Russian

 

Why study Russian?

Because of the recent reforms in Russia, the importance of Russian in the modern world is obvious. It is the official language of the largest country in the world and one of the five official languages of the United Nations. It is spoken widely as a second language in Eastern Europe.

The difficulties of the language itself are exaggerated; contrary to the expectations of many, the alphabet is quite easy and can be mastered in a few weeks. The study of Russian provides a fascinating insight into a country that has long been enigmatic but is now the focus of world
interest. Russian is a useful tool for students of the arts, history and
political science and, because of the prominence of Russian technology and research, it is also of benefit to students of business and all natural sciences. The knowledge of two or three languages is vital in today’s global environment. Training in Russian helps prepare students for careers in international business, the foreign service, the publishing industry, translation and international law.

Courses available in first year

Russian 1000
Elementary Russian I provides an introduction to
Russian grammar and a basic knowledge of the spoken and
written language.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/arts/ls.

Russian 1001
Elementary Russian II is a continuation of Elementary
Russian I.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Russian 1000 or equivalent
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/arts/ls.


Russian 2900
Russian Culture I is a study of the evolution of Russian
culture and Russian intellectual history up to 1917.
Lectures include discussions of Russian art, music and
film. Lectures are given in English.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Russian 2901
Russian Culture II is a study of the evolution of Russian
culture in the USSR and the post-Soviet period. Lectures
include discussions of Soviet Russian art, music and film.
Lectures are given in English.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

  1. Russian 1000 and 1001 are prerequisites for all other Russian courses, except Russian 2030, 2031, 2600, 2601, 2900, 2901, 3005, 3023 and 3910.
  2. A number of courses may be of interest to incoming students. They require no prerequisites, the language of instruction is English throughout and they cover Russian culture and literature, for example, Russian 2600, 2601, 2900, 2901 and 3004. These five courses may not be used as part of the bachelor of arts requirement for two courses in a second language.

Sample program for first year

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Russian will normally take the following courses in their first year:

 

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
English 1090critical reading & writing course (CRW) chosen from major subject area
minor program courseminor program course
quantitative reasoning (QR) course quantitative reasoning (QR) course 
Russian 1000Russian 1001
elective course (breadth encouraged)elective course (breadth encouraged)

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact
Dr. Stuart Durrant
Coordinator of Russian
jsdurrant@mun.ca
languages@mun.ca

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca