Classics


What is classics?

Classics is the study of the ancient Greek and Roman cultures from which many civilizations have developed and which continues to influence and shape our modern world. In particular, it emphasizes a multi-disciplinary and holistic approach by examining the ancient Greek and Roman worlds through a diverse array of methods of inquiry such as history, language, literature, archaeology, art, science, and philosophy.

 

Why study classics?

There is hardly any field of human thought or activity in the western world that is not still influenced by the concepts and practices of the ancient Greeks and Romans, and there are many areas in which ancient achievements have never been equalled or surpassed. The study of classics enables us to see our own culture and traditions within a perspective that extends back almost 4,000 years. Moreover, the multi-disciplinary methodology of classics trains its students to gather, comprehend and synthesize information from a broad spectrum of sources in order to obtain a more well-rounded and complete understanding, both of the classical world and, by extension, our own.

Courses available in first year

Classics 1051
Gods in Classical Mythology is an introduction to some of the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome, with particular attention to the gods. The myths will be studied with reference to their social and historical contexts, literary and artistic representations and modern theories of interpretation.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1052
Heroes in Classical Mythology is an introduction to some of the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome, with particular attention to the heroes. The myths will be studied with reference to their social and historical contexts, literary and artistic representations and modern theories of interpretation.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1100
Life in Ancient Greece is a general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of ancient Greek civilization. The course introduces the student to Greek social and political institutions, religion and myth, and achievements in art, philosophy, science and literature, as well as the influence of ancient Greece on the modern world.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1120
Introductory Latin I  familiarizes students with the basics of the Latin language. Students will learn how to read simple narratives and short poems in Latin and examine the connections between language and culture. Evaluation will focus largely on comprehension of written Latin.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow the LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

Classics 1121
Introductory Latin II continues to familiarize students with the Latin langauge and Roman culture and society. Students will acquire a broad vocabulary, learn to read more complex passages of prose and poerty in Latin, and gain insights into key social concepts through study of language.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Classics 1120 or its equivalent
Note: All sections of this course follow the LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

Classics 1130
Introductory to Ancient Greek I familiarizes students with the basics of the Ancient Greek language. Students will master the Ancient Greek alphabet, learn how to read simple narratives in Ancient Greek, and exmaine the connections between language and culture. Evaluation will focus largely on comprehension of written Ancient Greek.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow the LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

Classics 1131
Elementary Ancient Greek II continues to familiarize students with the Ancient Greek language. Students will acquire a broad vocabulary, learn to read more complex passages of prose and poetry, and gains insights into key social concepts through study of language.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Classics 1130 or its equivalent
Note: All sections of this course follow the LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/ls.

Classics 1200
Life in Ancient Rome is a general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of ancient Rome. The course introduces the student to social, political and legal institutions, the growth of the Roman Empire, Roman art, literature and religions, as well as Rome's pervasive influence in the modern world.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sample program for first year

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts with a major in classics will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
English 1090critical reading & writing (CRW) course
Classics 1120 or 1130Classics 1121 or 1131
another first-year classics courseanother first-year classics course
quantititive reasonsing (QR) coursequantititive reasoning (QR) course
minor program courseminor program course

 

 


For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 
For assistance with course selection, students should contact: Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
Dr. Brad Levett
blevett@mun.ca

 

 

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca