Philosophy

 

What is philosophy?

Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, truth, beauty, law, justice, validity, mind, and language, using a critical, generally systematic approach relying on reasoned argument.

Philosophy is one of the most influential of all areas of study, providing the frameworks in which we think and act. Allowing us to make sense of ourselves and our surroundings, Philosophy teaches not what to think but how to think. Philosophy is the discipline that questions the things that everywhere else and in every other discipline are taken for granted.

 

Why study philosophy?

Studying Philosophy gives one a chance to understand reality, clarify the nature of interactions between individuals and society, and come to terms with the problems of existence and ultimate values. Philosophy develops your intellectual abilities. Beyond the knowledge and skills required for any particular profession, a good philosophical education enhances the capacity to participate responsibly and intelligently in public life.

Courses available in first year

Philosophy 1000
Philosophy of Human Nature is an approach to philosophical thinking by way of analysis and critique of theories of human nature, classical and modern and the world views associated with them.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1001
Critical Reading and Writing in Human Nature provides an overview of foundational knowledge and skills to enable critical reading and writing at the university level by way of analysis and critique of selected conceptions and theories of human nature raised throughout the history of philosophy. Significant instructional time will be devoted to teaching writing skills that develop clarity, form, content, tone, and style appropriate for university writing.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1100
Critical Thinking aims to impart critical analytic skills: i.e., the ability to recognize good and bad arguments, to explain why a particular argument is good or bad and a general understanding of why a good argument ought to persuade and a bad argument ought not to persuade.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1200
Introduction to Philosophy is a general introduction to the study of philosophy both as a contemporary intellectual discipline and as a body of knowledge. The course covers the main divisions, fundamental questions and essential terminology of philosophy through a reading of classical texts. (It is a required course for further courses in philosophy programs.)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1230
Critical Reading and Writing in Ethics provides an overview of university-level critical reading, writing, and argumentative skills. Students learn the ability to put in their own words the thoughts and writings of important ethical thinkers, how to use and assess secondary sources, and how to bring new writing skills together in terms of critical analyses of different ethical ideas.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None. Students are encouraged to complete Political Science 1000

Philosophy 1600
Philosophy of Human Nature (available only at Grenfell Campus) is an approach to philosophical thinking by way of analysis and critique of theories of human nature, classical and modern and the world views associated with them.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sample program for first year

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts with a major in philosophy will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
English 1090critical reading & writing course (CRW) chosen from major subject area
language study course (LS)language study course (LS)
quantitative reasoning course (QR)quantitative reasoning course (QR)
Philosophy 1200Philosophy 2000, 2210 or 2220
elective course (breadth encouraged)elective course (breadth encouraged)

 

 


For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
Department of Philosophy
philosophy@mun.ca
www.mun.ca/philosophy

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca