German

 

What is German?

German is the first language of over 100 million people in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and other countries. In recent years and especially since the reunification of East and West Germany, German is used increasingly as a second and third language, because of its significance as a language of business, science and technology. Next to English, it is the most frequently studied language in the world.

 

Why study German?

The influence of German thought on Western civilization and culture, particularly in subjects such as philosophy, psychology, theology, history and music, has been considerable. Students in many fields of learning, therefore, find a knowledge of German not only useful but essential. The knowledge of two or three languages is vital in today’s global environment. Training in German helps prepare students for careers in international business, the foreign service, the publishing industry, translation and international law.

Courses available in first year

German 1000
Elementary German I is a course intended to give beginners a basic knowledge of the spoken and written language and culture of the German-speaking countries.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines available at www.mun.ca/arts/ls.

German 1001
Elementary German II is a continuation of Elementary German I with the same basic text.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: German 1000
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines available at www.mun.ca/arts/ls.

German 1010
Critical Reading and Writing: Hansel, Gretel, and the Big Bad Wolf introduces students to the German story-telling tradition from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will learn how to identify, critically read, analyse and evaluate arguments using rational judgement and appropriate rhetorical techniques and how to construct logically sound academic essays, incorporating the words and ideas of others. The communicative advantages of identifying an audience, the use of effective tone, word choice, and sentence patterns will also be covered.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: German 1000 is encouraged but not required
Note: All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

German 2900
Introduction to German Culture I is a study of the major cultural trends and movements of German-speaking Europe to the beginnings of the modern age. Lectures are given in English.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

German 2901
Introduction to German Culture II is a study of the major cultural trends and movements of German-speaking Europe in the modern age. Lectures are given in English.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

  1. Notes: A number of courses may be of interest to incoming students. They require no prerequisites, the language of instruction is English throughout and they cover German culture and literature: German 2900, 2901, 3000 and 3001. These courses do not meet the Language Study guideline for the Bachelor of Arts.
  2. Completion of German 1000 and 1001 qualifies students for the MUN&You@Heidelberg summer program in Heidelberg, Germany.

Sample program for first year

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts with a major in German will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
English 1090Critical Reading & Writing course
German 1000German 1001
Quantitative Reasoning courseQuantitative Reasoning course
Breadth of Knowledge courseBreadth of Knowledge course
Minor program courseMinor program course

 

 


For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
Dr. John Buffinga
johnb@mun.ca
languages@mun.ca

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca