Chemistry

 

Traditionally, chemistry is described as a basic physical science whose theories, principles and laws are based on many experimentally observed facts. Chemistry is concerned with the composition, structure and properties of substances, the reactions of substances with each other and the energy changes that occur in these reactions. The modern-day subject of chemistry is a dynamically-changing science that is about cutting-edge discoveries and the use of state-of-the-art techniques and technologies that impact almost every aspect of human life and almost every aspect of the development of human society. It is easy to understand why the field of chemistry is often described as the central science.

A basic knowledge and understanding of chemistry is imperative not only in physics and biology but also in important fields such as Earth sciences, oceanography, astronomy, environmental science and other important scientific fields. Many of these majors even require some second year courses in chemistry. The chemistry program at Memorial offers an excellent undergraduate program that helps to prepare students for a successful career in any scientific field.


Why study chemistry?

Many of our chemistry honours and majors students go on to complete professional degrees (medicine, veterinary, pharmacy, optometry, law, education, etc.), complete graduate degrees (M.Sc. or Ph.D), or pursue careers that require the technical and problem solving skills acquired during their program of study. Job opportunities for students studying chemistry include but are not limited to:

  • art conservationist
  • brew master
  • chemical engineer
  • chemical laboratory technician
  • chemistry teacher
  • clinical chemist
  • environmental chemist
  • forensic chemist
  • geochemist
  • government chemist
  • industrial research chemist
  • patent lawyer
  • petroleum chemist
  • pharmaceutical chemist

Chemistry at Memorial

The Department of Chemistry offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in pursuing a career in chemistry. The strength of our majors and honours programs lies in ready access to professors, internationally recognized for their research programs; access to state-of-the-art spectroscopic and analytical instrumentation and technologies as well as high performance computing facilities such as ACEnet (The Atlantic Computational Excellence Network).

The Department of Chemistry at Memorial is recognized for excellence in both teaching and research. Students will benefit from an environment that is friendly and well-equipped to support the development of their interests in all aspects of science for their future endeavours.


Materials for Chemistry Courses

For labs, students will require a lab coat and lab glasses that are available at the MUN bookstore. The textbook used for the first year courses is “Chemistry: A Molecular Approach” 1st CE with Mastering Chemistry by Tro, Fridgen, and Shaw. Students planning to purchase a used textbook are advised to first speak with their instructor. Purchasing a used book may actually be more expensive than purchasing a textbook package from the bookstore because the package includes other materials such as Mastering Chemistry (online assignments) which is required for 1st year courses.

In some first-year classes, personal response systems (or clickers) are used for in-class participation. The instructor will advise students if a clicker is required. A cell phone, tablet, or laptop will serve as a clicker so students should ensure that they are connected to MUN’s wireless. Instructions for setting up a wireless device and connecting to MUN’s wireless network are available at: www.mun.ca/cc/services/network/wireless/3stepwirelessconnection.php

For more information, please go to:
www.chem.mun.ca/ugrad.php?content=advising


 

Sample program for first year

For students completing a major in chemistry

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science  with a major in chemistry will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Mathematics 1000 (1090)*Mathematics 1001 (1000)*
Chemistry 1050**Chemistry 1051
Physics 1050 (1020)***Physics 1051 (1021)***
English 1090English 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110
electiveComputer Science 1510****

 


* Students completing Mathematics 1090/1000 will be required to complete Mathematics 1001 as well. Mathematics 1001 can be taken during the Spring semester in order to enable chemistry majors to take Chemistry 2301 in the Fall semester of their second year.

** Chemistry 1010 is a preparatory course for students who could not take Chemistry 3202 in high school or who achieved less than 65 per cent in Chemistry 3202. Students who take Chemistry 1010 in the Fall semester should take Chemistry 1050 in the Winter semester and Chemistry 1051 in the Spring semester. Students who wait until the Fall semester of their second year to take Chemistry 1051 can still complete a chemistry major in four years but will require careful planning of their program with the assistance of their faculty advisor.

*** Students registered in Physics 1050 must also be registered in Mathematics 1000 (not 1090). Students registered in Physics 1051 must also be registered in Mathematics 1001. All students will be required to complete Physics 1051. Students who complete Physics 1050 with at least 50 per cent or Physics 1020 with at least 70 per cent should take Physics 1051 in the Winter semester.

**** Students wishing to major in computational chemistry should take Computer Science 1510 and Computer Science 1710 in place of the electives in the sample first year program.

Notes:
  1. Admission to the chemistry major program normally requires students to complete 30 credit hours including:
    • six credit hours in chemistry
    • six credit hours in mathematics
    • six credit hours in physics is recommended although another science subject other than mathematics is acceptable
    • six credit hours in English
  2. Students wishing to major in chemistry should show an aptitude for science and are expected to achieve a 65 per cent average or better in their first-year chemistry, mathematics and physics courses. Students are encouraged to complete these courses in their first two semesters.
  3. Students considering a major in chemistry are encouraged to meet with the Deputy Head Undergraduate Studies, Dr. Chris Flinn, as early as possible to discuss the programs offered by the Department of Chemistry and the possibility of declaring a chemistry major.
  4. Information on the degrees offered by the Department of Chemistry, including the newly introduced Chemistry (Biological) program (major and honours), can be found at www.chem.mun.ca/ugrad.php?content=degrees

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

For students completing a major in chemistry (biological)

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science  with a major in chemistry (biological) will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Mathematics 1000 (1090)*Mathematics 1001 (1000)*
Chemistry 1050**Chemistry 1051
Physics 1050 (1020)***Physics 1051 (1021)***
English 1090English 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110
Biology 1001Biology 1002

 


* Students completing Mathematics 1090/1000 will be required to complete Mathematics 1001 as well. 

** Chemistry 1010 is a preparatory course for students who could not take Chemistry 3202 in high school or who achieved less than 65 per cent in Chemistry 3202. Students who take Chemistry 1010 in the Fall semester should take Chemistry 1050 in the Winter semester and Chemistry 1051 in the Spring semester.  

*** Students registered in Physics 1050 must also be registered in Mathematics 1000 (not 1090). Students registered in Physics 1051 must also be registered in Mathematics 1001. All students will be required to complete Physics 1051. Students who complete Physics 1050 with at least 50 per cent or Physics 1020 with at least 70 per cent should take Physics 1051 in the Winter semester.

 

Notes:
  1. Admission to the chemistry (biological) major program normally requires students to complete 30 credit hours including:
    • six credit hours in chemistry
    • six credit hours in mathematics
    • six credit hours in physics is recommended although another science subject other than mathematics is acceptable
    • six credit hours in English
    • six credit hours in biology
  2. Students wishing to major in chemistry should show an aptitude for science and are expected to achieve a 65 per cent average or better in their first-year chemistry, mathematics and physics courses. Students are encouraged to complete these courses in their first two semesters.
  3. Students considering a major in chemistry are encouraged to meet with the Deputy Head Undergraduate Studies, Dr. Chris Flinn, as early as possible to discuss the programs offered by the Department of Chemistry and the possibility of declaring a chemistry major.
  4. Information on the degrees offered by the Department of Chemistry, including the newly introduced Chemistry (Biological) program (major and honours), can be found at www.chem.mun.ca/ugrad.php?content=degrees

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

Course Criteria Chart

COURSE CRITERIA CHART FOR CHEMISTRY

ST. JOHN’S CAMPUS

Recommended courseRequired Prerequisite
Provincial
Students
National
Students
International
Students
1010Grade 12/ Senior Secondary Chemistry recommended but not required.Grade 12/ Senior Secondary Chemistry recommended but not required.Grade 12/ Senior Secondary Chemistry recommended but not required.
1050Chemistry 3202 with a grade of at least 65%.Grade 12/ Senior Secondary Chemistry with a grade of at least 65%.Grade 12/ Senior Secondary Chemistry with a grade of at least 65%.

Selecting a first-year chemistry course

The first-year chemistry program consists of a number of two-course and three-course options depending on the:

  • degree sought
  • student's level of preparedness
  • campus attended

Many degree programs will require students to complete General Chemistry I and II.

  • Chemistry 1050/1051 (St. John’s campus)
  • Chemistry 1200/1001 (Grenfell Campus)

To see the level of chemistry required for an intended program, students should view the full list of requirements found in the University Calendar.

Students meeting the prerequisite for Chemistry 1050 or 1200 are strongly encouraged to take this course in the Fall semester. Students who complete these courses will have the advantage of a stronger chemistry background as well as access to all second-year chemistry courses offered at Memorial in the Fall semester of their second year. These students will also have greater flexibility to change their intended major and/or minor programs.

Students who intend to complete these courses, but require a more introductory course in the first semester, can follow a three-course plan:

  • Chemistry 1010/1050/1051 (St. John’s campus)
  • Chemistry 1810/1200/1001 (Grenfell Campus)

Students who commence a sequence on one campus are strongly advised to complete the full sequence before transferring to the other campus due to differences in course content and the distribution of topics covered in each sequence of courses.

Students who intend to transfer to a program at another university are advised to complete General Chemistry I and II, as introductory courses may not be approved for transfer credit.

Some degrees require only introductory chemistry:

  • Chemistry 1010/1011 (St. John’s campus)
  • Chemistry 1810/1200 (Grenfell Campus)

It is important to review the requirements for your intended program. A full list of required courses for each program can be found in the University Calendar.

If you do take Chemistry 1010/1011, and you change your mind or your interests change to a new major (or minor) that requires higher level chemistry, you will need to take Chemistry 1050/1051.

Students should be aware that only six science credit hours may be counted toward a major or honours in Chemistry from the following course groups:

  • Chemistry 1010/1050/1051
  • Chemistry 1810/1200/1001

Chemistry 1010 and 1810 may be used as science electives for students who complete the three-course plan.

You are invited to contact the Deputy Head, Undergraduate studies, or a faculty advisor from the chemistry department to help you make your decision.

Courses available in first year at the St. John’s campus

Chemistry 1010
Introductory Chemistry I examines descriptive chemistry; measurements; atoms; molecules; the mole; mole calculations and reaction stoichiometry; the balancing of redox reactions; gases; thermochemistry; introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibrium; acids and bases.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours biweekly alternating with tutorials
Tutorial: 90 minute tutorial alternating with labs
Prerequisite: Science 1807. It is recommended that students have successfully completed high school Academic Mathematics 3201, or a pass in any university level mathematics course

Chemistry 1011
Introductory Chemistry II examines atomic structure; periodic properties; chemical bonding including VSEPR shapes and polarity; introduction to valence bond theory and hybridization; liquids, solids and intermolecular forces; solubility equilibrium; electrochemistry.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours biweekly alternating with tutorials
Tutorial: 90 minute tutorial alternating with labs
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1010 and Science 1807

Chemistry 1050
General Chemistry I builds on basic chemistry concepts from high school. Topics include gases; thermochemistry; atomic structure; periodic properties; chemical bonding including valence bond theory; hybridization and introduction to molecular orbital theory; properties of liquids and solids.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1010 with a grade of at least 60 per cent or high school Chemistry 3202 with a grade of at least 65 per cent; and Science 1807. It is also recommended that students have successfully completed high school Mathematics 3200 or 3201.

Chemistry 1051
General Chemistry II builds on Chemistry 1050 topics and on basic chemistry concepts from high school. Topics include solutions, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, equilibria involving acids and bases including polyprotic acids, buffers, acid-base indicators, titration curves, solubility and complex ion equilibrium, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1050 and Science 1807

Notes:

  1. Attendance in laboratories is required. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.
  2. Credit may be obtained for only one of Chemistry 1010 and 1200 (Grenfell Campus)
  3. Students who plan to transfer to a program at another university are advised that they may not receive transfer credit for Chemistry 1010.
  4. Credit may be obtained for only one of 1011, 1051 and Chemistry 1001 (Grenfell Campus).

 

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
Dr. Chris Flinn, Deputy Head, Undergraduate Studies
cgflinn@mun.ca

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca