Biochemistry

 

What are biochemistry and nutrition?

Broadly speaking, biochemistry is the study of the chemistry of living systems. In our department, there are a number of ways in which we try to do that. On the one hand, we study things at a small scale and ask questions about what happens inside a cell. This is molecular biochemistry. We ask questions about the structure of large molecules found in cells, such as muscle fibres and starch, or outside cells, such as lung surfactant or the matrix that holds many cells together. We also want to know about the genes that encode these molecules and how those genes are regulated in, for example, zebrafish and sea urchins. A different perspective is offered by physiological biochemistry. In bodies such as our own, cells are organized into tissues, such as the heart, the liver, the kidneys, and muscles. Understanding the complex interplay between tissues is important for good health and well-being. We ask questions about diabetes, heart disease and obesity, which are important health issues for us here in Newfoundland and Labrador. We ask questions about the food that we eat, about cholesterol, fats and amino acids, and how the body responds and regulates itself in response to different diets. Nutrition is the science that studies both the means by which we obtain and use foods and food components in the body, and the effects of food intake on health.

 

Why study biochemistry or nutrition?

Job opportunities for biochemists are available in:

  • hospitals
  • pharmaceutical, chemical, biotechnology, and cosmetics industries
  • universities – as teachers or researchers.

Nutrition graduates may be employed in:

  • community education programs
  • communications media
  • food industry
  • laboratory research.

With further training students may be eligible for a career as a:

  • biochemist
  • medical doctor
  • lawyer
  • dentist
  • environmental health specialist
  • biotechnologist.

Sample program for first year of biochemistry 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science with a major in biochemistry will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Mathematics 1000 (1090)*Mathematics 1001 (1000)*
Chemistry 1050**Chemistry 1051** 
Physics 1050 (1020)***Physics 1051(1021)***
Biology 1001 or electiveBiology 1002 or elective
English 1090****English 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110****

 

 

 

 


* Students completing Mathematics 1090/1000 will also be required to complete Mathematics 1001.

**Students who are not able to register for Chemistry 1050 in the Fall semester can take Chemistry 1010 in the Fall semester and Chemistry 1050 in the Winter semester. Students attending Grenfell Campus will normally
complete Chemistry 1200/1001 in their first year.

*** Students registered in Physics 1050 must also be registered in Mathematics 1000 (not 1090). Students registered in Physics 1051 must also be registered in Mathematics 1001.

**** Students attending Grenfell Campus will normally complete English 1000/1001 in their first year.

Notes:

  1. Entry to the biochemistry major program is based on academic standing. To be considered for admission to the program, students must have completed a minimum of 30 credit hours including the following courses (or their equivalents) with a minimum overall average of 60 per cent and be eligible for entry into Chemistry 2400 (see note 3 below): 

       • Mathematics 1000, 1001 (or 1090, 1000)
       • Chemistry 1050, 1051 (or 1010, 1050)
       • Physics 1050, 1051 (or 1020, 1021) or Biology 1001, 1002
       • English 1090, and one of 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110.

  2. Biochemistry majors are required to complete Biology 1001/1002, which may be taken in place of physics in their first year. However, it is recommended that both physics and biology courses be taken in the first year (with no elective)

  3. In order to complete the biochemistry major within
    four years, there are some things students need to
    know about completing the first-year chemistry
    courses.
    • Students MUST be eligible for Chemistry 2400 in the Fall semester of second year.
      • The prerequisite for Chemistry 2400 is Chemistry 1050; or a grade of 80 per cent in each of Chemistry 1010 and 1011; or a grade of 85 per cent in Chemistry 1011; or a grade of 65 per cent in Chemistry 1001. If not already completed, Chemistry 1051 must be taken concurrently.
    • All biochemistry majors MUST pass Chemistry 1051 with a grade of 60 per cent or Chemistry 1001 with a grade of 65 per cent as this is a prerequisite for Chemistry 2301 which must be completed in second year.
    • It is strongly recommended that Chemistry 1051 be completed before beginning the second year of studies. It will be possible to take Chemistry 1051 in the Spring semester.
  4. Students registering for Mathematics 1000 in the Fall semester should take Physics 1050 as their first Physics course. It is recommended that students who wish to pursue future studies in biophysics or related fields or are considering postgraduate health professional programs take Physics 1050 as their first physics course.
  5. Applicants to the biochemistry major are strongly recommended to apply for admission by May 31. Failure to apply by this date may result in your application not being processed before your registration time.

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

Sample program for first year of nutrition

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science with a major in nutrition will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
Mathematics 1090 (or 1000)*Mathematics 1000 or elective*
Chemistry 1010 (1050)**Chemistry 1011
(1051)
Physics 1020 (1050)***Physics 1021 (1051)***
Biology 1001Biology 1002
English 1090English 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110

 

 

 

 


* Students registered in Mathematics 1000 may take an elective in the second semester.

** Students attending Grenfell Campus for the first year of the program will normally complete Chemistry 1200/1001

*** Students registered in Physics 1050 must also be registered in Mathematics 1000 (not 1090). Students registered in Physics 1051 must also be registered in Mathematics 1001.

Note: Entry to the nutrition major program is based on academic standing. To be considered for admission, you must have at least 30 credit hours and have successfully completed the following courses with a minimum overall average of 60 per cent:

• English 1090, and one of 1191, 1192, 1193 or 1110 (or 1000, 1001)
• Mathematics 1090, 1000 (or Mathematics 1000 and an elective)
• Chemistry 1010, 1011 (or 1050, 1051)
• Physics 1020, 1021 (or 1050, 1051) or Biology 1001, 1002.

Applicants to the nutrition major are strongly recommended to apply for admission by May 31. Failure to apply by this date may result in your application not being processed before your registration time.

For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 

Contact information

For additional information please contact:
bcadvice@mun.ca

 

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca