Courses

Academic Integrity (Integrity 100 A/B) is a required non-credit course which must be completed in your first year of studies here at Memorial.

To see a list of available courses select the campus you plan to attend.

St. John's Campus

Anthropology

Anthropology 1031
Introduction to Anthropology provides an overview of the field of social and cultural anthropology. Diverse case studies will be used to illustrate key anthropological concepts and methods.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students who major or minor in anthropology are required to take Anthropology 1031.

Anthropology 2410
Classics in Social and Cultural Anthropology is an examination of selected milestone monographs, ground-breaking studies for subdisciplinary specialities and major synthesis.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Anthropology 2411
Anthropologists in the Field combines a firsthand introduction to ethnographic research and writing with an exploration of how anthropological understanding develops through the experience and human relationships of anthropologists in the field.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Anthropology 2412 
Threatened Peoples is an examination of key social and cultural factors involved in the global extinction of small-scale societies; the intrusive influences that jeopardize small-scale societies, such as disease; economics and military incursion; the role of international non-governmental agencies in aid of threatened peoples; and the role of the anthropologist in this human crises.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Anthropology 2413
Culture in a Globalized World explores the way in which social, cultural, economic and political interconnections at the global level interact with local social and cultural processes.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Anthropology 2415
Anthropology of Food explores how cultural identities, social relationships and inequalities are lined to the production, exchange and consumption of food.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Anthropology 2416
Cultural Formations explores the symbolic formations that humans create in order to give meaning to their lives. Some of the cultural formations that will be studied include specific examples from the realms of religion, play, sports, art, and commonplace material objects.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Archaeology

Archaeology 1001
Critical Reading and Writing about Archaeology is an introduction to archaeological literature including essays, monographs, and journal articles and popular media. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing, analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs. Students learn elements of academic assessment of literature and technical skills to refine analytical writing.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course qualifies as a Critical Reading and Writing (CRW) requirement for students in a Bachelor of Arts program, and may be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 1005 
Critical Reading and Writing in Aboriginal and Indigenous Studies provides students with the critical reading and writing skills necessary to succeed in university, including the analysis of scholarly literature, media, and other sources of knowledge related to Aboriginal and Indigenous studies. Students practice analytical reading and writing through class discussion and assignments related to two themes – the past and the present.
Lectures: This course is offered Online
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course qualifies as a Critical Reading and Writing (CRW) requirement for students in a Bachelor of Arts program, and may be used toward a major or minor in archaeology. 

Archaeology 1030
Introduction to Archaeology and Bioarchaeology is a broad overview of archaeology and bioarchaeology introducing the concepts of human biological and cultural evolution and the methods and techniques by which these are investigated. The course is designed to provide the basis for further study in the discipline.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Archaeology 1030 is a prerequisite for most other archaeology courses.

Archaeology 2450
Principles of Archaeological Science introduces the student to a broad range of scientific approaches and quantitative methods used in archaeology. The course provides an overview of the historical development of archaeological science and a survey of the current analytical techniques used to investigate materials recovered from archaeological contexts, including biomolecular methods, statistical analysis of data, geophysical prospection, dating techniques and quantitative methods of calibration, and remote sensing.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course qualifies as a Quantitative Reasoning (QR) requirement for students in a Bachelor of Arts program, and can be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 2492
Forensic Archaeology is an examination of procedures and techniques used by biological anthropologists and archaeologists to obtain data pertinent to investigations by law enforcement and medical authorities; evidence concerning the identification of human remains and the cause, time and manner of death.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may not be used for credit towards a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 2493
Archaeology on Film explores the use of archaeology as a popular backdrop to many films and documentaries. Yet, the manner in which archaeology is represented in modern film is hardly realistic, or is it? The portrayal of archaeology in popular film will be discussed in order to determine what movies convey to the public about archaeological method and theory as well as the historical stories that archaeologists investigate.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may not be used toward a major or minor in Archaeology.

Archaeology 2494
Game of Genders: Sex and Society in the Medieval North introduces students to considerations and expressions of gender in northern medieval society, with particular reference to Viking and Anglo-Saxon worlds. The course explores the concept of gender and considers varied gendered identities found in material and textual evidence. Students will reflect on how significant cultural changes, such as the conversion to Christianity and the expansion to the North Atlantic and to L'Anse aux Meadows, laid the foundation for what is considered gender appropriate in Western society.
Lectures: This course is offered online 
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may not be used toward a major or minor in archaeology.

Archaeology 2495
Archaeological Frauds and Mysteries will explore the sensationalized and ‘unreal’ side of archaeology and delve deeper into popular misconceptions of the past. From unraveling the mysteries of Big Foot to evaluating the evidence for alien life on Earth, students will learn how scientific methodology is used to determine facts from myths in archaeology.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may not be used toward a major or minor in Archaeology.

Biochemistry

Students interested in studying biochemistry should review the information in the Bachelor of Science, biochemistry major section of this guide. Students interested in studying nutrition should review the information in the Bachelor of Science, nutrition major section of this guide.

The following course is required for students that have been admitted into the Bachelor of Nursing (Collaborative) degree program:

Biochemistry 1430
Biochemistry for Nurses is an introduction to the chemistry and structure-function relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. It will examine the basic metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, with emphasis on the biochemical fluctuations that occur in human health and disease and will include a brief introduction to molecular genetics. Prospective fast-track program students should consult with the School of Nursing concerning admission to this course.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Level 3 Chemistry from high school or Chemistry 1010 or Chemistry 1810 or equivalent and acceptance to the bachelor of nursing (collaborative) program.
Notes:

  1. This course may not be used for credit to fulfill the requirements for a major in the Department of Biochemistry.
  2. Entry into this course is restricted to students in the BN (collaborative) program.
Biology

Biology 1001
Principles of Biology introduces biology as a scientific discipline, outlines the unifying ideas in modern biology and then illustrates these ideas by examining selected aspects of the form, function and diversity of some major groups of living organisms.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students who have written the College Board Advanced Placement Biology exam should consult the Advanced Placement Policy chart for possible awarding of credit.
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Biology 1002
Principles of Biology is a continuation and extension of the principles embodied in Biology 1001.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Biology 1001
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Business

Business 1000
Introduction to Business in Society introduces the basics of business and business corporations in society, in a real-world relevant manner. Particular attention is given to the societal stakeholders and to corporations’ internal business processes and management functions. Major emphases include corporate social responsibilities and management ethics and these are recurring themes in other topics, such as technology, globalization and people in organizations. The course is a combination of textbook theory and guided learning activities and assignments based on finding and integrating real world information.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Chemistry

Chemistry 1010
Introductory Chemistry I examines descriptive chemistry; measurements; atoms; molecules; the mole; mole calculations and reaction stoichiometry; the balancing of redox reactions; gases; thermochemistry; introduction to chemical kinetics and equilibrium; acids and bases.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours biweekly alternating with tutorials
Tutorial: One and one-half hour tutorial alternating with labs
Prerequisite: it is recommended that students have successfully completed high school Academic Mathematics 3201, or a pass in any university level mathematics course
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Chemistry 1011
Introductory Chemistry II examines atomic structure; periodic properties; chemical bonding including VSEPR shapes and polarity; introduction to valence bond theory and hybridization; liquids, solids and intermolecular forces; solubility equilibrium; electrochemistry.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: 3 hours biweekly alternating with tutorials
Tutorial: One and one-half hour tutorial alternating with labs
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1010
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Chemistry 1050
General Chemistry I builds on basic chemistry concepts from high school. Topics include gases; thermochemistry; atomic structure; periodic properties; chemical bonding including valence bond theory; hybridization and introduction to molecular orbital theory; properties of liquids and solids.
Lectures: four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Tutorial
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1010 with a grade of at least 60 per cent or high school Chemistry 3202 with a grade of at least 65 per cent. It is also recommended that students have successfully completed high school Mathematics 3200 or 3201.
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Chemistry 1051
General Chemistry II builds on Chemistry 1050 topics and on basic chemistry concepts from high school. Topics include solutions, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, equilibria involving acids and bases including polyprotic acids, buffers, acid-base indicators, titration curves, solubility and complex ion equilibrium, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Three hours per week
Tutorial:
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1050
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Notes:

  1. Attendance in laboratories is required. Failure to attend may result in a failing grade or deregistration from the course.
  2. Credit may be obtained for only one of Chemistry 1010 and 1200 (Grenfell Campus)
  3. Students who plan to transfer to a program at another university are advised that they may not receive transfer credit for Chemistry 1010.
  4. Credit may be obtained for only one of 1011, 1051 and Chemistry 1001 (Grenfell Campus).
Classics

Classics 1051
Gods in Classical Mythology is an introduction to some of the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome, with particular attention to the gods. The myths will be studied with reference to their social and historical contexts, literary and artistic representations and modern theories of interpretation.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1052
Heroes in Classical Mythology is an introduction to some of the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome, with particular attention to the heroes. The myths will be studied with reference to their social and historical contexts, literary and artistic representations and modern theories of interpretation.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1100
Introduction to Greek Civilization is a general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of ancient Greek civilization. The course introduces the student to Greek social and political institutions, religion and myth and achievements in art, philosophy, science and literature, as well as the influence of ancient Greece on the modern world.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1120
Elementary Latin I is an introduction to the grammar and syntax of Latin, with particular attention paid to the acquisition of basic skills in reading, composition and aural comprehension.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Classics 1121
Elementary Latin II is a continuation of the work begun in Elementary Latin I.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Classics 1120 or its equivalent
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Classics 1130
Elementary Ancient Greek I is an introduction to the grammar and syntax of ancient Greek, with particular attention paid to the acquisition of basic skills in reading, composition and aural comprehension.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Classics 1131
Elementary Ancient Greek II is a continuation of the work begun in Elementary Ancient Greek I.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Classics 1130 or its equivalent
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Classics 1200
Introduction to Roman Civilization is a general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of ancient Rome. The course introduces the student to social, political and legal institutions, the growth of the Roman Empire, Roman art, literature and religions, as well as Rome's pervasive influence in the modern world.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Communication Studies

Communications 2000
Critical Approaches to Popular Culture considers critical issues and approaches in the study of popular culture. It will explore the ways in which everyone is both a user of, and is used by, popular culture. A variety of critical approaches to studying popular culture will be examined: production, texts, audience and history.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Communications 2001
Introduction to Communication Theory provides an introduction to theoretical approaches to organization, use and manipulation of language including semiotics, performativity, mass and group communications, sociolinguistics and interpersonal communication. We will examine notions of influence, rhetoric, social judgment, deception, subject formation, globalization and cultural hybridity within the field of communications.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Communications 2000

Computer Science

Computer Science 1000
Computer Science – An Introduction
is a gentle introduction to computer science. In a breadth-first overview approach it discusses important aspects of computer science including fundamentals in algorithms, binary data representation, Boolean logic and its implementation, machine architecture, systems software, networking concepts, programming languages, databases, and selected Computer Science subfields.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students can receive credit for only one of Computer Science 1000 and 1700.

Computer Science 1001
Introduction to Programming
is an introduction to fundamental programming techniques, primitive data types, and to simple algorithms and their design concepts.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students can receive credit for only one of Computer Science 1001 and 1710.

Computer Science 1002
Introduction to Logic for Computer Scientists
introduces methods of reasoning and logic tools that underlie computer science. In particular, this course covers propositional and predicate logic, sets and other discrete structures, as well as modular arithmetic and basic counting, with emphasis on their applications in computer science.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Computer Science 1000
Notes:

  1. Students can receive credit for only one of Computer Science 2742, Engineering 4424, Mathematics 2320.
  2. Students cannot receive credit for Computer Science 1002 if completed with, or subsequent to, Mathematics 2320.

Computer Science 1400
Computing in the 20th Century and Beyond will give an overview of the development of computing technologies over the last 75 years as well as both the perception of these technologies by, and their impact on, society. The course will be organized chronologically by decade, and within each decade will examine the dominant computing developments, their image in various print and pictorial media, and their social impact. The aim is to give students of all disciplines an appreciation of the abilities and limitations of computer technology and how such technologies interact with society.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Computer Science 1510
An Introduction to Programming for Scientific Computing introduces students to basic programming in the context of numerical methods with the goal of providing the foundation necessary to handle larger scientific programming projects. Numerical methods to solve selected problems from physics, chemistry and mathematics will be covered.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000
Note: Students can receive credit for only one of Computer Science 1510 or Computer Science 2602.

Computer Science 1550
Introduction to Multimedia Application Development is an introduction to programming and computer science with an emphasis on the development of multimedia applications. The course introduces the fundamental principles of programming, including object-oriented and event driven programming, how to use and create classes and methods and combine them with multimedia libraries to produce animations, handle input from keyboard and mouse, and import sounds and videos to produce multimedia applications which can be directly deployed on the Internet.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Computer Science 1600
Basic Computing and Information Technology offers an overview of information technology. It provides students with an understanding of basic concepts and necessary skills required to use spreadsheet, database and presentation software to manage, analyze and present data.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Computer Science 1710
Object-Oriented Programming I is an introduction to fundamental programming techniques, primitive data types and operations, program control structures and the use of objects, classes and methods.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This is the first required course for all computer science majors.

Computer Science 2000
Collaborative and Emergent Behaviour is a survey of computation as a means of understanding, modelling and describing artificial and natural systems. The emergence of complex behaviour from the interaction of simple rules governing individual components is illustrated and discussed, as well as the role of communication between system components. Selected systems to be studied will be drawn from different topic areas which may include the World Wide Web, the mind (cognitive science), formal logic, autonomous robotics, chaos and fractals and bioinformatics. Each topic will incorporate an associated laboratory experience.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours bi-weekly
Prerequisite: None

Computer Science 2001
Object-Oriented Programming and Human-Computer Interaction
advances from Introduction to Programming and studies object-oriented programming. Additional topics include event-driven programming, program correctness and simple refactoring, as well as interfaces and human-computer interaction. A brief overview of programming languages is also provided.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours bi-weekly
Prerequisite: Computer Science 1001 and Mathematics 1000
Students can receive credit for only one of Computer Science 2001 and 2710

Computer Science 2500
Data Analysis with Scripting Languages introduces the use of scripting languages to solve common data analysis tasks. The control structures and expressions of the language are first discussed. Script solution to storing/retrieving data sets, searching data sets, and performing numeric and statistical calculation are covered. Plotting and visualization for data sets are also presented.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Computer Science 1510 or 1700 or 1710 or 2602

Computer Science 2510
Programming in C/C++ is a comprehensive treatment of the C/C++ programming languages. It is intended for students with some first programming experience. This course starts with a discussion of fundamentals of C and C++, moves on to the object-oriented aspects of C++, and introduces some advanced topics. It is an essential course for mastering the power of this rich programming language.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Computer Science 1510 or 1550 or 1700 or 1710 or Engineering 1020, or equivalent

Computer Science 2718
Development Tools, Work Flows and Concepts covers tools, work flows and concepts used in software development in a concentrated introductory set of topics. The essential work flows (with their underlying concepts) used to edit, build, test, combine with existing software and find existing software are introduced. The tools covered include text editors, programming language translators, file management tools, debuggers, scripting tools, source control tools, and building, testing and deployment tools. The architecture and use of an Integrated Development Environment are discussed.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisites: Computer Science 1510 or 1550 or 1700 or 1710 or 2650

Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences 1000
Earth Systems is a survey of the structure, function and interrelations of Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Topics include an exploration of the physical and chemical properties of planetary materials, forces driving and sustaining earth systems and biological modifiers (including humankind) on the Earth today.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Earth Sciences 1002
Concepts and Methods in Earth Sciences provides an introduction to a broad range of concepts concerning the development of the geological record and the Earth; practical methods for collection of field based data; topics in map interpretation and geometric analysis, stratigraphy, paleontology, structure and petrology. The course is presented with an emphasis on the development of practical skills needed to pursue a career in Earth sciences.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 1000
Note: Earth Sciences 1000 and 1002 are required for Earth sciences majors, minors and all joint programs.

Earth Sciences 2150
The Solar System describes the basic astronomy of the solar system, tracing the search to understand motion of the sun, moon and planets in the sky; modern observations of planets, moons, comets, asteroids and meteorites and what they tell us about the origin and evolution of the solar system.
Lectures: Two and a half hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Earth Sciences 2916
Natural Hazards on a Dynamic Earth describes the surface of the Earth being in a constant state of change, thereby posing risks and challenges for society. An understanding of geological processes in the past and present provides context for evaluating risks related to earthquakes, volcanic activity and mass movements, challenges related to water resources, land-use planning and waste disposal, and the background to interpret sources and consequences of climate change. The course will provide a broad perspective on contemporary issues facing society. This course is designed for students taking Earth sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to teachers.
Lectures: This is a distance course.
Prerequisite: None

Earth Sciences 2917
Gems: the science and politics introduces students to precious and semi-precious stones both from the perspective of their nature and origin and from the perspectives of geography and the socio-political issues of mining, recovery, trade and cartels. The properties that confer value upon gems (colour, clarity, cut and carat), the techniques used to enhance, fake and imitate gems and the techniques used to detect fraudulent “gems” will be covered. The course will include discussion of the diamond industry in Canada and consideration of some famous gems. This course is designed for students taking Earth sciences as an elective subject. This course complements traditional disciplines such as history, economics, and political science and should be of particular interest to teachers.
Lectures: Two and a half hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Earth Sciences 2918
Earth's Story is an overview of Earth's dynamic past of episodes of supercontinent collision and breakup, massive flooding, global warming and freezing, magnetic field reversals and continents travelling over large distances. The evolution of life is tied to this history and has had equally dramatic turns of rich growth and catastrophic extinction. Discussion will be based on Canadian geology and includes an introduction to techniques used to decipher the rock record.
Lectures: Two and a half hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Earth Sciences 2919
Introduction to Marine Geology (same as Ocean Sciences 2200) is a study of the formation and evolution of oceans, including plate tectonics, mid-ocean ridges (birth place of oceans), subduction zones (where oceans are consumed), sedimentary environments such as estuaries, deltas, beaches and barrier islands, continental shelves, slopes and deep abyssal plains and special topics, including anoxic events, evolution of tides, atmosphere-ocean interactions, formation of banded iron formations, snowball Earth, black and white smokers, and how Earth modulates its climate through atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere interactions.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 1000
Credit restricted: Ocean Sciences 2200
Note: EASC 1000 and 2919/OCSC 2200 can be used towards a minor in Oceanography.

Note: Earth Sciences 2150, 2916, 2917, 2918 are not acceptable as one of the required courses for the minor, major or honours programs in Earth sciences. Earth Sciences 2919 is acceptable as a minor course in Earth Sciences, but is not acceptable for the major program in Earth Sciences.

Economics

Economics 2010
Introduction to Microeconomics I examines scarcity and opportunity cost; demand and supply; elasticity; household demand: marginal utility; household demand: indifference curves; production functions; short-run and long-run cost functions; perfect competition in the short run and the long run; monopoly.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisites: None
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Economics 2020
Introduction to Macroeconomics is national income accounting, aggregate income analysis, money, banking and foreign trade.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisites: None
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Notes:

  1. Economics 2010 and 2020 need not be taken in any specific order and may be taken concurrently.
  2. Economics 2010 and 2020 are prerequisites to all further courses in economics.
Engineering

Engineering 1010
Engineering Statics is the first course in engineering mechanics. Forces and moments are described with vector algebra, leading to a description of the equilibrium conditions for particles and solid bodies. The importance of free body diagrams is highlighted. This knowledge is then applied to the analysis of trusses, frames and machines. Additional topics include an examination of friction and the concepts of centre of force, centroids and second moments of area.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Tutorials: One hour per week
Prerequisite: Level III Physics or Physics 1020 and Mathematics 1000 (which may be taken concurrently)

Engineering 1020
Introduction to Programming is an introduction to algorithmic problem solving techniques and computer programming, including basic program control structures (sequence, call, branch, loop) and data representations, functional decomposition and design by contract. Exercises and examples are drawn from a variety of engineering disciplines and are implemented using a standard modern programming language.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory/Tutorial: At least eight two-hour sessions
Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090

Engineering 1030
Engineering Graphics and Design provides two complementary competencies. First, it provides an introduction to the fundamentals of graphic communication, including orthographic projections, three dimensional pictorials, sectioning and dimensioning. Both sketching and CAD are utilized. Second, the course introduces students to standard design methodologies. The graphics and design competencies are reinforced through lab and project exercises.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory/Tutorial: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090

Engineering 1040
Mechanisms and Electric Circuits (pilot curriculum) will engage and prepare students for Memorial University’s engineering program by: exercising student judgement and understanding of an engineering mindset to problem formulation, solution, and assessment of what is a “reasonable” result; introducing students to software environments to increase their ability and comfort in using computers as engineering problem-solving tools; and introducing problems that relate to the variety of engineering disciplines offered in the program. Students in the electrical circuits portion of the course will be taught relevant theory, and the application of problem-solving skills, judgement and visualization to the solution of electrical circuit problems.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: Level III Physics or Physics 1051 (which may be taken concurrently) and Mathematics 1000 (which may be taken concurrently)

Note: The engineering course pairs 1010/1020 and 1030/1040 are offered in single slots so that students can only take one from each pair in the fall and winter semesters.

English

English 1080
Critical Reading and Writing in English is an introduction to such literary forms as poetry, short fiction, drama, and the essay. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. All sections of this course follow CRW for the Bachelor of Arts.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

English 1101
Critical Reading and Writing in Fiction is a study of such forms as the novel, the novella, and the story sequence. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts and build on foundational CRW content delivered in English 1080.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1080

English 1102
Critical Reading and Writing in Drama uses dramatic texts to emphasize analytical reading, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts and build on foundational CRW content delivered in English 1080
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1080

English 1103
Critical Reading and Writing in Poetry uses poetic texts to emphasize analytical reading, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts and build on foundational CRW content delivered in English 1080
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1020 or 1080

English 1110
Critical Reading and Writing in Rhetoric is an examination of prose texts such as essays, articles and reviews. Students write for different purposes and audiences. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts and build on foundational CRW content delivered in English 1080.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1080
Notes:

  1. Students cannot receive credit for both English 1020 and 1110; nor for both 1030 and 1110.
  2. All students entering the Faculty of Business undergraduate programs must have successfully completed English 1110 or English 1021.

 

Courses for students whose first language is not English:

English 1020
Writing for Second Language Students I is an introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for non-native English speaking students. This course is for students whose first language is not English and who have passed 102F or have attained a standard acceptable to the Department on the English Placement Test. Students who have passed English 1020 may take as their second English course one of English 1021, 1080, 1101, 1102, or 1103. Students completing this course may elect to use it with English 1021 to fulfill the Bachelor of Arts Language Study requirement
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Admission to this course will be determined on the basis of the departmental English Placement Test or successful completion of English 102F
Notes:

  1. Students who successfully complete English 1020 may enter English 1021, 1080, 1101, 1102 or 1103. They may not enter English 1110.
  2. Students may not receive credit for more than 6 credit hours in first-year courses in English (this includes unspecified first-year transfer credits), except English 1020 and 1021 if they are used to fulfill the Bachelor of Arts Language Study requirement.

English 1021
Writing for Second Language Students II develops skills in reading and writing of academic English, with emphasis on research and writing syntheses from sources, for non-native English-speaking students.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1020
Notes:

  1. Students completing this course may elect to use it with English 1020 to fulfill the Bachelor of Arts Language Study requirement.
  2. Students may not receive credit for more than 6 credit hours in first-year courses in English (this includes unspecified first-year transfer credits), except English 1020 and 1021 if they are used to fulfill the Bachelor of Arts Language Study requirement.
  3. One of English 1021 or English 1110 is required as the second semester first-year English course for entry into a Faculty of Business undergraduate program.

English 102F
Foundation English is a non-credit course designed for students whose first language is other than English and whose knowledge and use of English do not meet the standards for entry into the regular first-year English courses.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: One hour per week
Notes:

  1. For non-native speakers, English 1020 is a prerequisite for 1021, 1080, 1101, 1102 or 1103.
  2. One of the following combinations is a prerequisite for all other English courses: 1080 (or 1020)/1101; 1080 (or 1020)/1102; 1080 (or 1020)/ 1103; 1080/ 1110; 1020/1080; 1020/1021. English 1080 cannot be used as the prerequisite for 1020 or 1021.
  3. Students cannot receive credit for more than one of English 1000/1080 or for more than one of 1001/1101/1102/1103/1110, or for English 1020 and 1110. Nor may students receive credit for more than two first-year English courses. (This includes unspecified first-year transfer credits.)
Folklore

Folklore 1000
Introduction to Folklore explores the role of tradition in communication, art and society. Reading assignments and audiovisual material will emphasize the use of folklore in context. Students will analyze traditions in their own lives through special assignments. A student may not receive credit for both Folklore 1000 and 2000.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Folklore 2100
Folklore Research Methods introduces the resources, tools and methods that folklorists use for primary and secondary research, including interviewing and participant observation. 
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: it is strongly recommended that majors and minors take this course before taking 3000 and 4000 level courses

Folklore 2401
Folklife Studies examines the interweaving of traditional elements in the tangible and intangible cultural heritage of various cultures. These may include holiday customs, rites of passage, folk religion, home remedies, clothing, food and art.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

French

French 1500
Introductory University French I is a course for beginners and for students whose background in French is very weak. Permission to register for this course will not be given to students who have completed Français 3202 (high school French immersion).
Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Multi-Media Laboratory: as per instructor’s recommendation
Prerequisite: None
Notes:

  1. French 1500 is offered every semester. During fall and winter it is available evenings and online.
  2. Students who have difficulty registering for this course should contact Dr. Barbara Thistle, thistle@mun.ca
  3. All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

French 1501
Introductory University French II is one of three consecutive credit courses in French language at the first-year university level, offering a complete overview of basic oral and written French.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Multi-Media Laboratory: as per instructor’s recommendation
Prerequisite: High school French 3200 or 3201 with a final grade of at least 80 per cent or permission of the co-ordinator of first-year French. Ex-immersion students with less than 60 per cent should register for this course.
Notes:

  1. French 1501 is offered every semester. During fall and winter it is available evenings and online.
  2. All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

French 1502
Introductory University French III is one of three consecutive credit courses in French language at the first-year university level, offering a complete overview of basic oral and written French.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Multi-Media Laboratory: as per instructor’s recommendation
Prerequisite: French 1501 with a final grade of at least 60 per cent or high school French 3201 with a final grade of at least 90 per cent or permission of the co-ordinator of first-year French.
Notes:

  1. French 1502 is offered every semester. During fall and winter it is also available in the evenings. It is also available online.
  2. All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Note: Students may use only two of French 1500, 1501 and 1502 towards the minimum requirements for a major or minor in French. They are encouraged to consult their advisor or instructor about possibilities for further study in French-speaking areas.

French 2100
Intermediate French I is a course on composition, grammar and practice in oral skills.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: High school French immersion with a final grade of at least 85 per cent or an exceptional background in French or French 1502 with a final grade of at least 60 per cent.
Notes:

  1. Students who obtain a grade of less than four on the Advanced Placement examination in French language and students who have received less than 85 per cent in French Immersion 3202 should register for French 1502.
  2. All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts
Gender Studies

Gender Studies 1000
Introduction to Gender Studies considers gender, gender studies and feminisms as areas of exploration from historical, contemporary, transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives. The aim of this course is to provide a critical framework for thinking about questions related to gender and other forms of social difference.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Gender Studies 2005
Critical Reading and Writing in Identities and Difference builds foundational critical reading and writing abilities through an exploration of feminist scholarship about the construction of identities and difference in cultural discourse, representation, and institutions. Students learn the principles of scholarly analysis and the mechanics of academic writing. Coursework focuses on critically analyzing texts, evaluating sources, framing questions, developing an argument, and refining written work for gender studies and related fields. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Gender Studies 2006
Genders and Sexualities introduces genders and sexualities from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will explore the continuum of sex/gender and sexual identities, and examine how these identities intersect with other aspects of identity, including (but not limited to) race, class, and (dis)ability. Lectures: Three hours per week Prerequisite: None

Geography

Geography 1050
Geographies of Global Change provides perspectives on the major geographical challenges and changes facing the contemporary globe, including: climate and environmental change, sustainability, human development, economic globalization, cultural change, and population and migration. Using the integrative skills of geographical analysis, the course prepares students for advanced study in geography and citizenship in the modern world. (This course fulfills the QR requirement for the Faculty of Arts)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Geography 2001
Cultural Geography is an introduction to the study of culture in geography, emphasizing both the history of the field from classic studies of landscapes to contemporary scholarship and themes of recent importance. These include the relationship between nature and culture: imperialism and colonialism; place, identity and power; and global cultures of commodities, media and tourism.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050

Geography 2102
Physical Geography: The Global Perspective is a study of form, process and change in natural systems at and near the surface of Earth, viewed as human environment. Emphasis is on global and regional scales in the systematic study of climate, water, landforms and vegetation. (This course fulfills the QR requirement for the Faculty of Arts)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Geography 2105
Canada’s Natural Environments and Landscapes examines the characteristics and development of the natural environments and landscapes of each of the major regions of Canada. The diversity of natural environments is illustrated through discussion of the climatic, hydrological, biogeographical, and geomorphic processes responsible for shaping the land. The impact of both gradual and rapid (catastrophic) changes on local, national, and global scales will be emphasized.
Lectures: Three hours per week or by Distance
Prerequisite: none
Note: This course is not part of the Geography major requirements.

Geography 2195
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences is an introduction to the fields of cartography, remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS). Geographic information collection and representation and analysis methods are the topics for the course. An emphasis is given to applications of maps and satellite images. (This course fulfills the QR requirement for the Faculty of Arts)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Geography 2302
Issues in Economic Geography covers basic issues and ideas in economic geography. The development of a regional economy will be related to underlying economic, cultural and physical factors.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Geography 2425
Natural Resources is an introduction to the concepts of natural resources, environment and conservation: the nature and distribution of natural resources; methods of use, allocation and development of natural resources and the role of various physical, social, economic, political and technological factors influencing decision-making about resources.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050
Note: Credit may not be obtained for both Geography 2425 and 3325.

Geography 2495
Regional Geography of Labrador is a holistic study of the Geography of Labrador, including the terrain, geology, Quaternary history, climate, vegetation, and fauna; the cultural geography of Labrador, including Innu, Inuit, NunatuKavut, and Settler people and communities; economic activities in Labrador, and the interaction of the Labrador economy within NL, Canada, and globally; the management of physical and human resources; and the geographic techniques used to investigate and understand Labrador's unique Geography.
Lectures: Three hours per week or by Distance
Prerequisite: none
Note: This course is not part of the Geography major requirements.

German

German 1000
Elementary German I is a course intended to give beginners a basic knowledge of the spoken and written language and culture of the German-speaking countries.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

German 1001
Elementary German II is a continuation of Elementary German I with the same basic text.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: German 1000
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

German 1010
Critical Reading and Writing: Hansel, Gretel, and the Big Bad Wolf introduces students to the German story-telling tradition from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will learn how to identify, critically read, analyse and evaluate arguments using rational judgement and appropriate rhetorical techniques and how to construct logically sound academic essays, incorporating the words and ideas of others. The communicative advantages of identifying an audience, the use of effective tone, word choice, and sentence patterns will also be covered.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: German 1000 is encouraged but not required
Note: All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

German 2900
Introduction to German Culture I is a study of the major cultural trends and movements of German-speaking Europe to the beginnings of the modern age. Lectures are given in English.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

German 2901
Introduction to German Culture II is a study of the major cultural trends and movements of German-speaking Europe in the modern age. Lectures are given in English.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

  1. A number of courses may be of interest to incoming students. They require no prerequisites, the language of instruction is English throughout and they cover German culture and literature: German 2900, 2901, 3000 and 3001. These courses may not be used as part of the bachelor of arts requirement of two courses in a second language.
  2. German 2900 and 2901 qualify as research/writing courses for the Faculty of Arts.
  3. Completion of German 1000 and 1001 qualifies students for the MUN&You@Heidelberg summer program in Heidelberg, Germany.

 

History

History 1009
Themes in Ancient and Medieval History will introduce students to the methodology of studying ancient and/or medieval history through a close examination of textual and material remains. The course will be taught around a particular theme and/or historical period each year.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

History 1010
Themes in the Age of Expansion is a thematic examination of European interaction with the North Atlantic and the Americas from the voyages of discovery to the independence movements of the Americas.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

History 1011
Themes in Modern European History is a thematic examination of the political, economic, social and cultural developments in Europe and the wider world from the French Revolution to World War I.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

History 1012
Themes in Twentieth Century World History will examine some of the major themes in twentieth century world history after 1914.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

History 1013
Themes in Canadian History will examine the historical context for various contemporary problems being experienced by Canadians.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

History 1014
Themes in United States History will examine several historical themes or problems in the history of the United States.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

History 1015
Themes in Social and Cultural History introduces students to early modern Western history (1500 - 1800) through the study of original texts. It will combine lectures on the historical background to the texts, discussion of them and analysis of their meanings in assigned essays.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

History 1016
Themes in Aboriginal History takes a comparative and thematic approach to the study of Aboriginal history in North America. It places a great deal of emphasis on skills development. Historical content themes include but are not restricted to Indigenous worldviews, international relations before contact with Europeans, treaties, land use, colonial policies, gender and sexuality, and environmental debates.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

  1. History students may use only one first-year course to meet the requirements of their major or minor.
  2. Students may use up to two first-year history courses as arts electives.
  3. No student will receive credit for more than two first-year history courses.
Human Kinetics & Recreation

HKR 1000
Fitness and Wellness is an introduction to the concepts of fitness and wellness and the relationships among physical activity, fitness, wellness, quality of life and longevity.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course is not applicable towards any of the degrees offered by the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation.

HKR 1001
Resistance Training for Health and Activity is an introduction to resistance training exercises, programs and principles.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course is not applicable towards any of the kinesiology or physical education degrees offered by the School of Human Kinetics and Recreation.

HKR 2000
Introduction to Physical Education, Recreation and Kinesiology introduces the philosophical, scientific, socio-cultural, historical concepts and influences in kinesiology, physical education and recreation.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

HKR 2300
Growth and Development is an introductory study of human growth and developmental factors and their influence on the learning of motor skills.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

HKR 2505
Recreation Programming and Evaluation introduces the student to a variety of methodologies, skills and materials for planning, developing, implementing and evaluating professional recreation programs for diverse populations in a variety of settings.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

HKR 2515
Social Psychology of Leisure introduces the personality and social factors that shape how people experience leisure. Course materials will focus on life cycle theory, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, perceived freedom, constraints theory and other social psychological theory related to leisure.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

HKR 2585
Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation is designed to examine a variety of aspects of therapeutic recreation from both a practical and theoretical prospective. Topics will include the history, philosophies and theories underlying therapeutic recreation, therapeutic recreation models, essential skills for therapeutic recreationists and ethical considerations for therapeutic recreation. Diverse groups (i.e. adults, youth, disadvantaged and disabled) and settings (i.e. community, schools, institutions and workplace) suitable for therapeutic recreation will be discussed.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Italian

Italian 1000
Elementary Italian I is for beginners in Italian. Introduction to the fundamentals of Italian grammar, with particular attention to the acquisition of basic skills in oral and written communication.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: One hour per week
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Italian 1001
Elementary Italian II is a continuation of Elementary Italian I
Lectures: Four hour per week
Laboratory: One hour per week
Prerequisite: Italian 1000
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Law & Society

Law and Society 1000
Law, Democracy and Social Justice examines the nature and aims of democracy and contemporary issues related to social justice through a law and society perspective.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics

Linguistics 1100
Introduction to Linguisticsis a general introduction to linguistic concepts which are important for understanding the nature of language and its function for communication. Topics include: languages as structured systems; the systematicity of language change; the classification of languages into families and their geographical distribution; language, the brain, and language disorders; the acquisition of language; and human vs animal communication.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics 1103
Introduction to Linguistic Analysis: Syntax is an introduction to the study of grammatical patterns in the structure of phrases and sentences. This course provides students with the tools to analyze phrase structure and syntactic constituency in English and other languages. Theoretical topics covered include case theory and agreement, principles of thematic role assignment, and different types of syntactic movement.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics 1104
Introduction to Linguistic Analysis: Phonology is an introduction to the study of sound patterns in human languages. Basic empirical and theoretical issues in phonology are demonstrated through the analysis of data selected from English and other languages. Theoretical concepts surveyed include phonological features and contrasts, and syllable structure. These are examined through the study of allophony, allomorphy, and processes such as assimilation and neutralization.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics 1105
The Wonder of Words is an introduction to the structure of words. This course presents methods of linguistic analysis through an in-depth study of English word origins. The French, Latin and Greek origins of technical and scientific words are studied, together with the ways that these words may change in structure, sound, and meaning. The course also provides an introduction to etymology, to writing systems and transliteration, and to the use of dictionaries.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics 1155
Linguistics for Language Learners provides a thorough grounding in the linguistic concepts and terminology involved in university-level second language learning.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students may receive credit for only one of Linguistics 1100 and 1155.

Linguistics 2060
Aboriginal Languages of Eastern Canada is an overview of the Aboriginal languages of three language families of Eastern Canada: EskimoAleut (Inuttitut) and Algonquian (Innu-aimun, Mi'kmaq, MaliseetPasmaquoddy and Beothuk) and Iroquoian (Mohawk) with respect to both linguistic structure and current vitality. The course also reviews a history of language suppression and revitalization efforts, within the context of the larger issues of minority language attrition and maintenance. This course is intended for students who want to learn an Aboriginal language spoken in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics 2210
Language in Newfoundland and Labrador: An Introduction to Linguistic Variation examines linguistic variation and language change in the languages of Newfoundland and Labrador. Topics covered include the concept of variation within language, both regional and social, the chief causes of such variation, and some of its societal consequences. As a Quantitative Reasoning course, practical workshops and assignments focus on producing a final scientific research report using quantitative analysis, graphical representation of numerical data, and logical reasoning involving numbers.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow QR guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Linguistics 2212
Language and Gender explores gender, sexuality and language and their relationship to culture, power, performance, interaction, social networks, language change, and language in the school and workplace. The course introduces theoretical perspectives, methodologies, and research findings, from an early focus on gender difference to more recent work on how language helps people create and perform gender and sexuality.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics 2220
Linguistics and Law is an overview of the many relationships between linguistics and the judicial process. Topics to be covered include: the language of legal texts, and the Plain English movement; language use in legal settings (such as eyewitness testimony, juryinstructions, and the language of lawyer-client interactions); the legal disadvantages which language may impose on speakers of minority languages and non-standard dialects; and the emerging discipline of forensic linguistics (which deals with such issues as voice and authorship identification, and linguistic interpretation of evidence).
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics 2300
Philosophy of Language and Mind (same as Philosophy 2300) is a survey of philosophical thinking about human language and thought, and about how these phenomena relate to the rest of the natural world. Topics covered include the nature of language, the relations between thought and language, and the nature of consciousness.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Linguistics 2700
Introduction to Irish Gaelic I provides an introduction to Irish Gaelic.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Linguistics 1103 or 1104 is recommended
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Linguistics 2701
Introduction to Irish Gaelic II is a continuation of Irish Gaelic I.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Linguistics 2700
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Linguistics 2702
Introduction to Japanese I provides an introduction to Japanese.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Linguistics 2703
Introduction to Japanese II is a continuation of Japanese I.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Linguistics 2702
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Mathematics

Mathematics 1000
Calculus I is an introduction to differential calculus, including algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Applications include kinematics, related rates problems, curve sketching and optimization.
Lectures: Four hours per week (at Grenfell Campus, three hours of lectures and a one and one-half hour problem laboratory per week.)
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1090 or a combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department

Mathematics 1001
Calculus II is an introduction to integral calculus, including Riemann sums, techniques of integration and improper integrals. Applications include exponential growth and decay, area between curves and volumes of solids of revolution.
Lectures: Three hours per week (at Grenfell Campus, three hours of lectures and a one and one-half hour problem laboratory per week.)
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000

Mathematics 1050
Finite Mathematics I covers topics which include sets, logic, permutations, combinations and elementary probability.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or Mathematics 103F is required at the St. John’s Campus; or at Grenfell Campus, the successful completion of Level III Academic or Advanced Mathematics

Mathematics 1051
Finite Mathematics II covers topics which include elementary matrices, linear programming, elementary number theory, mathematical systems and geometry.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or Mathematics 103F at the St. John’s Campus; or at Grenfell Campus, the successful completion of Level III Academic or Advanced Mathematics

Mathematics 1090
Algebra and Trigonometry provides students with the essential prerequisite elements for the study of an introductory course in calculus. Topics include algebra, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, polynomials and rational functions.
Lectures: Four hours per week (at Grenfell Campus, three hours of lectures and a three-hour problem laboratory per week.)
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or Mathematics 104F at the St. John’s Campus; or at Grenfell Campus, the successful completion of Level III Academic or Advanced Mathematics.
Note: Students will not receive credit for Mathematics 1090 if they have previously received credit or are currently registered for Mathematics 1000 or 1001.

Mathematics 2050
Linear Algebra I includes the topics: Euclidean n-space, vector operations in 2- and 3-space, complex numbers, linear transformations on n-space, matrices, determinants and systems of linear equations.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department; or three credit hours in a first-year mathematics course.

Mathematics 102F/103F/104F
Mathematics Skills Program consists of non-credit courses intended for those students who have a weak background in mathematics or are returning to the subject after some time. The program enables students to master mathematical operations such as those involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, integers, exponents, linear equations, algebraic and rational expressions, formulas, graphs, systems of linear equations, basic trigonometry, exponents and radicals and quadratics.
Tutorial Sessions: Three hours per week
Testing Sessions: Approximately every other week
Prerequisite: None
Note: For information on the format of the Math Skills Program, visit: www.mun.ca/mlc/course

Mathematics 102N
Mathematics Skills Program for the BN (Collaborative) program is a non-credit course intended for students of the BN(Collaborative) program who have a weak background in mathematics and/or have not completed mathematics in some years. The program enables students to master mathematical operations such as those involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, per cents, units of measurement, ratios and proportions.
Prerequisite: None

Medieval Studies

Medieval Studies 2000
The Cultural Legacy of the Middle Ages will survey the formative cultures of the Middle Ages — Latin, Celtic, Arabic — as well as the rise of the new vernacular cultures, English, Germanic and Romance. Literary trends such as the reliance on authority, the emergence of national epic and the development of court literature will be studied. The course examines the interplay of all the arts — literature, music, art and architecture.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Medieval Studies 2001
Medieval Europe to 1050 (same as History 2320) is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of the early Middle Ages.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students can receive credit for only one of Medieval Studies 2001 and History 2320

Medieval Studies 2002
Medieval Europe, 1050 to the Reformation (same as History 2330) is a survey of the economic, social, political and cultural developments of Europe in the high and late Middle Ages.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students can receive credit for only one of Medieval Studies 2002 and History 2330.

Music

The following music courses are available to students who have not been admitted to the School of Music and are appropriate for students with little or no musical background:

Music 1116
Basic Musicianship is an introduction to sight singing and dictation for students whose level of preparation is not adequate for Music 1117.
Lectures: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: Music 1120
Credit Hours: One
Note: Credit for this course may not be applied to the bachelor of music degree.

Music 1120
Rudiments I is an introductory course in music rudiments and theory. Development of aural skills is emphasized.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Credit Hours: Three
Notes:

  1. Credit for this course may not be applied to the bachelor of music degree.
  2. Music 1120 is also available as a distance education course.


Music 2011
North American Popular Music examines the development of North American popular music from its origins in the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The course examines major musical genres, their historical roots, their musical characteristics, the influences that shaped them and the artists who defined them. It explores sociopolitical issues embedded in popular music, as well as how music has evolved to express new conceptions of self and community, social anxieties, tensions and ideals. No prior musical knowledge is required.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Credit Hours: Three
Note: Credit for this course may not be applied to the bachelor of music degree. Also available as a distance education course.

Music 2012
Understanding Classical Music: Introduction Through Guided Listening is a course designed to enhance and develop listening skills and an understanding of the basic elements of music. Form and musical style in Western classical music will be explored within a cultural and historical context. Through guided listening, the student will be exposed to a variety of musical styles and traditions. This course has a strong listening component. The ability to read music is not required.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Credit Hours: Three
Note: Credit for this course may not be applied to the bachelor of music degree.

Music 2013
Twentieth Century Musicals is a survey on 20th century musical theatre. Selected works, presenting different styles and periods, will be examined in detail. There will be a strong, required listening/viewing component to this course. The ability to read music is not required.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Credit Hours: Three
Notes:

  1. Credit for this course may not be applied to the bachelor of music degree.
  2. Credit can be received for only one of Music 2013, 3007 or English 2013.

Music 2014
Introduction to World Music provides an introduction to the musics of selected cultures and contemporary intercultural communities. Drawing on topics and issues in ethnomusicology, it focuses on musical practices, beliefs and techniques. It is intended to develop listening skills, broaden musical horizons, as well as to enable a deeper understanding of the way music functions in relation to social groups and individual lives.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Credit Hours: Three
Note: Credit for this course may not be applied to the bachelor of music degree.

Music 2021
Newfoundland and Labrador Folksinging is an introduction to the sociocultural contexts, functions and meanings of folksong in Newfoundland and Labrador. Proceeding from this contextual base drawn from oral and scholarly histories, the course offers practical instruction by a tradition-bearer in the singing of traditional Newfoundland and Labrador tunes and texts, using the techniques of aural transmission and assisted by the written medium where appropriate.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Credit Hours: Three

Notes:

  1. No more than three credits from the 2021-2023 series may be applied toward the bachelor of music degree as unspecified music electives.
  2. Music 2021 is also available as a distance education course.

Music 2022
Newfoundland and Labrador Fiddling is an introduction to the sociocultural contexts, functions and meanings of fiddling in Newfoundland and Labrador. Proceeding from this contextual base drawn from oral histories, the course offers practical instruction by a tradition-bearer on the fiddle, using the techniques of aural transmission and assisted by the written medium where appropriate.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Permission of the director
Credit Hours: Three
Note: No more than three credits from the 2021-2023 series may be applied toward the bachelor of music degree as an unspecified music elective.

Music 2023
Newfoundland and Labrador Accordion is an introduction to the sociocultural contexts, function and meanings of accordion music in Newfoundland and Labrador. Proceeding from this contextual base drawn from oral histories, the course offers practical instruction by a tradition-bearer on the button accordion, using the techniques of aural transmission and assisted by the written medium where appropriate.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Permission of the director
Credit Hours: Three
Note: No more than three credits from the 2021-2023 series may be applied toward the bachelor of music degree as an unspecified music elective.

The following large ensemble courses are available to non-music majors with appropriate background, subject to the approval of the instructor:

Music 2611
Festival Choir requires three hours rehearsal per week. Attendance is required.
Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor
Credit Hours: One

Music 2612
Chamber Choir requires three hours rehearsal per week. Attendance is required.
Prerequisite: An audition. Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours: One

Music 2613
Chamber Orchestra requires three hours rehearsal per week. Attendance is required.
Prerequisite: An audition. Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours: One

Music 2614
Concert Band requires three hours rehearsal per week. Attendance is required.
Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor
Credit Hours: One

Music 2615
Jazz Ensemble requires three hours rehearsal per week. Attendance is required.
Prerequisite: An audition. Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours: One

Music 2616
Opera Workshop requires three hours rehearsal per week. Attendance is required.
Prerequisite: An audition. Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours: One

Music 2619
Wind Ensemble requires three hours rehearsal per week. Attendance is required.
Prerequisite: An audition. Contact the School of Music.
Credit Hours: One 

Some courses in musicologies and music theory are available to non-music majors who have fulfilled the prerequisites. Please note that spaces in these classes are made available to non-B.Mus. students only after all B.Mus. students have registered. These may include:

Music 1005
Thinking and Writing about Music I is designed to develop listening, critical thinking, research and writing skills through selected cross-cultural topics and themes exploring the relationship between music and society. The course will introduce the student to the terminology of music history and the concepts of genre, musical style and style periods. This course has strong listening and writing components. The ability to read music is required.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Music 1120 or successful completion of the theory placement test or admission to the B.Mus. degree program
Credit Hours: Three
Note: Credit can be received for only one of Music 1005, Music 2012, or the former Music 1002.

Music 1006
Thinking and Writing about Music II is a continuation of Music 1005.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Music 1005
Credit Hours: Three
Note: This course has strong listening and writing components.

Music 1107
Materials & Techniques of Tonal Music I is the study of the basic materials of tonal music; introduction to melody writing and phrase structures; introduction to voice-leading with emphasis on chorale style; analysis and composition of smaller formal elements.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Music 1120 with a minimum grade of 75 per cent or successful completion of the Theory Placement Test
Co-requisite: Music 1117
Credit Hours: Three
Note: Credit may not be obtained for more than one of Music 110A, 1107 and 1113.

Music 1108
Materials & Techniques of Tonal Music II is a continuation of Music 1107. Harmonic vocabulary is expanded to include all diatonic triads and seventh chords, with an introduction to chromatic harmony; phrase expansions and contractions; analysis and composition of binary and ternary forms.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Music 1107
Co-requisite: Music 1118
Credit Hours: Three
Note: Credit may not be obtained for more than one of Music 110B, 1108 and 1114.

Music 1117
Aural Skills I is a course on sight-singing and dictation.
Lectures: Two hours per week
Credit Hours: One
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 75 per cent in Music 1116 or successful completion of the Theory Placement Test
Co-requisite: Music 1107

Music 1118
Aural Skills II is a continuation of Music 1117.
Lectures: Two hours per week
Prerequisites: Music 1107, 1117
Credit Hours: One

The following courses are restricted to students admitted to a program in the School of Music:

Music 1700
Introduction to Music Technology meets one hour per week and provides a practical introduction to useful computer tools for musicians, such as music notation software, basic digital audio editing and new media.
Credit Hours: One
Co-requisite: Music 140A/B

Music 140 A/B
Applied Study requires one hour per week of individual instruction (vocal or instrumental). Required attendance at School of Music recitals.
Lectures: One-hour private lesson per week
Prerequisite: Music 140A is a prerequisite for Music 140B
Co-requisite: in each semester for students whose applied study is voice, piano, organ or guitar: one of Music 2611, 2612 and in each semester for all other applied studies: one of Music 2611 or 2612, and one of Music 2613, 2614, 2615, 2619, 2620.
Credit Hours: Four over two semesters

Music 2700
Lyric Diction I is a study of English, German, French and Italian lyric diction. The International Phonetic Alphabet will be introduced and applied to singing in these four languages.
Credit Hours: One
Prerequisite: Open only to students whose principal applied study is voice

Music 2401
Functional Keyboard I is an introduction to practical keyboard skills for students whose principal applied study is not piano or organ. Functional accompaniment, transposition and score reading are emphasized. This course meets one hour per week.
Credit Hours: 0
Prerequisite: Music 1108, successful completion of the Piano Proficiency Test
Note: Students may gain credit for only one of Music 2401 or the former Music 1127. Music 2401 may not be taken for credit by students whose principal applied study is a keyboard instrument.

Music 2411
Advanced Functional Keyboard I is an introduction to practical keyboard skills for students whose principal applied study is piano or organ. Functional accompaniment, transposition and score reading are emphasized. This course meets one hour per week.
Credit Hours: 0
Prerequisite: Music 1108, permission of the instructor for students whose principal applied study is not a keyboard instrument
Note: Students may gain credit for only one of Music 2411 or the former Music 1137

Nursing

Nursing 1002
Anatomy and Physiology I presents a survey of human anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan. It includes aspects of cytology and histology that form a foundation for the practice of nursing. Special emphasis is given to the skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Nursing 1003
Developing Therapeutic Relationships focuses on the application of caring theory to interpersonal communications. It emphasizes the development of the role of communicator in individual and group experiences and in professional relationships. Utilizing an experiential model, laboratory experiences focus on self-awareness and group dynamics.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Co-requisite: Nursing 1004 

Nursing 1004
Introduction to Nursing introduces the major concepts and theories related to the paradigm of person, health, society, nursing, environment and nursing education in relation to the philosophy, conceptual framework and objectives of the program. Emphasis is placed on the concept of caring as the essence of nursing practice.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Nursing 1012
Anatomy and Physiology II presents a survey of anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan. It includes aspects of cytology, histology and embryology that form a foundation for the practice of nursing. Special emphasis is given to the circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems, including pregnancy and delivery.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: Nursing 1002

Nursing 1014
Health Assessment focuses on the development of competencies needed to assess the health status of individuals throughout the lifespan using a systematic approach. Content includes the nurse's responsibilities for health history, physical examination, interpretation of findings and documentation.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Co-requisite: Nursing 1012

Nursing 1015
Health Promotion throughout the Lifespan explores nursing concepts and theories pertaining to health promotion/protection throughout the lifespan. Content includes principles of teaching/learning, introduction to community health and primary health care concepts and the determinants of health.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: 24 hours during the course
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Psychology 1000, Nursing 1003, Nursing 1004

Nursing 1016
Healthy Aging will explore in depth, concepts and issues applicable to the well older adult (65+). Selected theories, physical changes and psychosocial, ethical and legal issues associated with aging will be presented.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: 1002, 1003 and 1004
Co-requisite: Nursing 1012, 1014 and 1015

Nursing 1017
Fundamental Psychomotor Competencies will provide the student an opportunity to acquire beginning psychomotor competencies that are related to the provision of client comfort and safety in a variety of settings. As well, this course provides the opportunity for the student to integrate the conceptual framework of the bachelor of nursing (collaborative) program into the development of psychomotor competencies.
Lectures: None
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Nursing 1003 and 1004

Nursing 1520
Extended Practice I provides the student with the opportunity to integrate the knowledge and practice the competencies acquired to date. The focus is the promotion, protection and maintenance of health for well individuals within the context of the family. This course is taught at the end of the winter semester, usually beginning during the final week of the examination period.
Clinical: 96 hours over three weeks
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Nursing 1012, 1014, 1015, 1016 and 1017

Ocean Sciences

Ocean Sciences 1000
Exploration of the World Ocean is an introductory course covering the major ocean sciences (biology, chemistry, geology, physics) at a level sufficient for science majors but accessible to non-science majors. It explores phenomena occurring from the shoreline to the abyss and from equatorial to polar regions. It also examines principles of marine ecology as well as how the marine environment affects humans and vice versa. The course is offered in a blended format that combines face-to-face lectures and online interactive activities in the form of virtual oceanographic expeditions.
Lectures: 1.5 hours per week
Online Interactive Activities: 1.5 hours per week (online interactive activities)

Philosophy

Philosophy 1000
Philosophy of Human Nature is an approach to philosophical thinking by way of analysis and critique of theories of human nature, classical and modern and the world views associated with them.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1001
Critical Reading and Writing in Human Nature provides an overview of foundational knowledge and skills to enable critical reading and writing at the university level by way of analysis and critique of selected conceptions and theories of human nature raised throughout the history of philosophy. Significant instructional time will be devoted to teaching writing skills that develop clarity, form, content, tone, and style appropriate for university writing.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1100
Critical Thinking aims to impart critical analytic skills: i.e., the ability to recognize good and bad arguments, to explain why a particular argument is good or bad and a general understanding of why a good argument ought to persuade and a bad argument ought not to persuade.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1200
Introduction to Philosophy is a general introduction to the study of philosophy both as a contemporary intellectual discipline and as a body of knowledge. The course covers the main divisions, fundamental questions and essential terminology of philosophy through a reading of classical texts. (It is a required course for further courses in philosophy programs.)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1230
Critical Reading and Writing in Ethics provides an overview of university-level critical reading, writing, and argumentative skills. Students learn the ability to put in their own words the thoughts and writings of important ethical thinkers, how to use and assess secondary sources, and how to bring new writing skills together in terms of critical analyses of different ethical ideas.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Physics

Physics 1020
Introductory Physics I is a non-calculus based introduction to mechanics.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090. Mathematics 1090 may be taken concurrently. It is recommended that students have completed at least one of Level II and Level III high school physics courses, however, this course may be completed by someone who has no physics background provided some extra effort is made. 

Physics 1021
Introductory Physics II is a non-calculus based introduction to fluids, wave motion, light, optics, electricity and magnetism.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Physics 1020 or 1050 and Mathematics 1090 or Math 1000, either of which may be taken concurrently
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Physics 1050
General Physics I: Mechanics is a calculus- based introduction to mechanics. The course will emphasize problem solving.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructors’ discretion.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000, which may be taken concurrently

Physics 1051
General Physics II: Oscillations, Waves, Electromagnetism is a calculus-based introduction to oscillations, wave motion, physical optics and electromagnetism.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Physics 1020 (with a minimum grade of 65 per cent), 1021 or 1050 and Mathematics 1001. Mathematics 1001 may be taken concurrently
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Police Studies

Police Studies 2000
An Introduction to Policing in Canada will examine the organization of policing, its mandate and operation. It will provide an overview of the history and development of policing in Canada; examples from Newfoundland and Labrador will be used where appropriate. It will discuss the various roles and responsibilities of the police in society. It will explore the issue of police decision making, the exercise of police powers and the use of discretion by police officers. Several other issues relating to policing will be discussed including police recruitment and training, the professional role of the police, stress on the job and policing in a diverse society.
Lectures Three lecture hours per week when offered on campus; also offered via distance.
Prerequisite None

Police Studies 2200
Introduction to Corrections introduces students to the Correctional Systems in Canada and their role in Canadian Criminal Justice. Topics covered in this course include: the evolution of punishment and corrections in Canada, the purpose of prison, the classification of federal prisoners, the prisoner subculture or ‘inmate’ code, violence inside prisons, and community corrections after full custody incarceration.
Lectures Offered via distance
Prerequisite None

Political Science

Political Science 1000
Introduction to Politics and Government is an introduction to the study of politics, power, law, public policy and government, touching on major areas of political ideologies, institutions and current domestic and international political issues.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None. Suitable for students in all disciplines

Political Science 1001
Critical Reading and Writing: Politics and Governance provides an overview of foundational knowledge and skills to enable critical reading and critical writing at the university level. Students learn the elements of academic assessment of literature and information that is available in the library and/or online, and about the mechanics of analytical writing. The “politics and governance” content varies by instructor and is not repeated in any other political science course.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Students are encouraged to complete Political Science 1000.
Note: All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Political Science 2200
Introduction to International Politics is an examination of the building blocks of international politics including determinants, means, processes and ends. Emphasis is on the post-1945 period.
Lectures: Three hours a week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course is required for students interested in the international bachelor of business administration (iBBA) degree program.

Notes:

  1. Although Political Science 1010, 1020 and 2200 do not require a prerequisite, the department encourages students to enrol in Political Science 1000 before attempting other political science courses.
  2. Political Science 1000 is a required course for a political science honours, major or minor. Students might also wish to take one of 1010 or 1020 in the same semester as 1000. We recommend that students take Political Science 2010 beginning in the second semester of their first year.
Psychology

Psychology 1000
Introduction to Psychology is the first half of a two semester introduction to psychology as a biological and social science. Topics include history, research methodology, behavioural neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory.
Prerequisite: None
Lectures: Three hours per week
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Psychology 1001
Introduction to Psychology is the second half of a two-semester introduction to psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include emotion, motivation, stress and health, personality and individuality, psychological disorders and treatment and social psychology.
Prerequisite: Psychology 1000
Lectures: Three hours per week
Note: Psychology 1000 and 1001 are prerequisites for all other psychology courses.
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Religious Studies

Religious Studies 1000
The Religions of the World is an introduction to the basic beliefs and practices of the world's great religions.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Religious Studies 1001
Religion and Violence examines the relationship between religion(s) and violence from religious studies perspectives. Students learn the principles of scholarly analysis appropriate to the study of religious phenomena, the elements of academic assessment, and the mechanics of academic writing. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing, analyzing texts, evaluating sources, framing questions, organizing paragraphs, developing effective arguments, and refining presentation of written work.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Religious Studies 1010
Religion in the Modern World is an introduction to some of the major issues confronting religion in the modern world. The focus will be on such topics as globalization and religion, religious faith and violence, freedom and authority.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Religious Studies 1021
Apocalypse: The End Times in Thought, Action and Imagination will explore the many ways in which Judaism and Christianity have anticipated and imagined the end times. Attention will be given to Jewish and early Christian notions of the Messiah and his reign, the end of the world and the impending judgment, as well as how Christianity has coped repeatedly with the delay of the end and how millennial thought and action have affected people during periods of social and natural crises. The role of millennial expectations in our modern era and why the apocalypse is once again a powerful image in religion, film and literature will also be covered.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Religious Studies 1022
Jesus in Film is a study of how Jesus is represented in modern film. The course explores the continuing impact that the Jesus of history and faith has had on modern western culture. The course will examine such films as The Greatest Story Ever Told, The Robe, The Gospel According to St. Matthew (by Pasolini), Jesus Christ Superstar, Jesus of Montreal, The Last Temptation of Christ, The Life of Brian, The Passion of the Christ, The Newfoundland Passion (video of the Squires' Paintings).
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Religious Studies 1040
Introduction to Chinese (Mandarin) I will introduce students to the basics of Chinese vocabulary, characters and grammar. Mandarin Chinese, the official dialect of China, Taiwan and Singapore, will be taught. This course is not intended for native speakers.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Religious Studies 1041
Introduction to Chinese (Mandarin) II is a continuation of Religious Studies 1040. At the end of this course students should know over a hundred Chinese characters, which should enable them to read basic texts and carry on a simple conversation. This course is not intended for native speakers.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Religious Studies 1040
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Religious Studies 1050
Introduction to Biblical Hebrew I is designed to introduce students to the elements of Biblical Hebrew in order to prepare them for reading the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in the original language. The emphasis will be upon learning the basic grammar and syntax of Biblical Hebrew.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Religious Studies 1051
Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II is a continuation of Religious Studies 1050. The emphasis will be upon the reading of selected Hebrew texts.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Religious Studies 1050
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Religious Studies 1060
Sanskrit Language Study I is an introduction to the Sanscrit language, to the (Devanagari) alphabet, basic grammar and foundational vocabulary with a focus on developing skills needed to read and translate Sanscrit texts.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Religious Studies 1061
Sanskrit Language Study II is a continuation of Sanscrit Language Study I. On completion of this course, students will have the ability to consult Sanscrit texts for research purposes.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.

Russian

Russian 1000
Elementary Russian I provides an introduction to Russian grammar and a basic knowledge of the spoken and written language.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Russian 1001
Elementary Russian II is a continuation of Elementary Russian I.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Russian 1000 or equivalent
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Russian 2900
Russian Culture I is a study of the evolution of Russian culture and Russian intellectual history up to 1917. Lectures include discussions of Russian art, music and film. Lectures are given in English.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Russian 2901
Russian Culture II is a study of the evolution of Russian culture in the USSR and the post-Soviet period. Lectures include discussions of Soviet Russian art, music and film. Lectures are given in English.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

  1. Russian 1000 and 1001 are prerequisites for all other Russian courses, except Russian 2030, 2031, 2600, 2601, 2900, 2901, 3005, 3023 and 3910.
  2. A number of courses may be of interest to incoming students. They require no prerequisites, the language of instruction is English throughout and they cover Russian culture and literature, for example, Russian 2600, 2601, 2900, 2901 and 3004. These five courses may not be used as part of the bachelor of arts requirement for two courses in a second language.
Science

Science 1000
Introduction to Science I is a liberal science course for arts students, which reflects the way scientists think and work through historical, philosophical and social considerations of the environment we live in. Typical course content includes: the concepts of matter, motion and energy; the chemical basis for life and the interdependence of organisms; and the abundance and distribution of the Earth's natural resources.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

  1. This course cannot be used to satisfy the science requirement for entry into the bachelor of education (primary/elementary) degree.
  2. This course may not be used to fulfil any of the science course requirements for the honours and general degrees in science.
  3. This course brings scientists into the classroom to discuss the kind of research they do and how it relates to what science is all about and the social and other issues involved. The course is taught by six scientists and the detailed content will vary from semester to semester.

Science 1150/1151
Introduction to Physical and Life Sciences is an introduction to some concepts in the physical and life sciences. These courses are primarily intended for the non-science major (students studying arts, education and/or physical education).
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Science 1150 and 1151 are not acceptable as prerequisites for 2000-level courses in physics, chemistry, biology, geography or earth sciences.
Note: Students must complete Science 1807 before attending the first laboratory for this course.

Social Work

Social Work 1710
Social Work Philosophy and Practice provides an overview of the historical development, philosophical orientation, basic values, principles and knowledge base and fields of practice of the profession. The course will examine critical social problems that impact societies with an emphasis on the quest for social justice at local, national and global levels.  
Lectures: This course is offered online in the Fall and Winter semesters.
Prerequisite: None Note: This is a prerequisite for ALL social work courses and is required for admission.

Sociology

Sociology 1000
Introduction to Sociology
is an introduction to the concepts, principles and topics of sociology. This course is a prerequisite to most departmental courses.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2100
Social Inequality
introduces the subject of social inequality and stratification, examines social inequality in historical perspective, reviews major theories about social inequality, and considers key social developments in contemporary societies in the area of social inequality.Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2120
Technology and Society
is an examination of the role of technology in society. Topics may include the emergence of modern technological society, the impact of new technologies on social organization and culture, and the institutionalization of science and the production of scientific knowledge. The course also explores the ideological functions of science and technology in advanced industrial societies as well as the question of the domination of nature.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2210
Communication and Culture is an examination of verbal and non-verbal systems of communication, and the influence of language on human cognition.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2230
Newfoundland Society and Culture focuses on social and cultural aspects of contemporary island Newfoundland.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2240
Canadian Society and Culture is a descriptive and analytic approach to the development of Canadian society and culture.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2250
Changing World is a sociological analysis of contemporary world issues and social problems.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2270
Families is a comparative and historical perspective on the family as a social institution, the range of variation in its structure and the determinants of its development.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2290
Animals and Society introduces students to contemporary sociological approaches to the study of the relationship between human and non-human animals
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2300
Criminological Inquiry introduces students to sociological models for understanding the phenomenon of “crime.” As a background for developing theory, this course will familiarize students with the problems inherent in defining what it is we mean by “crime.” Once the underlying premises of the theories are tackled, students critically examine each theoretical perspective with a focus on assessing the validity of the approach, and how the theory works to guide public policy.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Spanish

Spanish 1000
Elementary Spanish I is an introductory course, covering grammar, reading and oral Spanish.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: One compulsory multimedia language laboratory or conversation class period per week.
Prerequisite: None
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Spanish 1001
Elementary Spanish II is a continuation of Elementary Spanish I.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: One compulsory multimedia language laboratory or conversation class period per week.
Prerequisite: Spanish 1000 (or equivalent) or special authorization
Note: All sections of this course follow LS guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts

Notes:

  1. Free tutorial sessions are available, and are conducted by native Spanish-speaking or advanced student monitors.
  2. Spanish 1000 and 1001 are interactive courses that cover communication and culture.
Statistics

Statistics 1510
Statistical Thinking and Concepts examines the basic statistical issues encountered in everyday life, such as data collection (both primary and secondary), ethical issues, planning and conducting statistically-designed experiments, understanding the measurement process, data summarization, measures of central tendency and dispersion, basic concepts of probability, understanding sampling distributions, the central limit theorem based on simulations (without proof), linear regression, concepts of confidence intervals and testing of hypotheses. Statistical software will be used to demonstrate each technique.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: 90 minute lab per week
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1090 or a combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department.

University

University 1010
The University Experience helps first-semester students develop the skills and strategies that will benefit them as they make the transition from high school to university. Class activities and assignments focus on critical and creative thinking, communication skills, self-awareness, information literacy, and the ability to work in teams. Students will explore the campus community and examine the role the university plays in our society.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

University 1500
Introduction to Critical Reading and Writing in University introduces students to some of the processes, techniques, and standards of university-level critical reading and writing. Students will engage in the practices of critical reading and of pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing texts. An emphasis will be placed on using writing in response to critical reading exercises. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Notes:

  1. University 1010 and 1500 are restricted to students with fewer than 18 credit hours.
  2. University 1010 and 1500 must be taken concurrently in the Fall semester as part of the FYS program.

University 1020
Critical Reading and Writing: A Path to Future Studies broadens students' understanding of the multi-disciplinary nature of the university. Concentrating on reading and writing activities in multiple media, students will see how dialogue and text are involved in defining, creating, supporting, debating, refining, and disseminating research-based knowledge. The course offers students an opportunity to improve their own skills in an active and collaborative learning environment. All sections of this course follow CRW guidelines for the Bachelor of Arts.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: University 1010 and 1500

Grenfell Campus

Anthropology

Anthropology 1031
Introduction to Anthropology provides an overview of the field of social and cultural anthropology. Diverse case studies will be used to illustrate key anthropological concepts and methods.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students who major or minor in anthropology are required to take Anthropology 1031.

Anthropology 2410
Classics in Social and Cultural Anthropology is an examination of selected milestone monographs, ground-breaking studies for subdisciplinary specialities and major synthesis. 
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Art History

Visual Art 2700
Art History Survey I is the history of art from pre-historic times to the Renaissance.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Visual Art 2701
Art History Survey II is the history of art from the Renaissance to the 20th century.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Biochemistry

Biochemistry 1430
Biochemistry for Nurses is an introduction to the chemistry and structure-function relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. It will examine the basic metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, with emphasis on the biochemical fluctuations that occur in human health and disease and will include a brief introduction to molecular genetics. Prospective fast-track program students should consult with the School of Nursing concerning admission to this course.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Level 3 Chemistry from high school or Chemistry 1010 or Chemistry 1810 or equivalent and acceptance to the bachelor of nursing (collaborative) program.

Note: This course may not be used for credit to fulfill the requirements for a major in the Department of Biochemistry. Entry into this course is restricted to students in the BN (collaborative) program.

Biology

Biology 1001
Principles of Biology introduces biology as a scientific discipline, outlines the unifying ideas in modern biology and then illustrates these ideas by examining selected aspects of the form, function and diversity of some major groups of living organisms.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students who have written the College Board Advanced Placement Biology exam should consult the Advanced Placement Policy chart for possible awarding of credit.

Biology 1002
Principles of Biology is a continuation and extension of the principles embodied in Biology 1001.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Biology 1001

Business

Business 1010
Introduction to Business provides students with an overview of business in the Canadian environment, with a focus on the economic and business systems, as well as major social, technological, and global trends. The course introduces students to fundamental concepts related to many functional areas of business, such as human resource management, marketing, production, operations management, accounting, and financial management. Emphasis is placed on relating the course material to current events in the business world, as well as helping students acquire critical and analytical thinking skills.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Business 1020
Introduction to Entrepreneurship is designed to give students a broad understanding of the field of entrepreneurship, the role that entrepreneurship plays in society, and the importance of small business in Canada. Topics will include the nature and theories of entrepreneurship, the characteristics and behaviours of entrepreneurs, and the entrepreneurial process in small and large firms. Students will get to think and act in a creative manner, engage with local entrepreneurs, and evaluate their own entrepreneurial skill set. Students will learn entrepreneurial, technical and communication skills that will be useful in any organizational setting
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None Note: Students may not receive credit for Business 1020 and 1600.
Chemistry

Chemistry 1200
General Chemistry I is atomic structure and bonding, stoichiometry, reactions in aqueous solutions, gases, energetics of chemical reactions, the periodic table, chemical bonding and molecular geometry, intermolecular forces. This introductory course is intended for students who have a knowledge of high school chemistry.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Students should have high school Chemistry 3202 or at least 75 per cent in Chemistry 2202 or have successfully completed Chemistry 1810.

Chemistry 1001
Introductory General Chemistry II is rates of reaction, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics and introduction to organic chemistry.
Lectures/Tutorials: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1200 or equivalent

Chemistry 1050
General Chemistry I builds on basic chemistry concepts from high school. Topics include gases; thermochemistry; atomic structure; periodic properties; chemical bonding including valence bond theory; hybridization and introduction to molecular orbital theory; properties of liquids and solids.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1010 with a grade of at least 60 per cent or high school Chemistry 3202 with a grade of at least 65 per cent and Science 1807. It is also recommended that students have successfully completed high school Mathematics 3200 or 3201.

Chemistry 1810
Elements of Chemistry is matter, scientific measurement, atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical compounds and elementary bonding theory, the mole, chemical reactions, the chemistry of selected elements, gases, solutions, stoichiometry. This course is specifically intended for those who have no background in chemistry.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: This course may not be used as one of the chemistry courses required for a B.Sc. degree with a specialization in environmental science at Grenfell Campus, nor for a major or honours in chemistry, nor towards fulfilment of the 78 credit hours in science courses required for the B.Sc. degree on the St. John’s Campus.

Chemistry 1900
Chemistry in Everyday Life is a course that shows the relevance of chemistry in our daily lives. Following an introduction to atomic structure and chemical bonding, the course will focus on some of the following topics: organic chemistry and fuels; redox processes and batteries; acids, bases and household cleaners; phases and detergents; the chemical components of foods; polymers and plastics; toiletries and pharmaceuticals.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Chemistry 1900 may not be used as one of the required courses towards a minor, major or honours in any science degree program. Notes: Students who have done well in Chemistry 3202 are strongly advised to register for Chemistry 1200 Chemistry 1200 and 1001 provide a superior preparation for all subsequent programs at Memorial and at other Canadian universities.

Classics

Classics 1100
Introduction to Greek Civilization is a general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of ancient Greek civilization. The course introduces the student to Greek social and political institutions, religion and myth and achievements in art, philosophy, science and literature, as well as the influence of ancient Greece on the modern world.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1120
Elementary Latin I is an introduction to the grammar and syntax of Latin, with particular attention paid to the acquisition of basic skills in reading, composition and aural comprehension.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1121
Elementary Latin II is a continuation of the work begun in Elementary Latin I.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Classics 1120 or its equivalent

Classics 1130
Elementary Ancient Greek I is an introduction to the grammar and syntax of ancient Greek, with particular attention paid to the acquisition of basic skills in reading, composition and aural comprehension.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Classics 1131
Elementary Ancient Greek II is a continuation of the work begun in Elementary Ancient Greek I.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: Classics 1130 or its equivalent


Classics 1200
Introduction to Roman Civilization is a general illustrated survey of the origins and evolution of ancient Rome. The course introduces the student to social, political and legal institutions, the growth of the Roman Empire, Roman art, literature and religions, as well as Rome's pervasive influence in the modern world.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences 1000
Earth Systems is a survey of the structure, function and interrelations of Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Topics include an exploration of the physical and chemical properties of planetary materials, forces driving and sustaining earth systems and biological modifiers (including humankind) on the Earth today.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Earth Sciences 1002
Concepts and Methods in Earth Sciences provides an introduction to a broad range of concepts concerning the development of the geological record and the Earth; practical methods for collection of field based data; topics in map interpretation and geometric analysis, stratigraphy, paleontology, structure and petrology. The course is presented with an emphasis on the development of practical skills needed to pursue a career in Earth sciences.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Earth Sciences 1000
Note: Earth Sciences 1000 and 1002 are required for Earth sciences majors, minors and all joint programs.

Earth Sciences 2150
The Solar System describes the basic astronomy of the solar system, tracing the search to understand motion of the sun, moon and planets in the sky; modern observations of planets, moons, comets, asteroids and meteorites and what they tell us about the origin and evolution of the solar system.
Lectures: Two and a half hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Economics

Economics 2010
Introduction to Microeconomics I examines scarcity and opportunity cost; demand and supply; elasticity; household demand: marginal utility; household demand: indifference curves; production functions; short-run and long-run cost functions; perfect competition in the short run and the long run; monopoly.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisites: None

Economics 2020
Introduction to Macroeconomics is national income accounting, aggregate income analysis, money, banking and foreign trade.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisites: None

Notes:

  1. Economics 2010 and 2020 need not be taken in any specific order and may be taken concurrently.
  2. Economics 2010 and 2020 are prerequisites to all further courses in economics.
Engineering

Engineering 1010
Engineering Statics is the first course in engineering mechanics. Forces and moments are described with vector algebra, leading to a description of the equilibrium conditions for particles and solid bodies. The importance of free body diagrams is highlighted. This knowledge is then applied to the analysis of trusses, frames and machines. Additional topics include an examination of friction and the concepts of centre of force, centroids and second moments of area.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Tutorials: One hour per week
Prerequisite: Level III Physics or Physics 1020 and Mathematics 1000 (which may be taken concurrently)

Engineering 1020
Introduction to Programming is an introduction to algorithmic problem solving techniques and computer programming, including basic program control structures (sequence, call, branch, loop) and data representations, functional decomposition and design by contract. Exercises and examples are drawn from a variety of engineering disciplines and are implemented using a standard modern programming language.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory/Tutorial: At least eight two-hour sessions
Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090

Engineering 1030
Engineering Graphics and Design provides two complementary competencies. First, it provides an introduction to the fundamentals of graphic communication, including orthographic projections, three dimensional pictorials, sectioning and dimensioning. Both sketching and CAD are utilized. Second, the course introduces students to standard design methodologies. The graphics and design competencies are reinforced through lab and project exercises.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory/Tutorial: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090

Engineering 1040
Mechanisms and Electric Circuits (2015-16 pilot curriculum) will engage and prepare students for Memorial University’s engineering program by: exercising student judgement and understanding of an engineering mindset to problem formulation, solution, and assessment of what is a “reasonable” result; introducing students to software environments to increase their ability and comfort in using computers as engineering problem-solving tools; and introducing problems that relate to the variety of engineering disciplines offered in the program. Students in the electrical circuits portion of the course will be taught relevant theory, and the application of problem-solving skills, judgement and visualization to the solution of electrical circuit problems.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: Level III Physics or Physics 1051 (which may be taken concurrently) and Mathematics 1000 (which may be taken concurrently)

Note: The engineering course pairs 1010/1020 and 1030/1040 are offered in single slots so that students can only take one from each pair in the fall and winter semesters.

English

English 1000
Introduction to English I is an introduction to English literature and to the use of the English language with a particular emphasis on composition.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

English 1001
Introduction to English II  is a continuation of the studies begun in English 1000.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 

English 1110
Critical Reading and Writing II (Context, Substance, Style) is an examination of prose texts such as essays, articles and reviews. Students write for different purposes and audiences. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing: analyzing texts, framing and using questions, constructing essays, organizing paragraphs, conducting research, quoting and documenting, revising and editing. 
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or 1080

English 1020
Writing for Second Language Students I is an introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for non-native English speaking students. This course is for students whose first language is not English and who have passed 102F or have attained a standard acceptable to the Department on the English Placement Test. Students who have passed English 1020 may take as their second English course one of English 1021, 1080, 1101, 1102, or 1103. 
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Admission to this course will be determined on the basis of the departmental English Placement Test or successful completion of English 102F

Notes:

  1. Students who successfully complete English 1020 may enter English 1021, 1080, 1101, 1102 or 1103. They may not enter English 1110. Students cannot receive credit for both English 1020 and 1110.
  2. Students may not receive credit for more than 6 credit hours in first-year courses in English (this includes unspecified first-year transfer credits)
Environmental Science

Environmental Science 1000
An Introduction to Environmental Science is an introduction to the study of the environment. Environmental principles, issues and problems will be described and placed in a historical and societal context.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies 1000
An Introduction to Environmental Studies is an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of the environment that aims to develop environmental literacy. This course brings together perspectives from the natural sciences and the social sciences to examine such issues as global warming, air pollution, sustainability, new energy technologies and environmental law.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Folklore

Folklore 1000
Introduction to Folklore explores the role of tradition in communication, art and society. Reading assignments and audiovisual material will emphasize the use of folklore in context. Students will analyze traditions in their own lives through special assignments. A student may not receive credit for both Folklore 1000 and 2000.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Folklore 2100
Folklore Research Methods introduces the resources, tools and methods that folklorists use for primary and secondary research, including interviewing and participant observation. 
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: it is strongly recommended that majors and minors take this course before taking 3000 and 4000 level courses

Folklore 2401
Folklife Studies examines the interweaving of traditional elements in the tangible and intangible cultural heritage of various cultures. These may include holiday customs, rites of passage, folk religion, home remedies, clothing, food and art.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

French

French 1500
Introductory University French I is a course for beginners and for students whose background in French is very weak. Permission to register for this course will not be given to students who have completed Français 3202 (high school French immersion).
Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Multi-Media Laboratory: as per instructor’s recommendation
Prerequisite: None

French 1501
Introductory University French II is one of three consecutive credit courses in French language at the first-year university level, offering a complete overview of basic oral and written French.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Multi-Media Laboratory: as per instructor’s recommendation
Prerequisite: High school French 3200 or 3201 with a final grade of at least 80 per cent or permission of the co-ordinator of first-year French. Ex-immersion students with less than 60 per cent should register for this course.

French 1502
Introductory University French III is one of three consecutive credit courses in French language at the first-year university level, offering a complete overview of basic oral and written French.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Conversation/Multi-Media Laboratory: as per instructor’s recommendation
Prerequisite: French 1501 with a final grade of at least 60 per cent or high school French 3201 with a final grade of at least 90 per cent or permission of the co-ordinator of first-year French.

Note: Students may use only two of French 1500, 1501 and 1502 towards the minimum requirements for a major or minor in French. They are encouraged to consult their advisor or instructor about possibilities for further study in French-speaking areas.

French 2100
Intermediate French I is a course on composition, grammar and practice in oral skills.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: High school French immersion with a final grade of at least 85 per cent or an exceptional background in French or French 1502 with a final grade of at least 60 per cent.
Notes:

  1. Students who obtain a grade of less than four on the Advanced Placement examination in French language and students who have received less than 85 per cent in French Immersion 3202 should register for French 1502.
Geography

Geography 1050
Geographies of Global Change provides perspectives on the major geographical challenges and changes facing the contemporary globe, including: climate and environmental change, sustainability, human development, economic globalization, cultural change, and population and migration. Using the integrative skills of geographical analysis, the course prepares students for advanced study in geography and citizenship in the modern world. (This course fulfills the QR requirement for the Faculty of Arts)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Geography 2001
Cultural Geography is an introduction to the study of culture in geography, emphasizing both the history of the field from classic studies of landscapes to contemporary scholarship and themes of recent importance. These include the relationship between nature and culture: imperialism and colonialism; place, identity and power; and global cultures of commodities, media and tourism.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050

Geography 2102
Physical Geography: The Global Perspective is a study of form, process and change in natural systems at and near the surface of Earth, viewed as human environment. Emphasis is on global and regional scales in the systematic study of climate, water, landforms and vegetation. (This course fulfills the QR requirement for the Faculty of Arts)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050

Geography 2105
Canada’s Natural Environments and Landscapes examines the characteristics and development of the natural environments and landscapes of each of the major regions of Canada. The diversity of natural environments is illustrated through discussion of the climatic, hydrological, biogeographical, and geomorphic processes responsible for shaping the land. The impact of both gradual and rapid (catastrophic) changes on local, national, and global scales will be emphasized.
Lectures: Three hours per week or by Distance
Prerequisite: none
Note: This course is not part of the Geography major requirements.

Geography 2195
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences is an introduction to the fields of cartography, remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS). Geographic information collection and representation and analysis methods are the topics for the course. An emphasis is given to applications of maps and satellite images. (This course fulfills the QR requirement for the Faculty of Arts)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Geography 2302
Issues in Economic Geography covers basic issues and ideas in economic geography. The development of a regional economy will be related to underlying economic, cultural and physical factors.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050

Geography 2425
Natural Resources is an introduction to the concepts of natural resources, environment and conservation: the nature and distribution of natural resources; methods of use, allocation and development of natural resources and the role of various physical, social, economic, political and technological factors influencing decision-making about resources.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050
Note: Credit may not be obtained for both Geography 2425 and 3325.

Geography 2495
Regional Geography of Labrador is a holistic study of the Geography of Labrador, including the terrain, geology, Quaternary history, climate, vegetation, and fauna; the cultural geography of Labrador, including Innu, Inuit, NunatuKavut, and Settler people and communities; economic activities in Labrador, and the interaction of the Labrador economy within NL, Canada, and globally; the management of physical and human resources; and the geographic techniques used to investigate and understand Labrador's unique Geography.
Lectures: Three hours per week or by Distance
Prerequisite: none
Note: This course is not part of the Geography major requirements.

History

History 1100
Introduction to History is an introduction to the study and writing of history which will emphasize the concepts of history through a thematic approach to the history of Western civilization from ca. 1500 to ca. 1815.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

History 1101
Introduction to History is an introduction to the study and writing of history which will emphasize the concepts of history through a combination of research and writing within a thematic approach to the history of Western civilization from ca. 1815 to the present. Students in their first year normally take History 1100 and History 1101
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Humanities

Humanities 1001
Humanities and the Contemporary World is a study of the relevance of humanities disciplines and texts to contemporary forms and practices such as movies, popular music, television, comic books, graphic novels, professional sports, etc. This course will also focus on the mastery of composition skills. The course is designated writing course.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Humanities 1002
Six Texts that Changed the World is a study of six humanities texts which have helped to shape Western civilization. The course is a designated writing course.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: English 1000 or Humanities 1000

Mathematics

Mathematics 1000
Calculus I is an introduction to differential calculus, including algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Applications include kinematics, related rates problems, curve sketching and optimization.
Lectures: Four hours per week (at Grenfell Campus, three hours of lectures and a one and one-half hour problem laboratory per week.)
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1090 or a combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department

Mathematics 1001
Calculus II is an introduction to integral calculus, including Riemann sums, techniques of integration and improper integrals. Applications include exponential growth and decay, area between curves and volumes of solids of revolution.
Lectures: Three hours per week (at Grenfell Campus, three hours of lectures and a one and one-half hour problem laboratory per week.)
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000

Mathematics 1050
Finite Mathematics I covers topics which include sets, logic, permutations, combinations and elementary probability.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or Mathematics 103F is required at the St. John’s Campus; or at Grenfell Campus, the successful completion of Level III Academic or Advanced Mathematics

Mathematics 1051
Finite Mathematics II covers topics which include elementary matrices, linear programming, elementary number theory, mathematical systems and geometry.
Lectures: Four hours per week
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or Mathematics 103F at the St. John’s Campus; or at Grenfell Campus, the successful completion of Level III Academic or Advanced Mathematics

Mathematics 1090
Algebra and Trigonometry provides students with the essential prerequisite elements for the study of an introductory course in calculus. Topics include algebra, functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, polynomials and rational functions.
Lectures: Four hours per week (at Grenfell Campus, three hours of lectures and a three-hour problem laboratory per week.)
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department or Mathematics 104F at the St. John’s Campus; or at Grenfell Campus, the successful completion of Level III Academic or Advanced Mathematics.
Note: Students will not receive credit for Mathematics 1090 if they have previously received credit or are currently registered for Mathematics 1000 or 1001.

Mathematics 2050
Linear Algebra I includes the topics: Euclidean n-space, vector operations in 2- and 3-space, complex numbers, linear transformations on n-space, matrices, determinants and systems of linear equations.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: A combination of placement test and high school mathematics scores acceptable to the department; or three credit hours in a first-year mathematics course.

Mathematics 102N
Mathematics Skills Program for the BN (Collaborative) program is a non-credit course intended for students of the BN(Collaborative) program who have a weak background in mathematics and/or have not completed mathematics in some years. The program enables students to master mathematical operations such as those involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, per cents, units of measurement, ratios and proportions.
Prerequisite: None

Nursing

Nursing 1002
Anatomy and Physiology I presents a survey of human anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan. It includes aspects of cytology and histology that form a foundation for the practice of nursing. Special emphasis is given to the skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Nursing 1003
Developing Therapeutic Relationships focuses on the application of caring theory to interpersonal communications. It emphasizes the development of the role of communicator in individual and group experiences and in professional relationships. Utilizing an experiential model, laboratory experiences focus on self-awareness and group dynamics.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Co-requisite: Nursing 1004 

Nursing 1004
Introduction to Nursing introduces the major concepts and theories related to the paradigm of person, health, society, nursing, environment and nursing education in relation to the philosophy, conceptual framework and objectives of the program. Emphasis is placed on the concept of caring as the essence of nursing practice.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Nursing 1012
Anatomy and Physiology II presents a survey of anatomy and physiology throughout the lifespan. It includes aspects of cytology, histology and embryology that form a foundation for the practice of nursing. Special emphasis is given to the circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems, including pregnancy and delivery.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite: Nursing 1002

Nursing 1014
Health Assessment focuses on the development of competencies needed to assess the health status of individuals throughout the lifespan using a systematic approach. Content includes the nurse's responsibilities for health history, physical examination, interpretation of findings and documentation.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Co-requisite: Nursing 1012

Nursing 1015
Health Promotion throughout the Lifespan explores nursing concepts and theories pertaining to health promotion/protection throughout the lifespan. Content includes principles of teaching/learning, introduction to community health and primary health care concepts and the determinants of health.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratory: 24 hours during the course
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Psychology 1000, Nursing 1003, Nursing 1004

Nursing 1016
Healthy Aging will explore in depth, concepts and issues applicable to the well older adult (65+). Selected theories, physical changes and psychosocial, ethical and legal issues associated with aging will be presented.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: 1002, 1003 and 1004
Co-requisite: Nursing 1012, 1014 and 1015

Nursing 1017
Fundamental Psychomotor Competencies will provide the student an opportunity to acquire beginning psychomotor competencies that are related to the provision of client comfort and safety in a variety of settings. As well, this course provides the opportunity for the student to integrate the conceptual framework of the bachelor of nursing (collaborative) program into the development of psychomotor competencies.
Lectures: None
Laboratory: Two hours per week
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Nursing 1003 and 1004

Nursing 1520
Extended Practice I provides the student with the opportunity to integrate the knowledge and practice the competencies acquired to date. The focus is the promotion, protection and maintenance of health for well individuals within the context of the family. This course is taught at the end of the winter semester, usually beginning during the final week of the examination period.
Clinical: 96 hours over three weeks
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Nursing 1012, 1014, 1015, 1016 and 1017

Philosophy

Philosophy 1200
Introduction to Philosophy is a general introduction to the study of philosophy both as a contemporary intellectual discipline and as a body of knowledge. The course covers the main divisions, fundamental questions and essential terminology of philosophy through a reading of classical texts. (It is a required course for further courses in philosophy programs.)
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Philosophy 1600
Philosophy of Human Nature is an approach to philosophical thinking by way of analysis and critique of theories of human nature, classical and modern and the world views associated with them.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Physics

Physics 1020
Introductory Physics I is a non-calculus based introduction to mechanics.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Level III Advanced Mathematics or Mathematics 1090. Mathematics 1090 may be taken concurrently. It is recommended that students have completed at least one of Level II and Level III high school physics courses, however, this course may be completed by someone who has no physics background provided some extra effort is made. 

Physics 1021
Introductory Physics II is a non-calculus based introduction to fluids, wave motion, light, optics, electricity and magnetism.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Physics 1020 or 1050 and Mathematics 1090 or Math 1000, either of which may be taken concurrently

Physics 1050
General Physics I: Mechanics is a calculus- based introduction to mechanics. The course will emphasize problem solving.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructors’ discretion.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1000, which may be taken concurrently

Physics 1051
General Physics II: Oscillations, Waves, Electromagnetism is a calculus-based introduction to oscillations, wave motion, physical optics and electromagnetism.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Laboratories: Normally six laboratory sessions per semester, with each session lasting a maximum of two hours.
Tutorials/Problem Sessions: Scheduled during weeks when there are no laboratories, at the instructor’s discretion.
Prerequisite: Physics 1020 (with a minimum grade of 65 per cent), 1021 or 1050 and Mathematics 1001. Mathematics 1001 may be taken concurrently

Political Science

Political Science 1000
Introduction to Politics and Government is an introduction to the study of politics, power, law, public policy and government, touching on major areas of political ideologies, institutions and current domestic and international political issues.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None. Suitable for students in all disciplines

Political Science 1020
Issues in World Politics explores some of the world’s most pressing and interesting political issues.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None. This course is suitable for students in all disciplines who have an interest in international politics

Psychology

Psychology 1000
Introduction to Psychology is the first half of a two semester introduction to psychology as a biological and social science. Topics include history, research methodology, behavioural neuroscience, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory.
Prerequisite: None
Lectures: Three hours per week

Psychology 1001
Introduction to Psychology is the second half of a two-semester introduction to psychology as a biological and social science. Topics may include emotion, motivation, stress and health, personality and individuality, psychological disorders and treatment and social psychology.
Prerequisite: Psychology 1000
Lectures: Three hours per week
Note: Psychology 1000 and 1001 are prerequisites for all other psychology courses.

Religious Studies

Religious Studies 1000
The Religions of the World is an introduction to the basic beliefs and practices of the world's great religions.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology

Sociology 1000
Introduction to Sociology
is an introduction to the concepts, principles and topics of sociology. This course is a prerequisite to most departmental courses.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2100
Social Inequality
introduces the subject of social inequality and stratification, examines social inequality in historical perspective, reviews major theories about social inequality, and considers key social developments in contemporary societies in the area of social inequality.Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2120
Technology and Society
is an examination of the role of technology in society. Topics may include the emergence of modern technological society, the impact of new technologies on social organization and culture, and the institutionalization of science and the production of scientific knowledge. The course also explores the ideological functions of science and technology in advanced industrial societies as well as the question of the domination of nature.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2200
Communities is an interdisciplinary examination of the concept of Community. Readings will include community studies from North America and Europe.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2230
Newfoundland Society and Culture focuses on social and cultural aspects of contemporary island Newfoundland.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2270
Families is a comparative and historical perspective on the family as a social institution, the range of variation in its structure and the determinants of its development.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2290
Animals and Society introduces students to contemporary sociological approaches to the study of the relationship between human and non-human animals
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sociology 2300
Criminological Inquiry introduces students to sociological models for understanding the phenomenon of “crime.” As a background for developing theory, this course will familiarize students with the problems inherent in defining what it is we mean by “crime.” Once the underlying premises of the theories are tackled, students critically examine each theoretical perspective with a focus on assessing the validity of the approach, and how the theory works to guide public policy.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Sustainable Resource Management

Sustainable Resource Management 2000
Sustainable Resource Management I: Marine and Terrestrial Environments is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of sustainable resource management, including marine and terrestrial environments. The course focuses on sustainable practices rather than profit or resource extraction optimization. First Nations’ perspectives will also be considered.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: Geography 1050

Theatre

Theatre 1000 and 1001
Introduction to the History of Theatre I and II (available only at Grenfell Campus) is a historical survey of the art of the theatre.The history of theatre will be studied in terms of the evolution of performance and of the physical theatre from their origins in a variety of social rituals and contexts through to their present plurality of forms. At the same time, the nature and function of the various components of theatrical performance (acting, directing, design, etc.) will be analyzed in terms of period philosophical, social, cultural, political and religious contexts. These courses are open to non-theatre students.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Theatre 1010
Introduction to Acting (available only at Grenfell Campus) is an appreciation of the fundamentals of the craft ofacting. Basic exercises invoice, movement, relaxation and concentration, improvisation and script analysis will introduce the student to the imaginative and physical skills required by an actor. This is a basic course for all theatre students regardless of their specific areas ofinterest.
Studio: Six hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Theatre 1020
Introduction to Technical Theatre Production (available only at Grenfell Campus) is an appreciation of the basic vocabulary and techniques of the various technical and organizational structures and practices of staging plays. Areas of concentration will include scenic and costume construction, basics in lighting, painting, props, sound and stage management. This is a basic course for all theatre students regardless of their specific areas of interest.
Studio: Six hours per week
Prerequisite: None

Theatre 1110
Acting I (available only at Grenfell Campus) is an introductory course for those majoring in acting. Emphasis is on voice, speech, movement and text analysis. Various learning methods will be employed, from sensitivity exercises to improvisation and creative imagination exercises. Participation in in-class performance is required. This course is restricted to theatre majors.
Studio: Six hours per week
Prerequisite: Theatre 1000, Theatre 1010 and 1020

Theatre 1120
Technical Theatre Production I (available only at Grenfell Campus) is an introductory course for those majoring in technical theatre production. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of scenic carpentry, wardrobe, sound, lighting, crewing, painting and stage management. Practical projects will be related to departmental productions. This course is restricted to theatre majors.
Studio: Six hours per week
Prerequisite: Theatre 1000, 1010 and 1020

Tourism

Tourism 1000
Principles of Tourism This course introduces students to the history of tourism and leisure, and the development of the field of tourism studies. This will include consideration of foundational concepts such as culture and nature, research on the needs and gratifications of tourists, and studies of the functions of tourism. â—¦Note: Credit may not be obtained for both Tourism 1000 and HKR 3565
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

University

University 1010
The University Experience introduces students to the different modes of enquiry that one finds in the university, the interrelatedness of knowledge and the role of the university in society. It also provides students with tools and techniques of study and research that can lead them to academic success and a fulfilling career.
Lectures: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None

 

Visual Arts

Visual Arts 1500/1501
Drawing I and II
is the fundamentals of drawing with study of line, tone, shape, volume, form, texture and space. Emphasis is on drawing the human figure and studio problems. Attendance required.
Studio: Six hours per week
Co-requisite: Visual Arts 1510/1511, 1520/1521

Visual Arts 1510/1511
Two Dimensional Design and Media I and II
is principles of colour theory and colour mixing. Painting techniques in various media. Emphasis is on rendering of form in space and organization of two-dimensional surface through studio problems. Attendance Required.
Studio: Six hours per week
Co-requisite: Visual Arts 1500/1501, 1520/1521

Visual Arts 1520/1521
Three-Dimensional Design and Media is three- dimensional form and spatial organization. Exploration of sculptural media through studio problems. Attendance required.
Studio: Six hours per week
Co-requisite: Visual Arts 1500/1501; 1510/1511

Visual Arts 1000
Introduction to Two-Dimensional Media is an introduction to two-dimensional media (design, drawing and painting) that will provide students with both studio experience and an increased sensitivity to esthetic concerns. Students will investigate design principles through an exploration of visual fundamentals. The course will also cover basic drawing, including drawing from life and will introduce the study of colour through the use of a variety of media. These concepts will be explored through lecture and/or studio experiences. Attendance is required.
Studio and lecture: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students are not expected to have previous drawing or art experience.

Visual Arts 1001
Introduction to Process Based Media is an introduction to process-based media that will provide students with both studio experience and an increased sensitivity to esthetic concerns. Students will be shown the fundamental concepts of a variety of process-based media with selections being made from the media of printmaking, sculpture and photo media (photography, digital imaging, performance, video). These concepts will be explored through lecture and/or studio experiences. Attendance required.
Studio and lecture: Three hours per week
Prerequisite: None
Note: Students are not expected to have previous art experience

 

 

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