Archaeology

 

What is archaeology?

Archaeologists and bioarchaeologists study past human cultures and behavior through the material remains left behind: artifacts and features, plant and animal remains, human remains, sediments, sites, and their associated landscapes. In the Department of Archaeology, we provide our students with high quality comprehensive education on the different ways in which they can engage in practical training and experiential learning in classroom, laboratory, and field work; settings that provide a comprehensive education and transferable skills. State-of-the-art laboratories specializing in applied archaeological sciences, archaeobotany, archaeological conservation, and prehistoric, historical, and Aboriginal archaeology integrate our undergraduate students into community-university research initiatives from Northern Labrador to French Guiana and from British Columbia to Northwest Europe. As one of the largest Archaeology departments in the country, we train our students to become effective researchers, critical thinkers, and active stewards for our shared archaeological heritage.

 

Why study archaeology?

Courses in archaeology provide a valuable background for students who intend to specialize in the social sciences or humanities, in cultural resource management, medicine, communications, government, education, law, heritage industries and many other fields.

Courses available in first year

Archaeology 1000
Introduction to Archaeology is a broad overview of archaeology and bioarchaeology introducing the concepts of human biological and cultural evolution and the methods and techniques by which these are investigated. The course is designed to provide the basis for further study in the discipline.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Archaeology 1000 is a prerequisite for many other archaeology courses and can be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 1001
Critical Reading and Writing about the Archaeological Past is an introduction to archaeological literature including essays, monographs, and journal articles and popular media. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing, analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs. Students learn elements of academic assessment of literature and technical skills to refine analytical writing. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology/History 1005
Critical Reading and Writing in Aboriginal and Indigenous Studies features the analysis of scholarly literature, media, and other sources of knowledge related to Aboriginal and Indigenous studies. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments related to the study of both past and present. All sections of this course follow the Critical Reading and Writing course guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts available at www.mun.ca/hss/crw.
Lectures: This course is offered online.
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 2450
Principles of Archaeological Science introduces the student to a broad range of scientific approaches and quantitative methods used in archaeology. The course provides an overview of the historical development of archaeological science and a survey of the current analytical techniques used to investigate materials recovered from archaeological contexts, including biomolecular methods, statistical analysis of data, geophysical prospection, dating techniques and quantitative methods of calibration, and remote sensing.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow Quantitative Reasoning (QR) guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts, and can be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 2492
Forensic Archaeology is an examination of procedures and techniques used by biological anthropologists and archaeologists to obtain data pertinent to investigations by law enforcement and medical authorities; evidence concerning the identification of human remains and the cause, time and manner of death.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may not be used for credit towards a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 2493
Archaeology on Film explores the use of archaeology as a popular backdrop to many films and documentaries. Yet, the manner in which archaeology is represented in modern film is hardly realistic, or is it? The portrayal of archaeology in popular film will be discussed in order to determine what movies convey to the public about archaeological method and theory as well as the historical stories that archaeologists investigate.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may not be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 2494
Game of Genders: Sex and Society in the Medieval North introduces students to considerations and expressions of gender in northern medieval society, with particular reference to Viking and Anglo-Saxon worlds. The course explores the concept of gender and considers varied gendered identities found in material and textual evidence. Students will reflect on how significant cultural changes, such as the conversion to Christianity and the expansion to the North Atlantic and to L'Anse aux Meadows, laid the foundation for what is considered gender appropriate in Western society.
Lecture: This course is offered online
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 2495
Archaeological Frauds and Mysteries will explore the sensationalized and ‘unreal’ side of archaeology and delve deeper into popular misconceptions of the past. From unraveling the mysteries of Big Foot to evaluating the evidence for alien life on Earth, students will learn how scientific methodology is used to determine facts from myths in archaeology.
Lectures: This couses is offered online. 
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may not be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Sample program for first year

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts with a major in archaeology will normally take the following courses in their first year:

Sample program

Fall SemesterWinter Semester
English 1090Archaeology 1001 or 1005 (CRW)
Archaeology 1030Archaeology 2480
quantitative reasoning (QR) courseArchaeology 2450
language study (LS) courselanguage study (LS) course
minor program courseminor program course

 


For assistance with course selection, students should contact:
Academic Advising Centre, advice@mun.ca

 


Contact information

For additional information please contact:
Dr. Oscar Moro Abadia: omoro@mun.ca

Contact

Guide to First Year

230 Elizabeth Ave

St. John's, NL A1B 3X9 CANADA

Tel: (709) 864-2530

Fax: (709) 864-2552

becomestudent@mun.ca