course taken by students who have completed French 1502, with a final grade of at least 60 per cent.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Language Laboratory: One hour per week
Prerequisite: High school French immersion, an exceptional background in French or completion of French 1502 with a final grade of at least 60 per cent.

Note: Students who obtain a grade of less than 4 on the Advanced Placement examination in French language, and students who need to review material studied at the secondary level, should obtain permission from the head of the department to register for French 1502 rather than French 2100.




GEOGRAPHY

Geography: putting place-names on a map? Yes, but geography today is much more than this. It is quite simple to record where a city or volcano is located; it is much more interesting to analyse and understand why the town or volcano is located where it is and not somewhere else.

Geographers interpret the landscape, both the physical, or natural, landscape and the human activity which takes place within it. Geography unites the physical and social sciences by focussing on the interaction of peoples with their environment. Geographers study this interaction from the viewpoint of spatial relationships and processes: What kinds of environments are there? Where do people live? Why do they live there? Do they modify the environment?

GEOGRAPHY 1050
Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Geography

The course focuses on five areas of geography which continue through courses in other years of the geography program: physical, cultural, economic, resources, and geographic information sciences. The lectures are linked to assignments,

which provide both experience in the application of geographical skills and develop insight into the presence of geography at both the local and the global scales.

Note: Credit may not be obtained for both 1050 and any of 1000, 1001, 1010, or 1011.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

GEOGRAPHY 1000
Introduction to Geography I
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

An introduction to geography incorporating concepts, skills and techniques used by the geographer to understand the Earth as the home of humans. The major emphasis of the course is placed on human-environmental ecological systems. The course will include seminars and practical work.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

GEOGRAPHY 1001
Introduction to Geography II
(Available only at Grenfell Campus)

A continuation of introduction to basic concepts and techniques in the field of geography. This course emphasizes geography as a social science and introduces the sub-fields of political, economic, cultural and urban geography. The course will include seminars and practical work.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1000

Note: Credit may be obtained for only one of Geography 1010, Geography 1000 and Geography 1050; and for only one of Geography 1001, Geography 1011 and Geography 1050.


GEOGRAPHY 2001
Cultural Geography

An examination of the basic themes of cultural geography.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050, or 1011, or 1001

GEOGRAPHY 2102
Physical Geography: The Global Perspective

A study of form, process, and change in natural systems at and near the surface of Earth, viewed as human environment. Emphasis is on global and regional scales in the systematic study of climate, water, landforms and vegetation.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050, or 1011, or 1001

Note: Credit may not be obtained for 2102 and the former 2100 or 2101.

GEOGRAPHY 2195
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences

An introduction to the fields of cartography, remote sensing, and geographic information systems (GIS). Emphasis on the understanding and appreciation of maps and map-like images.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050, or 1011, or 1001

GEOGRAPHY 2302
Issues in Economic Geography

Basic issues and ideas in economic geography. The development of a regional economy will be related to underlying economic, cultural and physical factors.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050, or 1011, or 1001

GEOGRAPHY 2425
Natural Resources

An introduction to the concepts of natural resources, environment and conservation: the nature and distribution of natural resources; methods of use, allocation and development of natural resources and the role of various physical, social, economic, political and technological factors influencing decision-making about resources.

Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050, or 1011, or 1001

Note: Credit may not be obtained for both Geography 2425 and 3325.




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