Sociology

 

What is sociology?

Sociology is the study of social life, social change and the causes and consequences of human behaviour.

Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations and societies, and how people interact within these contexts. Few fields have such broad scope and relevance for research, theory and the application of knowledge.

 

Why study sociology?

An undergraduate degree in sociology provides a strong liberal arts foundation for entry level positions in business, social service and government as well as an excellent foundation for advanced study in professions such as law, politics, teaching and business.

There are no prerequisites for declaring a sociology major or minor. First-year students may enrol in the core introductory course, Sociology 1000. Students may also enrol in 2000-level sociology courses that have no prerequisites.

Courses available in first year

Sociology 1000
Introduction to Sociology
is an introduction to the concepts, principles and topics of sociology. This course is a prerequisite to most departmental courses.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2100
Social Inequalities
introduces the subject of social inequality and stratification, examines social inequalities in historical perspective, reviews major theories about social inequalities, and considers key social developments in contemporary societies in the area of social inequalities.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2120
Technology and Society
is an examination of the role of technology in society and society's role in shaping technology. Topics may include the emergence of modern technological society, the impact of new technologies on social organization and culture, and the institutionalization of science and the production of scientific knowledge. The course also explores the ideological functions of science and technology.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2210
Communication and Culture is an examination of verbal and non-verbal systems of communication, and the influence of language on human cognition.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2230
Newfoundland Society and Culture focuses on social and cultural aspects of contemporary island Newfoundland.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2240
Canadian Society and Culture is a descriptive and analytic approach to the development of Canadian society and culture.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2250
Changing World is a sociological analysis of contemporary world issues and social problems.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
All sections of this course follow the International Studies guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/IS.

Sociology 2270
Families is a comparative and historical study of the family, and the range of variation in its processes and structure.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2290
Animals and Society introduces students to contemporary sociological approaches to the study of the relationship between human and non-human animals
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2300
Criminological Inquiry introduces students to sociological models for understanding the phenomenon of “crime.” As a background for developing theory, this course will familiarize students with the problems inherent in defining what it is we mean by “crime.” Once the underlying premises of the theories are tackled, students critically examine each theoretical perspective with a focus on assessing the validity of the approach, and how the theory works to guide public policy.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sample program for first year

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts with a major in sociology will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
English 1090critical reading & writing course
Sociology 1000Sociology 2000-level
quantitative reasoning (QR) coursequantitative reasoning (QR) course
language study (LS) courselanguage study (LS) course
minor program courseminor program course

 

 


For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
Department of Sociology
sociology@mun.ca
www.mun.ca/soc

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca